You are on page 1of 129

 

 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends 
City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010 
 
Final Report 
 
Siim Sööt, Ph.D. 
Lu Gan 
Piyushimita (Vonu) Thakuriah, Ph.D. ‐ Project Lead 
University of Illinois at Chicago 
 
Melody Geraci 
Patrick Knapp 
Active Transportation Alliance 
 
Charlie Short  
Chicago Department of Transportation 
 

November, 2012 
 

This report was generously funded through a grant from the Illinois Department 
of Transportation, and by the City of Chicago.

 
 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 
 

 

ii 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

iii 

 

 
Disclaimer The analysis and views presented in this report are the sole
responsibility of the authors.
 
 

Acknowledgements

The research team is indebted to the help given by, Lori Midden of the Illinois Department of
Transportation, Parry Frank of the Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning, Tracie Smith of
the Children’s Memorial Hospital, Chicago, and Chrystal Price of the American College of
Surgeons. We are grateful to William Vassilakis, formerly at the University of Illinois at Chicago
and Dr. Caitlin Cottrill, Postdoctoral Research Associate at Massachusetts Institute of
Technology – National University of Singapore for their help with the project.

 
 
 
 
 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

iv 

 

 
Table of Contents 
 
Chapter 1: Key Findings ........................................................................................................... 1
Chapter 2: Introduction, Report Objectives and Organization of the Report ............................ 3
2.1:   Introduction ........................................................................................................................ 3
2.2:   Objectives of the Report .................................................................................................... 3
2.3:   Organization of the Report ................................................................................................. 4
Chapter 3: Background and Overview of the Bicycling Environment ........................................ 5
3.1:   Trends in Bicycle Use .......................................................................................................... 5
3.2:   National Trends in Bicycle Safety ....................................................................................... 6
3.3:   Bicycle Safety in Chicago .................................................................................................... 7
3.3.1:  Chicago Bicycle Safety Trends ...................................................................................... 7
3.3.2:  Chicago Bicycle Crashes Compared with Crashes for Other Modes ............................ 9
3.4:   Chicago versus Suburban Chicago and the Rest of Illinois ............................................... 10
3.5:   Peer City Comparison of Cycling to Work and Crashes .................................................... 12
3.6:   Comparison with Other Large Cities ................................................................................ 15
Chapter 4: Characteristics of Cyclists Involved in Crashes ...................................................... 18
4.1:   Bicycle Use and Safety Trends by Age and Gender .......................................................... 18
4.2:   Education Level of Cyclists ............................................................................................... 25
Chapter 5: Vehicles and Operators Involved in Bicycle Crashes ............................................. 26
5.1:   Alcohol and Bicycle Crashes ............................................................................................. 26
5.1.1:  Blood Alcohol Content of Motorists ........................................................................... 26
5.1.2:  Blood Alcohol Content of Cyclists ............................................................................... 27
5.1.3:  Hit‐and‐Run Crashes ................................................................................................... 28
5.2:  Age and Gender of Motorists ............................................................................................ 29
5.2.1:  Age of Motorists ......................................................................................................... 29
5.2.2:   Gender of Motorists Involved in Bicycle Crashes ...................................................... 29

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

 

5.3:  Vehicle Type and Use ........................................................................................................ 30
5.4:  Driver and Vehicle Maneuvers .......................................................................................... 34
5.5:  Dooring .............................................................................................................................. 36
5.6:  Bicyclist Activity ................................................................................................................. 37
5.6.1:  Bicyclist Action ............................................................................................................ 37
5.6.2:   Bicyclist Location ....................................................................................................... 39
5.6.3:   Bicyclist Helmet Use .................................................................................................. 40
Chapter 6: Environmental Factors and Road Conditions ........................................................ 41
6.1:  Environmental Factors during Crashes ............................................................................. 41
6.1.1:  Weather‐Related Factors ........................................................................................... 41
6.1.2:  Light Conditions .......................................................................................................... 42
6.1.3:  Weather‐Related Road Surface .................................................................................. 43
6.2:  Roadway Environment ...................................................................................................... 43
6.2.1:  Relation to Intersections ............................................................................................ 43
6.2.2:  Road Defects ............................................................................................................... 47
6.2.3:  Roadway Type and Number of Lanes ......................................................................... 47
6.2.4:  Roadway Classification ............................................................................................... 49
6.2.5:  Traffic Signal Control .................................................................................................. 50
6.3:  Work Zones ....................................................................................................................... 53
Chapter 7: Temporal Distributions of Crashes ........................................................................ 54
7.1:  Crashes by Quarter ............................................................................................................ 54
7.2:  Bicycle Crashes by Month ................................................................................................. 55
7.3:  Crashes by Day of Week .................................................................................................... 57
7.4:  Time of Day ........................................................................................................................ 59
7.4.1:  Fatal Crashes by Time of Day ...................................................................................... 59
7.4.2:  Injury Crashes by Time of Day .................................................................................... 60
7.4.3:  Dooring Crashes .......................................................................................................... 60
7.4.4:  Fatal and Injury Crashes by Hour ................................................................................ 61
7.5:  Special Events .................................................................................................................... 63

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

vi 

 

Chapter 8: Spatial Distribution .............................................................................................. 65
8.1:  Overall Spatial Distribution of Crashes ............................................................................. 65
8.2:  Chicago Community Areas ................................................................................................ 67
8.2.1:  Highest and Lowest Number of Bicycle Crashes ........................................................ 70
8.2.2:  Per Capita Crashes: Mapped by Community Areas .................................................... 72
8.3:  Hotspots ............................................................................................................................ 73
8.4:  Major Crash Corridors ....................................................................................................... 76
8.5:  Major Arterial Hotspots .................................................................................................... 77
8.6:  Dooring Crashes ................................................................................................................ 77
8.7:  Land Uses near Crash Locations ........................................................................................ 79
8.7.1:  Schools and Universities ............................................................................................. 79
8.7.2:  Central Business District ............................................................................................. 83
8.7.3:  Residential – Non‐Central Business District ............................................................... 84
Chapter 9: Summary and Limitations of the Study ................................................................. 86
9.1:  Study Summary ................................................................................................................. 87
9.2:  Limitations ......................................................................................................................... 87
Technical Appendix A: Data and Study Area .......................................................................... 89
A.1:  Data ................................................................................................................................... 89
A.2:  Study Area and Peer Cities ................................................................................................ 90
Technical Appendix B: Background‐‐Bicycling Safety Trends and Literature ........................... 93
B.1:  Benefits of Bicycling .......................................................................................................... 93
B.2:  Overall Transportation Safety Trends ............................................................................... 94
B.2.1:  Trends in Bicycle Safety .............................................................................................. 94
B.2.2:  Chicago‐Area Trends in Bicycling and Bicycle Crashes ............................................... 96
B.3:  Risk Factors to Bicycling: A Review of the Safety Literature ............................................. 96
B.3.1:  Crash Causation and Crash Risk.................................................................................. 97
B.3.1.1:  Dynamics of Bicycle Crashes ............................................................................... 97
B.3.1.2:  Risk Factors Contributing to Crash Involvement ................................................ 99
B.3.1.3:  Exposure‐Based Risk Estimation ....................................................................... 102

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

vii 

 

B.3.2:  Crash Severity and Effects ........................................................................................ 102
B.3.2.1:  Factors Determining Crash Severity ................................................................. 103
B.3.2.2:  Type of Trauma and Extent of Injury ................................................................ 103
B.3.3:  Comparative Studies ................................................................................................ 104
B.3.4:  Data and Information Systems ................................................................................. 105
B.3.5:  Crash Countermeasures and Evaluation .................................................................. 106
References........................................................................................................................... 109
 

 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

viii 

 

List of Tables   
Table 3‐1:  Bicycle crashes by type of injury and fatalities, City of Chicago, 2005‐2010 ................ 8
Table 3‐2:  Fatal and injury crashes in City of Chicago, 2005‐2010 ................................................ 9
Table 3‐3:  Fatalities in Illinois and indices by number of bicycle commuters and population ... 11
Table 3‐4:  Peer city fatality indices, 2005‐2009 ........................................................................... 14
Table 3‐5:  Peer city fatalities by gender, 2005 to 2010 ............................................................... 15
Table 3‐6:  Bicycling and walking as mode of transportation to work in major cities, 2010 ....... 17
Table 4‐1:  Gender mix of bicycling ............................................................................................... 18
Table 4‐2:  Chicago bicycling estimates, 2007 .............................................................................. 19
Table 4‐3:  Gender of cyclists injured in bicycle crashes .............................................................. 19
Table 4‐4:  Fatalities and injury crashes per 100 million miles of travel ...................................... 20
Table 4‐5:  Bicycling by age, miles and minutes per day, 2007* .................................................. 21
Table 4‐6:  Bicyclist fatalities by age and gender in City of Chicago, 2005‐2010 ......................... 22
Table 4‐7:  Bicyclists injured by age and gender in City of Chicago, 2005‐2010 .......................... 23
Table 5‐1:  Blood alcohol content of drivers involved in fatal bicycle crashes ............................. 26
Table 5‐2:  Apparent physical condition of drivers in bicycle injury crashes................................ 27
Table 5‐3:  Blood Alcohol Content of bicyclists in fatal crashes, 2005 to 2010 ............................ 28
Table 5‐4:  Known age of driver involved in fatal crash ................................................................ 29
Table 5‐5:  Gender of drivers involved in bicycle injury crashes .................................................. 29
Table 5‐6:  Vehicle type involved in bicycle injury crashes ........................................................... 30
Table 5‐7:  Vehicle use during crash ............................................................................................. 32
Table 5‐8:  Driver action in fatal crashes, City of Chicago, 2005‐2010 ......................................... 34
Table 5‐9:  Driver action in bicycle‐vehicle injury crashes ............................................................ 35
Table 5‐10:  Vehicle maneuver prior to bicycle injury crashes ..................................................... 36
Table 5‐11:  All versus dooring bicycle crashes, by injury type .................................................... 37
Table 5‐12:  Bicyclist action in fatal crashes, 2005‐2010 .............................................................. 37
Table 5‐13:  Bicyclist action in injury crashes ............................................................................... 38
Table 5‐14:  Bicyclist location in fatal crashes, City of Chicago, 2005‐2010 ................................. 39
Table 5‐15:  Bicyclist location in bicycle injury crashes ................................................................ 39

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

ix 

 

Table 5‐16:  Helmet use, 2005 to 2009 ......................................................................................... 40
Table 6‐1:  Weather conditions during bicycle crashes ................................................................ 41
Table 6‐2:  Light conditions during bicycle crashes ...................................................................... 42
Table 6‐3:  Road surface conditions during bicycle crashes, 2005 ‐2010 ..................................... 43
Table 6‐4:  Bicycle injury crashes at intersections ........................................................................ 43
Table 6‐5:  Intersections with the greatest number of injury crashes ......................................... 45
Table 6‐6:  Road defects ............................................................................................................... 47
Table 6‐7:  Location‐related factors for fatal bicycle crashes, 2005‐2010 ................................... 47
Table 6‐8:  Roadway type .............................................................................................................. 48
Table 6‐9:  Number of travel lanes ............................................................................................... 49
Table 6‐10:  Fatal and Type A crashes by roadway classification ................................................. 50
Table 6‐11:  All injury crashes by roadway classification .............................................................. 50
Table 6‐12:  Traffic control device at fatal crashes ....................................................................... 51
Table 6‐13:  Traffic control device at injury crashes ..................................................................... 51
Table 6‐14:  Condition of traffic control device at fatal and injury crashes ................................. 52
Table 6‐15:  Injury crashes in work zones, 2005‐2010 ................................................................. 53
Table 7‐1:  Bicycle injury crashes by calendar quarter in Chicago, 2005‐2010 ............................ 54
Table 8‐1:  Bicycle crashes and miles cycled in six community areas with the most crashes ...... 68
Table 8‐2:  Fifteen community areas with the highest number of injury crashes ........................ 70
Table 8‐3:  Fifteen community areas with the lowest number of injury crashes ......................... 71
Table 8‐4:  Dooring crashes compared to all injury crashes by major arterials, 2010 ................. 78
Table A‐1:  CMAP’s Travel Tracker Survey mode share for selected modes ................................ 92
Table B‐1:  Bicycle crash literature categories .............................................................................. 97
Table B‐2:  Safety countermeasures and strategies used in cities and states ............................ 108

 
 
 
 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

 

 
List of Figures  
Figure 3‐1:  Number of daily bicycle commuters, City of Chicago, 2000 to 2010 .......................... 5
Figure 3‐2:  Number of fatalities by selected transportation modes, 1995 ‐ 2009 ........................ 7
Figure 3‐3:  Number of bicycle injury crashes per 100,000 population ......................................... 8
Figure 3‐4:  Comparison of pedestrian and bicycle injury crashes, 2005 to 2010 ....................... 10
Figure 3‐5:   Bicyclists as a percent of all daily commuters, peer cities, 2010 ............................. 13
Figure 4‐1:   Ratio of male to female injury rates ......................................................................... 24
Figure 4‐2:   Annual average injury crash rate per 100,000 residents .......................................... 24
Figure 5‐1:  Hit‐and‐run bicycle crashes, 2005 to 2010 ................................................................ 28
Figure 5‐2:   Number of SUVs involved in bicycle crashes ............................................................ 31
Figure 7‐1:   Injury crashes by month and injury type, 2005 to 2010 total .................................. 55
Figure 7‐2:   Fatal bicycle crashes by month, 2005‐2010 ............................................................. 56
Figure 7‐3:  Fatal bicycle crashes by day of week, 2005‐2010 ...................................................... 57
Figure 7‐4:  Injury crashes by type of injury and day of week ...................................................... 58
Figure 7‐5:  Fatal bicycle crashes by time of day, 2005‐2010 ....................................................... 59
Figure 7‐6:  Injury bicycle crashes by time of day, 2005‐2010 ..................................................... 60
Figure 7‐7:  Dooring crashes, 2010‐2011 ...................................................................................... 61
Figure 7‐8:  Fatal and Type A injury crashes by hour, 2005 to 2010 ............................................ 62
Figure 7‐9:  Type B and C injury crashes by hour, 2005 to 2010 .................................................. 63
 

 
 
 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

xi 

 

List of Maps 
Map 6‐1:  Intersections with at least ten injury crashes .............................................................. 44
Map 7‐1:  Bicycle injury crashes on the six Fourth of Julys from 2005 to 2010 ........................... 64
Map 8‐1:  Fatal and serious (Type A) injury crashes in City of Chicago, 2005‐2010 ..................... 65
Map 8‐2:  Type B and C injury crashes in City of Chicago, 2005‐2010 ......................................... 66
Map 8‐3:  Fatalities and Type A injury crashes, 2005‐2010 .......................................................... 67
Map 8‐4:  Fatalities and Type A crashes from 2005‐2010 per 2010 population .......................... 72
Map 8‐5:  Type B and C crashes from 2005‐2010 per 2010 population ....................................... 73
Map 8‐6:  All injury crashes hotspots ........................................................................................... 74
Map 8‐7:  Fatal and Type A injury crash hotspots ........................................................................ 75
Map 8‐8:  Major arterials of injury crashes .................................................................................. 76
Map 8‐9:  Non‐intersection injury crashes ................................................................................... 77
Map 8‐10:  High school vicinities with injury crashes ................................................................... 79
Map 8‐11:  Primary school hotspots ............................................................................................. 81
Map 8‐12:  Primary school hotspots in the far west side ............................................................. 83
Map 8‐13:  Downtown Type B and C injury crashes ..................................................................... 84
Map 8‐14:  North Side Type B and C injury crashes ..................................................................... 84
Map 8‐15:  Hyde Park / University of Chicago area Type B and C injury crashes......................... 86
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

 

Chapter 1:   Key Findings 
CHICAGO BICYCLE CRASH SAFETY TRENDS, 2005‐2010 
 
1. Thirty‐two cyclists were killed in crashes with motor vehicles from 2005 to 2010.  
2. The number of fatal crashes decreased by 28 percent from seven in 2005 to five in 2010. 
3. Almost 9,000 bicyclists incurred injury crashes during the six‐year period. 
4. The number of injury crashes increased from 1,236 in 2005 to 1,566 in 2010. 
 
 
WHERE DID CRASHES OCCUR: SPATIAL AND LOCATIONAL DIMENSIONS 
 
5. Approximately 55 percent of fatal and injury crashes occurred at intersections. 
6. A high number of crashes have occurred on or near major diagonal arterial streets 
including Milwaukee Avenue. 
7. Six of the 77 community areas just north and northwest of the Loop accounted for one‐ 
third of the injury crashes but more than one‐third of the bicycle miles.  
8. The highest number of injury crashes was in West Town (just west of the Loop) followed 
by Near North Side and Logan Square. 
 
 
WHEN DID THE CRASHES OCCUR 
 
9. The largest number of injury crashes occurred from 4:00 pm to 7:00 pm but fatalities 
were highest from 8:00 pm to midnight.   
10. There were five fatalities from 4:00 pm to 7:00 pm but nine fatalities from 8:00 pm to 
midnight.  
11. Approximately 45 percent of the fatal and injury crashes occurred during three summer 
months.  
12. The great majority of crashes occurred during day light hours and in good weather. 
13. Sundays accounted for the highest number of fatalities but the fewest number of injury 
crashes. 
 
CHARACTERISTICS OF CYCLISTS: GENDER AND AGE 
 
14. Males were three times more likely to be involved in bicycle crashes than females 
overall, and in most age groups. 
15. The ratio of male to female crashes was lowest in the 20‐24 age group (1.98) but 
increased steadily with age. It was 12 times higher for males in the 75‐84 age group. 
16. The greatest number of miles cycled were logged by cyclists aged 25‐34 but they had 
much lower crash rates than younger cyclists.  
 
 
 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

 

EXTENT OF CYCLING AND HOW HAS IT CHANGED 
 
17. Since 2000, the number of bicycle commuters has increased by 150 percent.  
18. Nationally 0.6 percent of workers commuted to work by bicycle in 2010. In Chicago, that 
percent was 1.3 percent (15,000 cyclists daily).  
19. Among peer cities, Chicago has more bicycle commuters per capita than New York or 
Los Angeles, but fewer than Philadelphia and Seattle.  
 
COMPARING BICYCLE CRASHES WITH PEDESRIAN CRASHES, 2005‐2010,  
 
20. While the number of motor‐vehicle crashes with pedestrians declined during the 2005‐
2010 study period, crashes involving bicycles increased. 
21. Hit and run accounted for 25 percent of both injury and fatal bicycle crashes.  It was 
much lower than pedestrian fatal and injury crashes, 41 and 33 percent respectively.  
 
CRASH CIRCUMSTANCES –HELMET USE, TYPES OF MOTOR VEHICLES AND ALCOHOL 
 
22. Helmets were known to be worn in only one fatal crash. 
23. Cyclists are reported to have crossed against the traffic light in 20 percent of the fatal 
crashes but in only seven percent of the injury crashes. 
24. Four in ten fatalities and injury crashes were due to motorists not yielding right of way. 
25. Taxis (for‐hire vehicles) were involved in one in twelve injury crashes.  
26. Cyclists had blood alcohol content (BAC) over the legal limit in 22 percent of the fatal 
crashes. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

 

Chapter 2:   Introduction, Report Objectives and Organization of the Report 
The chapter begins with a brief overview of bicycle safety in Chicago from 2005 to 2010 
followed by a description of the primary report objectives. The chapter concludes with a 
summary of the report organization.    

2.1:   Introduction 
Nationwide, bicycle fatality and injury rates have been declining along with most other forms of 
transportation. In the City of Chicago, motor‐vehicle crashes have similarly been on the decline. 
Yet the recent history of bicycle injury crashes has been mixed with an overall increase in 
bicycle crashes from 2005 to 2010.  This may be attributable to the large increase in cycling. 
These increases in both bicycling and injury crashes have necessitated the need to develop a 
series of safety strategies that address bicycle safety. 
Between 2005 and 2010, a total of 1,021 persons were killed in the City of Chicago in all crashes 
involving motor vehicles, including drivers, other motor‐vehicle occupants, pedestrians and 
bicyclists. Total transportation fatalities declined 32 percent in the city during this period, with 
191 persons killed in 2005 compared to 128 in 2010. The total number of persons injured in all 
crashes in the city declined from 25,831 in 2005 to 19,865 in 2010 (a decrease of about 23 
percent). These decreases in the city reflect national trends. 
By contrast, during the same period, 32 bicyclists were killed in the City of Chicago. Bicycle 
fatalities during this period exhibit improvement over these six years, with seven fatalities in 
each of the first two years of the six‐year period and five fatalities in each of the last three 
years. The lowest number of fatalities was in 2007 with three. The number of injured bicyclists, 
however, has increased from 1,236 in 2005 to 1,566 in 2010, with a high of 1,782 in 2007. 
Two additional statistics, however, show slightly more consistency in the modest trend of 
increasing bicycle injury crashes. First, bicycle crashes, as a percent of all crashes, have 
increased from less than seven percent to nearly ten percent.  Second, the number of bicycle 
crashes per capita has increased from approximately 47 in 2005 to 62 in 2010.   Regardless of 
the metric, there is evidence that bicycle crashes have increased during the study period.  Still, 
bicycling (as measured by the number bicycle commuters) has grown more rapidly than any 
measure of the number of crashes.    

2.2:   Objectives of the Report 
The purpose of this report is to review trends in bicycle safety in the City of Chicago, and to 
identify ways to improve bicycle safety. The overall goal of the report is to provide a systematic 
assessment of the “who,” “what” and “how” of safety risks to bicyclists to support safety 
countermeasures and long‐term bicycle planning activities. The report has two objectives. 
 
Objective 1: To analyze bicycle crashes in the City of Chicago. Our overall objective is to make 
a comprehensive presentation of bicycle crash trends in Chicago over the 2005‐2010 period. 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

 

First, we have presented an overview of the bicycling usage and safety trends in the city and 
compared these to national trends and to those in peer cities. We have considered fatalities 
and injuries incurred. We have examined the characteristics of cyclists involved in crashes and 
that of the vehicles and vehicle operators. Environmental factors (weather and light conditions) 
and the characteristics of the roadway where crashes have occurred were then examined as 
well as road surface conditions. We then analyzed seasonal and time‐of‐day pattern of crashes, 
including crash patterns relating to special events. We also examined the spatial distribution of 
crashes by community area, corridors, location‐type and identify hotspots where crashes have 
occurred.  
 
We used two types of data for the analysis: (A) safety data on crashes, injuries and trauma from 
the Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT), National Highway Traffic Safety 
Administration (NHTSA) and the American College of Surgeons, and (B) travel trend data to 
identify patterns in bicycle use from the U.S. Census Bureau, National Household Travel Survey 
(NHTS) and the Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning (CMAP). More information regarding 
the data used is given in Technical Appendix A. 
 
Objective 2: To recommend a collection of strategies to improve bicycle safety that 
incorporates our summary and the crash data analysis. These are designed to assist in 
developing future courses of action regarding ways in which bicycle safety can be improved in 
the City of Chicago. 
 
To make the report self‐contained as a study of bicycle crashes, we have undertaken a review 
of the published literature, as well as of policy and planning documents published by the 
Federal Highway Administration and state and metropolitan planning organizations to 
understand the types of activities that are being undertaken to improve bicycle safety.  

2.3:   Organization of the Report 
The report is 
organized as follows: 
Chapters 3 through 8 
present the findings 
on bicycle safety 
trends. Chapter 9 
presents a summary 
of the study and its 
limitations. The report 
has two technical 
appendices: Appendix 
A describes the data 
used and Appendix B 
presents additional 
background material and a literature review. 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

 

Chapter 3:   Background and Overview of the Bicycling Environment 
This chapter begins the analysis of crash data.  It examines the growth in Chicago and compares 
it to national data and information from other cities.  

3.1:   Trends in Bicycle Use

 

Nationally there has recently been an appreciable increase in bicycling.  Close to one percent of 
all trips reported for all trip purposes (including work, shopping, social trips) were by bike 
(National Household Travel Survey (NHTS), 2009) and the total number of bicycle trips 
increased from 1.7 billion annual trips in 2001 to four billion reported trips in 2009 (NHTS, 
2009).The Census Bureau journey‐to‐work (commuting) data shows that bicycling to work has 
increased from 0.4 percent in 2000 to 0.53 percent in 2010 (U.S. Census Bureau, 2010). 
Bicycling has increased at a higher rate in Chicago than nationally. Using the same census data, 
the number of daily bicycle commuters in Chicago has risen in this millennium from just under 
6,000 to over 15,000 (Figure 3‐1).   This increase of approximately 9,000 additional bike  
 
Figure 3‐1:  Number of daily bicycle commuters, City of Chicago, 2000 to 2010 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Source: ACS, 2000 to 2010

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

 

 
commuters were achieved during a period in which there was a decline, though modest, in the 
number of commuters residing in the city.  Therefore, the rise in bicycling mode share was 
proportionately slightly higher, increasing from 0.5 percent to 1.3 percent of commuters, 2000 
to 2010.  This puts Chicago well above the national level in terms of commuting trips and higher 
than many other metropolitan areas. 

3.2:   National Trends in Bicycle Safety 
While bicycling has grown in popularity, the number of bicycle fatalities nationally exhibits a 
slight downward trend with a 
substantial decline during 
our study period. From 2005 
to 2009, the national number 
of bicycle fatalities declined 
from 786 to 630 (Figure 3‐2).  
This is a decrease of 20 
percent. However, safety 
gains for all motor‐vehicle 
crash fatalities were 
considerably higher, with a 
decline in fatalities among 
motor‐vehicle drivers of 24 
percent and among 
passengers of 31 percent.  This difference may be attributable the 13 percent decline in 
highway passenger miles (http://www.bts.gov/publications/national_transportation_statistics) 
from 2005 to 2009, a period during which bicycle use has shown the opposite trend, i.e., has 
grown rapidly.  Also important is the decline among pedestrian fatalities, 16 percent, though 
the decline is not as great as for the modes (driver and motor‐vehicle passenger) cited above. It 
may be noted that the national population increased during the 2005‐2009 period by 18 million 
people, making the decline in fatalities even more impressive.  
 
Although there are many important differences with respect to the sociodemographics of users 
and overall use patterns, perhaps the most direct comparison is with motorcycle fatalities.  
Both bicycle and motorcycle use has increased during the study period and both typically have 
just two wheels. During 2005 to 2009, motorcycle fatalities decreased by 2.5 percent but 
actually increased by 16 percent in three years (2005 – 2008) before the sharp one‐year drop 
from 2008 to 2009.  During the longer period, since 1995, however, there has been a dramatic 
100 percent increase in the number of motorcycle fatalities. By contrast, bicyclist fatalities 
recorded an approximately 25 percent decline between 1995 and 2009.   
 
 
 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

 

 
 
Figure 3‐2:  Number of fatalities by selected transportation modes, 1995 ‐ 2009 

Source: FARS, 1995‐2009,   http://www‐fars.nhtsa.dot.gov/Main/index.aspx 

3.3:   Bicycle Safety in Chicago 
Nationally, the number of bicycle 
fatalities has declined considerably. 
But since the growth of cycling in 
Chicago has exceeded the national 
trend, it is necessary to examine 
Chicago crashes with this in mind.  
Below we examine Chicago bicycle 
crashes and compare them to other 
modes.   
3.3.1:  Chicago Bicycle Safety Trends 
During the study period, bicycle 
fatalities in Chicago have declined but 
due to their small number it is difficult 
to point definitively to a solid trend.  In 
the first two years of the study period, 

 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

 

2005 and 2006, there were seven fatalities (Table 3‐1) in each year versus five fatalities in each 
of the last three years (2008 and 2010).  These numbers indicate a decrease of 28 percent, with 
the lowest number of three fatalities in 2007.   
 
Table 3‐1:  Bicycle crashes by type of injury and fatalities, City of Chicago, 2005‐2010 
Type 
2005 
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010 
Total
Fatalities 

7
3
5
5

32
A* 
127 
186
178
159
162
149 
961
B** 
734 
645
895
719
648
851 
4492
C*** 
375 
554
709
628
576
566 
3408
Total injuries 
1236 
1385
1782
1506
1386
1566 
8861
 

Type A Injuries: any injury other than fatal injury which prevents the injured person from walking, driving, or normally 
continuing  the  activities  he/she  was  capable  of  performing  before  the  injury  occurred.  Includes  severe  lacerations, 
broken limbs, skull or chest injuries, and abdominal injuries. 

** 

Type B Injuries: Any injury, other than fatal or incapacitating injury, which is evident to observers at the scene of the 
crash. Includes bump on the head, abrasions, bruises, minor lacerations. 
Type  C  Injuries:  Any  injury  reported  or  claimed  which  is  neither  of  the  above.  Includes  momentary  unconsciousness, 
claims of injuries not evident, limping, complaint of pain, nausea, hysteria. 

*** 

Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 
 
The data on bicycle crash injuries are less symbolic of a clear trend. Although the numbers have 
increased overall from 2005 to 2010, injury crashes were fewer in 2010 than the peak year of 
2007. Shown on a per capita basis, Figure 3‐3 indicates the highest injury‐crash level was in 
2007, the same year with the lowest number of fatalities.  Generally, since 2007, there has been 
a decrease, though the lowest overall number of injury crashes was in 2005. 
 
Figure 3‐3:  Number of bicycle injury crashes per 100,000 population 

 
Source: computed from IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data and  

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

 

American Community Survey (ACS) population data 
3.3.2:  Chicago Bicycle Crashes Compared with Crashes for Other Modes 
There has been a relatively steady decline in fatal and injury crashes involving all transportation 
modes in the city. From 2005 to 2010, both bicycle and motor‐vehicle fatal crashes declined by 
approximately 28 percent (Table 3‐2). The use of both modes may have increased; however 
bicycle usage has certainly increased more. 
 
Perhaps due to the sharp rise in bicycle use, the number of injury crashes has increased from 
2005 to 2010 (27 percent) while injury crashes involving all modes have declined (14 percent). 
Still, the number of bicycle injury crashes rose dramatically in the first two years only to drop 
almost the same amount the next two years (to 2009).  This was followed by another increase 
in 2010.  Given these data, it is difficult to conclusively argue there is a long‐term, ongoing 
phenomenon, especially since there appears to be no change in the number of injury crashes 
from 2006 to 2009 (1,385 versus 1,386). Overall, however, the prevailing trend points to an 
increase in the annual number of bicycle crashes. 

Fatal 
Crashes 

Injury 
Crashes 

Table 3‐2:  Fatal and injury crashes in City of Chicago, 2005‐2010 
Mode 
2005 
2006
2007
2008
2009 
2010
Bicycle 

7
3
5

5
Pedestrian 
65 
48
49
55
34 
30
All 
179 
176
164
156
141 
127
% Bicycle 
4% 
4%
2%
3%
4% 
4%
Bicycle 
1236 
1385
1782
1506
1386 
1566

TOTAL*
32
281
943
3%
8861

Pedestrian 
All 
% Bicycle 

3406 

3781

3686

3484

3130 

2914

 20,401

18,505 
6.7% 

18,516
7.5%

17,541
10.2%

15,599
9.7%

15,645 
8.9% 

15,881
9.9%

101,687
8.7%

*Crashes involving property damage are not included 

Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 
 
Figure 3‐4 shows cycling and pedestrian injury crashes over the study period. In contrast to 
bicycle injury crashes which have increased overall from 2005 to 2010, pedestrian injury 
crashes declined (from 3,406 in 2005 to 2,914 in 2010). Perhaps this is partly due to the large 
increase in bicycling in the region.  If the use of a bicycle in the work trip is an indication of a 
more universal use of bicycles, then it is not surprising that, with a surge in use, there is not an 
obvious decline in injury crashes. At some point, however, we might expect a long‐term 
decrease. Many modes of transportation experience increases in crashes when they first 
become popular and then decline as they become more universally used. Motor‐vehicle 
fatalities in the U.S. have been declining for nearly forty years (since the early 1970s) despite 
the growth in population and levels of vehicle use.  
 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

10 

 

It is also appropriate to note here that the injury crashes in Table 3‐1 and Figure 3‐4 do not 
include crashes with only property damage. Comparing these totals with other studies would 
make this apparent.  There are three reasons for not including crashes that only have property 
damage.  First, like the limited number of property damage cases involving pedestrians, there 
are relatively few such bicycle crashes associated with only property damage. Second, since 
injuries are not sustained, they fall into a different class of crashes. Third, property damage 
data vary substantially during the study period and would complicate assessing an overall crash 
trend. 
Figure 3‐4:  Comparison of pedestrian and bicycle injury crashes, 2005 to 2010 

 
Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 

3.4:   Chicago versus Suburban Chicago and the Rest of Illinois 
Table 3‐3 shows that the City of Chicago accounts for approximately 22 percent of the 
statewide fatalities and just over half of the fatalities in Cook County.  There are also fewer 
fatalities in the five collar counties than in suburban Cook County, which may reflect usage 
levels.   
Statewide, the number of fatalities in 2010 was lower than in 2005, but the intermediate data 
do not show an obvious trend.  Yet when the data are combined into two‐year periods, the last 
two years, 2009 and 2010, have a lower total than the first two years and one fewer fatality 
than the middle two years. 
 
The sub‐areas shown in Table 3‐3 similarly do not show upward or downward trends.  Perhaps 
the rest of Illinois and Chicago show the clearest pattern of decreasing fatalities.   

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

11 

 

 
 
 
Table 3‐3:  Fatalities in Illinois and indices by number of bicycle commuters and population 
Year 
City of  Suburban 
Collar 
Rest of 
Total
Chicago 
Cook
counties
Illinois
2005 

3
6
15
31
2006 

7
1
10
25
2007 

4
1
9
17
2008 

3
7
12
27
2009 

3
2
9
19
2010 

8
4
7
24
Total 
32 
28
21
62
143
Bike 
12,706 
4388
4507
8877
30,478
commuters 
Fatalities 
2.5 
6.4
4.7
7.0
4.7
/1000 
commuters 
Population 
2,824,064  2,432,937 3,099,766
4,486,399 12,843,166
1.1 
1.2
0.7
1.4
1.1
Fatalities 
/100,000 
population 
Source: 2005‐2009 ACS for number of commuters and population, 
and IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data for fatalities 
 
 
The lower part of Table 3‐3 also provides a means to further interpret the data by computing 
two indices.  The first divides the number of fatalities by thousands of commuters.  As a 
measure of exposure, this shows that Chicago has the lowest index level followed by the collar 
counties (DuPage, Lake, McHenry, Will and Kane counties in northeastern Illinois). Since the 
number of commuters does not necessarily reflect the total number of users, we also index by 
population size.  The more accurate exposure measure is likely to be between the two 
surrogate exposure measures, commuters and population.  
 
 
The population index shows that the collar counties have the lowest index followed by Chicago.  
The Chicago level mirrors the statewide figure. Again the “rest of the Illinois“ has the highest 
index.  Suburban Cook has the second highest level as in the previous index.    
 
These numbers may be further examined by observing that Chicago has 22 percent of the 
state’s fatalities and 22 percent of the state’s population, but 42 percent of the state’s bicycle 
commuters.  In this regard, Chicago’s data ranks well in comparison with the other geographies 
in Table 3‐3. 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

12 

 
 
 

3.5:   Peer City Comparison of Cycling to Work and Crashes 
Peer cities are those places that most resemble Chicago in size and character. While no two 
places are alike in all criteria, there are a small number of places that are broadly similar to 
Chicago.  Four criteria were developed for the identification of peer cities: (1) over 500,000 in 
population; (2) population density of over 5,000 residents per square mile; (3) at least 75 
square miles; and (4) at least 17 percent proportion of commuters that use non‐auto modes.  
These criteria are patterned after the New York Pedestrian Safety Study, which uses three of 
the four criteria [not number (3) ‐‐New York City Department of Transportation, 2010]. 
Additional details on the selection of peer cities are given in Technical Appendix A. 
 
Since the scientific community does not have 
guidelines for the definition of a peer city, we also 
include in this report the twelve largest cities in 
the U.S. and some other noteworthy places for 
comparison.   Increasing to these twelve cities 
permits the inclusion of another midwestern city ‐ 
Indianapolis ‐ while keeping the analysis to a 
manageable number. Still, the peer cities 
represent the most meaningful comparisons of 
statistics such as mode share.  
 
We examine U.S. Census bicycling‐to‐work data 
because it is the only large‐sample, annual data 
that show levels of bicycling in cities across the 
nation. We also compared bicycle safety statistics 
of Chicago to these peer cities.  
In comparison to our two most immediate peer 
cities, Los Angeles and New York, Chicago in 2010 
had nearly as many bike commuters (15,096) as 
Los Angeles (16,101), a much larger city.  The population of Los Angeles exceeds that of Chicago 
by approximately one million people. New York City has nearly three times Chicago’s 
population but has less than twice the number of bicycle commuters (27,917).  
Figure 3‐5 shows that the mode share for bicyclists is noticeably higher in Chicago than in New 
York and Los Angeles, but lower than in Philadelphia and Seattle.  This suggests that increases in 
mode share since 2000 are important but there is still the potential for higher levels of bicycling 
in the future.  Note also that the geographically closest peer city to Chicago is Milwaukee, which 
has a mode share approximately half that of Chicago. 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

13 

 

 
 
 
Figure 3‐5:   Bicyclists as a percent of all daily commuters, peer cities, 2010 

 
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, ACS, 2010 data 
 
Among the peer cities, Chicago ranks third in the number of fatalities, behind New York (photo 
on right) and Los Angeles (Table 3‐4).  
Further, Chicago is also third based 
on an index that is computed by 
dividing the total number of fatalities  
over a five‐year period (2005‐2009) 
by thousands of bicycle commuters 
during the same period  (we use the 
number of commuters since there is 
no other universal data on bicycle 
use).   On the basis of this statistic, 
Chicago is only marginally higher 
than Baltimore.   
Table 3‐4 shows a relationship 
between the fatality index and city 
size. New York clearly has the highest rate and Milwaukee and Seattle have the lowest rates.  
 
 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

14 

 

 
Table 3‐4:  Peer city fatality indices, 2005‐2009 
(Five years of fatalities divided by the average number of daily bike commuters) 
 City 
Fatalities Commuters1 Index2

New York  
Los Angeles
Chicago 
Philadelphia
Seattle 
Baltimore 
Milwaukee 

97
35
293
16
8
3
1

22,420
13,764
12,706
8921
8981
1428
1803

4.33
2.54
2.28
1.79
0.89
2.10
0.55

                                        1

Average number 2005‐2009 
Total fatalities divided by thousands of commuters 
                                        3
FARS reports slightly higher numbers than IDOT 
                                        2

Source: 2005‐2009 American Community Survey 5‐Year Estimates and 
FARS: Fatal Accident Reporting System, ftp://ftp.nhtsa.dot.gov/fars/ 
 
What is most remarkable about the peer cities is the extent to which New York dominates the 
number of fatalities.  It accounts for half of the bicycle fatalities, even though it has just under 
one third of the bicycle commuters (see also Table 3‐6).  
 
Also, Chicago’s fatality number is lower than that of Los Angeles, even though the two cities 
have about the same number of bicycle commuters. 
Moreover, the gender mix is very different. Only four 
percent of the Los Angeles fatalities are female, versus 15 
percent for Chicago and 12 percent among the peer cities.  
 
Table 3‐5 also depicts the change in the number of fatalities 
on an annual basis.  It is apparent that there are large year‐
to‐year fluctuations; thus an assessment of only annual data 
would likely not be particularly informative.  We therefore 
examined the first two years (2005 and 2006) versus the last 
two years (2008 and 2009). The 2010 FARS data were not 
available at the time of this analysis.  
 
All of the cities had lower numbers in the last two years 
versus the first two years, except Seattle (partly due to small 
numbers).  Chicago’s fatalities dropped from 14 to 12, Los 
Angeles from 15 to 12.  Collectively, the number of fatalities 
in the seven cities dropped by 12 percent.  Since bicycling is 
most prevalent in large cities (other than college towns), the 
drop in fatalities restates the national improvement in 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

15 

 

bicycle fatalities. However, we see how the addition of one year of data changes the trend.  In 
2010 there were more male and female fatalities than in 2009 and also a large jump in male 
fatalities in Los Angeles. The overall increase rose from 28 to 42 fatalities, even with the slight 
decline in Chicago from six to five (we use IDOT data throughout much of this report that shows 
no change in Chicago from 2009 to 2010). 
 

 

                                                                                                   

New York City 
Los Angeles 

2005 
M   F 
16  4 
5  0 

2006
M  F
15  2
9  1

2007
M F
24 2
8 0

2008
M F
20 2
7 0

2009
M
F
11
1
4
1

2010 
Total 
M

M  F
15
3  101  14
12
0  45  2

Chicago 
Philadelphia 
Seattle 
Baltimore 
Milwaukee 
Total 






30 






38 

2
4
2
0
0
40

5
2
1
1
0
36

4
2
2
0
0
23

5
2
0
1
1
36

 






0
0
1
0
0
4

1
1
0
0
0
4

1
1
0
0
0
4

2
0
1
0
0
5

0  29  5
2  16  4

6  3

4  0

2  0
6  203  28

Percent
F
12%
  4%
15%
20%
33%
  0%
  0%
12%

Table 3‐5:  Peer city fatalities by gender, 2005 to 2010 
Source:   FARS: Fatal Accident Reporting System, ftp://ftp.nhtsa.dot.gov/fars/ 

3.6:   Comparison with Other Large Cities 
A more thorough assessment of the relative position of Chicago includes a larger collection of 
cities and characteristics.  Table 3‐6 shows that when the basis for comparison is expanded to 
the twelve largest cities, Chicago’s rank jumps to second place, since Seattle drops from the list 
of peer cities and of the 12 largest cities only Philadelphia has a share higher than Chicago. 
 
When we further broaden the scope 
of comparison, places like Portland, 
San Francisco, Minneapolis and 
Washington, D.C. appear with higher 
bicycle mode shares.  As stated 
earlier, some of these high levels have 
been achieved with relatively small 
city land areas. 
 
In Table 3‐6, we have also included 
the share for walking to work.  Places 
such as Boston, Washington, D.C. and 
New York are cities where walking to 
work is common.  While Chicago cannot compare with these places in terms of pedestrian 
mode share, the 6.5 percent is still more than twice the national share of 2.8 percent.    

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

16 

 

The  walk  percentage  is  also  given  as  a  possible  indicator  of  the  potential  to  which  the  bike 
share may rise in the future.  This may be useful if there is an interest in knowing how high the 
bicycle mode may rise with a concerted effort to promote bicycling.  
 
The logic for this inference is that walking acts as a surrogate for the density of residents and 
urban opportunities ‐ mainly jobs ‐and could possibly be attained by bicycling.  Table 3‐6 
presents the ratio of biking to walking.  If one were to subscribe to this logic ‐ that the walking 
share is a possible target to which bicycling to work might rise ‐then the relative magnitudes are 
important. Accordingly, Chicago has already achieved 20 percent of this target, with 1.29 
percent that bicycle to work versus 6.54 percent for those that walk to work (five times as 
many).  
 
Note that in Portland, the 
ratio is just over one (more 
cyclists than walkers) and 
in Sacramento the ratio is 
0.86. In Sacramento, 
however, among male 
commuters, there is 68 
percent more cycling than 
walking to work.  Females 
disproportionately walk 
more; therefore the 
cycling/walking ratio is 
0.86.  Perhaps it would be 
too ambitious in most 
places to even reach a 
ratio of 0.5, but at a 
minimum the ratio may 
provide useful information 
as to what may be possible 
in the future. 
 
Lastly, Table 3‐6 shows the percentage of the bicycle commuters that are male.  The highest 
levels are found in Detroit, Dallas and Phoenix.  Conversely, women make up the highest 
percentage of cyclists in Philadelphia, Boston and Portland.  
 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

17 

 

 
Table 3‐6:  Bicycling and walking as mode of transportation to work in major cities, 2010 
 

Commuters 

US 
Illinois 

136,941,010  731,286
5,792,659  33,427

New York* 
Los Angeles* 
Chicago * 
Philadelphia* 
Seattle 
Baltimore  
Milwaukee 
Houston  
Phoenix 
San Diego  
Dallas  
San Antonio 
San Jose  
Jacksonville  
Indianapolis 
San Francisco 
Washington, D.C. 
Boston  
Portland,  OR 
Columbus, OH 
Sacramento 
Detroit  
Austin, TX 
Minneapolis  
Miami  

By 
Percent 
bicycle 
bike 

Walk

Percent 
walk 

0.53% 3,797,048
2.77% 
0.58%
178,901
3.09% 
Peer cities 
3,615,588  27,917
0.77%
364,273
10.08% 
1,706,116  16,101
0.94%
61,154
3.58% 
1,168,318  15,096
1.29%
76,372
6.54% 
583,734  10,503
1.80%
48,318
8.28% 
339,160  12,306
3.63%
29,070
8.57% 
256,622 
1,788
0.70%
16,532
6.44% 
249,594 
1,723
0.69%
11,736
4.70% 
Twelve largest cities*, not found above in peer cities 
961,240 
4,393
0.46%
20,641
2.15% 
620,072 
3,576
0.58%
11,025
1.78% 
620,939 
6,390
1.03%
18,178
2.93% 
543,348 
820
0.15%
9,895
1.82% 
591,725 
1,159
0.20%
13,686
2.31% 
426,136 
2,708
0.64%
6,768
1.59% 
375,579 
843
0.22%
6,700
1.78% 
366,017 
1,935
0.53%
7,035
1.92% 
Other noteworthy cities 
437,814  15,208
3.47%
41,362
9.45% 
296,717 
9,288
3.13%
34,895
11.76% 
309,620 
4,369
1.41%
49,007
15.83% 
286,228  17,035
5.95%
15,078
5.27% 
370,337 
2,498
0.67%
11,205
3.03% 
188,974 
4,725
2.50%
5,507
2.91% 
196,706 
651
0.33%
4,905
2.49% 
412,291 
4,242
1.03%
12,184
2.96% 
200,853 
6,969
3.47%
13,458
6.70% 
164,340 
1,550
0.94%
6,166
3.75% 
Source: U. S. Census Bureau, ACS, 2010 

Ratio 
Bike 
bike to  percent 
walk 
male 
0.19  73.6%
0.19  71.4%
0.08 
0.26 
0.20 
0.22 
0.42 
0.11 
0.15 

79.1%
78.4%
72.3%
58.4%
70.1%
81.5%
77.8%

0.21 
0.32 
0.35 
0.08 
0.08 
0.40 
0.13 
0.28 

81.3%
90.2%
69.1%
92.3%
77.0%
83.6%
79.2%
83.2%

0.37 
0.27 
0.09 
1.13 
0.22 
0.86 
0.13 
0.35 
0.52 
0.25 

67.3%
67.9%
61.2%
64.9%
67.1%
75.5%
100%
77.9%
75.5%
79.9%

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

18 

 
 

Chapter 4:   Characteristics of Cyclists Involved in Crashes 
In this chapter, we examine bicycling patterns in the City of Chicago by gender, age and 
educational levels. We also examine the details of crash statistics by these sociodemographic 
groupings. 

4.1:   Bicycle Use and Safety Trends by Age and Gender 
Most studies show that the majority of cyclists are male, with the exception that women are 
more likely make trips to school by bicycle (Garrard, et al 2008; Krizek, et al 2005).  Using a 
variety of sources and circumstances, we estimate that males typically account for two‐thirds to 
three‐quarters of the cyclists (Table 4‐1).  Using the CMAP Travel Tracker survey data, we find 
that in Chicago, males are particularly predominant in recreational and entertainment trips, 
accounting for 78 percent of these trips. Females account for roughly one‐third of the trips in 
the CMAP Travel Tracker Survey, and 27 percent of the cyclists in a CDOT downtown count. 
Variable 

Table 4‐1:  Gender mix of bicycling 
Male

Chicago 
Bicycle trips per day CMAP survey 
CMAP – routine shopping trips 
CMAP – recreation and entertainment trips 
2005‐2009 ACS journey to work 
CDOT Downtown Bike Count 13/9/2011* 
Chicago fatalities – 2005 to 2010 
Beyond Chicago 
Fatalities in peer cities – 2005‐2009 
National fatalities 2008 
National fatalities 2009 

No.

27

Percent
66%
59%
78%
72%
73%
84%

167
93
81

88.4%
87.0%
85.2%

9303

Female 
No. 
 
 
 
3620 
 

 
22 
623 
549 

Total

Percent
34%
41%
22%
28%
27%
16%

9722
32

11.6%
13.0%
14.8%

189
716
630

 

*http://www.chicagobikes.org/pdf/NBPDcount_stats.pdf 

Source for Chicago data: CMAP Travel Tracker Survey, 2007‐8 
Source for statewide data: IDOT Crash Data, 2005‐2010 
Source for National data: Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS) 
 
 
The largest gender differences are in fatalities statistics. Nationally, females accounted for 
approximately one of every seven fatalities, or 13.0 and 14.8 percent in 2008 and 2009 
respectively.  This is similar to the six‐year data for Chicago, where the female portion of 
crashes was 16 percent. For comparison, only nine percent of bicyclists who died as a result of 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

19 

 

crashes in New York City from 1996 through 2003 were female (NYCDOT), though more recent 
data show that  this statistic has risen to 12 percent in the last six years. Los Angeles’ result in 
this same data category is four percent (Table 3‐5). 
Some differences may be attributable to greater exposure and higher speeds for males (Table 
4‐2). Females account for just under one‐third of the miles traveled (Note: The CMAP Travel 
Tracker survey provides very useful information for this study; however, the data processed 
and reported are not intended to be precise, in part due to the small sample size and overall 
objectives of the CMAP survey). 
Table 4‐2:  Chicago bicycling estimates, 2007 
  
Daily 
Daily 
Average  Average 
miles*  minutes* minutes/  miles / 
trip 
trip 
Female 
98,200
800,000
22.1
2.70 
Male 
221,600 1,660,000
23.1
3.08 
Total 
319,800 2,460,000
 
Ratio 
2.3
2.1
1.05
1.14 

Speed 
MPH 
7.3
8.0
1.10

*The  minutes  and  miles  are  estimates  computed  by  the  authors  from  CMAP  survey  data  and  are  not 
intended to be precise computations and do not have a defined margin of error 

Source:  Computed by the authors from CMAP Travel Tracker data, 2007 
 
While males account for approximately twice as much cycling, they incur three times more 
injuries (Table 4‐3).  The three‐to‐one ratio largely holds true throughout the six‐year study 
period.  Only data for the year 2008 falls below this ratio. 
 
Table 4‐3:  Gender of cyclists injured in bicycle crashes 
  
2005  2006  2007  2008 2009 2010  Total Percent  Percent 
known 
Male 
Female 
Unknown 
Total   

777  1046  1347  1093 1064 1163 6490
72.86% 
243  334  429  405 328 381 2120
23.80% 
226 
17 
14 
9
4
27
297
3.33% 
1246  1397  1790  1507 1396 1571 8907
100% 
Source:  IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 

75.38%
24.62%

100%

 
To further understand the relationship between male and female cycling, we examined the 
crash rates per miles cycled. Table 4‐4 shows that females living in Chicago cycle 36 million 
miles annually, and together with males log over 110 million miles annually. Using the standard 
used in transportation literature on motorized fatalities, we estimate that the rate for females 
is 2.8 fatalities for every 100 million bicycle miles traveled (BMT). For males, the ratio stands at 
approximately two times higher at 5.5. The rate for all cyclists is 4.6 fatalities per 100 million 
BMT. Most of the bicycle mileage data used in these calculations were based on household 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

20 

 

travel surveys compiled largely in 2007 when there were only a total of three fatalities.  Using 
this as the base, the fatality rates for that year was only 2.6 per millions BMT. 
 
Table 4‐4:  Fatalities and injury crashes per 100 million miles of travel 
(fatalities and injuries represent the annual average over the six‐year study period, 
miles biked are conservative, approximate estimates) 

 

Annual miles 

Fatalities / 
Injury crashes / 
100 million miles 
100 million miles 
Female 
36,000,000 
2.8 
1000 
Male 
81,000,000 
5.5 
1400 
Ratio M/F 
2.25 
2.0 
1.4 
Source:  IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data and CMAP Travel Tracker data, 2007  
 
These numbers are higher than for national motor‐vehicle fatalities, that have decreased in 
recent years to 1.14 per 100 million miles traveled. In making this comparison two points need 
to be acknowledged. First, the bike miles are estimated from CMAP household survey data that 
includes data on bicycling but was not weighted strictly with bicycling in mind. Second, bicycles 
and motor‐vehicles travel on very different roadways, especially in a City of Chicago versus 
national comparison.  Many of the motor‐vehicle miles are logged on interstate highways, 
impractical for most city trips.  Still, the statistics provide a crude comparison of the relative 
safety of two rather different modes of travel. The female per mile fatality rate in Chicago is 
approximately the rate for motor vehicles about 35 years ago, regardless of gender. The male 
rate of 6.7 fatalities per million miles traveled was true for highway fatalities about 60 years 
ago.  In the 1930s, the rate of motor‐vehicle fatalities per 100 million miles of travel was over 
ten. 
 
Regarding demographics, bicycling seems to increase in popularity up to age 34 and then 
decreases. The largest number of trips is made by cyclists 25 to 34 years of age, but the data in 
Table 4.5 need to be evaluated with the caveat that they are based on a relatively small sample. 
In particular since the CMAP Travel Tracker data in Table 4‐5 are divided into eight age 
categories, some of the age groups may reflect data, in particular, that are based on a small 
sample size.  Nevertheless, there is evidence that cycling miles and minutes also increase with 
age until age 34, at which point it begins to decline.  The 55‐64 age group fits the pattern for 
number of trips and distance, but their averages in the last two columns do not fit any obvious 
pattern. Without this 55‐64 age group it appears the average trip distance (miles and minutes) 
increases with age (last two columns).  
Since gender and age are both related to bicycle use, it would be informative to examine both 
gender and age together. We begin by examining fatality numbers and then injury data rates. 
 
 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

21 

 

Table 4‐5:  Bicycling by age, miles and minutes per day, 2007 
(Eight age categories yield a table with uneven sample sizes so that  
the data in this table should not be interpreted precisely) 

Age 
<5 
5‐14 
15‐24 
25‐34 
35‐44 
45‐54 
55‐64 
65+ 
Total 

Trips 

Distance 

Minutes Average  Average 
distance minutes 
<1 
1
10
1.3
13.9 

17
158
2.1
20.2 
18 
40
371
2.1
20.2 
48 
109
1096
2.3
23.0 
14 
40
356
2.8
25.0 
12 
33
314
2.8
26.8 

10
96
1.6
16.4 

4
34
2.8
27.3 
107 
252
2434
2.3
22.6 
Source: Estimated from CMAP Travel Tracker2007 

The greatest difference in the fatality rates between males and females is for cyclists older than 
34 (Table 4‐6).  For these older cyclists, there are no female fatalities but 15 male fatalities. A 
similar pattern was found in New York City with much higher fatality numbers, where 45‐54 
year‐old men had the highest death rate at 8.3 per million residents (NYCDOT). In Chicago, 
there is also a noticeable difference in the 10‐14 year old 
age category.  Conversely, the fatality rates are essentially 
the same for the two age categories between 15 and 24 
years in age as well as the category 5‐9 years.  By 
combining the 5‐9 and 10‐14 age categories into one age 
category ‐ 5‐14 ‐ we find that both Chicago and New York 
had five times more male fatalities than female.  
 
Furthermore, Table 4‐6 clearly suggests that male cyclists 
over  24  years  of  age  are  in  a  special  category.  For  these 
cyclists,  the  ratio  of  male  to  female  fatalities  is  19:1.  
There may be more male cyclists in this age range, but it 
is highly unlikely that it is the same ratio, 19:1.   The injury 
ratio for the age over 24 group is closer to 3:1 (Table 4‐7).  
 
 Like  the  number  of  fatalities,  the  number  of  injuries 
increases  with  age  and  again  peaks  at  the  25‐34  age 
group.  But  unlike  fatalities,  injuries  decline  consistently 
with increasing age (Table 4‐7).  Fatalities seem to peak at 
numerous  age  categories  including  45‐54  (the  highest 
number) and 65‐74 year age groups.  
 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

22 

 

Table 4‐6:  Bicyclist fatalities by age and gender in City of Chicago, 2005‐2010 
Age(years) 
Male 
Female 
Total 
Total 
killed 

<5 
5‐9 
10‐14 
15‐19 
20‐24 
25‐34 
35‐44 
45‐54 
55‐64 
65‐74 
75‐84 
85+ 
Total 

Population 

Fatality 
rate* 

0   107,904 
1  
88,712 
4  
92,581 
1  
95,562 
2   109,645 
4   265,102 
3   204,779 
6   175,753 
2   119,382 
3  
66,998 
1  
38,504 
0  
11,046 
27   1,375,968 

0.0 
1.9 
7.2 
1.7 
3.0 
2.5 
2.4 
5.7 
2.8 
7.5 
4.3 
0.0 
3.3 

Total 
Killed 

Population

Fatality 
rate 

0  103,359

88,685

88,160

93,533
2  112,518
1  267,347
0  198,982
0  182,307
0  138,883

87,541

59,902

26,879
5  1,448,096

0.0 
1.9 
0.0 
1.8 
3.0 
0.6 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.6 

Total 
killed 

Population

Fatality 
rate 

0   211,263
2   177,397
4   180,741
2   189,095
4   222,163
5   532,449
3   403,761
6   358,060
2   258,265
3   154,539
1  
98,406
0  
37,925
32   2,824,064

0.0 
1.9 
3.7 
1.8 
3.0 
1.6 
1.2 
2.8 
1.3 
3.2 
1.7 
0.0 
1.9 

*2005‐2010 average annual fatalities divided by millions of residents in the age group 

Source: Population data: 2005‐2009 American Community Survey 5‐Year Estimates 
Fatality data: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 
 
With more injury data than fatality data, the relationship between age and injury crashes is 
more evident.  For both males and females, the rate per population increases with age until the 
20‐24 age group.  With increasing age beyond the 20‐24 group, both rates decline.  Moreover, 
these comments apply to not only the rate but also the number of injury crashes in each age 
category. 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

23 

 

 
Table 4‐7:  Bicyclists injured by age and gender in City of Chicago, 2005‐2010 
(Gender is not recorded for 286 injury crashes; therefore these data are not included here) 
Age

Male
Injured

Avg.

Female

Population*

annual

Injury

Injured

rate*

Avg.

Total

Population

annual

injured

Injury

Injured

rate*

Avg.

Population

annual

injured

Injury
rate*

injured

<5

18

3.0

107,904

28

6

1.0

103,359

10

24

4.0

211,263

19

5-9

243

40.5

88,712

457

83

13.8

88,685

156

326

54.3

177,397

306

10-14

668

111.3

92,581

1203

179

29.8

88,160

338

847

141.2

180,741

781

15-19

664

110.7

95,562

1158

209

34.8

93,533

372

873

145.5

189,095

769

20-24

971

161.8

109,645

1476

503

83.8

112,518

745

1474

245.7

222,163

1106

25-34

1365

227.5

265,102

858

571

95.2

267,347

356

1936

322.7

532,449

606

35-44

826

137.7

204,779

672

231

38.5

198,982

193

1057

176.2

403,761

436

45-54

791

131.8

175,753

750

166

27.7

182,307

152

957

159.5

358,060

445

55-64

338

56.3

119,382

472

48

8.0

138,883

58

386

64.3

258,265

249

65-74

118

19.7

66,998

294

17

2.8

87,541

32

135

22.5

154,539

146

75-84

48

8.0

38,504

208

6

1.0

59,902

17

54

9.0

98,406

91

85+

12

2.0

11,046

181

0

0.0

26,879

0

12

2.0

37,925

53

425

70.8

-

-

100

16.7

-

-

525

87.5

-

-

6487

1081.2

1,375,968

786

2119

353.2

1,448,096

244

8606

1434.3

2,824,064

508

Unknown
Total

*2005‐2010 average annual injured divided by millions of residents in the age group 
Source: Population data:  2005‐2009 American Community Survey 5‐Year Estimates 
Fatality data:  IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 

 
More importantly, there is a very dramatic decrease in injury crashes from the 20‐24 group to 
the 25‐34 group.  There is a 45 percent drop in the injury rate for all cyclists and a 52 percent 
drop for females. This is compelling evidence that countermeasures to reducing injury crashes 
need to focus on the young, targeting mainly those over ten years of age and increasing the 
focus as age increases until at least age 24.  Still, all cyclists would benefit from safety training 
and refreshers, regardless of age. 
Finally, the gender difference with relation to injury crashes is, again, rather striking. Females 
account for 24 percent of injuries from crashes but only 16 percent of the fatalities. There are 
more than three times as many injury crashes among males than females. The highest ratios 
are for cyclists over 55 years of age (Figure 4‐1). There are also above average ratios in the 10 – 
19 age group.  The major exception to this trend is in the high risk category, 20‐24.  In this age 
group the ratio is just under 2.0.  This suggests that while female cyclists have much lower 
injury crash rates, the 20‐24 age group may merit special attention in improving bicycle safety, 
for both males and females. 
 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

24 

 

Figure 4‐2 illustrates the relationship between male and female cyclist injury crash rates by age 
shown above in tabular form. There is generally a consistent pattern with males experiencing 
higher rates and numbers for each age group. There are, however, two age categories that 
seem out of step: 10‐14 and 45‐54 years.  In these two age groups, males have higher rates 
than the pattern implied by the shape of the line for female cyclists, and do not conform to 
steadily increasing and decreasing rates found for females. Lastly, both lines peak at 20‐24 
years of age. 
Figure 4‐1:   Ratio of male to female injury rates 
(Rate is injury per population in the age cohort, there is no data point for 85+  
since there were no injuries for females) 

 
Source: Prepared by the authors from IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 
Figure 4‐2:   Annual average injury crash rate per 100,000 residents 

 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

25 

 

Source: Prepared by the authors from IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 

4.2:   Education Level of Cyclists 
Education levels attained may also provide us with information regarding how we might 
develop crash countermeasures.  The CMAP Travel Tracker data suggest that there is an 
apparent relationship between educational attainment and cycling activity, but the sample sizes 
do not permit definitive analysis.  The positive association between (1) level of education 
attained and (2) the amount of cycling is consistent with the information in Chapter 8 that 
includes maps depicting the high number of crashes on the North Side of Chicago between the 
Kennedy Expressway and Lake Michigan.  This is an area replete with young professionals.   
 
 

 
 
 
 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

26 

 

 
Chapter 5:   Vehicles and Operators Involved in Bicycle Crashes 
In this chapter we examine the condition of vehicles, drivers and bicyclists at the time of the 
crash as well as hit‐and‐run statistics.  

5.1:   Alcohol and Bicycle Crashes 
High BAC of drivers involved in traffic fatalities has been a long‐standing problem. Nationally, 
the percentage of motor‐vehicle drivers exceeding the permitted BAC level of 0.08 has 
remained steady for over a decade (http://www.fars.nhtsa.dot.gov/Trends/TrendsAlcohol.aspx) 
at approximately 32 percent and accounted for over 10,000 fatalities in 2009. 
5.1.1:  Blood Alcohol Content of Motorists 
Of the 32 bicycle fatalities in our study period, only six motorists received a field sobriety test, 
and one refused to be tested.  Of these six, four had no alcohol in their system and two had 
positive results, but within the legal limit (Table 5‐1, using FARS as a data source). These two 
positive levels were 0.1 and 0.7, the latter being close to the legal limit.  
Table 5‐1:  Blood alcohol content of drivers involved in fatal bicycle crashes 
BAC level for drivers 
Frequency
(g/dL) 
BAC = 0 

 0.001< BAC <0.08 

 BAC > 0.08 

Test refused 

Test not offered 
22 
Total 
29 
                 Source: FARS 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

27 

 

Regarding injuries, the IDOT data report nearly 9,000 crash injuries,  but less than one percent 
were classified as having a driver impaired by alcohol or drugs, medicated or “had been 
drinking” (Table 5‐2).  Over 99 percent of motorists are identified as appearing “normal”, i.e., 
the contributing cause was not due to drug‐induced impairment.      
 
Table 5‐2:  Apparent physical condition of drivers in bicycle injury crashes 
Condition 
2005  2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Total Percent  Percent 
known 
Normal 
892  983 1283 1063 981 1101 6303 70.73%  99.24%
Impaired 
– 

4
5
4
4
6
28
0.31% 
0.44%
alcohol 
Impaired – drugs 

0
2
2
1
0
5
0.06% 
0.08%
 Illness 

0
2
0
0
0
2
0.02% 
0.03%
Asleep/fainted 

0
0
0
0
0
0
0.00% 
0.00%
Medicated 

0
1
0
0
0
1
0.01% 
0.02%
Had been 

2
2
0
2
1
8
0.09% 
0.13%
drinking 
Fatigued 

2
0
0
0
2
4
0.04% 
0.06%
Other/unknown 
347  406 499 444 403 461 2560 28.73% 

Total 
1245  1397 1794 1513 1391 1571 8911 100.00%  100.00%
Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 
5.1.2:  Blood Alcohol Content of Cyclists 
Of the 27 fatalities for which BAC is available (seven were not tested for alcohol), eight bicyclists 
showed measureable alcohol in their system (Table 5‐3).  Four of these had levels over 0.08, 
which is the legal limit for motor‐vehicle drivers in Illinois, or almost 15 percent of those who 
were tested. Two had levels of 0.06, just below the 0.8 level.  
 
Using 0.08 as a benchmark, the DUI percentage for bicyclists is 14.8 percent.    This compares to 
32 percent for motor‐vehicle fatalities in the U.S. and 35 percent in Illinois in 2009 
(http://www.census.gov/compendia/statab/cats/transportation/motor_vehicle_accidents_and
_fatalities.html).  Using a lower level of 0.06, the statistic rises to 22 percent for bicyclists. The 
percentage for bicyclists compared to motor‐vehicle operators may be lower in part due to the 
lack of age limit for bicycle use, unlike motor‐vehicle drivers who need to be at least 15 years of 
age. In Chicago, six cyclists under the legal driving age were killed in bicycle crashes. 
 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

28 

 

 
Table 5‐3:  Blood Alcohol Content of bicyclists in fatal crashes, 2005 to 2010 
BAC test result (g/dL) 
Frequency 
0.00 
19 
0.01 

0.02 

0.06 

0.11 

0.14 

0.18 

0.25 

Total 
27 
14.8 percent DUI among total tested bicyclists 
                       Source: FARS 
5.1.3:  Hit‐and‐Run Crashes 
Hit‐and‐run crashes continue to be a vexing problem for bicycle crashes (Figure 5‐1). They 
account for approximately a quarter of all fatalities and bicycle injury crashes. While these 
proportions may seem high, they are lower than in the case of pedestrian crashes. From 2005 
to 2009, 33 percent of the pedestrian injury crashes and 41 percent of the pedestrian fatalities 
were hit and run. 
Figure 5‐1:  Hit‐and‐run bicycle crashes, 2005 to 2010 

Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

29 

 

 
5.2:  Age and Gender of Motorists 
5.2.1:  Age of Motorists 
Over 60 percent of the drivers involved in fatal crashes were between 25 and 44 years of age 
(Table 5‐4).  Only one in four was over 44 years of age. Males accounted for approximately two 
thirds of the fatal crashes, and only in the 25 to 34 age group did female drivers outnumber 
male drivers.  

 

Table 5‐4:  Known age of driver involved in fatal crash 
Age 
Male  Female Total  Percent
15‐24 



11.1%
25‐34 



25.9%
35‐44 


10 
37.0%
45‐54 



11.1%
55‐64 



14.8%
65+ 



0.0%
  
19 

27 
 
                                                           Source:  FARS  

5.2.2:   Gender of Motorists Involved in Bicycle Crashes 
It is also informative to examine the gender 
mix of motor‐vehicle drivers involved in 
bicycle crashes.  Table 5‐5 shows that males 
comprise the majority of drivers involved in 
bicycle crashes.  They account for almost 
two‐thirds of the drivers involved in injury 
bicycle crashes.  This ratio seems to be 
constant over the six‐year study period.  
 
 
 
Table 5‐5:  Gender of drivers involved in bicycle injury crashes 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

30 

 

  

2005  2006  2007 2008 2009 2010

Total Percent   Percent 
known

Male  
Female  
Unknown 
Total 

635  703  880 752 670 801 4441
331  399  545 414 394 425 2508
279  295  369 347 327 345 1962
1245  1397  1794 1513 1391 1571 8911
Source:  IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 

49.84%  63.91%
28.14%  36.09%
22.02% 

100% 
100%

 

5.3:  Vehicle Type and Use 
Typical household vehicles, including 
passenger cars, SUVs and vans, 
account for approximately 90 percent 
of bicycle injury crashes (Table 5‐6). 
Buses account for another two 
percent.  Large vehicles such as buses 
and trucks may inflict serious damage, 
but together account for less than five 
percent of the injuries. We pursue this 
line of examination because the 
literature is replete with similar studies, such as the association between bicycle crashes, buses 
and taxis and their use (Pai, 2010). 
 
Table 5‐6:  Vehicle type involved in bicycle injury crashes 
 Vehicle  type  involved  in  2005  2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Total Percent   Percent 
bicycle injury crashes 
known
Passenger car 

880 

921 1167

980

937 1109

5994

71.45% 

74.16%

Sport utility vehicle (SUV) 

87 

91

122

120

130

165

715

8.52% 

8.85%

Van/mini‐van 

93 

100

103

82

83

106

567

6.76% 

7.02%

Pickup truck 

30 

41

40

45

38

54

248

2.96% 

3.07%

Bus  

25 

18

26

20

20

38

147

1.75% 

1.82%

Truck – single unit 

16 

14

26

18

14

9

97

1.16% 

1.20%

Tractor w/semi‐trailer 

3

3

4

5

8

27

0.32% 

0.33%

Motorcycle (over 150 cc) 

2

6

1

3

6

20

0.24% 

0.25%

Motor‐driven cycle 

0

1

3

3

1

8

0.10% 

0.10%

Tractor w/o semi‐trailer 

1

1

0

1

1

7

0.08% 

0.09%

Other vehicle with trailer

0

1

2

0

2

5

0.06% 

0.06%

All‐terrain vehicle (ATV) 

1

0

0

0

2

3

0.04% 

0.04%

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

31 

 

Other 

39 

40

51

40

35

39

244

2.91% 

3.02%

Unknown/NA 

40 

51

64

59

56

37

307

3.66% 

Total 

1219  1283 1611 1374 1325 1577

8389 100.00%  100.00%

Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 
The total number of injury crashes has 
fluctuated from year to year, but a few of the 
vehicle types show evidence of a trend over 
the study period.  During the last four‐year 
period, the number of single‐unit trucks 
involved in bicycle crashes has steadily 
declined. They decreased from 26 in 2007 to 
only nine in 2010. 
Increases have been registered by pick‐up 
trucks.  Though the increases are not steady, 
the rise in their involvement has been from 30 
in 2005 to 54 in 2010.  The most noticeable 
increase, however, has been with SUVs.  Figure 
5‐2 shows the rise from 87 in 2005 to 165 in 
2010.  Not only has there been an increase 
every year (modest in some years) but there 
has been almost a doubling in the number 
during the study period.   
 
Figure 5‐2:   Number of SUVs involved in bicycle crashes 
 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

32 

 

 
Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 
Table 5‐7 examines the role of motor vehicles more closely by noting the type of use during the 
injury crash.  As anticipated from the previous table, personal use is the most common vehicle 
use.  This is followed by taxis (together with other for‐hire vehicles). This group accounts for 
one in 12 bicycle crashes with injuries.  CTA buses, commercial vehicles and police all account 
for more than one percent of the crashes. 
Many of the individual uses shown in Table 5‐7 trend with the total number of bicycle injury 
crashes, making it difficult to identify their individual trends.  Police vehicles, however, show a 
steady decline since 2007.  The numbers have declined from 20 in 2007 to 12 in 2010, two years 
that had a high number of injury crashes, 1611 and 1577 respectively, showing little overall 
decrease in crashes. 
Table 5‐7:  Vehicle use during crash 
Type of use 
Not in use 
Personal 

2005  2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Total  Percent 
50 
810 

38

54

51

846 1084

885

Percent 
known 

50

296 

3.53% 

4.21%

855 1024

5504 

65.61% 

78.36%

53

Taxi/for hire 

80 

91

110

114

90

107

592 

7.06% 

8.43%

City bus 

19 

15

23

11

13

31

112 

1.34% 

1.59%

14

20

11

16

15

104 

1.24% 

1.48%

12 

13

20

17

14

12

88 

1.05% 

1.25%

4

6

9

1

9

37 

0.44% 

0.53%

Commercial – single unit 
Police 
Construction/maintenance 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

33 

 

Other transit 

3

4

7

6

9

33 

0.39% 

0.47%

Mass transit 

6

7

8

0

3

32 

0.38% 

0.46%

State owned 

2

0

2

3

3

12 

0.14% 

0.17%

School bus 

0

2

1

1

3

0.10% 

0.11%

Tow truck 

2

1

0

2

1

0.08% 

0.10%

Camper/RV  

3

0

0

0

1

0.06% 

0.07%

Fire 

0

2

0

1

0

0.05% 

0.06%

Driver education 

1

2

0

0

0

0.04% 

0.04%

Ambulance 

0

2

0

0

0

0.04% 

0.04%

House trailer 

1

0

0

1

0

0.02% 

0.03%

27 

33

39

35

33

36

203 

2.42% 

2.89%

187 

211

235

223

236

273

1365 

16.27% 

Other 
Unknown/NA 
Total 

1219  1283 1611 1374 1325 1577
Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 

 

8389  100.00%  100.00%

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

34 

 

 
5.4:  Driver and Vehicle Maneuvers 
In 24 of the 32 fatalities, the action taken by the motor‐vehicle driver is known. In half of these 
cases, the driver is reported to have contributed to the fatality by either failing to yield, driving 
too fast or engaging in an improper lane change (Table 5‐8).  In one‐third of the cases, there 
was no identified action and in another four cases the action was classified as “other”. 
Table 5‐8:  Driver action in fatal crashes, City of Chicago, 2005‐2010 
Driver action 
Frequency 
Percent known 
None 
Failed to yield 
Too fast for conditions 

8
10

33% 
42% 

1

4% 

Improper passing 
1
Other 
4
Unknown 
8
Total 
32
Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 

4% 
17% 
‐ 
100% 

 
 
Failure to yield right‐of‐way was also a 
major factor in approximately 40 
percent of the injury crashes (Table 5‐
9), similar to the trend shown for fatal 
crashes shown in the previous table. 
Improper actions associated with lane 
change, backing, passing, parking and 
turning are also contributors, but 
collectively account for approximately 
only five percent of the injury crashes. 
In just over a third of the crashes, the 
driver was not involved in a maneuver 
listed in Table 5‐9.  In essence, the 
driver maneuvers in both fatal and 
injury crashes are rather similar.  The 
difference may be attributed to the much larger data base of injury crashes that permits more 
detail regarding ‘other’ maneuvers.  
 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

35 

 

 

Driver action 

None 
Failed to yield 
Disregarded control 
devices 
Too fast for conditions 
Improper turn 
Wrong way/side 
Followed too closely 
Improper lane change 
Improper backing 
Improper passing 
Improper parking 
License restrictions 
Stopped school bus 
Emergency vehicle on 
call 
Evading police vehicle 
Other 
Unknown 
Total 

Table 5‐9:  Driver action in bicycle‐vehicle injury crashes 
2005  2006  2007 2008 2009 2010 Total Percent  

360 
357 
21 

390 
385 
38 

477
551
34

368
452
26

358
463
25


15 

12 
12 
13 




14 
23 

11 
10 
16 
10 



19
24
8
15
15
15
10
2
0
2
1

16
35
4
10
16
10
10
2
0
1
1

13
27
2
16
15
9
6
0
0
1
4

431 2384
525 2733
14
158
11
33
6
13
14
8
9
4
0
2
0

82
157
31
77
82
71
52
13
2
8
7



2
0
0
0
2
136  155  165 165
137 138
896
296  331  454 397
315 363 2156
1245  1397  1794 1513 1391 1571 8911
Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 

The motion or direction of the vehicle is given in 
Table 5‐10. The previous table (Table 5‐9) 
described the action of the driver.  According to 
available data, the motor vehicle was moving 
straight ahead in nearly all cases.  Both turning 
vehicles and entering traffic from parking each 
accounted for less than one percent of driver 
actions.    

Percent 
known 

26.75% 
30.67% 
1.77% 

35.29%
40.46%
2.34%

0.92% 
1.76% 
0.35% 
0.86% 
0.92% 
0.80% 
0.58% 
0.15% 
0.02% 
0.09% 
0.08% 

1.21%
2.32%
0.46%
1.14%
1.21%
1.05%
0.77%
0.19%
0.03%
0.12%
0.10%

0.02% 
0.03%
10.05%  13.26%
24.19% 

100.00%  100.00%

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

36 

 

 
Table 5‐10:  Vehicle maneuver prior to bicycle injury crashes 
Vehicle maneuver 
2005  2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Total  Percent 
Straight ahead 
Passing/overtaking 
Turning left 
Turning right 
Turning on red 
U‐turn 
Starting in traffic 
Slow/stop – left turn 
Slow/stop – right turn 
Slow/stop – 
load/unload 
Slow/stop in traffic 
Driving wrong way 
Changing lanes 
Enter traffic from 
parking 
Unknown/NA 
Total 

735 












803 1014
1
2
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
5
2
0
0
0
1
0
4

1
0
1
10

825
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
2
1

791
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
2

0
0
0
3

918 5086  56.81%
2
6  0.07%
1
3  0.03%
0
2  0.02%
0
1  0.01%
0
2  0.02%
0
1  0.01%
0
2  0.02%
1
16  0.18%
0
1  0.01%
0
0
0
3




24 

Percent 
known
98.81%
0.12%
0.06%
0.04%
0.02%
0.04%
0.02%
0.04%
0.31%
0.02%

0.01%
0.01%
0.01%
0.27%

0.02%
0.02%
0.02%
0.47%

501 
587 774 689 602 652 3805  42.50%
100%
1249  1402 1805 1521 1398 1577 8952 
Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 

5.5:  Dooring 
When a bicyclist runs into a motor‐vehicle 
door that is opened unexpectedly, it is 
known as a case of dooring.  We use the 
IDOT data on dooring starting with 2010; 
therefore the summaries reported below are 
for a relatively short period of time. It shows, 
however, that dooring is associated with 
disproportionately more Type B injuries 
(Table5‐11).  Adding Types A and B together 
shows the high degree of severe injuries 
common with dooring (Type C injuries are 
the least serious). 
 

100%

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

37 

 

(The photographs are through a rear view mirror). 
 
Table 5‐11:  All versus dooring bicycle crashes, by injury type 
Injury type  All non‐dooring crashes 
Dooring crashes 
Type A 
11% 
8% 
Type B 
51% 
61% 
Type C 
38% 
31% 
Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 2005‐2010 and IDOT Dooring Data 2010‐2011 

5.6:  Bicyclist Activity 
In this section we explore the actions of 
bicyclists and where the crash occurred.  
It concludes by examining the 
propensity to wear a helmet. 
5.6.1:  Bicyclist Action 
We first consider fatal crashes followed 
by injury crashes. Over 45 percent of 
the 32 fatalities occurred while 
bicyclists were moving in traffic.  In over 
one‐third (11) of the fatalities the cyclist 
was moving with the flow of traffic 
(Table 5‐12) and in only two cases was the cyclist moving against the flow. Signalized 
intersections represent a significant problem area. At signalized intersections where fatalities 
occurred, cyclists crossed against the signal in six of the cases, or 20 percent of the time. Lastly, 
left turns were the contributing factor in three of 32 fatalities.   
Table 5‐12:  Bicyclist action in fatal crashes, 2005‐2010 
Bicyclist action 
Fatalities Percent 
Percent  
known 
Turning left 

9.4%
10.3% 
Enter from drive/alley 

3.1%
3.5% 
Crossing – with signal 

6.3%
6.9% 
Crossing – against signal 

18.8%
20.7% 
Walking / Riding with traffic 
11 
34.4%
37.9% 
Walking / Riding against 

6.3%
6.9% 
traffic 
Playing in roadway 

3.1%
3.5% 
Other action 

9.4%
10.3% 
Unknown/NA 

9.4%
‐ 
Total 
32 
100%
100% 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

38 

 

Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 
 
Like fatal crashes, a similarly high percentage of injury crashes (50 percent) also occurred while 
the cyclist was moving in traffic (Table 5‐13 – percent known). Again, a similarly high proportion 
of these “in traffic” injuries occurred when moving against traffic, approximately 20 percent. 
The lack of exposure data make it impossible to know if this is disproportionate to actual traffic. 
Also, crossing at signalized intersections is the second highest contributor to bicycle crashes, 
accounting for 20 percent of the crashes.  In slightly more than one‐third of these crashes, the 
cyclist was crossing against the signal.  
 
 
Table 5‐13:  Bicyclist action in injury crashes 
Bicyclist action 
Injury type 
Total 



Turning left 
25 107
86
218 
Turning right 
15
46
40
101 
Enter from drive/alley 
33 209 147
389 
No action 
26 119 112
257 
Crossing – with signal 
91 505 372
968 
Crossing – against signal 
69 275 185
529 
Entering/Leaving/Crossing school bus 
0
0
1

(within 50ft) 
Entering/Leaving/Crossing parked vehicle 
1
13
9
23 
Entering/Leaving/Crossing not at 
13
52
38
103 
intersection 
Walking/Riding with traffic 
288 1624 1084 2996 
Walking/Riding against traffic 
94 374 296
764 
Walking/Riding to/from disabled vehicle 
0
6
2

Waiting for school bus 
0
2
3

Playing/working on vehicle 
0
1
1

Playing in roadway 
7
25
29
61 
Standing in roadway 
0
5
10
15 
Working in roadway 
0
1
4

Other action 
87 483 382
952 
Intoxicated  
2
10
8
20 
Unknown/NA 
176 658 658 1492 
Total 
927 4515 3465 8907 
Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 

Percent  Percent 
known 
2.45%  2.94%
1.13%  1.36%
4.37%  5.25%
2.89%  3.47%
10.87%  13.05%
5.94%  7.13%
0.01%  0.01%
0.26% 
1.16% 

0.31%
1.39%

33.64%  40.40%
8.58%  10.30%
0.09%  0.11%
0.06%  0.07%
0.02%  0.03%
0.68%  0.82%
0.17%  0.20%
0.06%  0.07%
10.69%  12.84%
0.22%  0.27%
16.75% 

100% 
100%

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

39 

 

 
5.6.2:   Bicyclist Location 
Over two‐thirds of fatalities occurred in roadways (Table 5‐14).  Next in frequency are crashes 
that occurred in a location where a crosswalk was not available. 
 
Table 5‐14:  Bicyclist location in fatal crashes, City of Chicago, 2005‐2010 
Bicyclist location 
Number Percentage
In roadway 

22 

68.8% 

In crosswalk 

9.4% 

Not in available 
crosswalk 
Crosswalk not available 

3.1% 

12.5% 

Driveway access 

3.1% 

Not in roadway 

3.1% 

Total 

32 

100% 

Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 
 
Injuries were also most prevalent in roadways, but the second most common location was in 
crosswalks (Table 5‐15).  Studies have shown that marked crosswalks are perceived by 
individuals as safe zones, and they may not be as attentive to motorists who are not fully 
engaged in driving. 
 
Table 5‐15:  Bicyclist location in bicycle injury crashes 
Bicyclist location 
Injury type 
Total  Percent 



In roadway 
604 2877 2052
5533 62.12% 
In crosswalk 
128 724
539
1391 15.62% 
Not in available crosswalk 
17
55
57
129
1.45% 
Crosswalk not available 
10
27
10
47
0.53% 
Driveway access 
10
78
93
181
2.03% 
Not in roadway 
22 127
103
252
2.83% 
Bikeway 
15 110
71
196
2.20% 
Unknown/NA 
121 517
540
1178 13.23% 
Total 
927 4515 3465
8907
100% 
Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 

Percent 
known 
71.59%
18.00%
1.67%
0.61%
2.34%
3.26%
2.54%

100%

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

40 

 

5.6.3:   Bicyclist Helmet Use 
One of the proven means of minimizing 
serious injuries from bicycle crashes is 
helmet use.  Among the 29 fatalities 
recorded between 2005 and 2009, only one 
cyclist is known to have used a helmet 
(Table 5‐16). Importantly, the reporting for 
the remaining 28 crashes was not conclusive 
as to whether a helmet was worn or not 
(recorded on crash reports as “none 
used/not applicable”). For this reason, 
conclusions regarding the true rate of 
helmet use in these crashes, or the impact 
on crash severity cannot be drawn from 
these data. 
 
Table 5‐16:  Helmet use, 2005 to 2009 
Helmet use 
Number Percent 
known 
None Used/Not Applicable 
26 
97% 
Used 
Unknown 
Total 

  1 
  2 
29 

  4% 
‐ 
100% 

Source: FARS ftp://ftp.nhtsa.dot.gov/fars/ 
However, national trauma data indicate that the percentage of incidents in which helmets are 
used has ranged from 22 to 24 percent (based on approximately 50,000 trauma incidents 
between 2007 and 2010). 
 

 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

41 

 

Chapter 6:   Environmental Factors and Road Conditions 
In this chapter we examine the relationship of bicycle crashes to environmental factors such as 
weather and light conditions. This is followed by a discussion of road conditions.  

6.1:  Environmental Factors during Crashes 
Previous research suggests that bicycle/motor‐vehicle crashes are associated with poorly‐lit 
streets, streets without medians and high speed limits.  We explore some of these points in this 
section. 
6.1.1:  Weather‐Related Factors 
Perhaps surprisingly, inclement 
weather does not seem to be a 
major contributor to bicycle 
crashes. This may be due to the fact 
that cycling levels are low during 
inclement weather; however, we 
have no exposure data (miles 
traveled in inclement weather) to 
assess how weather may 
disproportionately contribute to 
crashes. 
 
The great majority of injury and 
fatal crashes occurred in clear weather (Table 6‐1). Rain was present in less than ten percent of 
crashes, suggesting that bicycling predominantly occurs during good weather.   
 

Weather 
Clear 
Rain 
Snow 
Fog/smoke/haze 
Sleet/hail 
Severe cross wind 
Other 
Unknown 
Total 
 

Table 6‐1:  Weather conditions during bicycle crashes 
Fatal 
Injury crash type 
Injury  Percent 
crashes 
A
B
C total 
29  807
3932
2939
7678
86.65% 
2  93
320
252
665
7.50% 
  11
22
23
56
0.63% 
  20
91
69
180
2.03% 
 
4
8
12
24
0.27% 
 
1
3
3
7
0.08% 

6
30
10
46
0.52% 
  19
86
100
205
2.31% 
32  961
4492
3408
8861 100.00% 
Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 

Percent 
known
88.70%
7.68%
0.65%
2.08%
0.28%
0.08%
0.53%

100.00%

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

42 

 

 
6.1.2:  Light Conditions 
In addition to clear weather, the 
majority of bicycle crashes occurred 
during daylight hours, in nearly three 
of four crashes (Table 6‐2).   Most of 
the remaining crashes occurred 
during hours of darkness, but in 
locations where the roadway is 
lighted. This is the case in 18 percent 
of injury crashes and more than one‐ 
third of fatal crashes. In Chapter 7, 
the disproportionate number of fatal 
crashes in the evening hours is 
explored further. 
 
 
 

 
Table 6‐2:  Light conditions during bicycle crashes 
Light Conditions 
Injury crashes 
Injury crash type 
Total 
Injury 
percent 
A
B
C
Daylight 
635
3269
2479
6383
72.03% 
Dawn 
18
54
45
117
1.32% 
Dusk 
35
168
126
329
3.71% 
Darkness 
53
154
137
344
3.88% 
Darkness, lighted road 
209
794
566
1569
17.71% 
Unknown 
11
53
55
119
1.34% 
Total 
961
4492
3408
8861 100.00% 
Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 

Percent 
known 
73.02%
1.34%
3.76%
3.94%
17.95%

100.00%

Fatal 
crashes 
17 
 


11 

32 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

43 

 

 
6.1.3:  Weather‐Related Road Surface 
Expectedly, the data on road surfaces can be inferred from the findings relating to the weather 
data (Table 6‐3). Nearly 90 percent of crashes occurred when the road surface was dry and ten 
percent when it was wet.  Again, as expected, snow or slush was rarely the contributing factor. 
Table 6‐3:  Road surface conditions during bicycle crashes, 2005 ‐2010 
Road surface 
Fatal 
Injury crash type 
Injury
Injury  Percent 
total
percent 
known



Dry 
29  802 
3875
2878 7555
85.26% 
89.16%
Wet 
2  114 
415
322
851
9.60% 
10.04%
Snow or slush 
 

18
22
45
0.51% 
0.53%
Ice 
 

2
6
9
0.10% 
0.11%
Sand, mud, 
 

3
2
6
0.07% 
0.07%
dirt 
Other 
 

7
0
8
0.09% 
0.09%
Unknown 

37 
172
178
387
4.37% 

Total 
32  961 
4492
3408 8861 100.00%  100.00%
Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 

6.2:  Roadway Environment 
6.2.1:  Relation to Intersections 
Intersections represent a greater hazard 
to bicyclists compared to other roadway 
sections. Table 6‐4 shows that over half 
of both fatal and injury crashes occurred 
at intersections. The data reflect the 
nature of the Chicago street system, 
with many diagonal streets creating 
complex intersections. 
 
Intersection 
related 
Yes 
No 
Total 

Table 6‐4:  Bicycle injury crashes at intersections 
Fatal crashes 
Injury crash type 
Total  Percent 
Number 
Percent



18 
56.3%
541
2436
1836
4813 
54.3%
14 
43.8%
420
2056
1572
4048 
45.7%
32 
100%
961
4492
3408
8861 
100%
Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

44 

 

 
Intersections represent a potential hazard for all traffic, and particularly to bicycles and 
pedestrians. Map 6‐1 shows intersections that recorded at least ten crashes.  The vast majority 
of these intersections are located northwest of downtown Chicago.  Only one intersection is 
located south of the Loop and outside the greater downtown area, at Archer and Western. 
Map 6‐1:  Intersections with at least ten injury crashes 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 
 

 

The size of an intersection (geographic scope) is not fixed and varies by intersection design and 
complexity.  We, however, use the same size definition for all intersections. Specifically, if a 
crash occurs within 125 feet of the center point of the intersection, it is counted as an 
intersection crash.      
Table 6‐5 shows that none of the 12 intersections with the highest number of crashes are 
located in the immediate downtown area.  The intersection at Chicago and Halsted is the site 
closest to the Loop.   
The two intersections with the highest numbers of crashes are large, complex intersections 
where three major arterial roadways converge.  The highest number of intersection crashes 
occurs at the intersection of Damen, Fullerton and Elston Avenues, followed closely by the 
intersection of Chicago, Milwaukee and Ogden Avenues.  Many of the high‐crash intersections 
are associated with diagonal streets, including Milwaukee, Clybourn and Lincoln. The largest 
number of crashes at a non‐diagonal intersection is at Chicago and Halsted.  

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

45 

 

Crash 
count 

Table 6‐5:  Intersections with the greatest number of injury crashes 
N/S street 
E/W street 
Diagonal street / Avenue 
Community area 

20 
19 

Damen Ave 
n/a 

Fullerton Ave 
Chicago Ave 

17 
16 
16 
15 
15 
14 

Halsted St 
Lake Shore Dr 
California Ave 
Halsted St 
Damen Ave 
Damen Ave 

Chicago Ave 
Montrose Ave 
n/a 
Fullerton Ave 
North Ave 
Diversey Ave 

14 
14 
14 
14 
14 

n/a 
Ashland Ave 
Halsted St 
Damen Ave 
Clark St 

Elston Ave 
Milwaukee Ave& Ogden 
Ave 
n/a 
n/a 
Milwaukee Ave 
Lincoln Ave 
Milwaukee Ave 
Clybourn Ave 

Fullerton Ave 
Milwaukee Ave 
Cortland St 
n/a 
Armitage Ave 
n/a 
n/a 
Wicker Park Ave 
n/a 
Ridge Ave 
Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 

Logan Square 
West Town 
West Town 
Uptown 
Logan Square 
Lincoln Park 
West Town 
North Center/Lincoln 
Park 
Logan Square 
Logan Square 
Lincoln Park 
West Town 
Edgewater 

 
Map 6‐2 shows the 
locations of the high‐crash 
intersections more clearly. It 
is evident that the diagonal 
arterials account for the 
vast majority of crashes.  
This includes Milwaukee, 
Elston, Clybourn, Lincoln 
and Clark.  These are all 
important arterials radiating 
from downtown Chicago. 
Halsted is the major 
exception, followed by 
North Avenue. 
Among the intersections closest to downtown are at (1) Halsted and Madison and (2) Roosevelt 
and State.  They are not, however, in the list of the 12 highest crash intersections.  
 
 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

46 

 

Map 6‐2 Intersections with large number of injury crashes 

 
 

Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 
 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

47 

 

6.2.2:  Road Defects 
The road circumstances seem not to be an important element in bicycle crashes. No defects 
were reported in 97 percent of the crashes (Table 6‐6). Some of the defects listed in Table 6‐6 
are inevitable over the short term before maintenance crews can act, such as debris on the 
road. 
Road defects 
No defects 
Construction zone 
Maintenance zone 
Utility work zone 
Work zone – unknown 
Shoulders 
Rut, holes 
Worn surface 
Debris on roadway 
Other 
Unknown 
Total 

Table 6‐6:  Road defects 
Fatal 
Injury crash type 
Injury
total 



30 
864 4000
2770 7634
 0 
10
46
28
84

0
2
2
4

0
0
3
3
 0 
2
3
2
7

0
0
1
1

2
11
9
22

3
11
10
24

6
19
38
63

3
13
6
22

71
387
539
997
32 
961 4492
3408 8861
Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 

Injury 
percent 

Percent 
known 

86.15% 
0.95% 
0.05% 
0.03% 
0.08% 
0.01% 
0.25% 
0.27% 
0.71% 
0.25% 
11.25% 
100.00% 

97.08%
1.07%
0.05%
0.04%
0.09%
0.01%
0.28%
0.31%
0.80%
0.28%

100.00%

6.2.3:  Roadway Type and Number of Lanes 
Most fatal bicycle crashes occur on two‐way streets. Over 80 percent are on such streets (Table 
6‐7).  One‐way streets account for one in eight fatalities.  The lack of exposure data prevents us 
from assessing the degree to which one‐way streets are safer.   
Table 6‐7:  Location‐related factors for fatal bicycle crashes, 2005‐2010 
Roadway Type 
 Fatalities Percent 
Two way, Not divided 
10 
31.3% 
Two way, Divided, no median barrier 
11 
34.4% 
Two way, Divided w/median barrier 

15.6% 
One‐way or ramp 

12.5% 
Alley or driveway 

3.1% 
Other 

3.1% 
Total 
32 
100.00% 
Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 
 

Injury crashes tend to occur on the same roadway types as fatalities (Table 6‐8). The largest 
difference appears to be on two‐way divided streets with a median.  Only 6.2 percent of the 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

48 

 

injury crashes occur on these roadways in contrast to 15.6 percent of fatal crashes, more than 
twice as many. 
Roadway type 

Table 6‐8:  Roadway type 
Injury crash type 
Total 
Percent  Percent 
known 



282
1352
1028
2662  30.04%  32.44%
369
1713
1093
3175  35.83%  38.70%

Two‐way, Not Divided 
Two‐way, Divided, no median 
barrier 
Two‐way, Divided w/median 
63
269
180
barrier 
Two‐way, Center turn lane 
5
19
17
One‐way or ramp 
105
526
357
Alley or driveway 
41
230
182
Parking lot 
5
19
23
Other 
37
167
123
Unknown 
54
197
405
Total 
961
4492
3408
Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 

512 

5.78% 

6.24%

41 
0.46% 
0.50%
988  11.15%  12.04%
453 
5.11% 
5.52%
47 
0.53% 
0.57%
327 
3.69% 
3.99%
656 
7.40% 

8861  100.00%  100.00%

 

 
The data on number of lanes is 
not easily interpreted, since 
over half of the fatal crashes fall 
into the ‘not applicable’ 
category (51.7 percent). What 
stands out, however, as seen 
from Table 6‐9, is that 
approximately half of the non‐
intersection fatal crashes 
occurred on four‐lane facilities 
(24.1 percent of all crashes). 
Non‐fatal injury crashes are 
much more likely to occur on 
four‐lane streets.  Four‐lane 
facilities frequently have higher 
speed limits; therefore, speed may be a contributing factor to the high proportion of fatal 
crashes. 
 
 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

49 

 

Table 6‐9:  Number of travel lanes 
Total no. of travel  Fatal  Percent  Injury crash type 
Total 
lanes(both 
known 



directions) 
NA‐Used for 
15  51.7% 
183 781
636
1600
intersection 

4  13.8% 
121 675
558
1354

3  10.3% 
328 1632
1187
3147

 
 
30 102
73
205

7  24.1% 
189 775
570
1534

 
 
5
27
16
48

 
 
18
83
30
131

 
 
0
8
2
10

 
 
1
7
4
12

 
 
3
8
5
16
10+ 
 
 
3
0
1
4
Unknown 
3   
80 394
326
800
Total 
32 
100% 
961 4492
3408
8861
Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 

Percent 

Percent 
known 

18.06% 

19.85% 

15.28% 
35.52% 
2.31% 
17.31% 
0.54% 
1.48% 
0.11% 
0.14% 
0.18% 
0.05% 
9.03% 
100.00% 

16.80% 
39.04% 
2.54% 
19.03% 
0.60% 
1.63% 
0.12% 
0.15% 
0.20% 
0.05% 
‐ 
100.00%

 
6.2.4:  Roadway Classification 
In most urban areas, local streets account 
for over two‐thirds of roadway miles and 
serve primarily residential areas. 
Collectors account for generally less than 
ten percent of road miles and typically 
connect residential areas with higher‐
order roadways and commercial areas.  
Arterials usually account for one quarter 
of roadway miles but considerably more 
traffic.  
In Chicago, collectors and minor arterials 
account for the great majority of fatal 
and Type A bicycle crashes (Table 6‐10).  
Principal arterial and local roads show 
roughly equivalent numbers of these 
crashes. Trends from 2005 to 2010 are 
not immediately apparent, but from 2006 
to 2010 the number of fatal and Type A 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

50 

 

crashes show signs of decreasing. The same holds for principal arterials, down from 40 to 23, 
and for collectors, decreasing from 77 to 53. Fatal and Type A crashes on minor arterials have 
held steady over the last four years.        
Table 6‐10:  Fatal and Type A crashes by roadway classification 
Roadway class 

2005 

2006 

2007 

2008 

2009 

2010 

Total 

Percent 

Principal Arterial 

22 

40

37

25 

32

23

179 

18.0%

Minor Arterial 

32 

39

45

45 

43

46

250 

25.2%

Collector 

50 

77

61

68 

50

53

359 

36.2%

Local road or Street  

28 

35

32

26 

34

28

183 

18.4%

Interstate 

1

0

3

2

0.8%

Unknown 

1

3

5

2

14 

1.4%

134 

193

178

167 

167

154

993 

100.0%

Total 

Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 
Considering all crashes (Table 6‐11), minor arterials and collectors again dominate, but local 
streets have a higher percentage of the crashes than principal arterials.  Since local streets tend 
to have lower speeds, the crashes apparently are proportionately less serious. Subtracting 
Table 6‐10 data from Table 6‐11 yields Type B and Type C injuries.  These data show that local 
streets have 46 percent more Type B and C injury crashes than principal arterials, whereas fatal 
and Type A crashes were very similar, 183 versus 179.          
Table 6‐11:  All injury crashes by roadway classification 
Roadway class 

2005 

2006 

2007  2008  2009 

2010 

Total 

Percent 

Principal Arterial 

201 

197

264 

226

227

259

1374 

15.5%

Minor Arterial 

293 

346

447 

377

357

416

2236 

25.2%

Collector 

403 

501

654 

546

485

570

3159 

35.7%

Local road or Street  

323 

318

386 

328

282

293

1930 

21.8%

Interstate 

5

12

14

9

53 

0.6%

Unknown 

12 

18

22 

17

21

19

109 

1.2%

1236 

1385

1782  1506

1386

1566

8861 

100.0%

Total 

Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 
6.2.5:  Traffic Signal Control 
As seen in Table 6‐12, 50 percent of fatal bicycle crashes occurred at locations with no traffic 
signals.   About 34 percent of the crashes occurred at signalized locations and another nine 
percent occurred at stop signs.  Given the small number of fatal crashes versus the injury 
crashes, there are no noteworthy differences between Tables 6‐12 and 6‐13, i.e., the presence 
of traffic control devices seemed to be similar in fatal and injury crashes. A possible exception is 
lane‐use markings that accounted for six percent of the fatal crashes but less than one percent 
injury crashes. Still, this describes only two fatalities, which may have been an aberration. 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 
 

Table 6‐12:  Traffic control device at fatal crashes 
Traffic control device 
 Frequency 
Percent 
No controls 
16 
50.0% 
Traffic signal 
11 
34.4% 
Stop sign/flasher 

9.4% 
Lane‐use marking 

6.3% 
Total 
32 
100.0% 
Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 
Table 6‐13:  Traffic control device at injury crashes 
Traffic control device 
Injury crash type 
Total 
Percent  Percent 
known 



No controls 
468
2207
1665
4340 48.98%  50.37%
Traffic signal 
303
1316
956
2575 29.06%  29.89%
Stop sign/flasher 
148
760
596
1504 16.97%  17.46%
Yield 
3
16
14
33
0.37% 
0.38%
Police/flagman 
2
4
0
6
0.07% 
0.07%
Railroad crossing gate 
0
3
0
3
0.03% 
0.03%
Other Railroad crossing 
0
0
1
1
0.01% 
0.01%
School zone 
0
1
0
1
0.01% 
0.01%
No passing 
3
18
13
34
0.38% 
0.39%
Other regulatory sign 
2
4
4
10
0.11% 
0.12%
Other warning sign 
1
0
0
1
0.01% 
0.01%
Lane‐use marking 
4
33
17
54
0.61% 
0.63%
Other 
5
23
25
53
0.60% 
0.62%
Delineators (added in 
0
1
0
1
0.01% 
0.01%
2008) 
Unknown 
22
106
117
245
2.76% 

Total 
961
4492
3408
8861 100.00%  100.00%
Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 
 
The following table (Table 6‐14) shows the 
condition of the traffic control device during the 
crash.  In both fatal and injury crashes there were 
no control devices in half of the crashes. In places 
where there was a control device, it was 
improperly functioning in both fatal and injury 
crashes in about three percent of the cases. While 
this is a low percentage, it clearly needs to be 
addressed. 

51 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

52 

 

Table 6‐14:  Condition of traffic control device at fatal and injury crashes 
Traffic  Control  Device 
Fatal 
Injury Crash Type 
Total 
Percent 
Percent 
crash 
Known 
Condition 



No controls 
Not functioning 
Functioning improperly 
Functioning properly 
Worn reflective 
material 
Missing 
Other 
Unknown 
Total 

15 


15 

480
10
32
391
0

2265
43
158
1769
4

1706
36
106
1337
2

4451
89
296
3497
6


0
1
1
2

13
60
49
122

35
192
171
398
32 
961
4492 3408
8861
Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 

50.23% 
1.00% 
3.34% 
39.47% 
0.07% 

52.59%
1.05%
3.50%
41.32%
0.07%

0.02% 
0.02%
1.38% 
1.44%
4.49% 

100.00%  100.00%

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

53 

 

6.3:  Work Zones 
None of the 32 fatalities occurred in a work zone.  Only one percent of injury crashes occurred 
in work zones with the majority incurring Type B injuries (Table 6‐15).  There were also 12 
serious injury crashes (Type A) in work zones.  It is likely that cyclists are especially careful as 
they proceed into road conditions which are uncertain, commonly the case in work‐zone areas.   
Table 6‐15:  Injury crashes in work zones, 2005‐2010 

 

 

 
 
Work zones 
 
related 
 
Yes 
 
No  

Total 

Injury crash type 



12 
51 
35 
949 
4441 
3373 
961 
4492 
3408 

Total 

Percent 

98 
8763 
8861 

1.1% 
98.9% 
100.0% 

Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

54 

 
 

Chapter 7:   Temporal Distributions of Crashes 
Traffic safety patterns have seasonal and temporal variations, reflecting both levels of use as 
well as inherent risks that affect crash causation and severity. In this chapter, we consider such 
variations, in terms of quarter of the year, month, day of week and hour of day. 

7.1:  Crashes by Quarter 
Table 7‐1 shows that for the years 
considered, fatalities and injuries are 
highest during the third quarter. Since 
weather (temperature) tends to be a factor 
in biking, it is expected that this is the 
period with the highest level of biking 
activity.  Accordingly, the winter months of 
January to March have the lowest levels of 
injuries.  The fourth quarter has the second 
lowest followed by the second quarter. The 
number of fatalities tends to follow this 
pattern with the slight exception that the 
fourth quarter has one fewer fatality during 
the study period than the first quarter, yet the first quarter has the fewest injury crashes. 
 
Table 7‐1:  Bicycle injury crashes by calendar quarter in Chicago, 2005‐2010 
Quarter  Crashes  2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Average 

Injury  
67 117 134 100 119 117
109.0 
Jan‐Mar  Fatal 

0

2

1

1

0

1

0.8 

Injury 

345

442

524

491

390

485

446.2 

Apr‐Jun  Fatal  

2

2

0

3

3

1

1.8 

Injury 

614

598

803

710

626

684

672.5 

Jul‐Sept  Fatal  

3

3

2

0

1

3

2.0 

210

228

321

205

251

280

249.2 

2

0

0

1

1

0

0.7 

Injury  

Oct‐Dec  Fatal 
        
Total 

 

Injury 
Fatal 

1236 1385 1782 1506 1386 1566
7

7

3

5

5

Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 

5

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

55 

 

7.2:  Bicycle Crashes by Month 
The seasonal pattern of injury crashes is quite 
predictable.  Crashes are low in December through 
February, start building in March and increase 
almost linearly until July.  Injury crashes begin to 
decline rapidly from August until December.   
Type A injury crashes are the exception. Rather 
than peaking in July as Types B and C injury 
crashes, they peak in August. But the three injury 
types are very similar in that the months of 
December, January and February have few crashes.  
This implies that winter months have fewer cyclists.   
The annual pattern suggests that a natural division of the year into four quarters would include 
these three winter months ‐‐ December, January and February ‐ into one quarter, and the three 
summer months of June, July and August into another quarter.  The remaining three months 
before and after the winter months would constitute the other two quarters.  With this 
alignment of quarters, the autumn quarter of September, October and November has higher 
injury numbers than the spring quarter of March, April and May. This suggests that the inertia 
of cycling activity continues from the summer into the colder fall months, but is slow to start in 
the spring months.    
Figure 7‐1:   Injury crashes by month and injury type, 2005 to 2010 total 

 

 
Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

56 

 

While the monthly injury data reveals a 
pattern of increasing and then 
decreasing numbers, the low overall 
fatality figures cause the pattern to be 
less discernible (Figure7‐2). Again, 
perhaps due to the small number of 
winter bicyclists suggested in the 
previous table, it is not surprising that 
November and December have the 
fewest number of fatalities. Still, 
November is not among the four 
lowest injury‐crash months.  Likewise, 
the four fatalities in the first two 
months of the year, January and 
February, versus none in the last two 
months of the year, may have more to 
do with the small number of fatalities 
than with weather‐related factors.   
 
 
 
 
Figure 7‐2:   Fatal bicycle crashes by month, 2005‐2010 

 
Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

57 

 

7.3:  Crashes by Day of Week 
Regarding when during the week bicycle crashes occur, 
fatality patterns are somewhat different than injury 
crash patterns.  The main difference is on Sunday.  
Sundays are likely to be characterized by recreational 
cycling, and perhaps correspondingly they account for 
over one‐fifth of the fatalities. Indeed, it is the day with 
the largest number of fatalities (Figure 7‐3). The low 
number of injury crashes on Sundays further suggests 
that the fatality rates are unusually high.  Closer scrutiny 
shows that four of the seven Sunday fatalities occurred 
well after 8:00 pm or before 2:00 am, implying that 
darkness was a factor.  
Remarkably, Saturdays have less than half the number 
of fatalities than recorded on Sundays. Sundays deserve 
further consideration in establishing counter measures.   
Saturdays are tied with Mondays and Thursdays for the 
lowest number of fatalities. The injury data below suggest that these latter two days have the 
lowest weekday traffic levels.  In this regard, Mondays and Thursday, are in sync with the low 
number of fatalities and injury crashes (though Type C injuries are relatively high on Thursdays). 
Figure 7‐3:  Fatal bicycle crashes by day of week, 2005‐2010 

 
Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 
Injury crashes show more uniformity than fatalities over the days of the week (Figure 7‐4).  
Wednesdays and Fridays have the largest number of Type B injuries. Fridays show the highest 
number of Type A and Type C injury crashes. Collectively, Fridays have the highest total number 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

58 

 

of injury crashes. Conversely, Sundays have the lowest injuries of each of the three injury types, 
underscoring the anomalous fatality numbers of Sundays (though the small overall number of 
fatalities may be a factor). Mondays have the lowest weekday injury crashes for each of the 
three injury types.  Based on Type B injuries, bicycle traffic appears to build during the first 
three days of the week (Monday to Wednesday). 
Figure 7‐4:  Injury crashes by type of injury and day of week 
(the percentages sum to 100 over the seven‐day week for each injury type) 

 

Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 

 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

59 

 

7.4:  Time of Day 
The time of day is divided into five periods with the last one 
consisting of four hours. Hourly data are also presented to 
provide some detail.   
7.4.1:  Fatal Crashes by Time of Day 
While the number of injuries peaks earlier in the day, the 
number of fatalities continues to rise into evening hours. 
The highest total is in the 8:00 pm to midnight time 
interval, even though it is the only four hours in length. The 
other time periods in Figure 7‐5 are also divided into four 
hour increments. Due to the likelihood that there is less 
cycling late in the evening, the high number of fatalities 
warrants further study. 
 
 
 
Figure 7‐5:  Fatal bicycle crashes by time of day, 2005‐2010 

 
Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 
 
 
 
 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 
 

7.4.2:  Injury Crashes by Time of Day 
Crashes with injuries (Figure 7‐6) tend to reflect that same 
pattern as fatal crashes with the important exception that the 
8:00 pm – 12:00 am time period does not have the largest 
number of injury crashes, although it represents the largest 
share of fatality crashes. For each of the three injury types, the 
late night time slot has the third lowest number of injuries 
among the five time categories.  In essence, it falls into the 
median range.  This temporal distribution of crashes is very 
similar to the pattern in New York City, where more crashes 
occur between 3:00 pm and 8:00 pm than any other period 
(NYCDOT). 
Figure 7‐6:  Injury bicycle crashes by time of day, 2005‐2010 

Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data
7.4.3:  Dooring Crashes 
In large part, dooring incidents reflect the same time of day 
pattern as for all other injury crashes   (Figures 7‐6 and 7‐7).  
They grow during the course of the day and peak in the 
3:00 ‐ 8:00 pm time slot. This time period accounts for 
nearly half of all dooring crashes. This percentage, 45.7 
percent, is lower than for Type B and C crashes but higher 
than Type A crashes in Figure 7‐6. But in all four cases on 
Figure 7‐6 and 7‐7, the last time period, 8:00 pm to 
midnight, has the third highest proportion of crashes.         

60 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

61 

 

Figure 7‐7:  Dooring crashes, 2010‐2011 

 
Source: IDOT Dooring Data 2010‐2011 
 
7.4.4:  Fatal and Injury Crashes by Hour 
Given the late‐night differences 
cited above, more examination is 
merited.  We therefore present 
hourly data, initially for fatal and 
Type A data together, since 
graphing only 32 fatal crashes  over 
24 hours would not be very 
enlightening. Note that Figure 7‐5 
above depicts only fatal crashes; 
therefore it looks different than 
Figure 7‐8.   Figure 7‐8 shows that 
serious injury and fatal crashes 
seem to grow steadily from 4:00 
am and peak at 5:00‐6:00 pm (17 
on Figure 7‐8).  The sharpest rise runs from very early morning until 8:00 am, while the sharpest 
decline occurs after 9:00 pm.  The overall highest levels are from 2:00 pm until 9:00 pm.   
 
 
 
 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

62 

 

Figure 7‐8:  Fatal and Type A injury crashes by hour, 2005 to 2010 

Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 

 

 
 
 

An examination of only fatal 
crashes reveals that nine of the 
fatalities occurred from 8:00 pm 
to midnight, with two occurring 
each hour with one exception 
(three fatalities from 11:00 pm to 
midnight). The busy four‐hour 
cycling period from 3:00 pm to 
7:00 pm shows eight fatalities.  
Darkness may be a factor in the 
large number of fatal crashes after 
8:00 pm. 
 
 
 

The graph showing Type B and C injury crashes (Figure 7‐9) resembles in large part the previous 
graph (Figure 7‐8).  The most distinctive difference is the mini‐peak at 8:00 am on Figure 7‐9. 
Overall it is evident that the afternoon period has the highest numbers of crashes of all types. 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

63 

 

It is also again evident that evening hours have a disproportionate number of fatal and Type A 
injury crashes. On Figure 7‐8 the next three hours after the 5:00 – 6:00 pm peak all had very 
high numbers, not so on Figure 7‐9 (for less serious crashes).  
Figure 7‐9:  Type B and C injury crashes by hour, 2005 to 2010 

Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 

 

 

7.5:  Special Events 
Crashes during major holidays provides us with a unique opportunity to examine the spatial 
pattern of crashes when commercial and work‐trip related cycling is a much smaller part of 
bicycle travel.  We therefore selected July 4th as a day in which much of the cycling is largely for 
recreational and personal business purposes. 
Map 7‐1 shows the pattern for the six Fourth of July holidays from 2005 to 2010. On those days 
there were a total of 24 injury crashes. There were no fatal crashes on these six days.   It shows 
a pattern that is very different from other maps in this report.  
First, the crashes seem to be scattered throughout the city. Second, the largest ‘cluster’ is in the 
general vicinity of 71st Street and Ashland.  There are eight crashes here, counting the serious 
crash near 63rd and California (red dot).  This vicinity accounts for one‐third of the crashes.  
Third, there are very few crashes east of the Kennedy Expressway.  A large number of crashes 
occurred in this area over the six‐year period (see Map 8‐1). Fourth, there are no crashes in the 
Loop and only two in the Central Area, one to the north near Division and one to the south on 
Roosevelt. What is similar to other maps in this report, however, is the Milwaukee Avenue 
corridor. There are four crashes on Milwaukee with one serious crash plus three others in close 
proximity.  Milwaukee Avenue may then be one of the few all‐purpose arterials that services 
both daily and special‐occasion traffic. No other arterial stands out on Map 7‐1. 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

64 

 

Map 7‐1:  Bicycle injury crashes on the six Fourth of Julys from 2005 to 2010 

 
Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

65 

 

 
Chapter 8:   Spatial Distribution 
This chapter presents a series of maps depicting the spatial pattern of fatal and injury crashes.  

8.1:  Overall Spatial Distribution of Crashes 
During the six‐year study period there were 32 fatalities and 961 serious injury (Type A) 
crashes.  As is evident on Map 8‐1, most of these serious crashes were just north and northwest 
of the downtown area.   The number of crashes seems to continue north near Lake Michigan all 
the way to the northern boundary with Evanston at Howard Street. This finding is consistent 
with previous research on other cities that has found that crash frequency, severity and 
circumstances differed systematically in different parts of these cities (Loo, 2010). 
Map 8‐1:  Fatal and serious (Type A) injury crashes in City of Chicago, 2005‐2010 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

66 

 

Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 
There are scattered clusters on the West Side and few on the South Side.   The Hyde 
Park/University of Chicago neighborhood and the area along Archer Avenue appear to have a 
small cluster of crashes. As a whole, the South Side has relatively fewer serious crashes, though 
some of the void areas are industrial and generate few bicycle trips. 
All other injury crashes are shown in Map 8.2, including Type B – non‐incapacitating injuries and 
Type C – possible injuries.  The heavy concentrations are more difficult to see here versus the 
previous map.  Map 8‐2 better shows, however, the locations of land uses where bicycling is 
uncommon, such as O’Hare Airport, the far south Lake Calumet area and, to a lesser extent, the 
southwest industrial corridor and Midway Airport. It again displays a high concentration of 
crashes in the downtown area. 
Map 8‐2:  Type B and C injury crashes in City of Chicago, 2005‐2010 
 

 

Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

67 

 
 

8.2:  Chicago Community Areas 
Map 8‐3 shows the pattern of fatal and Type A crashes by community area (see Map 8‐4 for 
community‐area names). As above, the distribution of fatal and Type A crashes shows a large 
number of crashes in the community areas north of the downtown area. 
 
Map 8‐3:  Fatalities and Type A injury crashes, 2005‐2010 

 

Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

68 

 

In interpreting this map 
it is important to note 
that populations have 
shifted since these 
community‐area 
boundaries were 
drawn. There are four 
community areas on 
the North Side each 
with populations over 
80,000, and six on the 
South Side each with 
fewer than 10,000 
residents. 
There has also been a 
population shift in the 
downtown area during 
the study period.  From 
2000 to 2010, the Loop 
and the three adjacent 
community areas had a combined population increase of approximately 41,000 residents at a 
time that the rest of the city experienced a drop of 240,000 residents. 
Considering the underlying population data, Map 8.3 expectedly shows that there are six near 
North Side community areas that have 34 percent of the fatal and serious crashes (Table 8.1). 
These six community areas account for 333 of these crashes, or more than one‐third of the city 
total of 961. But it is estimated that the six community areas also account for 40 percent of the 
bicycle miles traveled by Chicago residents (CMAP, Travel Tracker Survey).  
 
Table 8‐1:  Bicycle crashes and miles cycled in six community areas with the most crashes 
(by crash location; miles by place of residence) 

Bicycle crashes  000s 
miles/
Fatal + 
Total
day 
Type A 
Total of six highest CCAs 
333 
3206
129 
City total 
976 
8740
320 
Six CCAs as percent of city total 
34% 
37%  40% 
Source: 2007 CMAP Travel Tracker data and IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data.  
Community area (CCA) 

The miles traveled are calculated estimates by the authors using publically available files. 

 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

69 

 

The Loop, with 35 crashes, could be added 
as a seventh community area to the six in 
the previous paragraph, but its main 
reason for exclusion is its small population 
base and high bicycle traffic volumes.  Still, 
the highest category needs to be defined at 
some value (over 45 on Map 8‐3) and there 
may always be community areas that could 
be on the other side of the dividing line 
(category definition). This needs to be 
considered in interpreting the data on Map 
8.3, where the highest category is over 35, 
as well as other maps. Specifically, some 
areas have small numbers of crashes either 
because they are small in area or less 
visually obvious; they have few residents or 
few traffic generators.  Moreover, some areas experience heavy through traffic that is not 
attributable to the land use or density within the area. 
Map 8.3 also shows a concentric pattern on the north side.  As the distance from the downtown 
increases, the number of serious crashes declines. This concentric pattern extends farther north 
along the lake and northwest in contrast to the west.    

 
 
 
 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

70 

 

8.2.1:  Highest and Lowest Number of Bicycle Crashes 
The community areas with the highest number of crashes are displayed in Table 8‐2. The data in 
the ‘fatal’ and ‘Type A’ columns of Table 8‐2 are shown on Map 8‐3 and the percent of all 
bicycle crashes in the community area that fall into these two categories is given in the last 
column of Table 8‐2. Note that most of the percentages are close to ten percent (see Map 8‐4 
for community area names).  This ten‐percent level is relatively low in contrast to community 
areas with lower levels of cycling. 
 
Table 8‐2:  Fifteen community areas with the highest number of injury crashes 
No.  Community area 
Fatal



Total 
Percent 
fatal + A 
24 

West Town 

72 

387 

300 

761 

9.72% 

Near North Side 

51 

287 

217 

557 

9.52% 

22 

Logan Square 

50 

277 

215 

546 

9.89% 

Lincoln Park 

59 

241 

182 

482 

12.24% 

Lake View 

47 

229 

193 

469 

10.02% 

28 

Near West Side 

46 

197 

148 

391 

11.76% 

32 

Loop 

35 

190 

106 

331 

10.57% 

Uptown 

29 

127 

108 

264 

10.98% 

25 

Austin 

18 

116 

91 

227 

8.81% 

23 

Humboldt Park 

31 

95 

67 

193 

16.06% 

19 

Belmont Cragin 

19 

85 

88 

192 

9.90% 

77 

Edgewater 

20 

85 

83 

188 

10.64% 

15 

Portage Park 

18 

92 

68 

178 

10.11% 

21 

Avondale 

16 

83 

76 

176 

9.66% 

Rogers Park 

17 

85 

73 

175 

9.71% 

Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 

 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

71 

 

Table 8‐3 shows the number of crashes for the 15 community areas with the lowest number of 
crashes.  Collectively they have 237 crashes.  This total is considerably less than the highest 
values for individual community areas at the top of Table 8‐2.  Each of the top three community 
areas in Table 8‐2 has over 500 bicycle crashes. 
 
Table 8‐3:  15 community areas with the lowest number of injury crashes 
No.  Community area 
Fatal



Total 
Percent 
fatal + A 
52 

East Side 

20 

25 

0.00% 

62 

West Elsdon 

12 

10 

25 

12.00% 

Edison Park 

13 

23 

13.04% 

18 

Montclare 

10 

23 

17.39% 

45 

Avalon Park 

11 

23 

17.39% 

48 

Calumet Heights 

11 

21 

9.52% 

74 

Mount Greenwood 

20 

20.00% 

51 

South Deering 

10 

17 

17.65% 

37 

Fuller Park 

13 

0.00% 

76 

O’Hare 

13 

15.38% 

55 

Hegewisch 

11 

27.27% 

36 

Oakland 

14.29% 

50 

Pullman 

14.29% 

47 

Burnside 

16.67% 

54 

Riverdale 

0.00% 

Source:  IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 
 
 
The percentage of the crashes that are either 
fatal or have serious injuries (Type A), however, is 
considerably higher in Table 8‐3 than Table 8‐2.   
Three community areas (Table 8‐3) have no 
crashes that are either fatal or Type A; therefore 
the percentage is zero. Still, many of the 
percentages hover around 15 percent, higher 
than on Table 8.2.  Some of the high percentages 
may be attributable to small values, but 
collectively they show that in these areas, where 
there are few crashes, high proportions tend to 
be either serious or fatal.   
 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

72 

 

8.2.2:  Per Capita Crashes: Mapped by Community Areas 
Given the discussion on variable population levels in each community area, from less than 
3,000 to almost 100,000, it would be useful to examine maps that show per population 
patterns.  Map 8‐4 shows the cumulative number of fatalities and Type A bicycle crashes from 
2005 to 2010 divided by the 2010 population per community area.  In this regard it is not an 
annual figure but rather more akin to an index that shows the pattern of highest per capita 
crashes.    
 
 
Map 8‐4:  Fatalities and Type A crashes from 2005‐2010 per 2010 population 

 
Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 
The pattern on Map 8‐4 resembles Map 8‐3 with several noteworthy differences, at least one in 
presentation. Specifically, in Map 8‐4 the data are divided into five equal quintiles; each 
category has approximately 15 community areas.  On Map 8‐4 the categories are chosen by the 
mapping system searching for natural breaks in the data. 
 
Map 8‐4 shows that many of the areas that have large numbers of bicycle crashes (Maps 8‐1 
and 8‐2) also have high per capita numbers. West Englewood on the South Side is an area with 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

73 

 

high crashes per capita. Also, Jefferson Park stands out on the far Northwest Side.  It is a 
transportation hub with numerous Chicago Transit Authority (CTA) and Pace bus lines 
converging on a CTA station, with a well‐used protected bicycle rack (see photo on page 70).      
 
The map of all Type B and C crashes (Map 8‐5) shows two distinctions from Map 8‐4 of the fatal 
and Type A crashes.  First, the highest category reaches from the Loop all the way to the 
northern city limits.  Second, in the southern part of the city there are proportionately few Type 
B and C injury crashes.  
Map 8‐5:  Type B and C crashes from 2005‐2010 per 2010 population 

 
Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 

8.3:  Hotspots 
There are several concentrations of bicycle crashes through the city.  These are places where 
there are unusually high numbers of crashes that warrant further examination to ascertain the 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

74 

 

proper counter measures to reduce crashes.  Map 8‐6 identifies the locations of many of these 
clusters and they are called hotspots.   
The hotspots are calculated by first mapping the locations of the crashes. These places are 
shaded in light blue against the dark blue background.  At each crash site the system searches a 
radius of one‐half mile, and as it identifies additional crashes, the color changes initially to light 
Map 8‐6:  All injury crashes hotspots 

Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 

 

green, yellow, orange and finally to red, signalizing an increasing number of crashes within the 
search radius.  On Map 8‐6 we use a search of all injury crashes within a radius of one‐half mile, 
but in the Chicago Loop, where there is a high concentration of crashes, we use a radius of one‐ 
eighth mile.       

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

75 

 

Map 8‐6 shows graphically what we have seen on previous tables and maps.  The downtown 
area stands out as do several diagonal corridors.  Milwaukee Avenue is most prominent, but 
parts of Elston, Clybourn, Clark and Lincoln are also hotspots.   
Map 8‐7 is similar to Map 8‐6 but displays only the hotspots for fatal and Type A injury crashes.  
Again the downtown area and Milwaukee Avenue stand out as does Lincoln Avenue, especially 
where it begins to converge with Clark Street. 
Map 8‐7:  Fatal and Type A injury crash hotspots 
 

Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 

 

 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

76 

 

8.4:  Major Crash Corridors 
In addition to the map of intersections with high numbers of crashes and hotspot areas, dot 
maps of individual crashes are informative.  Map 8‐8 shows that there are almost a continuous 
series of sites that have experienced bicycle crashes.  These are shown on a map that ranges 
from Grand on the south to Belmont on the north and west to east from approximately Kedzie 
to Halsted. Damen (north‐south street in the middle of the map) and Milwaukee Avenues have 
particularly high concentrations of crashes.  Similarly, Halsted has a large number of crashes, 
but the density is lower.     
Map 8‐8:  Major arterials of injury crashes 
(Type B injuries are large blue dots and Type C injuries are small red dots) 

 

 

Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 

 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

77 

 

 
8.5:  Major Arterial Hotspots 
Other than the concentrations of crashes at intersections (55 percent), there may be street 
segments that have high numbers of crashes. Map 8‐9 depicts those street segments that have 
the greatest concentrations of crashes not associated with intersections. Milwaukee and Clark 
appear to have the highest linear densities of crashes though the highest overall area is in 
downtown Chicago and the immediate area to the north.  
Map 8‐9:  Non‐intersection injury crashes 

 
Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 

 
8.6:  Dooring Crashes 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

78 

 

Some arterials are more prone to dooring crashes than others.  Since we do not have exposure 
data, we use the number of injury crashes as a surrogate.  On this scale, arterials such as 
Milwaukee, Clark and Halsted have the highest levels of bicycle activity.  Milwaukee and Clark 
also have the highest number of dooring crashes, but Lincoln has almost twice as many dooring 
crashes as Halsted, even though it has less than half as many overall bicycle crashes. We 
therefore present a ratio of dooring to all bicycle crashes.    
In this ratio, Lincoln has the highest value, 6.0, followed by Clark and Milwaukee. Other arterials 
with high values are Armitage, Damen and Belmont.  Conversely, lowest ratios among the ten 
arterials with the highest number of bicycle crashes are found on Fullerton, Chicago, Western 
and Ashland.  These are relatively wide arterials.  More study, however, is suggested to identify 
some of the underlying reasons for these differences, such as parking rates and densities.   
Table 8‐4:  Dooring crashes compared to all injury crashes by major arterials, 2010 
There exists double counting since intersection injury crashes are attributed to more than one arterial. 
Arterial 
Fatalities 
Injury 
Dooring  Ratio* 
crashes 
Milwaukee 
Halsted 
Clark 
Western 
Ashland 
Damen 
North 
Fullerton 
Chicago 
Division 
Diversey 
Belmont 
Lincoln 
California 
Kedzie 
State 
Grand 
Elston 
Lake Shore 
Irving Park 
Armitage 
Cicero 


834 
33 

715 
11 

658 
28 

590 


520 


509 
19 

494 


454 


428 


367 


350 


332 
12 

331 
20 

319 


302 


294 


277 


255 


255 


241 


238 


225 

*(Dooring x 100/Injury crashes) 

4.0 
1.5 
4.3 
0.8 
0.8 
3.7 
1.4 
0.2 
0.5 
1.9 
1.1 
3.6 
6.0 
1.6 
2.0 
2.0 
0.7 
0.0 
0.0 
1.7 
3.8 
0.0 

Source: IDOT Dooring Data 2010‐2011 and IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data, 2005‐2010 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

79 

 

 
8.7:  Land Uses near Crash Locations 
In this section, we explore the association between bicycle crashes and land uses. 
8.7.1:  Schools and Universities 
 

In assessing whether there may be an unusual problem in the vicinity of schools, we searched 
for crashes in close proximity to schools during the beginning and the end of the school day. We 
have selected the period 7:00 am to 9:00 am for the beginning of school and 1:00 pm to 4:00 
pm as the period associated with dismissal.  We have also selected a quarter‐mile radius around 
the school as the primary target area. 
For high schools, we have included bicycle crashes that fit the above criteria for riders aged 15 
to 18. The result is Map 8‐10.  It shows the locations of these crashes and lists the three high 
schools with three such crashes and another 12 with two crashes each.   The high schools that 
have three crashes are scattered across the city with one each on the north, west and south 
sides.  In general, the distribution of crashes on Map 8‐10 shows more crashes on the northern 
periphery of the city than previous maps. 
Map 8‐10:  High school vicinities with injury crashes 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

80 

 

Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 

 

 

For primary schools, we use the age group 5 to 14.  There are far more primary schools than 
high schools in Chicago, and more potential areas for analysis.  Indeed, Map 8‐11 shows a 
scattering of hotspots throughout the city.  Of all the maps presented in this report, this seems 
to display the greatest balance across the study area.  There are few overwhelming pockets 
though we will focus in the next paragraph on a cluster on the far west side.  This balance 
implies two things.  First, the problem is uniform across the city, not just primarily in one 
region.  Second, it suggests that young residents throughout the city are becoming bicycle 
riders, which could translate to more bicycle traffic throughout the city in the future.   
 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Map 8‐11:  Primary school hotspots 

81 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

82 

 

Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A closer examination of the far West 
Side shows that the area between 

 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

83 

 

Madison and Ogden at Central Park is a problem area (Map 8‐12). Perhaps expectedly, since the 
bicyclists in this case are young, the crashes are predominantly on neighborhood streets.  There 
are two diagonal arterials on this map, Grand and Ogden, and neither seems to represent 
problem arterials.       
 
Map 8‐12:  Primary school hotspots in the far west side 

Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 
 

 
 
8.7.2:  Central Business District 
The Chicago downtown clearly has a large number of bicycle crashes. Many of these are on 
north‐south streets from Michigan Avenue to Wells including State, Dearborn, Clark and LaSalle 
(Map 8‐13). Outside the Loop, Halsted also has a large number of crashes.  

 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

84 

 

Madison is one of the few east‐west arterials with a large number of crashes. Just north of the 
Loop, Grand Avenue and Kinzie Street also are evident on Map 8‐13.  Beyond this immediate 
downtown area Chicago and Milwaukee Avenues appear prominently.    
Map 8‐13:  Downtown Type B and C injury 
crashes

 
Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 
 
8.7.3:  Residential – Non‐Central Business District 
Community areas from Rogers Park to the Near North Side, including Edgewater, Uptown, Lake 
View and Lincoln Park, have a considerably high level of bicycling and bicycle crashes (Map 8‐
14). Clark Street is a major north‐south arterial that tends to parallel the lake and has an 
unusually high concentration of crashes especially near the south end. 
 
Map 8‐14:  North Side Type B and C injury crashes 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

85 

 

Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 

 

 

The University of Chicago/Hyde Park area is one of the few areas on the southern half of the 
city that has a substantial number of crashes.  Map 8‐15 shows the Type B and C injury crashes. 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

86 

 

Many are on 55th and 57th Street in and near the university.  There are also a large number of 
crashes on Dorchester, a north‐south arterial east of Woodlawn (street name not shown on 
Map 8‐15).      
 
Map 8‐15:  Hyde Park / University of Chicago area Type B and C injury crashes 

Source: IDOT Motor Vehicle Crash Data 
 

Chapter 9:   Summary and Limitations of the Study 

 

 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

87 

 

This section reviews the major findings of this study.  It also discusses the principal limitations. 

9.1:  Study Summary 
The findings in this report are important since cycling is growing in popularity nationwide, and 
Chicago remains a leading cycling community among the largest cities.  Chicago has a higher 
mode share of bicycle commuters than Los Angeles or New York City. It also has a lower fatality 
rate than these two cities. Nevertheless, there is room for further growth in bicycle use and 
bicycle safety.  Among seven peer cities, both Seattle and Philadelphia have a higher bicycle 
modes share among commuters. There are also more bicycle commuters in San Francisco and 
Portland.   Also, there are five times as many commuters walking to work versus bicycle use in 
Chicago.  In many other places the ratio is much smaller, and in Portland, Oregon there are 
more commuters using bicycles than walking to work.  Walking to work is an indication of the 
proximity to places of work and a surrogate for the feasibility of bicycling to work. 
The main finding in this report is that while the number of bicycle crashes in Chicago has risen, 
the level of bicycling has increased at a greater pace.  In this millennium, the number of bicycle 
commuters has more than doubled, while during the six‐year study period the number of 
bicycle fatalities has increased, but declined since 2007, the peak year of bicycle crashes.  Given 
the sharp rise in cycling, the fact that the number of injury crashes has increased but only 
modestly is also a positive development. Still, any increase in crashes requires attention.  
Another positive sign is that alcohol is much less of a problem associated with bicycle crashes 
than with motor‐vehicle crashes.     
At the same time, there are a few areas of concern.  Intersections account for over half of 
bicycle crashes. Roadway design features hold promise in mitigating this problem. The evening 
hours are associated with a disproportionate number of fatalities. Better visibility and better 
awareness among drivers would help this situation. A lack of helmet use continues to be a 
factor in the severity of bicycle crashes.  While only one of the cyclists involved in fatal crashes 
are known to have worn a helmet, crash reports record are numerous ‘unknowns’, making 
analysis of this data difficult. However, national trauma data show that only about a quarter of 
their bicycle‐crash patients wore a helmet.  

9.2:  Limitations 
The main limitation of the study is the unavailability of data. IDOT’s crash data are very useful 
and extensive source of information that we have used throughout this study.  As complete as 
it is, it only includes data on bicycle crashes with motor vehicles.  They does not include 
information on crashes with other bicyclists or pedestrians (i.e. on bike paths) nor on crashes 
with stationary objects. This has led us to examine the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB). 
While the trauma data are useful, the dataset includes information only from participating 
hospitals and without location identifiers for those hospitals. Hence, we were only able to do a 
national scan of trauma registries without being able to infer trends for the City of Chicago 
specifically. 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

88 

 

Also, crash data are most useful when there is a comparable data set that includes exposure 
information.  The Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning collected household travel 
information in 2007 that includes over 550 bicycle trips in the City of Chicago.  These data have 
been remarkably useful, even though they were collected for regional travel demand modeling 
purposes and had numerous objectives, not just to collect information on bicycling levels.   
Ideally, a larger data source would be available in the future. 
 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

89 

 

 

Technical Appendix A: Data and Study Area 
A.1:  Data 
The analysis presented in this report used two types of data: (A) safety data and (B) travel trend 
and exposure data. 
Safety Data: We analyzed four sources of secondary sources of information on safety: 


Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT) Motor Vehicle Crash Data, 2005 to 2010;  
Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT) dooring data, 2010‐2011; 
National  Highway  Traffic  Safety  Administration’s  (NHTSA)  Fatality  Analysis  Reporting 
System (FARS), 2005 to 2009; 
 American College of Surgeons’ National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB), 2005‐2010). 
 
The primary data source used in this study is the IDOT motor‐vehicle “crash file”.  These data 
include bicycle crashes that occur on roadways shared with motor vehicles.  Therefore, crashes 
that occur on bicycle trails or single‐bicycle crashes that occur from falls or hitting obstructions 
are not included in the analysis based on this data. The dataset is composed of police reports. 
In examining the six‐year study period,  we have focused on fatal crashes involving bicyclists 
and crashes involving three levels of injury crashes (Types A,B and C). We have not examined 
bicycle crashes leading to property damage. We have analyzed fatal and injury crashes involving 
cyclists by the spatial distribution and characteristics of communities and neighborhoods, 
location of crashes, time of day and year, weather conditions and trends over time. Results 
have been disaggregated by sociodemographics such as age and gender and by crash 
characteristics (type of crash, level of injury).  
We have compared trends in the City of Chicago to those in a number of other areas. These 
include Cook County, the state of Illinois, peer cities which most resemble Chicago in size and 
character and the U.S. as a whole. For 2010 and 2011, we were able to analyze dooring 
information compiled by IDOT. In order to contextualize bicycle fatalities in the City of Chicago 
to national trends and also to obtain greater details on fatalities that occurred in the city that 
are not available from the IDOT data, we used the FARS data.  
As noted above, the safety data do not include crashes on bike paths, single‐bicycle crashes 
with stationary objects or pedestrian‐bicycle crashes. In order to obtain information on injuries 
resulting from these types of safety events and also to understand helmet wearing behavior to 
a greater extent, we analyzed trauma data from the American College of Surgeons’ National 
Trauma Data Bank. The NTDB contains trauma registry data from participating trauma centers 
on an annual basis, and it is important to note that the data are not of all persons admitted to 
hospitals. At the time of writing this report, we were not able to obtain the location identifiers 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

90 

 

of the hospitals in the dataset. Hence, we have analyzed the trauma data at the national level 
only.  
Travel Trend and Exposure Data. We have also developed a limited amount of exposure data 
for the purpose of estimating relative risk.  The following sources were used to estimate 
exposures: 



U.S. Census Bureau, Decennial Census (Census 2010), 
U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey (ACS 2005 to 2010), 
National Household Travel Survey (NHTS 2009) and 
Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning’s (CMAP), Travel Tracker Survey (TTS  2007). 
 
The Census Bureau data provides population figures and commuting mode shares.  The ACS 
provides, in addition to population, annual data on bicycle use in the journey to work, thereby 
giving us the ability to track trends. 
We have also extensively used the Travel Tracker Survey conducted by the Chicago 
Metropolitan Agency for Planning, the Metropolitan Planning Organization for northeastern 
Illinois.  This survey includes data from approximately 10,500 households in northeastern  
Illinois. It provides daily travel diaries and information on approximately 550 bicycle trips made 
in Chicago, regardless of trip purpose.  Collected from January of 2007 to March of 2008, the 
dataset is frequently known as the Travel Tracker Survey, and includes information on trip 
origins and destinations and well as on the characteristics of the traveler. 

A.2:  Study Area and Peer Cities 
The analysis presented in this report pertains only to the City of Chicago.  
While in some studies the term city is ambiguous and sometimes 
includes suburban areas, the focus of this study is entirely on the area 
within the Chicago city limits. In this context, it is important to note that 
there is no national standard on the scope of city limits.  Places like 
Boston, San Francisco and Miami are less than one quarter of the size of 
Chicago (in square miles), while places like Oklahoma City, Houston, 
Phoenix, Jacksonville and Los Angeles are more than twice the area of 
Chicago. In Florida, Jacksonville is more than 20 times larger than Miami 
in land area, but the Miami metropolitan population is more than four 
times greater.  These distinctions need to be considered in making 
comparisons with other cities and selecting peer cities. 
Our selection of peer cities includes the following criteria (1) population 
greater 500,000; (2) density greater than 5,000 residents per square 
mile; (3) at least 17 percent of the commuters use public transit, bicycle 
or walk to work; and (4) the area of the city is at least 75 square miles. 
For peer cities, therefore, we include the city size (square miles) in the 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

91 

 

list of criteria, since several cities are particularly small and encompass only the high density 
core.  San Francisco, Boston and Miami are all less than 50 square miles.  Since Chicago is 227 
square miles, a comparison with Boston or Miami would not be particularly meaningful.  A 
more appropriate comparison with these cities would be with the core area of Chicago, but the 
definition of such an area is likely to be arbitrary.   
The area size criterion is 
applied because small 
cities tend to be of high 
density, therefore having 
disproportionately higher 
bicycle mode share rates 
in their core areas. As the 
area increases, the 
number of cyclists 
increases but the share 
declines.  For example, 
Washington, D.C. has a 
bicycle commuting mode 
share of 3.1 percent, 
considerably higher than 
the 1.3 percent in Chicago. 
But D.C.’s metropolitan 
share is only 0.54 percent, 
actually lower than the 
Chicago metropolitan 
figure of 0.61 percent. 
Also, both Boston and San Francisco have higher population densities than Chicago due to their 
small areas, though the inner City of Chicago certainly has much higher density than the entire 
city as a whole.    
No definition of peer cities meets all situations.  San Francisco is not 
one of our peer cities, nor is it among the twelve largest U.S. cities, 
but it has approximately the same number of bicycle commuters as 
Chicago.  The same is true for Portland, Oregon. Portland is a 
unique place in many regards. It is the only city among the 50 
largest that has more bicycle commuters than those that walk to 
work. Hence, there are frequently limitations to comparisons with 
other ‘large’ cities.     
 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

92 

 

The point that bicycling varies by region in the metropolitan area can be seen using CMAP’s 
Travel Tracker data (Table A‐1). The City of Chicago and suburban Cook County are each divided 
into three zones. The central area of the City of Chicago extends from Hyde Park on the south 
to Lincoln Park and Lakeview in the north and to Humboldt Park and North Lawndale (adjacent 
to Cicero Avenue) on the west. Since it covers about one‐third of the city, the central area 
covers more than just the core area. Moreover, central Chicago as defined is larger in area than 
Boston, San Francisco or Miami. 
 
The table shows that central Chicago, with a two percent bicycle mode share, has a much 
higher rate of bicycle use than other parts of the region.  ‘North Chicago’ also has a high share 
(1.5 percent) while the southern part of the city has a lower share (0.1 percent).  Thus, using a 
small core area yields a higher mode share than the entire city. 
 
 
Table A‐1:  CMAP’s Travel Tracker Survey mode share for selected modes 
 

Walk 

Bike 

Driver

Passenger
 

CTA 
bus 

CTA 
train 

Para‐ 
transit 

School
bus 

Central Chicago 

26.4% 

2.0% 

33.3%

20.0%

10.9%

4.6%

0.1% 

0.3%

North Chicago 

15.3% 

44.2%

24.4%

6.9%

5.2%

0.0% 

0.9%

South Chicago 

13.2% 

41.1%

27.5%

11.3%

3.1%

0.2% 

0.7%

North Cook 
County 
West Cook 
County 
South Cook 
County 
Metro Region 

8.3% 

1.5% 
0.1% 
1.4% 

59.3%

25.3%

0.6%

1.0%

0.0% 

1.9%

11.0% 

0.9% 

53.0%

27.0%

1.3%

2.4%

0.0% 

1.7%

6.7% 

0.5% 

59.2%

26.6%

0.5%

0.8%

0.1% 

2.5%

10.4% 
26.5
3.3
1.8
0.0% 
1.8%
1.0%  53.0%
Source: Chicago Regional Household Travel Inventory Mode Choice and Trip Purpose for the 
2008 and 1990 Surveys, CMAP, June 2010

 
 
 
 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

93 

 

 
Technical Appendix B: Background‐‐Bicycling Safety Trends and Literature 
B.1:  Benefits of Bicycling 
Bicycling has the potential to provide several health and environmental benefits, in addition to 
its intrinsic recreational value. Physical activity is considered to be a critical ingredient in 
reducing the risk of poor health outcomes such as heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure 
and improving obesity levels and healthy bones, muscles and joints (U.S. Department of Health 
and Human Services, 1996). In the U.S, an estimated 25 percent of all adults are not active at all 
and nearly half of young people aged 12‐21 are not vigorously active on a regular basis (Centers 
for Disease Control, 2011). Although recent research has focused on the trade‐offs associated 
with these benefits versus individual adverse health effects such as higher exposure to air 
pollution and risk of a traffic accident (for example, see de Hartog, et al, 2010), the overall 
opportunity for moderate to vigorous activity together with the ability to accomplish travel 
objectives make bicycling an important and sustainable instrument to achieve health goals.  
Non‐motorized modes of transportation also offer significant potential to reduce the negative 
externalities associated with motorized travel such as traffic congestion and its associated 
societal costs such as air pollution and Green House Gas (GHG) emissions. In addition, cycling 
can reduce the out‐of‐pocket costs associated with motor‐vehicle travel and provides an 
alternative to motor vehicles for those types of trips for which there are no public 
transportation options and where the distances are too great to walk. While the economic 
value of time savings and travel reliability may outweigh the benefits of cycling in certain travel 
markets, in other travel markets, such as those requiring shorter trips, cycling may make 
considerable economic sense. In the U.S., the average bicycle trip was 2.26 miles in 2009, 
compared to 9.75 miles for all trips (National Household Travel Survey, 2009). Fuel 
consumption and emission rates on a per vehicle‐mile basis are much higher for the first few 
miles of driving when vehicle engines are cold, a phenomenon known as cold starts; reductions 
in the number of short vehicle trips by diverting to cycling and walking are most likely to lead to 
the largest emission reduction benefits on a per mile basis.  These factors point to the 
importance of considering strategies to make cycling an integrated part of a larger multimodal 
passenger transportation network, consisting of walking, bicycling and on‐demand shared 
green compact and ultra‐compact vehicles (for example, for car‐sharing and station cars) 
opportunities and feeding modes by means of which these transportation options can be used 
with public transportation. 
Due to its potential to expand options for low‐cost and healthy personal transportation and to 
improve broader societal and environmental outcomes, policy interest in promoting bicycling as 
a mode of transportation has increased substantially in the last two decades in the U.S. The 
Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 was particularly responsible for 
bringing visibility to non‐motorized modes of transportation. The 1994 U.S. Department of 
Transportation Strategic Plan explicitly drew attention to considering cycling and walking needs 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

94 

 

in designing transportation facilities. However, benefits are only a part of the overall stimulus 
for “people‐powered” transportation modes; as the amount of bicycling increases, a significant 
factor motivating these policy activities is safety. 

B.2:  Overall Transportation Safety Trends 
In 2009, nearly half of all road deaths worldwide were among vulnerable road users—
pedestrians, cyclists and motorcyclists (World Health Organization, 2009). However, overall 
safety levels vary due to a number of conditions. One factor explaining aggregate safety levels is 
“exposure” – that as more people drive in a society, injury and fatality risks to drivers and 
motor‐vehicle occupants increases. However, the WHO reported that as countries motorize 
from high levels of non‐motorized modes, the risks to vulnerable users initially increase and 
then level off. In a similar fashion, it may be speculated that as highly motorized travel 
environment become more non‐motorized, with greater numbers of persons cycling and 
walking, risks to such users increase at first, but that such risks decline over time. However, it is 
too early, in many ways, to concretely deduce any trends. One aspect of this trend was recently 
speculated by Jacobsen (2003), who analyzed the relationship between two different measures 
(injuries per capita and fatalities per capita) in diverse U.S. and European settings ranging from 
specific intersections to cities and countries. He reported that collision rates involving bicyclists 
and pedestrians share a negative, non‐linear relationship with increases in usage levels. As 
walking and bicycling increase, crashes with motor vehicles are less likely because there is 
“safety in numbers”. One explanation for these trends is behavioral changes on the part of 
motorists, bicyclists and pedestrians that lead to reduced conflict situations; the other 
explanation is that as the number of users within a mode increase, policy and design 
interventions are taken, which, in turn, improves safety levels. 
Worldwide, traffic fatalities have exhibited a decreasing trend. The U.S. is no exception and has 
also experienced decreasing levels of fatalities. However, motor‐vehicle crashes remain the 
leading cause of death, accounting for 23 percent of accidental deaths in 2007, which is the 
fifth leading cause of death (Xu, et al, 2010). Traffic fatalities reached a high of 54,589 deaths in 
1972, although, in terms of total miles traveled, the relative risks have been almost 
continuously decreasing since records were kept on vehicle miles traveled in 1921. A total of 
32,885 traffic fatalities were recorded in 2010. Overall, the 2010 estimate represents over 24 
percent decline in traffic fatalities from 2005. This is despite the fact that the U.S. population 
grew over four percent during this time and total vehicle miles driven increased (albeit at a 
slower rate compared to historical growth rates due to the economic recession) from an 
estimated 2,989,480 million miles in December 2005 to 2,999,970 million miles in 2010. Injury 
levels (severe to minor) declined as well ‐ by about 17 percent. 
B.2.1:  Trends in Bicycle Safety 
In 2009, only one percent of all trips nationwide were bicycle trips, although this estimate is a 
considerable increase from 0.7 percent in 1990. Yet, close to two percent of all on‐road 
fatalities were bicyclists and 2.3 percent of all traffic injuries in 2009 were experienced by 
bicyclists. The fatality rate per 100 million bicycle trips in 2009 is estimated to be 15.4, while the 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

95 

 

injury rate per 100 million bicycle trips is 1,250. While there is no reliable current estimate of 
bicycle miles traveled nationally, using 2009 bicycle person miles traveled from the NHTS as a 
proxy for bicycle miles traveled, the fatality rate per 100 million miles bicycled is estimated to 
be 7.0 while the injury rate is 570. These rates are higher than those for motor vehicles and 
pedestrians, but less than motorcycles.  
During the period 2005 and 2010, a total of 4,219 bicyclists were killed nationally. Bicyclist 
fatality levels appear to be declining as well, with 784 bicyclist fatalities in 2005 nationally and 
618 in 2010, representing a drop of about 21 percent. This is a lower rate of improvement 
compared to fatalities in all modes. Close to two percent of all traffic fatalities are bicyclist 
fatalities. However, the numbers of persons sustaining injuries during this timeframe increased 
by over 13 percent and injured bicyclists have remained at over two percent of all persons 
injured in traffic crashes since 2008. 
The personal, social and economic consequences of fatalities and injuries in bicycle crashes, as 
in the case of crashes involving any other mode, is staggering. The costs of road traffic crashes 
as a proportion of Gross National Product (GNP) was found to be approximately 2.0–2.3 
percent of the GNP in the U.S. (Blincoe et al. 2002; Elvik 2000).  A recent study, based on 2005 
data, estimated the costs (on medical spending and due to productivity losses) associated with 
fatal and injury bicyclist crashes to be $5.4 billion, with fatal bicycle crashes costing more than 
$1 billion (Naumann, et al. 2010). Bicyclists included riders of unicycles, bicycles, tricycles, and 
mountain bikes who were killed or injured as a result of a collision, loss of control, crash, or 
some other event involving a moving vehicle or pedestrian. Motor‐vehicle‐related fatal and 
nonfatal injury costs exceeded $99 billion in total. Reflecting overall usage levels and crash 
involvement rates, costs associated with motor‐vehicle occupant fatal and nonfatal injuries 
accounted for 71 percent ($70 billion) of all motor‐vehicle‐related costs, followed by costs 
associated with motorcyclists ($12 billion), pedestrians ($10 billion), and bicyclists ($5 billion). 
Perceptions of safety risks are a deterrent to bicycling and individual attitudes and perceptions 
have been found to play a significant role in the decision to bicycle (Sener, et al, 2009). These 
include perceptions of safety from crashes, perceptions of safety from crime, exercise habits 
and an overall perception of bicycle facilities (Rietveld, et al, 2004).  Neighborhoods where 
individuals perceive a higher safety risk have lower physical activity levels and lower bicycling 
levels (Boslaugh, et al, 2004).The results of a survey of a representative sample of 9,616 U.S. 
residents 16 and older indicated that more than one in ten bicyclists (13 percent) felt 
threatened for their personal safety on the most recent day they rode their bicycle in the past 
30 days (Royal and Miller‐Steiger, 2008). Close to 88 percent of bicyclists feeling unsafe while 
bicycling felt threatened by motorists, 37 percent due to uneven roadway surfaces or 
walkways, and 17 percent for perceptions of crime and four percent because they felt that 
there was not enough space to bicycle.  
Numerous other factors including topography, land‐use patterns, climate, bicycle facilities and 
facility quality, and bicycle amenities (such as showers at work sites and bicycle racks on buses) 
affect the decision to bike; for a comprehensive review, see Sener, et al, (2009). Additionally, 
residents of low density‐single residential neighborhoods are more likely to perceive their 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

96 

 

neighborhood as dangerous for bicyclists, although compact, mixed‐use neighborhoods exhibit 
higher crash rates (Cho, et al, 2009).  Crane (2007) found that women place a higher value on 
safety. Safety countermeasures, together with other design, education, enforcement and 
planning approaches, should be an integral aspect of overall strategies to promote biking. 
B.2.2:  Chicago‐Area Trends in Bicycling and Bicycle Crashes 
As indicated earlier, non‐motorized transportation modes such as biking and walking have 
made significant recent gains in usage.  Nationally, close to one percent of all trips reported for 
all trip purposes (work, shopping, social trips) were by bike (NHTS, 2009). Another source of 
data, the Census Journey‐to‐Work data, shows that bicycling to work has increased from 0.4 
percent of work trips by all modes in 2000 to 0.53 percent in 2010 (U.S. Census Bureau, 2010). 
The total number of bicycle trips increased from 1.7 billion annual trips in 2001 to four billion 
reported trips in 2009 (NHTS, 2009).  
The City of Chicago has also enjoyed resurgence in bicycling and by several indicators, increases 
in cycling in the city has been greater than in nationwide increases.  Commuting to work by 
bicycle has increased from just under 6,000 daily trips in 2000 to over 15,000 in 2010. However, 
bicycles are used for other trip purposes as well. Only about 15 percent of all cycle trips are for 
work or work‐related purposes in the city (CMAP’s TTS, 2007). Bicycles are used predominantly 
for social, civic or recreational trips as well as for shopping and running errands. The average 
trip distance covered by bicyclists in 2007 in Chicago was 2.11 miles and 75 percent of all trips 
were less than 2.75 miles. Trip duration was an average of 22.9 minutes. Males are more than 
twice as likely to bike in the city as females. 
Between 2005 and 2010, a total of 1,021 persons were killed in the City of Chicago in all crashes 
that involved motor vehicles. Fatalities declined 32 percent in the city during this period, with 
191 persons killed in 2005 and 128 in 2010. The total number of persons injured in crashes in 
the city declined, as in the national case, from 25,831 in 2005 to 19,865 in 2010 (a decrease of 
about 23 percent). During the same period, 32 bicyclists were killed in the City of Chicago; with 
seven fatalities in 2005 to five in 2010. In terms of injured bicyclists, the numbers have, in 
contrast to all crashes by all modes, actually increased from 1,236 in 2005 to 1,566 in 2010, 
with a high of 1,782 in 2007. 

B.3:  Risk Factors to Bicycling: A Review of the Safety Literature 
In this section, we review the literature on bicycle safety with the objective of understanding 
risk factors towards the development of future countermeasures. The bicycle safety literature 
can be grouped into five broad categories given in Table B‐1. These studies attempt to improve 
our understanding of the causes, dynamics, risk factors and severity of bicycle crashes. Other 
aspects of the literature focus on comparative studies and assessment of the quality of 
information on the basis of which crashes can be better understood. One line of research 
focuses on safety countermeasures and ways to evaluate the effectiveness of the 
countermeasures in alleviating risk. The five categories are given in Table B‐1. 
 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

97 

 

Research category 

 
Table B‐1:  Bicycle crash literature categories 
Description

Bicycle crash causation and 
crash risk 

Studies  of  the  dynamics  of  bicycle  crashes,  risk  factors 
contributing  to  crash  involvement,  methods  to  estimate 
exposure to risk and risk‐based fatality and injury estimation 

Bicycle crash severity and 
effects 

Analysis  of  determinants  of  crash  severity,  type  of  trauma,  the 
extent of injury and survival trends 

Comparative studies 

Studies  of  policy,  planning  and  action‐oriented  implications 
based  on  studies  of  bicycle  facilities,  use  patterns  and 
supporting policies in an international context 

Data and information 
systems 

Studies assessing gaps in information systems to study universe 
of bicycle crashes and safety hazards to bicyclists 

Bicycle crash 
countermeasures and their 
evaluation 

Infrastructure,  design  and  control  to  improve  safety,  education 
and enforcement strategies, models of institutional partnership 
and  coordination,  methods  to  evaluate  effectiveness  of 
countermeasures based on safety criteria 

 
B.3.1:  Crash Causation and Crash Risk 
A voluminous amount of research has examined different aspects of bicycle crash causes and 
factors that elevate the risk of bicycle crashes. Broadly speaking, this area encompasses three 
types of research: studies of the dynamics of the crash (in Section B.3.1.1), factors that elevate 
risk factors (in Section B.3.1.2) and exposure‐based risk estimation (B.3.1.3).  
B.3.1.1:  Dynamics of Bicycle Crashes 
Studies of the dynamics of bicycle crashes identify the chain of events (pre‐crash, crash and 
post‐crash) in the crash. The analysis of the actions of bicyclists (motorists, pedestrians and 
other human elements present at the time of the crash).  The role played by the equipment, 
vehicles and the overall (road, traffic control and bicyclist) environment in which the crash 
occurred and the interaction of these different elements, can improve understanding of how 
and why a crash occurred.  
Bicycle crashes with motor‐vehicles occur most commonly on road intersections and not 
surprisingly, have generated the greatest amount of research (Hunter et al., 1995; Summala et 
al., 1996; Thom and Clayton, 1992; Räsänen and Summala, 1998, 2000; Stone and Broughton, 
2003; Herslund and Jorgensen, 2003; Wang and Nihan, 2004; Walker, 2005; Helsand Orozova‐
Bekkevold, 2007; Daniels et al., 2008, 2009). Such crashes generally exhibit complex dynamics 
and the interplay of behavioral and physical factors. The crashes are most often the result of 
infringement into the motorist or bicyclist right‐of‐way (ROW). Factors which have been found 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

98 

 

to be important include loss of control, failure to slow down or stop on the part of the motorist 
in making turns in the presence of cyclists, misunderstanding of the intention of or unjustified 
expectations of the actions of the other party, failure to detect the other party (motorist or 
cyclist), inability to realize potential danger and lack of time to react.   
For example, Rasanen and Summala (1998), in an analysis of 188 bicycle motor‐vehicle crashes 
in four cities in Finland found that in 37 percent of collisions, neither driver nor cyclist realized 
the danger or had time to yield. In the remaining collisions, the driver (27 percent), the cyclist 
(24 percent) or both (12 percent) took some type of action to avert the crash. The authors 
identified two common mechanisms underlying the crashes: first, allocation of attention such 
that the presence of other road users were not detected, and second, unjustified expectations 
about the behavior of others. The most frequent accident type among collisions between 
cyclists and cars at bicycle crossings was a driver turning right and a bicycle coming from the 
driver’s right along a cycle track.  Drivers tend to look left for cars during the critical phase and 
only 11 percent of drivers noticed the cyclist before impact. However, 68 percent of cyclists 
noticed the driver before the crash, and 92 percent of those who noticed believed the driver 
would give way as required by law.  
Non‐intersection crashes, namely, same‐direction crashes such as those incurred when a motor 
vehicle overtakes a bicyclist or a rear‐end crash which occur when a driver hits a cyclist from 
behind, have received relatively lesser attention, compared to intersection crashes. Motorist 
behaviors are deemed to be responsible for most rear‐end crashes as these are cases of the 
vehicle following the bicycle too closely (Cross and Fisher, 1977), especially at night when the 
majority of rear‐end crashes occur and due to poor conspicuity of the bicyclist due to 
inadequate reflective clothing, bicycle tail lights or poor street lighting (Wood, et al, 2009; Pai, 
et al, 2010).  Crashes that occur due to overtaking in non‐intersection roadway stretches have 
been found to lead to more injurious crashes and higher fatality levels, as the motor vehicle is 
likely to have higher speeds mid‐segment compared to intersections, where the vehicle has to 
slow down to turn (Stone and Broughton, 2003; Pai, et al, 2010).  
The “looked‐but‐failed‐to‐see” crashes (Herslund and Jorgensen, 2003), where motor‐vehicle 
drivers report looking in the direction of the bicyclist but not seeing or perceiving her/his 
presence was well‐researched in the 1990’s, well before the current focus on distracted driver 
safety studies. The authors in this case concluded that inappropriate visual focus and lack of 
reaction to stimuli outside visual focus, perception failure and failures in visual search strategies 
in an otherwise familiar travel environment, contributed to the “looked‐but‐failed‐to‐see” 
crashes. Another aspect of crash dynamics critical to bicyclist safety is driver response to 
bicyclist detection and recognition. The responses examined are reaction times (Mathews, 
1980), detection times (Owens 1994) and recognition times (Muttart, 2000). Associated 
outcomes examined are detection distances or distance from when the bicyclist is detected to 
when the bicyclist is reached (Blomberg, 1986, Moberly, 2001), recognition distance, i.e., 
distances from when the bicyclist is recognized to when reached (Bolk, 2008) and frequency of 
recognition (Zwahlen, 1997; Owens 2007).  

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

99 

 

More recently, the effect of driver distraction has been a cause for concern relating to crashes, 
particularly as cell phone use for voice calls or text messaging is on the rise. Studies have shown 
that the use of cell phones has a direct impact on the driver’s perception‐reaction time, 
experiences of “inattention blindness” and “cognitive distraction” and problems staying in lanes 
(National Safety Council, 2010).  Based on the NHTSA’s National Occupant Protection Use 
Survey (NOPUS), the NSC (2009) estimated that 11 percent of drivers during any daylight 
moment are talking on a cell phone. In 2008, an estimated 200,000 crashes involved texting or 
e‐mailing, versus 1.4 million crashes involved talking on cell phones (NSC, 2009). To date, there 
has been no scientific study on the effects of distraction on bicyclist safety. Most legal bans on 
cell phone use while driving or bicycling do not extend to hands‐free devices. 
Overall, crashes with motor vehicles have been reported to be responsible for a relatively small 
fraction of all events leading to bicyclist injuries as determined from hospital and trauma data 
(for example, Siman‐Tov, 2012, reported that 30 percent of 5529 injured bicyclists in Israel 
involved a motor vehicle, and Babul, et al, 2010 reported a remarkably similar number – 34 
percent, based on 300 bicycle cases in Toronto and Vancouver in Canada).  
One category of non‐motor‐vehicle, bicycle crashes leading to injuries in significant numbers is 
single‐vehicle (or single‐bicycle) crashes. Falling off a bicycle, hitting an obstacle on the road‐
side, leaving the road, poor vehicle handling and hazardous conditions (due to uneven road 
surfaces) can also result in (serious) injury. It has been noted that relatively little scientific 
research has been done in this area (Wegman, et al, 2012) but hospital records indicate that 
they constitute a large share of total bicyclist injuries (for example, Schepers, 2008; Siman‐Tov, 
2012). Another category of non‐motor‐vehicle crashes with pedestrians. For example, Pucher 
and Buehler (), in a study of six Canadian cities, found that a “widespread” safety problem is 
crashes with pedestrians caused by illegal cycling on sidewalks and failure to give way to 
pedestrians in crosswalks.  
Crashes involving bicyclists striking open motor‐vehicle doors of parked cars (called “dooring”) 
is an example of bicycle crashes that do not involve moving vehicles. As reported by Pai, et al. 
(2011), “Collision impacts resulting from first contact with the door (thereby causing cyclists to 
tumble) and/or second contact with the ground can be devastating, especially to unhelmeted 
bicyclists”. There appears to be a dearth of peer‐reviewed published materials on this subject 
as well and the dooring crash rates may well vary between areas (for example, Babul, et al, 
2011 noted that the odds of being doored were greater for Toronto cyclists than Vancouver 
cyclists). Dennerlien and Meeker (2002) describes a sample of 100 Boston bicycle messengers 
who reported that 29 percent of the collisions they experienced were due to dooring. Pai 
(2011) reported that the probability of dooring crashes increases in roadways with lower 
speeds (less than 40 mph), one‐way streets and during nighttime.  
B.3.1.2:  Risk Factors Contributing to Crash Involvement 
Another stream of literature within the context of crash causation is on risk factors. Studies of 
risk factors focus on those human/sociodemographic (gender, age, income), environmental 
(nighttime, daytime, weather), infrastructure (roadway design and use, presence of bicycle 
lanes and sidewalks, parking, traffic control), risk‐taking behavior among motorists and risk‐

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

100 

 

taking behavior among bicyclists (not wearing helmets, use of lights at night, conspicuous or 
reflective clothing, disobeying traffic rules, cycling under the influence) that influence bicycle 
crash involvement. In contrast to studies of crash dynamics which analyzes characteristics of 
crashes, risk factor studies identify those elements that, overall, are likely to increase the 
likelihood of being involved in a crash. 
B.3.1.2.1:  Human and Socio‐demographic Risk Factors 
Children account for the majority of all bicycle injuries likely due to their inexperience and risky 
riding behaviors (Yeung et al., 2009; Lee et al., 2009; Rosenkranz and Sheridan, 2003). More 
severe injuries and fatalities related to bicycling are higher for adults. Most of these occur as a 
result of collisions with motor vehicles (Rosenkranz and Sheridan, 2003; Yeung et al., 2009). 
Reports by NHTSA show that during the past 10 years, there has been a steady increase in the 
average age of both cyclists killed and those injured. Cyclists ages 25 to 64 have made up an 
increasing proportion of all cyclist deaths since 2000. The proportion of cyclist fatalities among 
those ages 25 to 64 was 1.2 times higher in 2009 as in 2000 (64 percent and 52 percent, 
respectively). Those under 16 years of age accounted for 13 percent of all cyclists killed and 20 
percent of all those injured in traffic crashes in 2009 (NHTSA, 2009). Maring and van Schagen 
(1990) pointed out that even though age by itself was not the causal factor, age was strongly 
associated with variables such as perceptual‐motor speed and cognitive development that are 
relevant to a crash situation. Most of the cyclists killed or injured in 2009 were males (87 
percent and 80 percent, respectively). The cyclist fatality rate per capita was seven times higher 
for males than for females, and the injury rate per capita was more than four times higher for 
males. These trends are likely to partly reflect use patterns. 
Some studies on risk factors use an ecological framework. The ecological design is characterized 
by its consideration of differences between groups rather than individuals (Walter, 1991), 
where the groups can be defined by place (multiple group design), by time (time trend design), 
or by a combination of the above. In the bicycle safety literature, a number of studies have 
utilized the ecological framework; for example, several authors have examined the effect of 
wearing bicycle helmets as an intervention in preventing bicycle injuries and fatalities using 
such an approach (Lee, et al., 2000; Floerchinger, et al., 2000; Wesson, 2000; Durkin, 1999). 
Other authors have utilized the framework to examine crash risk to school age bicyclists near 
schools (Abdel‐Aty et al., 2007), in urban neighborhoods (Bagley, 1994). Cottrill and Thakuriah 
(2010) and Thakuriah et al (2010) used such approaches to study spatial variations in pedestrian 
crashes in the City of Chicago. 
In contrast to the studies examining the dynamics of actual crashes, there is a paucity of 
research focusing on the association between built environments and perceived crash risk. 
Socioeconomic factors, particularly the percentage of low‐income households within a 
neighborhood, played an important role in the prediction of bicycle accident rates (Epperson, 
1995). Pless et al. (1989) reported that family and neighborhood characteristics were stronger 
risk factors for bicycle injuries than children’s personality and behavior; higher risk of injury was 
related to fewer years of parent education, a history of accidents in the family, an environment 
judged as unsafe, and poor parental supervision. 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

101 

 

 
B.3.1.2.2:  Environmental Risk Factors 
Environmental factors play a critical role in increasing bicycle crash risk. By focusing on two‐
lane, undivided roadways, Klop and Khattak (1999) observed that injury severity increased in 
fog, after dark on unlighted sections, with higher speed limits, on road sections with an 
up/downgrade, and decreased with increasing average annual daily traffic, street lighting, and 
an interaction of the shoulder‐width and speed limit.   
Fernandez de Cieza et al. (1999) identified that the main causes of bicycle traffic crashes in San 
Juan, Puerto Rico were:  excessive vehicle speed, lack of proper illumination during the 
afternoon peak period and at night, and poor roadway design. Kim et al (2006) found other 
controlling factors including inclement weather, darkness with no streetlights, morning peak 
(6:00 am to 9:59 am), head‐on collisions and trucks resulting in a doubling in the probability of a 
bicycle fatality. Pai (2011) found unlit streets, adverse weather and wet road surfaces to be 
related to rear‐end crashes. 
B.3.1.2.3:  Roadway Design 
Some research indicated that cycling on‐road was safer than using off‐road paths and 
sidewalks, in terms of the relative rates for falls and injuries (Forster, 2001; Aultman‐Hall and 
Adams, 1998; Moritz, 1998; Rodgers, 1997). However, Smith and Walsh (1988) and Pucher 
(2001) argued that cycling was much safer where bicycle facilities such as bikeways and bike 
lanes were provided. This inconsistency shows that bicycle safety, in terms of risk of accidents, 
varies significantly and that there are safe and unsafe bike paths, just as there will be areas 
where on‐road riding is relatively safe, e.g. wide lanes and a bicycle friendly environment, and 
areas where on‐road riding is risky, e.g. narrow lanes with little or no shoulders.  
Roundabouts are reported to reduce the risk of crashes (Elvik, et al, 2009) primarily due to 
reduced approach and travel speeds. The results are mixed because in certain situations (for 
example, a Belgian study by Daniels, et al, 2008, found that roundabouts increased bicycle 
injury crashes). Complicated interactions arise between cyclists and motorized traffic due to 
how cyclists on a roundabout intersect with traffic entering or leaving a roundabout. Other 
interventions such as cycle tracks physically separating bicycle traffic from motor‐vehicle traffic 
have been studied to a lesser extent. Bicycle facilities (bicycle lanes and bicycle paths) on road 
segments where motor vehicles can drive relatively fast (>50 km/h) have been found to reduce 
risks for cyclists (SWOV, 2008). A problem spot with cycle tracks is traffic crossings. Recent 
research by Schepers, et al (2011) indicates that cycle tracks and related countermeasures such 
as the color of markings at bicycle crossings, raised bicycle crossings and other speed reducing 
measures have a complex relationship with two different types of crashes (type I crashes which 
are through bicycle‐related collisions where the cyclist has right of way on the priority road and 
type II crashes which are motor‐vehicle related collisions where the motorist has right of way, 
i.e. motorist on the priority road). 
B.3.1.2.4:  Risk Taking Behavior 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

102 

 

One more controversial area of research is the extent to which risk‐taking behavior among 
motorists and bicyclists (disobeying traffic rules, not wearing helmets, use of lights at night, 
conspicuous or reflective clothing, driving or cycling under the influence) influence bicycle crash 
involvement. Schramm et al (2008) noted that there has been limited research into the risk‐
taking behaviors that contribute to bicycle‐vehicle collisions. In reported collisions where the 
vehicle was considered the “at‐fault” party, the most frequently reported contributing factors 
were: undue care and attention (19.5 percent of crashes),turning in the face of oncoming traffic 
(15.9 percent), failure to give way (15.3 percent), disobey a give‐way sign (13.0 percent), 
miscellaneous factors (10.0 percent), vehicle entering a driveway (7.3 percent),inattention or 
negligence (6.7 percent), opening a motor‐vehicle door causing danger (6.5 percent), improper 
turn other than u‐turn (4.1 percent), disobey stop sign (3.9 percent) and miscellaneous road 
conditions (3.5 percent). Research by Hunter et al (1996) demonstrated that the vehicle was at 
fault in 42.5 percent of collisions, the cyclist in 35.9 percent, with the remaining 21.6 percent 
undefined. While the information presented was not detailed in terms of violations committed 
or other factors involved, it did indicate that the single most frequent crash type was vehicle 
failing to yield in crossing path crashes at 21.7 percent.  
However, there is evidence in the literature that alcohol consumption by bicyclists may be a 
factor in some bicycle crashes (Petersson, et al, 1997; Noland and Quddus, 2004; Kim, et al, 
2006; Nicaj, et al, 2009). A voluminous literature has commented on the risk reductions to head 
and brain injuries associated with wearing helmets (Depreitere et al., 2004; Robinson, 2001; 
Schieber and Sacks, 2001; Povey et al., 1999; Thompson et al., 1996; Wasserman et al., 1988). 
Wearing fluorescent materials in yellow, red and orange improved detection by drivers during 
the day, while lamps, flashing lights and retro‐reflective materials in red and yellow reduced the 
risk of lowered driver detection at night (Kwan and Mapstone, 2009). 
B.3.1.3:  Exposure‐Based Risk Estimation 
Studies of exposure‐based risk estimation analyzes the factors that contribute to exposure to 
risk (for example, number of miles bicycled or type of traffic conditions in which bicycling trips 
occur) in order to estimate fatality rates or injury rates given exposure rates. The traffic safety 
literature has, in general, considered a wide spectrum of exposure measures. Illustrative 
measures include distance traveled (Richter, et al, 2005; Kweon, et al, 2003), number of trips 
taken (Pucher and Dijsktra, 2003; Massie et al, 1995; Beck, et al, 2007) and amount of time 
spent traveling (Chipman, et al, 1993; Lee and Abdel‐Aty, 2005).  
Detailed measures of exposures such as miles traveled or time duration of travel are difficult to 
derive in the case of bicycle traffic for individual cities or municipalities because most 
household travel surveys, from which such measures are derived do not contain enough bicycle 
trips to yield valid estimates.  Bicycle counts, which are routinely conducted in many cities, are 
also not conducted at a city‐ or municipality‐wide level. Many bicycle studies, with a few 
exceptions express exposure‐based fatality or injury risks in terms of population figures (for 
example, per million population) and are therefore population‐based and not exposure‐based.  
B.3.2:  Crash Severity and Effects 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

103 

 

A second major area of research is on the physical consequences of bicycle crashes (we have 
grouped studies on estimated economic consequences under Crash Countermeasures and 
Evaluation). One aspect of severity research focuses on determinants of crash severity by asking 
the question: once involved in a crash, which factors determine the extent of crash severity in 
terms of trauma? A second line of research focuses on describing the type of trauma and injury. 
B.3.2.1:  Factors Determining Crash Severity 
The literature on crash severity focuses on human tolerance factors (Wegman, 2012), higher 
speeds (Stone and Broughton, 2003; Garder, 1994), collision type – for example, head‐on versus 
same‐direction (Kim, et al, 2006; Stone and Broughton, 2003; Pai, et al, 2010) and helmet use 
(Depreitere et al., 2004; Robinson, 2001). A World Health Organization (2004) review of 
European studies on traffic fatalities concluded that 50 percent of all deaths occurred within 
the first few minutes after the motor‐vehicle crash, either in the crash scene or on the way to 
hospitals. Response time of emergency care is a critical ingredient in overall safety.  Prevention 
of death is determined by access to emergency medical centers, delivery of medical care before 
arrival at the hospital and level and quality of trauma care (Piyawatchwela, 2010; Sithisarankul 
and Suwaratchai, 2010). 
Severity of crashes involving a bicycle is well articulated in Wegmen et al (2012), who wrote 
that “As a direct consequence of the laws of (bio) mechanics and the fragility of the human 
body, cyclists are vulnerable in traffic. Cyclists fall easily and can sustain serious injury. In 
crashes, other than sometimes by a bicycle helmet, a cyclist is unprotected. Brain damage is a 
serious and frequent injury, often sustained by young people in particular. When a cyclist is 
injured in a crash with a motorized vehicle travelling at high speed, kinetic energy is processed. 
Furthermore, a cyclist can lose control of the bicycle, take a fall and be injured, especially if a 
cyclist is inexperienced or when obstacles play a role. Often cyclists fail to obey the traffic rules 
and show unexpected behavior in the eyes of other road users. The consequence is that cyclists 
have a relatively high crash rate compared to that of pedestrians and particularly that of 
drivers.” 
B.3.2.2:  Type of Trauma and Extent of Injury 
A second aspect of this line of research, mostly in the medical literature, focuses on the type of 
trauma, the extent of injury and survival trends. A recent study (Rivara and Sattin, 2011) noted 
that about 900 bicyclist deaths occur annually, and most deaths from bicycle‐related injuries 
are caused by collisions with motor vehicles. Head injury is by far the greatest risk posed to 
bicyclists, comprising one‐third of emergency department visits, two‐thirds of hospital 
admissions, and three‐quarters of deaths. A recent French study on those injured in bicycle‐
only crashes, found that fractures of the upper extremities accounted for a high percentage (50 
percent of all injuries); unspecified head injuries (unconsciousness without any further specified 
injury) accounted for 13.5 percent, and internal organ injuries for 5.5 percent (3.6 percent to 
the head and 1.7 percent to the torso).  
An Israeli study (Siman‐Tov, et al, 2012) reported that rates of injury type differed according to 
age group. For example, head, face or neck injuries were more prevalent among children than 
adults (30 percent versus 19 percent, respectively), while the rate of spinal cord injuries was 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

104 

 

substantially higher among adults than children (eight percent versus one percent, 
respectively).The odds of head, face and neck or spine injuries were higher among children and 
adults involved in bicycle crashes involving a motor vehicle than in a non‐motor‐vehicle crashes, 
whereas the likelihood of an injury to extremities were similar regardless of mechanism. 
B.3.3:  Comparative Studies 
Comparative studies attempt to derive policy, planning and action‐oriented implications based 
on studies of bicycle facilities, use patterns and supporting policies in an international context. 
Most comparative studies examine policies in European cities where bicycling rates have been 
traditionally high.  
Pucher and Dijkstra (2003) examined successful bicycling policies in The Netherlands and 
Germany, and drew conclusions for safe bicycling and walking in the U.S. Broad categories 
suggested are: improved transportation infrastructure for cycling such as networks of bicycle 
paths and planes; bicycle streets where cars are permitted but cyclists have strict right of way 
over the entire breadth of the roadway and strategies to support such separate rights‐of‐way 
including special bike turn lanes leading directly to intersections; separate bike traffic signals 
with advance green lights for cyclists; bicyclist‐activated traffic signals at key intersections; and 
modification of street networks to create direct, fast routing for bikes. Traffic calming measures 
suggested include lowered speed limits, physical barriers such as raised intersections and 
crosswalks, traffic circles, road narrowing, zigzag routes, curves, speed humps and artificial 
dead‐ends created by mid‐block street closures. Other measures recommended based on the 
European situation include restrictions on motor‐vehicle use, traffic education and strict 
enforcement of motor‐vehicle traffic violation laws. 
Pucher and Buehler (2005), by examining six Canadian cities, identified considerable growth in 
cycling in the 1970s and 1980s. Bicycling mode shares in these cities are roughly three times as 
high as in American cities of comparable size. These levels were achieved through a variety of 
measures to promote safe cycling measures and to better integrate cycling with public 
transportation modes. Safety measures implemented include uniform bikeway design and 
traffic control standards, expansion of both off‐road and on‐road cycling facilities including 
cycle tracks and educational programs.  Yet, the authors reported a stagnation of cycling levels 
in many Canadian cities in recent years, after considerable growth during the 1970s and 1980s. 
One explanation offered for the stagnation is that many Canadian governments did not 
concurrently encourage the level of car‐restrictive policies, increases in motor‐vehicle 
ownership and use costs and the development of comprehensive, integrated, regional network 
of cycling facilities as in many European cities where bike modal shares average about 10 
percent. These types of strategies, together with mandatory completion of a cycling education 
course by children, may help raise cycling levels once again. Despite these issues, for Canada as 
a whole, total cycling fatalities fell by 50 percent from 1984 to 2002, from 126 to 63, and total 
cycling injuries fell by 33 percent, from 11,391 to 7,596 (Transport Canada, 2004). 
Osberg et al (1998), on the basis of observing passing bicyclists in Boston and Paris, noted that 
bicycle travel and use patterns emerge from different laws and public health priorities, types of 
bicycle riding, types of bicycles used and perceived risks. Among 5,808 passing bicyclists, there 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

105 

 

were large differences in helmet and light use: only 2.2 percent of Paris bicyclists wore helmets 
compared to 31.5 percent in Boston. In contrast, 46.8 percent of nighttime Paris bicyclists had 
working head or tail lights compared to only 14.8 percent in Boston. These differences highlight 
a point made by Wegman et al (2012) that the literature on countermeasures cannot always be 
generalized from the specific context where a particular study was done, unless there are 
overall similarities in the broader social, cultural and infrastructure aspects. Hence many of the 
comparative studies stimulate ideas on the types of countermeasures that may be considered, 
but suitability to a particular context may require context‐specific testing and evaluation. 
B.3.4:  Data and Information Systems 
Reliable, accurate and timely safety‐related data is a problem worldwide. The WHO (2009) 
reported that among the factors that can affect the quality of reported data are political 
influences, competing priorities, and availability of resources. Most data systems on safety in 
the US are geared towards complete records on motor‐vehicle safety, especially for incidents 
that involve moving vehicles. Bicycle and pedestrian crashes, especially those that lead to 
injuries – as opposed to fatalities of the users of these non‐motorized modes ‐ may not be 
complete to the fullest extent. Veisten et al (2007) noted that bicycle crashes and injuries are 
underreported in police data, with this being more extensive than for any other transportation 
mode. Stutts and Hunter (1998) found that only 48 percent of cyclists admitted to hospital as a 
result of a crash were also recorded in state motor‐vehicle crash files, and with crashes that 
occur on roadways only 50 percent of cases matched. It may be necessary to consider the 
varying reporting requirements in different jurisdictions, particularly as they pertain to property 
damage. It was also found that the cyclist profile (age, location and injury level) was similar 
between general bicycle crashes and bicycle‐vehicle crashes, indicating that the possibilities of 
additional biases may not be problematic in police‐reported bicycle‐vehicle crashes (Stutts and 
Hunter, 1998). 
Events that involve non‐moving vehicles–for instance, by means of “dooring”, where bicyclists 
are injured while being struck by drivers or passengers of motor vehicles opening vehicle doors, 
may  not  be  reported.  Injuries  from  single‐bicycle  crashes  incurred  when  colliding  into  other 
non‐moving objects may similarly not be available from crash files (Heesch, et al, 2011).  
Other incidents may not be reported at all to law enforcement officers, although the bicyclist 
may seek medical help. Some injured bicyclists may be treated in emergency rooms but not 
admitted to hospitals (for example, Strutts, et al, 1990, noted that only a minority of children 
treated in the emergency department for bicycle‐related injuries are admitted to hospitals), 
leaving emergency room records as a source of information, and ruling out police reports and 
hospital records.  
Whereas the Blood Alcohol Content (BAC) of bicyclists killed in crashes are available (from 
FARS), the levels of bicyclists injured in crashes are not reported in state crash files. However, as 
noted previously, there is evidence in the literature that alcohol consumption by bicyclists may 
be a factor in some bicycle crashes. These issues are some illustrative examples of the gaps that 
exist in bicycle crash data, which may limit our understanding of the dynamics of bicycle 
crashes and countermeasures that may be appropriate. 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

106 

 

 
B.3.5:  Crash Countermeasures and Evaluation 
A variety of safety countermeasures have been proposed to alleviate the risk of the occurrence 
of bicycle crashes and to minimize harm if a crash occurs. A line of research that extends the 
appropriateness of crash countermeasures is an evaluation of countermeasures by using safety‐
related criteria. The current literature on safety countermeasures recognizes that there is a 
strong degree of dependency on the behavior of individuals (either motorist or bicyclist or 
both) in reducing bicycle crashes. A multi‐pronged intervention strategy is needed to reduce 
the number and intensity of human error and violations.  
One type of countermeasure focuses on the actions of bicyclists in preventing fatalities and 
injuries namely using bicycle helmets. Effectively, the only protective device available for 
cyclists is the bicycle helmet. Several studies have shown that a properly designed helmet 
provides very good protection for the most vulnerable part of the body, the head, against being 
severely injured in a crash (SWOV, 2009). By some estimates, the maximum effect of a bicycle 
helmet is approximately a 45 percent reduction of the risk of head and brain injury when a 
good helmet is worn correctly. Yet, some questions linger about the effectiveness of helmet 
safety studies primarily due to selection biases; since wearing a helmet is not mandatory in 
most situations, bicyclists who wear helmets may be a non‐random sample of bicyclists who are 
“safe cyclists” when measured on other criteria. 
Making helmet‐wearing compulsory for cyclists has also been found to lead to reductions in 
cycling in countries such as Australia and Canada (Wegman, et al, 2012).  Although, in other 
evaluation studies, this result appears not to be generalizable to other places. Another aspect 
of bicyclist action studied is bicyclist conspicuity and visibility strategies that aid in the early 
detection of their presence by motorists. 40 percent of cyclist fatalities are reported to occur 
during the hours of darkness (Jaermark 1991); a high proportion of these crashes are related to 
frontal rather than rear conspicuity (Gale 1998). Based on 42 studies which compare driver 
detection of people with or without visibility aids, it was found that fluorescent materials in 
yellow, red and orange improved driver detection during the day, while lamps, flashing lights 
and retro‐reflective materials in red and yellow, particularly those with a “biomotion” 
configuration (which takes advantage of the motion from a pedestrian’s limbs), improved 
pedestrian recognition at night (Kwan and Mapstone, 2007). Thornley, et al (2008), based on 
self‐reported recall of crashes in the preceding 12 months among bicyclists in New Zealand  
reported substantially lower crash injury rates among those who reported always wearing 
fluorescent colors.  
Bicyclists have been found to benefit from traffic calming measures, specifically by reducing 
speeds of motorized traffic to less than 30 km/h. Infrastructure solutions such as converting      
three‐leg or four‐leg intersections into roundabouts has been widely researched; although 
roundabouts have been found to generally improve fatality and injury rates primarily due to 
reduced approach and travel speeds, the results are mixed because in certain situations, 
complicated interactions arise between cyclists and motorized traffic due to how cyclists on a 
roundabout intersect with traffic entering or leaving a roundabout. Other interventions such as 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

107 

 

cycle tracks physically separating bicycle traffic from motor‐vehicle traffic have been studied to 
a lesser extent. Bicycle facilities (bicycle lanes and bicycle paths) on road segments where cars 
can drive relatively fast (>50 km/h) have been found to reduce risks for cyclists (SWOV, 2008). 
One line of research has considered changes in vehicle design to include crash‐friendly motor‐
vehicle fronts and side‐underrun protection for truck to buffer cyclists from injuries and 
equipping cars with exterior airbags.  
Practical approaches to improve bicyclist safety have focused on five E’s: Engineering, 
Education, Encouragement, Enforcement and Evaluation and Planning. Bicycle planning and 
safety reports from several cities and states were reviewed for this purpose. Specific strategies 
within each group are summarized below in Table B‐2. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

108 

 

 
Table B‐2:  Safety countermeasures and strategies used in cities and states 
 
Strategy 
 
Engineering 

Actions 
Install/Expand bike lanes

 

Respond to high‐crash locations

 

Evaluate or create state DOT guidelines for cycling awareness/responsiveness 

 
 
Education 

 
 

Improve/Maintain existing bike lanes
Integrate cycling considerations into planning, design, construction and maintenance policies 
Conduct safety audits 
Install additional cycling amenities
Young cyclist education campaigns
Public safety awareness campaigns
Driver safety training 
Cyclist safety training 

Planner, engineering, and law enforcement safety training
 
Legal clinics ‐ laws related to cycling, laws related to driving around cyclists, insurance issues, 
 
and what to do in the event of a crash 
 
Resources to encourage safe cycling
 
Encouragement 
Encourage politicians to support cycling development
 
Encourage bicycle & pedestrian friendly development
 
Provide bike parking and facilities
 
 
Actively promote safe cycling
 
Advocacy to increase bicycling and walking movement
 
Enforcement 
Conduct Speed and crosswalk enforcement at safety hotspots
 
Train law enforcement officers in bicycle laws, crash reporting, and safety issues 
 
Improve the reporting of bicycle and pedestrian crashes
 
Increase penalties for unsafe driving practices impacting cyclists
 
Enforce safe cycling practices
 
Enforce or create sidewalk riding regulations
 
Evaluation and Planning 
Clarify rules related to interactions between cyclists and motorists
 
Improve collection practices for cycling crashes
 
Establish a process for evaluating cycling safety responses
 
Development of priority projects
 
 
Conduct additional cycling traffic studies
 
 
Based  on  reports  from  New  York  City,  Portland,  OR;  Washington,  D.C.;  Toronto,  Ontario; 
Arlington,  VA;  Boise,  ID;  Mineta  Transportation  Institute  report;  and  the  states  of  Georgia, 
Montana and Michigan. 
We would like to thank Dr. Caitlin Cottrill for her help in producing this table.  

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

109 

 

References 
Allen‐Munley, C., Daniel, J., Dhar, S. (2004). Logistic Model for Rating Urban Bicycle Route Safety. 
Transportation Research Record, 1878. 
Abdel‐Aty, M., Dhindsa, A., and Gayah, V. (2007), Considering various ALINEA Ramp Metering Strategies 
for Crash Risk Mitigation on Freeways under Congested Regime. Transportation Research, Part C: 
Emerging Technologies, 15(2). 
Antonakos, C. L. (1994). Environmental and Travel Preferences of Cyclists. Transportation Research 
Record, 1438: 25–33. 
Aultman‐Hall, L., Hall, F. L., (1998).Ottawa‐Carleton On‐ and Off‐road Cyclist Accident Rates. Accident 
Analysis and Prevention, 30(1): 29‐43. 
Aultman‐Hall, L., and Hall, F. L. (1998).Research Design Insights from a Survey of Urban Bicycle 
Commuters. Transportation Research Record, 1636: 21–28. 
Aultman‐Hall, L., Adams. M. F., (1998). Sidewalk Bicycling Safety Issues. Transportation Research Record, 
1636: 71–76. 
Babul, S., Frendo, T., Winters, M., Brubacher, R. J., Chipman, L. M., Chisholm, D., Cripton, A. P., 
Cusimano, D. M., Friedman, M. S., Harris, A. M., Hunte, S. G., Reynolds, C. CO., and Teschke, K., (2010). 
Injuries to adult cyclists in Toronto and Vancouver: describing the circumstances as a first step towards 
injury prevention. Injury Prevention, 16 (1): A82. 
Bagley, C., (1992). The urban setting of juvenile pedestrian injuries: A study of behavioural ecology and 
social disadvantage. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 24 (6): 673‐678.  
Balk, S. A., Tyrrell, R. A., Brooks, J. O., Carpenter, T. L., (2008). Highlighting human form and motion 
information enhances the conspicuity of pedestrians at night. Perception, 37(8): 1276‐1284. 
Beck, L. F., Dellinger, A. M., O’Neil, M. E. (2007). Motor Vehicle Crash Injury Rates by Mode of Travel, 
United States: Using Exposure‐Based Methods to Quantify Differences. American Journal of 
Epidemiology, 166(2): 212–218. 
Blincoe, L.J., Seay, A.G., Zaloshnja, E., Miller, T.R., Romano, E.O., Luchter, S., and Spicer R.S. (2002). The 
economic impact of motor vehicle crashes 2000. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. 
Blomberg, R.D., Hale, A., (1986). Experimental evaluation of alternative conspicuity‐enhancement 
techniques for pedestrians and bicycles. Journal of Safety Research, 17, 1–12. 
Blomberg, R. D., Cleven, A., Thomas, F., Peck, R., (2008). Evaluation of the Safety Benefits of Legacy Safe 
Routes to School Programs. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. August. 
 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

110 

 

Boslaugh, S. E., Luke, A. D., Brownson, C. R., Naleid, S. K., and Kreuter, W. M., (2004). Perceptions of 
Neighborhood Environment for Physical Activity: Is It“Who You Are” or “Where You Live”? Journal of 
Urban Health, 81(4): 671‐681. 
Chipman, M. L., Macgregor, C. G., Smiley, A. M., and Leegosselin, M. (1993). The role of exposure in 
comparisons of crash risk among different drivers and driving environments. Accident Analysis and 
Prevention, 25(2), 207‐211.  
Cho, G., Rodriguez, D., Khattak, A. (2009) The Role of the Built Environment in Explaining Relationships 
Between Perceived and Actual Pedestrian and Bicyclist Safety. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 41. 
Clarke, A., (1992). Bicycle‐Friendly Cities: Key Ingredients for Success. Transportation Research Record, 
1372: 71–75. 
Cottrill, C. and P. Thakuriah (2010). Evaluating Pedestrian Crashes in Areas with High Low‐Income or 
Minority Populations. In Accident Analysis and Prevention, 42(6): 1718‐1728. 
Crane, R. (2007). Is there a quiet revolution in women’s travel? Revisiting the gender gap in commuting. 
Journal of the American Planning Association 73(3), 298‐316. 
Cross, K.D., and Fisher, G. A. (1977). Study of Bicycle/Motor‐Vehicle Accidents: Identification of Problem 
Types and Countermeasure Approaches.  Volumes I and II, Report Nos.DOT‐HS‐803‐315 and DOT‐HS‐
803‐316. 
Daniels, S., Nuyts, E., Wets, G. (2008). The effects of roundabouts on traffic safety for bicyclists: an 
observational study. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 40(2), 518‐526. 
Daniels, S., Brijs, T., Nuyts, E., Wets, G. (2009). Injury crashes with bicyclists at roundabouts: influence of 
some location characteristics and the design of cycle facilities. Journal of Safety Research, 40(2), 141‐
148. 
Dennerlein J. T., Meeker J. (2002) Injuries among Boston Bicycle Messengers. American Journal of 
Industrial Medicine, 42(6): 519‐525. 
Depreitere, B., Van Lierde, C., Maene, S., Plets, C., Vander Sloten, J., Van Audekercke, R., Van der Perre, 
G., Goffin, J., 2004. Bicycle related head injury: a study of 86 cases. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 36: 
561‐567. 
deHartog, J.J., Boogaard, H., Nijland, H., Hoek, G., (2010). Do The health benefits of cycling outweigh the 
risks? Environmental Health Perspectives, 118 (8): 1109‐1116. 
Drummond, A.E., Jee, F.M., (1988). The Risks of Bicyclist Accident Involvement. Monash University 
Accident Research Centre. 
 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

111 

 

Durkin, M. S., Laraque, D., Lubman, I., Barlow, B., (1999). Epidemiology and Prevention of Traffic Injuries 
to Urban Children and Adolescents. Pediatrics, 103(6): e74. 
Fernandez de Cieza, A.O., Ortiz Andino, J.C., Archilla, A.R., Gomez, A.M., Gonzalez, C.G., Mengual, S., 
Morrall, J., (1999). Nonmotorized traffic accidents in San Juan, Argentina. Transportation Research 
Record, 1695: 19–22. 
Floerchinger‐Franks, G., Machala, M., (2000).Evaluation of A Pilot Program in Rural Schools to Increase 
Bicycle and Motor Vehicle Safety. Journal of Community Health 25(2): 113‐24. 
Elvik, R., Høye, A., Vaa, T., Sørensen,M., (2009). The Handbook of Road Safety Measures, second ed. 
Emerald Publishing, Bingley. 
Elvik, R., Amundsen, A. H. (2000). Improving Road Safety in Sweden. Main report. Report 490. Institute 
of Transport Economics, Oslo. 
Forster, J., (2001). The bikeway controversy. Transportation Quarterly, 55 (2). 
Epperson, B. (1995). Demographic and Economic Characteristics of Bicyclists Involved in Bicycle‐Motor 
Vehicle Accidents. Transportation Research Record, 1502: 56–64. 
Gale, A.G., Cairney, P., Catchpole, J., (1996). Patterns of perceptual failures at intersections of arterial 
roads and local streets. In: Proceedings of the Fifth International Conference on Vision in Vehicles. 
Elsevier, Glasgow.  
Garder, P., (1994). Bicycle accidents in Maine: an analysis. Transportation Research Record, 1438: 34–41. 
Garrard J., Rose G., Sing K.L., (2008). Promoting transportation cycling for women: the role of bicycle 
infrastructure, Preventive Medicine, 46(1):55–59. 
Heesch, K. C., Garrard, J., Sahlqvist, S. (2011). Incidence, severity and correlates of bicycling injuries in a 
sample of cyclists in Queensland, Australia. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 43(6): 2085‐2092. 
Helsand, T., Orozova‐Bekkevold, I., (2007). The effect of roundabout design features on cyclist accident 
rate. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 39: 300‐307. 
Herslund, M., and Jørgensen, N. O., (2003).Looked‐but‐failed‐to‐see‐errors in traffic. Accident Analysis 
and Prevention, 35: 885–891.   
Hunter, W. W., Pein, W. E..Stutts, J. C. (1995). Bicycle‐Motor Vehicle Crash Types: The Early 1990s. 
Transportation Research Record, 1502: 65–74. 
Hunter, W. W., Stewart, J. R., Stutts, J. C. (1999).Study of Bicycle Lanes Versus Wide Curb Lanes. 
Transportation Research Record, 1674: 70–77. 
Jacobsen, P. L. (2003). Safety in numbers: more walkers and bicyclists, safer walking and bicycling. Injury 
Prevention, 9(3), 205‐209. 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

112 

 

 
Jaermark, S., Gregersen, N.P., Linderoth, B., (1991).The Use of Bicycle Lights. TFB and VTI 
Forskning/Research. 
Khan, A. M., Bacchus, A., Allen, J. H., (1995).Bicycle Use of Highway Shoulders. Transportation Research 
Record ,1502, 8–21. 
Kim, D. and Washington, S., (2006). The significance of endogeneity problems in crash models: An 
examination of left‐turn lanes in intersection crash models, Accident Analysis and Prevention, 38(6): 
1094‐1100. 
Klop, J. R. and Khattak, A. J. (1999). Factors Influencing Bicycle Crash Severity on Two‐Lane, Undivided 
Roadways in North Carolina. Transportation Research Record, 1674: 78‐85. 
Kwan, I., Mapstone, J., (2009). Interventions for increasing pedestrian and cyclist visibility for the 
prevention of death and injuries. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2006, Issue 4. 
Kweon, Y. J., and Kockelman, K. M., (2003). Overall injury risk to different drivers: Combining exposure, 
frequency, and severity models. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 35(4): 441‐450. 
Krizek, K. J., Johnson, P. J., Tilahun, N., (2005). Gender differences in bicycling behavior and facility 
preferences. Research on Women's Issues in Transportation, Conference Proceedings 35.Technical 
Papers, vol. 2. Transportation Research Board, Washington, D.C. 
Lee, A. J., Mann, N. P., Takriti, P. A., (2000). Hospital Led Promotion Campaign Aimed to Increase Bicycle 
Helmet Wearing among Children Aged 11‐15 Living in West Berkshire 1992‐1998. Injury Prevention, 6: 
151‐153. 
Lee, R. S., Hagel, B. E., Karkhaneh, M., Rowe, B. H., (2009). A systematic review of correct bicycle helmet 
use: how varying definitions and study quality influence the results. Injury Prevention, 15(2):125‐31. 
Lee, C., Abdel‐Aty, M., (2005). Comprehensive Analysis of Vehicle‐Pedestrian Crashes at Intersections in 
Florida, Accident Analysis and Prevention, 37(4): 775‐786. 
Linn, S., Smith, D., Sheps, S., (1998). Epidemiology of bicycle injury, head injury, and helmet use among 
children in British Columbia: a five year descriptive study. Injury Prevention, 4, 122‐125. 
Loo, B. P. Y. and Tsui, K. L. (2010).Bicycle Crash Casualties in a Highly Motorized City. Accident Analysis 
and Prevention, 42.   
Lusk, A. C., Furth, P., Morency, P., Mirando‐Moreno, L., Willet, W., Dennerlein, J., (2011). Risk of Injury 
for Bicycling on Cycle Tracks Versus in the Street. Injury Prevention, 17. 
 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

113 

 

Mandel‐Ricci, J., Stayton, C., Nicaj, L., Assefa, S., Woloch, D., Jeffrey, K., McCarthey, P., Budnick. N., 
(2008). A Multiagency Effort to Reduce Bicyclist Fatalities and Serious Injuries in New York City. Public 
Health Reports, 123. 
Maring, W., van Schagen, I.,(1990) Age dependence of attitudes and knowledge in cyclists. Accident 
Analysis and Prevention, 22 (2): 127–136. 
Massie, D. L., Campbell, K. L., Williams, A. F., (1995). Traffic accident involvement rates by driver age and 
gender. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 27:73–87. 
McCarthy, M., Gilbert, K., (1996). Cyclist road deaths in London 1985‐1992: drivers, vehicles, maneuvers 
and injuries. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 28: 275‐279. 
Matthews, M. L., Boothby, R. D., (1980). Visibility of cyclists at night: laboratory evaluation of three rear 
warning devices. Human Factors: Science for Working and Living. 24th Human Factors Society Annual 
Meeting Proceedings, Santa Monica, California. 129–33. 
Minikel, E. (2011).Cyclist Safety on Bicycle Boulevards and Parallel Arterial Routes in Berkeley, California. 
Accident Analysis and Prevention. 
Moberly, N. J., Langham, M. P., (2001). Pedestrian conspicuity at night: failure to observe a biological 
motion advantage in a high‐clutter environment. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 164:477–85. 
Moll, E. K., Donoghue, A. J., Alpern, E. R., Kleppel, J., Durbin, D. R., Winston, F. K., (2002). Child bicyclist 
injuries: are we obtaining enough information in the emergency department chart? Injury Prevention, 8: 
165–169. 
Moritz, W. E. (1998). Adult Bicyclists in the United States: Characteristics and Riding Experience in 1996. 
Transportation Research Record, 1636: 1–7. 
Muttart, J.W., (2000). Effects of retroreflective material on pedestrian identification at night. Accident 
Reconstruction Journal, 11 (1): 51–60. 
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (2009).Traffic Safety Facts 2009 Data. Bicyclists and 
Other Cyclists.DOT HS 811 388. 
National Household Travel Survey, 2009. Available from: http://nhts.ornl.gov/. 
Naumann, R. B., Dellinger, A. M., Zaloshnja, E., Lawrence, A. B., Miller, T. R., (2010), Incidence and Total 
Lifetime Costs of Motor Vehicle‐Related Fatal and Nonfatal Injury by Road User Type, United States, 
2005. Traffic Injury Prevention, 11(4): 353–360. 
Nicaj, L., Stayton, C., Mandel‐Ricci, J., McCarthy, P., Grasso, K., Woloch, D., Kerker, B., (2009). Bicyclist 
fatalities in New York City: 1996‐2005. Traffic Injury Prevention, 10(2): 157‐161. 
 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

114 

 

National Safety Council (2009). Summary of Estimate Model. Retrieved from 
http://www.nsc.org/news_resources/Resources/Documents/NSC%20Estimate%20Summary.pdf on Aug. 
13, 2012. 
National Safety Council (2010).Understanding the Distracted Brain: Why Driving Using Hands‐Free Cell 
Phones is Risky Behavior. White Paper, March 2010. Retrieved from 
http://www.nsc.org/safety_road/Distracted_Driving/Documents/Dstrct_Drvng_White_Paper_Fnl.pdfon 
Aug. 13, 2012. 
Noland, R. B., Quddus, M. A., (2004). A spatially disaggregated analysis of road casualties in England. 
Accident Analysis and Prevention, 36(6): 973‐984. 
Osberg, J. S., Stiles, S., Asare, O. (1998). Bicycle Safety Behavior in Paris and Boston. Accident Analysis 
and Prevention, 30(5).   
Osland, A., Czerwinski, D. E., Johnson, C. S., Anderson, E., Brazil, J. M. Curry, M., (2012). Promoting 
Bicycle Commuter Safety. Mineta Transportation Institute. 
Owens, D.A., Antonoff, R.J., (1994). Biological motion and pedestrian safety in night traffic. Human 
Factors 36 (4): 718–732. 
Owens, D. A., Wood, J. M., Owens, J. M., (2007). Effects of age and illumination on night driving: a road 
test. Human Factors, 49(6):1115–1131. 
Pai, C. (2011). Overtaking, Rear‐end, and Door Crashes Involving Bicycles: An Empirical Investigation. 
Accident Analysis and Prevention, 43.  
Petersson, E., Schelp, L., (1997). An epidemiological study of bicycle‐related injuries. Accident Analysis 
and Prevention, 29(3): 363‐72. 
Petritsch, T., Landis, B., Huang, H., Challa, S. K., (2006). Sidepath Safety Model‐ Bicycle Sidepath Design 
Factors Affecting Crash Rates. Sprinkle Consulting report to the Florida Department of Transportation. 
21 March 2006. 
Piyawatchwela, T., (2010). Outcome from emergency services for emergency injury by Advance Team, 
Emergency Medical Service, Khon Kaen Hospital. Injury Prevention, 16: A38.  
Pless, I.B., Verreault, R., Tenina, S., (1989). A case–control study of pedestrian and bicyclist injuries in 
childhood. American Journal of Public Health, 79 (98): 995–998. 
Povey, L. J., Frith, W. J., Graham, P. G., (1999). Cycle helmet effectiveness in New Zealand. Accident 
Analysis and Prevention, 31: 763‐770. 
Pucher, J. (2001). Cycling Safety on Bikeways vs. Roads. Transportation Quarterly, 55(4). 

 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

115 

 

Pucher J., Buehler R., (2008). Making Cycling Irresistible: Lessons from the Netherlands, Denmark 

and Germany, Paper accepted for publication in Transport Reviews, Vol. 28, July. 
Pucher, J.,Dijkstra, L. (2003). Promoting Safe Walking and Cycling to Improve Public Health: Lessons 
From the Netherlands and Germany. American Journal of Public Health, 93(9). 
Pucher, J., Komanoff, C., Schimek, P., (1999). Bicycling Renaissance in North America? Recent Trends and 
Alternative Policies to Promote Bicycling. Transportation Research, Part A. 
Räsänen, M., Summala, H., (1998). Attention and expectation problems in bicycle‐car collisions: An in‐
depth study. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 30: 657‐666. 
Räsänen, M., Summala, H., (2000).Car drivers’ adjustments to cyclists at roundabouts. Transportation 
Human Factors, 2: 1‐17. 
Richter, M., Pape, H. C., Otte, D., Krettek, C., (2005). Improvements in passive car safety led to 
decreased injury severity: a comparison between the 1970s and 1990s. Injury, 26(4): 484‐488. 
Rietveld, P., Daniel, V., (2004). Determinants of bicycle use: Do municipal policies matter? 
Transportation Research, Part A: Policy Practice, 38: 531–550. 
Rivara, F. and Sattin, R. W., (2011). Preventing bicycle‐related injuries: next steps. Injury Prevention, 
11(3). 
Robinson, D., (2005). Safety in Numbers in Australia: More Walkers and Bicyclists, Safer Walking and 
Bicycling. Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 16(1): 47‐51. 
Rodgers, G. B. (1997). Factors Associated with the Crash Risk of Adult Bicyclists. Journal of Safety 
Research, 28(4). 
Rosenkranz, K. M., Sheridan, R. L., (2003). Trauma to adult bicyclists: a growing problem in the urban 
environment. Injury, 34: 825‐9. 
Royal, D., Miller‐Steiger. D., (2008). National Survey of Bicyclist and Pedestrian Attitudes and Behavior. 
Final Report, Washington: US Department of Transportation. 
Saelens, B. E., Sallis, J. F., Frank, L. D., (2003). Environmental correlates of walking and cycling: findings 
from the transportation, urban design, and planning literatures. Annals of Behavioral Medicine: A 
Publication of the Society of Behavioral Medicine, 25(2): 80‐91. 
Schepers, J.P. (2008). The role of infrastructure in single‐bicycle crashes. Rijkswaterstaat Dienst Verkeer 
en Scheepvaart. [In Dutch] Delft, The Netherlands. 
Schepers, J. P., Kroeze, P. A., Sweers, W., Wust, J. C., (2011). Road factors and bicycle‐motor vehicle 
crashes at unsignalized priority intersections. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 43(3): 853‐861. 
 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

116 

 

Schieber, R. A., Sacks, J. A., (2001). Measuring community bicycle helmet use among children. Public 
Health Reports, 116:113‐121. 
Schramm, A., Rakotonirainy, A., Haworth, N. How much does disregard of road rules contribute to 
bicycle‐vehicle collisions? Proceedings: High Risk Road Users‐motivating behavior change: what works 
and what doesn’t work? National Conference of the Australian College of Road Safety and the Travelsafe 
Committee of the Queensland Parliament, Brisbane. 
Sener, I., Eluru, N., Bhat, C., (2009). An analysis of bicyclists and bicycling characteristics: Who, why, and 
how much, are they bicycling? Transportation Research Record, 2134:63‐72.  
Sharples, R., (1999). The Use of Main Roads by Utility Cyclists in Urban Areas. Traffic Engineering and 
Control, Jan: 18–22. 
Siddiqui, C., Abdel‐Aty, M., Choi, K., (2011).Macroscopic Spatial Analysis of Pedestrian and Bicycle 
Crashes. Accident Analysis and Prevention.  
Siman‐Tov, M., Jaffe, D., Peleg, K., Israel Trauma Group. (2011). Bicycle Injuries: A Matter of Mechanism 
and Age. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 44. 
Sithisarankul, P., Suwaratchai, P., (2010). Effect of care in emergency room toward death within 48 h of 
traffic. Injury Prevention, 16: A35. 
Smith, R.L., Walsh, T., (1988). Safety impacts of bicycle lanes. Transportation Research Record, 1168: 49–
56. 
Stone, M., Broughton, J., (2003). Getting off your bike: cycling accidents in Great Britain in 1990–1999. 
Accident Analysis and Prevention, 35 (4): 549–556. 
Stutts, J., Williamson, J., Whitley, T., Sheldon, F., (1990). Bicycle accidents and injuries: a pilot study 
comparing hospital and police‐reported data. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 22: 67‐78. 
Stutts, J.C., Hunter, W.W., (1999). Motor vehicle and roadway factors in pedestrian and bicyclist injuries: 
an examination based on emergency department data. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 31 (5): 505–
514. 
Summala, H., Pasanen, E., Räsänen, M., Sievänen, J., (1996). Bicycle Accidents and Drivers’ Visual Search 
at Left and Right Turns. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 28 (2):147‐153. 
SWOV, (2004). Bicycle facilities on road segments and intersections of distributor roads. SWOV Institute 
for Road Safety Research Factsheet. The Netherlands: SWOV. 
Taylor, D. and Davis, W. Review of Basic Research in Bicycle Traffic Science, Traffic Operations and 
Facility Design. Transportation Research Record, 1674. 
 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

117 

 

Thakuriah, P., Cottrill, C., N. Thomas and S. Vaughn. (2010). Sketch Planning Methodology for 
Determining Interventions in Bicycle and Pedestrian Crashes: An Ecological Approach. In Proc. 879h 
Transportation Research Board Annual Conference, Jan. 2010. 
Transport Canada, 2004. School Bus Restraints for Small Children in Canada. Prepared by the Standards 
and Regulations Division, Road Safety and Motor Vehicle Regulation Directorate, Transport Canada, 
November 16, 2004. 
Todd, L., (2011). Evaluating Non‐Motorized Transportation Benefits and Costs.  Victoria Transport Policy 
Institute. 24 November 2011. 
Thompson, D. C., Nunn, M. E., Thompson, R. S., Rivara, F. P., (1996). Effectiveness of Bicycle Safety 
Helmets in Preventing Serious Facial Injury. Journal of the American Medical Association, 276:1974–5. 
Thom, R.G., Clayton, A.M., (1992). Low‐cost opportunities for making cities bicycle‐friendly based on a 
case study analysis of cyclist behavior and accidents. Transportation Research Record, 1372: 90–101. 
Thornley, S. J., Woodward, A., Langley, J. D., Ameratunga, S. N., Rodgers, A. (2008). Conspicuity and 
Bicycle Crashes: Preliminary Findings of the Taupo Bicycle Study. Injury Prevention, 14. 
Veisten, K., Sælensminde, K., Alær, K., Bjornskau, T., Elvik, R., Schistad, T., Ytterstad, B., (2007). Total 
costs of bicycle injuries in Norway: Correcting injury figures and indicating data needs, Accident Analysis 
and Prevention, 39 (6): 1162‐1169. 
U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census of Population and Housing, Washington, D.C., 2011. 
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Physical Activity and Health: A Report of the Surgeon 
General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and 
Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 1996. 
Wachtel, A., and Lewiston, D., (1994). Risk Factors for Bicycle–Motor Vehicle Collisions at Intersections. 
ITE Journal, Sep: 30–35. 
Walker, I., (2005). Psychological factors affecting the safety of vulnerable road users: A review of the 
literature, Working Paper, University of Bath. 
Walker, M., (1991). Law Compliance and Helmet Use Among Cyclists in New South Wales, April 1991. 
Road Safety Bureau, NSW Roads and Traffic Authority, Rosebery, NSW. 
Wang, Y, and Nihan, N. (2004). Estimating the Risk of Collisions Between Bicycles and Motor Vehicles at 
Signalized Intersections. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 36.   
Wasserman, R.C., Waller, J.A., Monty, M.J., Emery, A.B., Robinson, D.R., (1988). Bicyclists, helmets and 
head Injuries: a rider‐based story of helmet use and effectiveness. American Journal of Public Health, 78 
(9): 1220–1221. 
 

Bicycle Crash Analysis and Review of Trends, City of Chicago, 2005 to 2010: Final Report 

118 

 

Wegman, F., Zhan, F., Dijkstra, A. (2012).How to Make More Cycling Good for Road Safety. Accident 
Analysis and Prevention, 44: 19‐29. 
Wesson, D., Spence, L., Hu, X., Parkin, P., (2000). Trends in bicycling‐related head injuries in children 
after implementation of a community‐based bike helmet campaign. Journal of Pediatric Surgery, 35(5): 
688‐689. 
World Health Organization, 2009. Global status report on road safety: time for action. Geneva, 
(www.who.int/violence_injury_prevention/road_safety_status/2009). 
Wood, J. M., Lacherez, P. F., Marszalek, R. P., King, M. J. (2009). Drivers' and cyclists' experiences of 
sharing the road: incidents, attitudes and perceptions of visibility. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 
41(4): 772‐776. 
Xu, J., Kochanek, K. D., Murphy, S. L., Tejada‐Vera, B., (2010). Deaths: Final Data for 2007. National Vital 
Statistics Reports 58/9, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics. 
Yan, X., Ma, M., Huang, H., Abdel‐Aty, M., Wu, C., (2011). Motor vehicle‐bicycle crashes in Beijing: 
Irregular maneuvers, crash patterns, and injury severity. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 43.   
Yeung, J. H., Leung, C. S., Poon, W.S., Cheung, N. K., Graham, C. A., Rainer, T. H., (2009). Bicycle related 
injuries presenting to a trauma centre in Hong Kong. Injury, 40(5): 555‐559. 
Zwahlen, H.T., Schnell, T., (1997). Visual detection and recognition of fluorescent color targets versus 
nonfluorescent color targets as a function of peripheral viewing angle and target size. Transportation 
Research Record, 1605, 28–40.