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Cerebral Cortex

1o somatosensory located at pot central gyrus (parietal lobe) Receives somatic sensation from contralateral body Damage results in contralateral loss of sensation 1o motor located at pre-central gyrus (frontal lobe) Responsible for upper motor neurons for contralateral body Damage results in contralateral loss in motor 2o motor located at premotor cortex (Lateral) and supplementary motor area (medial) Responsible for complex movements, planning, steady non-moving join Damage results in postural instability and akinesia (unable to initiate movement) 1o visual cortex is located at the occipital lobe, both banks of calcarine sulcus Responsible to simple visual information from contralateral visual field Stimulated by crude flashes of bright light Damage results in loss of vision in contralateral vision field Visual association cortex is located in the occipital lobe adjacent to 1o visual cortex Responsible for more complex visual processing Stimulated by hallucination of formed images Damage results in visual agnosia (able to see but unable to recognize) Where pathway also known as the dorsal visual pathway, goes up posterior parietal lobe Responsible for processing spatial relationship What pathway also known as ventral visual pathway, located at underside of temporal lobe Responsible for processing colour/form information and recognition Frontal eye field located in middle frontal gyrus in area 4 Responsible for voluntary eye movement to contralateral Stimulated when both eyes deviate contralaterally Damage results in both eyes deviating ipsilaterally

Vision

Hearing and speech 1o auditory is located at superior temporal gyrus Responsible for auditory information from both ears Damage results in each ear responding bilaterally Wernickes speech area located at superior temporal gyrus Responsible for comprehension of spoken word Damage results in receptive aphasia (able to hear but unable to understand. Speech=unmeaningful) Brocas speech area located at inferior frontal gyrus Responsible for speech production Damage results in expressive aphasia (able to understand but unable to express language)