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Division of Health Sciences

David M. Brady, ND, DC, CCN, DACBN
Vice Provost, Health Sciences

AANP 2009

Brady Presentation Proposal II

Presenter:

David M. Brady, ND, DC, CCN, DACBN

Contacts:

University of Bridgeport
30 Hazel Street
Bridgeport, CT 06640
Tel. 203-576-4589
Fax 203-576-4591
E-mail: dbrady@bridgeport.edu

Potential Sponsors: Designs for Health, Inc. & Metametrix Labs

Abstract:

Fibromyalgia: A Pain Disorder of the Central Nervous System: Differential Diagnosis
and Functional Management

Research suggests that “classic” fibromyalgia (FMS) is a central pain-processing
disorder
and that FMS does not appear to be a peripheral somatic disorder. This presentation
will
emphasize the concept that classic FMS must be clinically differentiated from the
various
subsets of organic, functional, and musculoskeletal problems that can lead to an
erroneous
diagnosis of FMS. The underlying pathophysiologic and neurologic mechanisms of
classic fibromyalgia will be explored in detail and an evidence based integrated
approach to treatment of FMS will be provided.

Rather than being viewed as one grandiose syndrome under which all patients with
unexplained widespread pain and/or fatigue are lumped, fibromyalgia (FMS)-like
symptoms should result in a comprehensive workup to properly determine the
underlying
foundational elements of the patient’s complaints. This presentation will outline at
least four
distinct clinical subsets that can lead to an erroneous diagnosis of FMS. All should
be

30 Hazel Street • Bridgeport, Connecticut 06604 • Telephone: 203.576.4667 • Fax: 203.576.4591
Division of Health Sciences
David M. Brady, ND, DC, CCN, DACBN
Vice Provost, Health Sciences

considered during the differential diagnosis of patients with widespread pain as the
primary
symptom. These four subsets are: (1) “classic” FMS, (2) medical diseases that
mimic FMS,
(3) functional/metabolic disorders that mimic FMS, and (4) musculoskeletal
disorders that
mimic FMS. Specific diagnostic and therapeutic strategies will be presented for each
of
these subsets.

Outline:

1. Framing the problem and the concept of central pain processing and the consequences of
dysfunction of descending inhibition.
2. Presenting evidence of the difference between regionalized somatic pain and true central
allodynia.
3. Explore the current diagnostic and treatment approaches to patients presenting with classic
fibromylgia.
4. Discussion of the comprehensive process of differential diagnosis required in patients presenting
with suspicion of fibromyalgia.
5. Delineate the common subsets of clinical disorders that can lead to an erroneous diagnosis of
fibromyalgia (i.e., pseudo-fibromyalgia).
6. Review the scientific and "false" diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for these disorders.

Goals & Objectives:

1. Analyze the concept of central pain processing and the consequences of dysfunction of
descending inhibition.
2. Assess the difference between regionalized somatic pain and true central allodynia.
3. Develop a diagnostic and treatment approach to patients presenting with classic fibromylgia.
4. Evaluate the comprehensive process of differential diagnosis required in patients presenting with
suspicion of fibromyalgia.
5. Identify the common subsets of clinical disorders that can lead to an erroneous diagnosis of
fibromyalgia (i.e., pseudo-fibromyalgia).
6. Review the scientific and "false" diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for these disorders.

Supporting Presenter-Authored Publications & Presentations:

The 15th International Symposium on Functional Medicine: Fibromyalgia: A Pain Processing Disorder of
the Central Nervous System. Carlsbad, CA. May 22-25, 2008
International and American Association of Clinical Nutritionist (IAACN) 17th Annual Scientific
Symposium. Supportive Nutritional Therapies for Acute and Chronic Pain. Baltimore, MD, September 4-
7, 2008.
Schneider M, Brady DM, Perle S. Differential diagnosis of fibromyalgia syndrome. J. Manip. Physio
Ther. Vol. 29, No. 6, Jul/Aug. 2006.
30 Hazel Street • Bridgeport, Connecticut 06604 • Telephone: 203.576.4667 • Fax: 203.576.4591
Division of Health Sciences
David M. Brady, ND, DC, CCN, DACBN
Vice Provost, Health Sciences

Schneider MJ, Brady DM. Fibromyalgia syndrome: A new paradigm for differential diagnosis and
treatment. J Manipulative Physiol Ther 2001; Vol 24, No 8, 529-541.

Presenter Biography:

Dr. Brady is a licensed Naturopathic Physician and a Board Certified Clinical Nutritionist. Dr. Brady also
originally trained as a chiropractic physician. He serves as the Vice Provost of the Division of Health
Sciences, the Director of the Human Nutrition Institute, and an Associate Professor of Clinical Sciences at
the University of Bridgeport in Connecticut. Dr. Brady is also the Chief Medical Officer and product
formulator for Designs for Health, Inc. and a technical consultant for both Metametrix and Cell Science
Systems medical laboratories. He is the senior clinician at Allied Health & Wellness Centers in Trumbull,
CT, where he specializes in “Complementary and Integrative Medicine”. Finally, Dr. Brady has been the
author and contributor for numerous peer-reviewed scientific publications, textbooks and popular books.
His newest release is Dr. Brady’s Healthy Revolution: What You Really Need to Know to Stay Healthy in
a Sick World. Learn more at HealthyRevolutionBook.com or DrDavidBrady.com

*Detailed presentation slides and full-text of supportive literature available upon request.

30 Hazel Street • Bridgeport, Connecticut 06604 • Telephone: 203.576.4667 • Fax: 203.576.4591