INSIDE

:
n Visions
Volume 15
– Special section
n Scott Picnic
In the Park
schedule
nLook inside!
Special sales
events from ...
Chief, Menards,
Rite Aid,
Rural King,
Ruler Foods
Around
Paulding
County
Concert at park
on Friday night
PAULDING – Paulding
Chamber of Commerce pres-
ents recording artist Bekah
Bradley for a “Christmas in
July” concert at 7 p.m.
Friday, Aug. 1 at Herb
Monroe Community Park.
Bradley has agreed to
waive her booking fee for
this community fundraiser.
In lieu of an admission fee,
donations will be accepted
that will be used to upgrade
the Christmas decorations on
the downtown square.
Another way to donate to-
ward the decorations is for a
family or business to “adopt”
a street light pole in their
honor. For more information
on this project, contact
Marsha at 419-399-3650 or
pick up a form at the con-
cert.
Auglaize F.D.
ice cream social
JUNCTION – The
Auglaize Township Fire
Department Auxiliary is
hosting its fifth annual ice
cream social from 4-7 p.m.
Saturday, Aug. 2. The event
will be at the fire station, lo-
cated at the corner of Ohio
637 and Road 169. The
menu will include home-
made ice cream, pies, sand-
wiches, chips and beverages.
Carryouts are also available.
Weather permitting. the
Lifeflight helicopter will be
making a special appearance.
PERI to meet
PAULDING – Paulding
County Chapter 10 OPERI
will meet at 10 a.m.
Wednesday, Aug. 6 at the
Paulding County Senior
Center. Guest speaker will
be Rep. Tony Burkley.
Anyone retired from OPERS
is welcome to attend.
P
P
AULDING
AULDING
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community and its residents
always seem to find a way to
take care of the needs of oth-
ers. That is what makes it such
a great place to live and raise a
family.”
Chief has agreed to be a
drop off location and is set up
and ready to go. Farr also
noted that people are always
asking what is needed and she
said that anything is appreciat-
ed. Donor funds are placed in
the Communities For Kids ac-
ment in the Progress, a num-
ber of concerned county resi-
dents stepped up to the plate to
help see that needs were met.
Farr scheduled a meeting of
concerned citizens and
Communities For Kids was
born.
“This county is very sharing
and together we can accom-
plish and provide what our
kids need for school,” said
Farr. “We are so pleased that
two young ladies are hosting a
clothing drive on the same day
as the giveaway this year. This
supply giveaway. This is the
sixth year that Communities
For Kids has coordinated the
giveaway.
The generosity of
Communities For Kids began
in 2009 when Job and Family
Services, which had previous-
ly provided over $59,000 for
school clothes and supplies
and another $20,000 for book
fees, got a budget cut. The cuts
impacted not only families,
but businesses and schools as
well.
Following an announce-
By NANCY WHITAKER
Correspondent
PAULDING – It seems like
summer has just begun, but
school will be back in session
in a few weeks. So, now is the
time to think about school sup-
plies and those who may need
assistance in purchasing them.
In fact, a lot of stores already
have them on display and the
buying has already begun.
Communities For Kids,
Susan Farr and Nicole Harris
and volunteers, are currently
gearing up for the 2014 school
Visions
historical
edition
released
In this issue of the Paulding
County Progress, readers will
find the 15th edition of our
annual series, Visions of
Paulding County: From the
Historical Archives of the
Paulding County Progress.
2014 marks the 175th an-
niversary of Paulding County.
In 1839, the county, which
had been attached to various
other counties, began govern-
ing itself with the first seat of
government at New
Rochester. This year’s Visions
is part 1 of a timeline of the
county and the region, from
the Ice Age through 1845.
Each year, this free maga-
zine-style publication brings
readers original, never-be-
fore-published material, as
well as gems from our issues
from the past century.
Everyone will find the Visions
series an invaluable reference
source, whether you are a
newcomer to the area, or your
family has lived here for gen-
erations.
The Ohio Newspaper
Association awarded Visions
first place in 2009 and 2011 a
second-place award for 2010
and 2012.
The Progress staff invites
readers to browse through this
complimentary copy of
Visions, which will certainly
become a treasured keepsake.
A free copy is included in
this July 30 edition of the
Progress for the enjoyment of
our readers.
We have a limited supply of
additional copies, which may
be picked up at local libraries.
Copies can be obtained by
mail for $2 shipping and han-
dling by writing to: Paulding
County Progress, P.O. Box
180, Paulding OH 45879.
Copies of previous editions
are also available, except for
Vol. 1 and Vol. 6. See SUPPLIES, page 2A
See BIG CAT, page 2A
TV series looks at unsolved Oakwood homicide
Progress published this article:
Noffsinger’s death ruled homicide
Paulding County sheriff’s deputies
are investigating the death of Alma
Delgado Noffsinger, 29, who was
found in her home on Fifth Street in
Oakwood at 9:16 a.m. Dec. 17.
Dr. Don K. Snyder, Paulding County
Coroner, ruled her death a homicide.
“The probable cause of death was a
basal skull fracture from multiple
blows to the head,” said Snyder.
According to John Keeler, Paulding
County Sheriff, the fatal wound was in-
flicted with a blunt weapon and that the
victim was home alone at the time of
her alleged murder. “We are running
down some leads,” Keeler said.
An unsolved 1981 homicide near
Oakwood will be the focus of an
episode of the TNT series “Cold
Justice.” The episode is set to air on
Friday, Aug. 8.
TNT offers the following synopsis of
the episode, titled “Second Thoughts”:
“Alma Noffsinger, 29, was an attrac-
tive, fun-loving mother of three young
children. She was recently divorced
from her second husband, Steve, and
the two were in a custody battle over
the child they had together. Throughout
Alma’s marriage to Steve, she main-
tained a good relationship with her first
husband, David, the father of her two
older children. David’s new girlfriend
was reportedly unhappy with their
close contact.
On Dec. 17,
1981, a neigh-
bor noticed
that Alma’s
front door had
been open all
m o r n i n g .
Concer ned,
she walked in-
side Alma’s house, calling out for her
when, to her horror, she came upon a
lifeless Alma lying face-down in her
bed. There was blood all over the
room. Now, almost 33 years later, after
being approached by Alma’s family,
newly elected Paulding County Sheriff
Jason Landers has reopened Alma’s
case and as-
signed two
seasoned in-
vestigators to
it, Deputy
Robert Garcia
and Lt. Brion
Hanenkrat t .
During the
past months,
they’ve formed a close relationship
with Alma’s family and have vowed to
put whoever is responsible behind
bars.”
Airs on: Friday, Aug. 8, 2014
It appears that very little information
was released at the time of the incident.
The Dec. 22, 1981 edition of the
Randy Shaffer/Paulding County Progress
FUN AT SUMMERFEST – Grover Hill celebrated its annual Summerfest last weekend at Welcome Park. One of the high-
lights was the parade on Saturday morning. Parade units included ball teams, businesses and classic cars. For more pho-
tos, visit our website at www.progressnewspaper.org.
Possible bobcat sighted in county
By DENISE GEBERS
Progress Staff Writer
FORT BROWN – Last week the
Paulding County Sheriff’s Office re-
ceived what it believed to be a credible re-
port of a “large cat” in Brown Township.
Sheriff Jason Landers issued a press re-
lease July 22 stating the animal was seen
running north of the intersection of roads
151 and 108 on the east side of the road.
Two contractors working in the area were
the source of the information.
Additionally, several days preceding
this sighting, a local resident told deputies
that they had heard the cry of a cat in the
area. They said it did not sound like a
“normal” cat.
“The animal was described as 40-50
pounds, approximately knee high, a long
body and the color of a bale of straw,”
said Sheriff Landers. “The description
could be that of a bobcat or mountain
lion.
“I am sending out this press release to
inform the residents of this area what was
reported. We have not had any reports of
livestock being killed or property dam-
age,” he continued. “However, residents
might pay attention while outside, espe-
cially when small children are playing
outdoors.”
Communities For Kids school
supply project is under way
2A - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, July 30, 2014
As in the past, there will be many food and
craft booths ready to serve the park attendees as
well as a variety of informational tables. The
Little Maumee Express train will be on hand to
offer rides to the children rides.
New this year will be a “chalk walk” for the
kids and miniature golf.
Other popular activities returning this year
will include the car show hosted by Larry
Copsey and Dan Bowers. The duck race will
also make its way down the lazy river, or if your
talent is baking, there will be a pie baking con-
test.
The public is invited to bring their retired flags
and leave them at the chamber table for a dis-
posal ceremony at 4 p.m. by the Antwerp Boy
Scouts and the Antwerp VFW.
There is still time to have an informational
booth. Please note, if anyone has information or
“goodies” to distribute, they are required to have
a table so the people can come visit it.
There is something for everyone. Bring a lawn
chair hair and come to the park for a day of fun.
By JOE SHOUSE
Progress Staff Writer
ANTWERP – Antwerp’s 15th annual Day In
the Park is scheduled for Saturday, Aug. 9 at
Riverside Park. The day will be filled with com-
munity fun at the beautiful park along the
Maumee River.
The day will kick off at 10 a.m. with a parade
through downtown Antwerp. The crowd will
then gather at the park at 11 a.m. for the official
opening of the day’s events with the community
band leading those in attendance in the National
Anthem and a salute to the United States.
Following the patriotic celebration of music
will be the presentation of the Gem of Antwerp
and the Friend of the Chamber.
Entertainment will continue on stage to in-
clude the community band, Dance Dolls, the
Alley Cats, “Johnny Appleseed” and the
Paulding County Sheriff’s Office will do a
demonstration with their K-9 unit. Those attend-
ing are encouraged to leave their pets at home so
they do not interfere with the program.
By JIM LANGHAM
Feature Writer
PAULDING – Paulding
County commissioners an-
nounced on Monday they have
put out a letter asking for bids
to do major repairs on the local
courthouse. Commissioners
are asking for bids on a pro-
posal for cleaning, sealants,
masonry repair, brick repair or
replacement, sheet metal and
water repellent.
“The need for many of these
repairs is not really noticeable
from the street,” commented
Commissioner Tony Zartman.
“When you get up by the dome
and look behind the chimneys,
it really looks bad.
“It’s to the point where we
are even concerned about pub-
lic safety issues,” continued
Zartman. “If some brick were
to let go and land on the side-
walk, it could be a very dan-
gerous situation. This is a pri-
ority yet this year.”
Zartman said that commis-
sioners hope that things can get
rolling as soon as a proper bid
is accepted, prior to the coming
of late fall and winter weather.
“We are aware that this is
going to be a very expensive
project, but it has to get done.
Our office is committed to the
preservation and maintenance
of this beautiful building for
future generations to appreci-
ate,” observed Zartman. “We
want people to see the level of
pride we have in our commu-
nity by looking at our court-
house square.”
Zartman said that diligence
is also being given to grounds
keeping and more flowers. He
said that commissioners are
well aware of the need to keep
the community looking good
in order to attract new busi-
n SUPPLIES
Continued from Page 1A
expenditure for a new comput-
er for the police department
and a $300 upgrade to the
computer for the cruiser. The
office computer is outdated
and doesn’t meet the standards
from the state.
As for the fire department,
their office computer needs the
2013 version of Microsoft
software installed at a cost of
As of Monday, the sheriff
said his office had not been
notified of any other sightings.
He said several calls have
come in indicating other peo-
ple have seen such cats in the
area. These callers told
deputies the animals are just
living and not hurting any-
thing.
Landers’ office does not
keep record of “large cat”
complaints, but he did remem-
ber a call from the early
2000s. He said people reacted
by going on their own “lion
hunts” in areas where the ani-
mals were seen.
According to the Ohio
Department of Natural
Resources’ website, bobcats
(Lynx rufus) are native to Ohio
but were extirpated (meaning
it was present at the time of
European settlement, but has
since disappeared) from the
state in 1850. Although sight-
ings are relatively rare around
the state, they have been on
the rise. Between 1970 and
2009 there were 359 verified
reports with 92 of them in
2009 alone.
The ODNR species guide
describes the bobcat as having
short, dense, soft fur that
varies in color from light gray,
yellowish brown, buff, brown
and reddish brown on the
upper parts. The middle of the
back is usually darker than the
sides and their undersides are
whitish with spots or bars. The
backs of their ears are black
with white spots and black
tips. Their tails, which are 4 to
7.5 inches long, are also black.
ODNR does not have list-
ing for mountain lions (Puma
concolor), also known as pan-
thers, cougars and pumas. No
information about sightings
was listed either.
Animal Diversity Web,
published by University of
Michigan, indicates these
largest American cats ranged
from coast to coast in North
America and into South
America in earlier times.
It says the big cats are slen-
der with short muscular limbs.
Coloration varies from yel-
lowish brown to grayish
brown with pale under belly
and whitish chests. They can
weigh from 64 to 265 lbs. and
are 34 to 61 inches long. Their
tails are long and cylindrical
and about one-third of the an-
imal’s total length.
The site indicated most
mountain lion sightings in the
eastern U.S. are likely to be
escaped or abandoned “pets.”
Big cat sightings in
Paulding and surrounding
counties have been mentioned
numerous times on social
media outlets in the past few
years. Rumors about big cats
have occasionally surfaced for
several decades.
Sheriff Landers said the
local game warden was noti-
fied of this most recent report
and is involved in the investi-
gation. He urged residents to
contact his office if they see an
animal matching the descrip-
tion he gave and not to take
action on their own. Call 419-
399-3791 or visit the office
website at www.pauldin-
gohsheriff.com and leave an
email for the sheriff.
Wildlife Officer Mike
Ohlrich could not be reached
for comment.
mitted to restoring this build-
ing and maintain it so that fu-
ture generations can enjoy it
and be proud.”
The current structure was
built in 1886 after approxi-
mately 50 years of use of a
prior wooden structure on the
courthouse square. The build-
ing is considered to be two and
a half stories high with a cen-
tral tower. It is a brick building
with a stone foundation.
In 1974, due to its well-pre-
served architecture, it was list-
ed on the National Register of
Historic Places.
nesses.
“If we’re not willing to in-
vest in ourselves, nobody is
going to invest here either,”
said Zartman.
Zartman said that bids have
already been advertised on a
national website for contrac-
tors.
“There seems to be a great
deal of interest in contractors
actively seeking bids,” said
Zartman.
In the past few years, com-
missioners have renovated the
dome, put a new roof on the
dome and the courthouse,
painted and trimmed, taken
care of electrical concerns and
accomplished several small re-
pairs inside the building.
“This is the big and final
project we’ve been working
towards to bring the court-
house up to where it should
be,” Zartman. “We are com-
enough moisture, the brace
roots can’t grow.”
“Can those plants recover?
That depends on the severity
of the situation,” observed
Noggle. “Right now we are or
have been at the peak of polli-
nation. The plants need plenty
of moisture.”
“Fortunately,” said Noggle,
“rains late last week and over
the weekend are going to be a
boost to many of the situa-
tions.
“These were well-timed
rains with pollination going
on,” Noggle continued.
“Another thing we are look-
ing at right now is corn goose
necking, which makes it more
difficulty to harvest.”
Two other conditions that
Noggle is currently monitor-
ing is in beans – brown spot
and frogeye leaf spot. Noggle
pointed out that if there are
brown spots on later planted
fields, it is likely that the added
costs of the application com-
bined with the yield loss from
later planting are going to hurt
the overall budget for that
field.
Noggle said that frogeye is
caused by the fungus, “cer-
cospora sojina” and causes
“whiskers” on the underside of
the bean leaf in spots.
Some areas this past week-
end received large hail, but
there doesn’t appear to be
widespread damage. Most
rainfall amounts ranged from
close to an inch in the western
part of the county to nearly
two inches in some areas
southeast of Paulding.
However, in the extreme
southeast, hardly any rain fell.
Weather specialist Rick
McCoy said that the National
Weather Service doesn’t be-
lieve that there is going to be
any major changes in the
weather pattern early in
August with the exception of a
little drier pattern setting in
early.
Temperatures still look to be
way below normal for the first
part of the month, said
McCoy.
system can be blown over
sooner by strong winds.
“I have noticed several
lodging factors to be con-
cerned about,” said Noggle.
“Roots are pretty shallow, in
some ways due to soil com-
paction. If you’re in a dryer sit-
uation, if you don’t have
ground.
The danger of that, said
Noggle, is that if a dry spell
comes, roots will not be
formed in a way that is needed
to get down to where moisture
deeper in the ground is still
available. In addition, corn
with a poorly supported root
fields.
One of those is corn lodg-
ing, particularly in the south-
ern part of the county. Due to
an abundance of early rain in
several fields, Noggle said that
many of the stalks’ roots have
developed to the side rather
than digging deep into the
By JIM LANGHAM
Feature Writer
Driving through the coun-
tryside gives a view of another
good farm crop on the way,
but Paulding County OSU
Extension agent Sarah Noggle
said recently there are con-
cerns she is monitoring in area
money donation, Alex
Products will be donating 90
packs of loose leaf note book
paper and Boyd Automotive
has also donated.
Divine Mercy Catholic
Church will be holding a spe-
cial collection Aug. 10 to be
disbursed to all area supply
drives. Communities For Kids
wishes to thank each one for
their support.
Oakwood students may reg-
ister for supplies by calling the
library. Available supplies may
be picked up at the library
from 10-11 a.m. on Aug. 16.
Paulding students can pick
up supplies on Aug. 16 from 9
a.m.-noon at Patrick Place
Apartments Community
Room in Emerald Acres.
Antwerp’s giveaway is set
for noon-4 p.m. Aug. 17 at
Riverside Family Center (cor-
ner of Road 192 and Ohio 49
north of Antwerp).
The Department of Job and
Family Services will have lim-
ited funding available for eligi-
ble families this year.
Communities For Kids will be
working with them to make
sure they know to register for
supplies by calling the library.
Available supplies may be
picked up at the library from
10-11 a.m. on Aug. 16.
count at First Federal to fill in
the holes.
Also, if anyone wants to just
sponsor a child and bring in
supplies for one child for a
specific grade, they can con-
tact Susan or Nicole and they
will make arrangements with
the child. Communities For
Kids would like to thank St.
John’s Tire for collecting book
bags and to the First Christian
Church for sponsoring a grade.
“We have made a few con-
tacts and are waiting to hear
from other local organiza-
tions,” said Harris.
Other donations have be
made by Dangler Excavating
By JOE SHOUSE
Progress Staff Writer
Over the years, many things have
changed since I was a student in the
public schools. I remember taking 15
cents to school and it would entitle
me to a carton of milk every day for
a week. Book rental was around $6
per semester and lunch at the school
cafeteria was 35 cents. I would go to
school on the first day wearing new
pants and shirt and pencil in hand. It
was a simpler kind of life back then
or at least I thought so.
Now, many years later, it’s a new
era, a new day, and as changes take
place I could not help but notice the
school supply lists that each parent is
required to fulfill before the first bell
rings on the first day back to school.
After reading the long list of supplies
necessary in order to go to school, it
made me relish the good old days
and at the same time wonder how
young families with more than one
child manages these days.
The idea of buying all the school
supplies, paying book rental, pur-
chasing school clothes, gym shoes
and back packs and lunch boxes.
Then sporting events start and tickets
to games need to be bought and soon
it will time for school pictures. That
is some kind of list and I am proba-
bly leaving something out.
With a sigh I am so thankful that I
don’t have to fulfill the long list
today. I did that already a few years
ago. Not once but twice. I guess I
were packaged in two’s or four’s or
even a dozen. So, you make a deci-
sion on what to buy and hope every-
one will be happy. Kleenex was to be
200 count – not the easiest thing to
find. I thought about trying to slip in
a box that had 160 count but I kept
looking and finally found 200 count
Kleenex. Mission accomplished. I
guess the lists could have been a lit-
tle more specific.
I must admit, I left each shopping
experience frustrated and I didn’t
have a fourth grader hanging on to
my leg making sure I did it right. It
was all make-believe for me and I
still found myself talking to myself
in aisle 7 as I stared at the high price
Expo dry erase markers. For those of
you that are experiencing the real
thing - good luck. You will probably
be talking to yourself before its all
over.
I confess – I was able to make
most all my purchases and with the
exception of an item or two I did al-
right, but you will have to take a lit-
tle trip in order to get the deals. So,
here is what I discovered on my
“let’s pretend” shopping trips, al-
though the prices are real.
A fourth grader attending
Antwerp: The two large stores were
about the same with one being
$20.20 while the other was $19.73.
The local store came in at $35.69.
A fourth grader attending
Paulding this year: One large store
was $41.31 and the other $36.24.
Again, the local store came in at
$48.98.
A fourth grade Oakwood student:
The two larger stores were very
close with one at $26.71 and the
other being $24.45. The local busi-
ness where most all the supplies can
be purchased was $53.29.
A fourth grader attending Grover
Hill will spend $38.72 and $43.72 at
the two discount box stores while at
the local store within the county the
total came in at $78.40.
Here are some of my observations
concerning the stores visited. There
were deals at all three and even the
local store had the lower price on a
few of the items. If money is not the
problem and time is important then
shop local. You can get the job done
in 30 minutes.
The selection and choices were
about the same at the two large de-
partment stores. Prices were cut deep
on crayons, glue, index cards and
notebooks. I had a hard time finding
red ink pens, folders with pockets
and prongs and I never did find
medium point markers.
Like anything we purchase today,
it is always best to shop around in
order to save money. It will take time
and effort but it’s the way it is and
there is no one to fault. However, I
look back when I went to school on
the first day with pencil in hand and
15 cents in my pocket and the world
seemed alright and I guess the world
is alright today.
have paid my dues. But I can’t help
but sense the pressure that many fam-
ilies must be feeling as the middle of
August approaches and school is just
around the corner.
And while living in Paulding
County, unfortunately, many of the
purchases pertaining to school will
need to be made at one of the larger
discount box stores we are all famil-
iar with, outside of the county. So,
purchasing many of the school sup-
plies will require a trip – probably
more than one trip. And with gas at
nearly $4 a gallon, the costs continue
to rise.
So, to get a better understanding
about these school supplies and how
much they will cost, I decided to do
my own unscientific research.
Therefore, I decided to play the game
called “let’s pretend.” So, I went on a
shopping trip (actually three trips) to
buy school supplies for my fourth
grader (that’s the pretend part). I
wanted to see first hand what many
families will be attempting to do over
the next few weeks. Just how much
money will they be shelling out for
glue, crayons and pencils.
Now, I write this, not to blame
teachers, the school district, the gov-
ernment or president. It’s 2014 and
it’s just the way it is and families
have to deal with it the best they can.
But I do write this, almost as an apol-
ogy, to those of you who never expe-
rienced $6 book rental and lunches
for less than a dollar.
With list in hand I went shopping
for my pretend fourth grader who
had no voice in my decision making
when it came to making critical pur-
chases. If I could purchase 20 pencils
for 99 cents then I got the pencils
even if I only needed ten and if it was
the brand name the teacher expected
then I tried to hold fast to that request
as well. I shopped at two large dis-
count stores that are out of county
and I also purchased school supplies
in Paulding County at a chain store.
Since the lists were different for each
school I shopped as if my fourth
grader was attending Grover Hill,
Oakwood, Antwerp and Paulding.
Four schools with different request
items when it comes to school sup-
plies.
There is nothing scientific about
my shopping trips. I picked a day
and went to the various stores. I had
no flyers advertising specials and no
coupons. I simply tried to get the
best deals.
What I did discover was how the
lists were somewhat incomplete. For
example, a fourth grader is to have a
highlighter but there are several
styles, colors and widths including
fine, medium and wide. Or, a box of
Ziploc bags, quart size or gallon size.
But, how many in a box should I
buy?
Well, since I was buying them, I
bought the cheapest. Or there were
things like glue sticks where the re-
quest was three sticks and yet they
copyright © 2014 Published weekly by
The Paulding County Progress, Inc. P.O.
Box 180, 113 S. Williams St., Paulding,
Ohio 45879 Phone 419-399-4015
Fax: 419-399-4030;
website: www.progressnewspaper.org
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Entered at the Post Office in Paulding,
Ohio, as 2nd class matter. Subscription
rates: $38 per year for mailing addresses
in Defiance, Van Wert Putnam and Paulding
counties. $46 per year outside these coun-
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Deadline for display adver-
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News deadline 3 p.m.
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Paulding County Progress
n BIG CAT
Continued from Page 1A
See PAYNE, page 8A
The adventures of shopping for school supplies
By JOE SHOUSE
Progress Staff Writer
PAYNE – On Monday
evening, the Payne Village
Council met in regular session.
Computer upgrades in the po-
lice and fire department were
approved, council okayed the
gun raffle for the fire depart-
ment, and a promotion was
also made within the fire de-
partment.
Council approved a $1,120
Noggle sees some concerns in corn, bean fields
Courthouse to receive major repair work
Antwerp Day In the
Park set for Aug. 9
Computer updates,
gun raffle approved
Wednesday, July 30, 2014 Paulding County Progress - 3A
Obituaries
Updated weekdays at www.progressnewspaper.org
Obituaries are
posted daily
The Paulding County
Progress posts obituaries
daily as we receive them.
Check our Web site at
www.progressnewspaper.
org and click on “For the
Record.”
The Amish Cook
2 eggs, beaten
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon paprika
3 cups cooked diced chicken
1/2 cup cooked peas
Mix ingredients in the order
given and pour into a greased
loaf pan. Bake at 350° for 1
hour. Let stand 10 minutes
before turning out of pan.
May be served hot or cold.
A reader in Mt. Sterling,
Ohio asked about tomato
fritters:
MENNONITE
TOMATO FRITTERS
1 cup all-purpose four
1 teaspoon sugar
1/4 teaspoon dried basil OR
2 tablespoons fresh basil,
minced
1 tablespoon parsley, minced
1 egg
Vegetable oil for frying
1 tsp. baking powder
3/4 teaspoon salt
1 (28 oz.) can tomatoes,
drained
1 tablespoon onions, minced
1/2 teaspoon Worcestershire
sauce
In a large bowl, combine
four, baking powder, sugar,
basil and salt. Cut tomatoes
into 1/2 inch pieces and drain
further on a paper towel. Add
them to the flour mixture
This is part two of our
summer recipe series,
answering reader requests for
different recipes. The column
will return in its usual format
next week.
A reader in Hampshire,
W.Va. asked for a “bacon
dressing” recipe:
HOT BACON DRESSING
1 pound bacon cooked and
crumbled
2 cups sugar
2 teaspoons salt
3 eggs (depending on size)
1 cup white vinegar
4 cups of greens (lettuce,
endive or dandelions)
Preheat large skillet, lightly
greased to med/high. Mix
all ingredients, except for
bacon and greens, in a mixing
bowl. Pour ingredients from
mixing bowl into skillet and
heat just to boiling. Add
crumbled bacon. Add four or
cornstarch to thicken to about
the consistency of gravy,
and it’s done. Traditionally,
this was served over lettuce,
endive, or dandelions.
A reader in Huber Heights,
Ohio asked for a chicken loaf
recipe:
CHICKEN LOAF
WITH PEAS
1 cup soft bread crumbs
2 cups milk
along with onion, parsley and
Worcestershire sauce, but do
not mix in. In small bowl, beat
egg and add it to the four-
tomato mixture. Blend lightly
with a fork. Heat oil (about
1/4 inch) in fry pan. Drop the
batter by tablespoons into hot
oil. Fry until golden brown on
both sides. Keep fritters warm
in oven until serving. Serves
4 - 6.
A reader in Floral City,
Fla., requested a homemade
chocolate ice cream recipe!
MOCHA ICE CREAM
1 tablespoon gelatin
1/2 cup cold coffee
1 small can evaporated milk
2 cups milk
1 cup brown sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 cup whipping cream
1/2 cup nuts or shredded
coconut
Dissolve gelatin in cold
coffee. Let stand fve minutes
and then melt over hot
water until clear. Combine
evaporated milk, brown
sugar, vanilla and milk. Add
dissolved gelatin and stir
until thoroughly mixed. Add
whipped cream and pour
into mold and allow to set
in refrigerator. Garnish with
nuts, coconut or maraschino
cherries. Makes 6-8 servings.
Would you like to work with
funeral directors who understand
how valuable it is for you and your
family to have a truly meaningful
funeral experience?
When the time comes to honor a
loved one’s memory in a personal
way, give us a call.
Dooley
FUNERAL HOME
Antwerp
419-258-5684
49c1
Payne
419-263-0000
For a Life Worth Celebrating
SM
www.dooleyfuneralhome.com
1st Saturday of each month.
Paulding County Fairgrounds 9-11
Cecil Fire Department 9-12
If you have questions
call ERIE RECYCLING at 419-258-2345
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The following obituary is
being reprinted to correct an
error.
RONDA WYNNE
1953-2013
SHERWOOD – Ronda
Sue (Kreager) Wynne, 60, of
Sherwood, died unexpectedly
on Nov. 17, 2013 in
Guangdong, China, where she
was teaching Spoken English.
R o n d a
graduated
f r o m
An t we r p
L o c a l
in 1971
and was
an avi d
crafter and
seamstress.
Survivors are her husband,
Steve; sons, Josh and Chris
(Penny) Wynne; parents,
Harold and Ruby Kreager;
siblings Rod (Susan) Kreager,
Cindy (Terry) Slattman,
and Jan (Scott) Michael;
niece Melinda (Corbin)
Rhonehouse; and nephew Jay
Michael.
Services were held at Holy
Trinity Evangelical Lutheran
Church in Harlan, Ind. on
Saturday, July 19, 2014 with
the Rev. Amy Beitelschees-
Albers.
GERALDINE
GRIFFIN
1917-2014
ST. CLAIR SHORES,
Mich. – Geraldine M. Griffn,
97, died Sunday, July 20.
She was the beloved wife of
the late Harold D. Workman
and the late Harold Griffn;
and the loving mother of the
late Sonny Workman and the
late Gene Workman.
She was the dear
49c1
Call us at 419-399-3887
Toll Free
1-800-784-5321
To soften the sorrow,
To comfort the living,
Flowers say it
best!
grandmother of Sheryl
Workman and Robert
( Wi l l i am) Wor kman
and great-grandchildren,
Katharine, Azalea, Anjelika
and Andrew.
She is also survived by
step-children, Shirley Brumer,
David (Debbie) Griffn and
step-grandchildren, Cathleen
(Geoff) Daniel, Pamela
(Todd) Brown and David
(Laura) Griffn.
Burial services were at
Little Auglaize Cemetery in
Melrose.
Memorials may be made to
Redeemer United Methodist
Church, 20571 Vernier Road,
Harper Woods, Mich. 48225.
Gendernalik Funeral Home,
New Baltimore, was in charge
of the arrangements.
MARGARET
CLEMENS
1925-2014
LATTY – Margaret A.
Clemens, age 89, died
Tuesday, July 22 at the
Country Inn Enhanced Living
Center, Paulding.
She was born Feb. 14, 1925
in Paulding
C o u n t y ,
t h e
da ught e r
of El za
and Emma
( Hube r t )
Tope. On
Feb. 14,
1948, she
married William K. Clemens,
who survives. She was a
member of the Paulding
Church of Christ. She retired
in 1986 from the U.S. Postal
Service as postmaster of the
Latty Post Offce.
She is survived by her
husband, William Clemens,
Latty; two sons, Randy
(Karen) Clemens of Naples,
Fla. and Brad (Kathy)
Clemens of Paulding; and fve
grandchildren, Seth, Jacob,
Adam and Gabriel (Kimberly)
Clemens and Ella (Patrick)
Thomas.
She was preceded in death
by her parents; four brothers,
Wilbur, August, Ira and
Carl Tope; and three sisters,
Catherine Stoller, Maxine
Riggenbach and Dorathea
Blue.
Funeral services were
Saturday, July 26 at the
Den Herder Funeral Home,
Paulding. Burial was in Blue
Creek Cemetery, Haviland.
In lieu of fowers, the family
requests donations made to
Country Inn Enhanced Living
Center Activity Fund.
Online condolences may
be sent to www.denherderfh.
com.
MAURICE
MARTIN
1920-2014
WOODBURN – Maurice
B. Martin, 93, of Woodburn,
passed away Saturday, July 26
at Byron Health Center, Fort
Wayne.
Oakwood EMS coordinator resigns;
new council member appointed
By BILL SHERRY
Correspondent
OAKWOOD – EMS coordinator Chad
Brown has resigned effective July 31. Mayor
Erhard “Bud” Henke thanked Brown for the
time and effort that he has put into the job.
Oakwood Village Council appointed
Pam Erford as temporary EMS coordinator
beginning July 31.
Brown indicated that he had fnished the
grant cycle on June 30 and had ordered the
following equipment from grant money: 10
EZ Drivers, batteries for the Phillips monitor,
two AEDs, new backboards, new stair chair,
C-pap equipment and new Sager splints.
Brown advised council that the Phillips
monitor needs a motor. Brown also noted
that the backup squad printer driver needs
replaced at a cost of $1,500.
Brown indicated that they had four people
interested in the basic EMT course, which
consisted of 150 hours of training over fve
or six months to become a basic EMT. It
was noted that a need for additional EMTs is
critical at this time and if anyone is interested,
they should contact the village offce. Brown
also offered to train frst responders from the
Auglaize Township Fire Department.
Auglaize Township Trustee Bill Wiles
commented that the response time from
Oakwood EMS was too long. Mayor Henke
told council and Wiles that he and Police
Chief Mark Figert were investigating several
options, including setting up joint districts,
more training, Henry County model, and
possibly hiring an EMT to cover from 6 a.m.-6
p.m. Henke stated that some changes had to
be made and they were actively working to
get response time down.
Four village residents were present to
inquire about the vacant council seat. Each
candidate introduced themselves. Council
voted to seat Cheryl Ellwanger as the new
council member to bring the total council
members to six.
The other three village residents that
were interested in the council seat were
Frank Marvin, Ron Wisenberger and Eric
Hanenkratt.
Chief Figert reported the following calls
received and cleared in June: welfare check
(2), 911 hang up (1), child abuse (2), keep
the peace (1), criminal damaging (1), assist
EMS (5), and trash complaint (1). Thirteen
complaints were reported and cleared for the
month.
Figert has completed a 32 hour feld sobriety
class in Paulding and fnished the basic EMS
refresher class.
Village administrator John Keyes told
council that an aerator motor failed last week
and they had to buy and install a new motor.
Keyes also noted that they were getting ready
for the upcoming Oakwood Homecoming
weekend.
Mayor Henke reminded council that Cooper
Farms will be having an open house at their
new biosecurity facility from 11 a.m.-3 p.m.
on July 31. The facility is located east of
Oakwood on Ohio 613.
Mayor Henke distributed information
to council regarding House Bill 5, which
concerns municipal tax reform. Some of the
provisions of the bill indicate that if this bill
passes there would be reduced revenue from
municipality’s income tax.
Henke provided council with information
regarding the Local Government
Transportation Survey which will begin a
regional transportation plan on July 1, 2015.
The next regular council meeting will be at
6:30 p.m. Aug. 18.
Commissioners’ Journal
Commissioners’ Journal July 7, 2014
This 7th day of July, 2014, the
Board of County Commissioners met
in regular session with the following
members present: Roy Klopfenstein,
Fred Pieper, and Nola Ginter, Clerk.
Absent: Tony Zartman.
MEETING NOTES OF
APPOINTMENTS
Edward Bohn, EMA director, met
with the commissioners for his weekly
scheduled meeting. He reported he is
working on achieving administrative
privileges with Facebook to assist in
reporting adverse weather conditions.
Bohn will be attending the fire
chiefs’ meeting tomorrow evening
and hopes to address the guidelines
for dangerous weather updates. He
reported Van Wert County has had 20
tornados since 1970. Paulding County
has had six tornados in that same time
frame.
Bohn has been working with
Defiance County’s EMA director
to complete Paulding County’s
LEPC fscal report. The Paulding
County Auditor’s offce is assisting
by running revenue and expense
reports. The application for Bohn to
be approved for the LEPC has been
forwarded to the state. Once Bohn
is approved by the state, he would
like to set a meeting of the Paulding
County LEPC. He plans to try and
schedule an exercise this fall and also
next spring.
Bohn was reminded there are three
new weather sirens being stalled,
fnanced with CDBG dollars. Bohn
noted the sheriff’s offce tests the
sirens every Wednesday at 1 p.m.
He will ask the fire chiefs for a
representative to be responsible for
making sure the sirens are working
by being at their physical location
on Wednesday at 1 p.m. All non-
working sirens should be reported to
its respective subdivision if repairs
need to be made. Bohn said he could
assist if the problem is with the radio.
Bohn then noted he recently
applied for a grant for hazmat
training. The grant would pay for
supplies and props to use during the
training/exercise. He noted there are
counties that may not use their entire
grant award. The funds they return
are reissued to other counties. Bohn
reported he will be purchasing EOC
(Emergency Operations Center) fow
charts unless he fnds some in the
offce or storage unit. He will also
contact Jeff Beattie at Ohio EPA
regarding his LEPC application
approval.
Bohn has also been working on
a listing of damaged equipment and
office supplies resulting from the
mercury spill. The list will be turned
into the county’s insurance.
Eric Baughman, Baughman Tile;
and Ben Moore, Moore Farms –
Baughman and Moore met with the
commissioners to discuss the tiling
of the farm north of Paulding on U.S.
127. Moore Farms has the current cash
rent agreement and has requested the
commissioners consider tiling two 80-
acre felds.
Baughman, Moore and the
commissioners reviewed aerial maps
of the felds. Moore commented he
hopes to have the wheat harvested
soon and would like to start the tiling
project soon after. He won’t be able
to determine the outlet needs until he
begins digging. Baughman asked that
the commissioners and Moore keep
him up to date on the project and its
progress.
Commissioners’ Journal July 9, 2014
This 9th day of July, 2014, the
Board of County Commissioners met
in regular session with the following
members present: Roy Klopfenstein,
Fred Pieper, and Nola Ginter, Clerk.
Absent: Tony Zartman.
MEETING NOTES OF
APPOINTMENTS
Brion Hanenkratt, E-911
coordinator, Hanenkratt reported the
dates have been set for reprogramming
the radios for the sheriff’s office,
the fire departments, the township
trustees, and the schools. The sheriff’s
offce will be coordinating the process.
Hanenkratt noted he had attended
the fre chiefs’ meeting last night. He
said it was well attended.
Sheriff Jason Landers presented
2014 budget projections for wages,
equipment and supplies. He explained
certain equipment purchased are
reimbursable with grant dollars.
Sheriff Landers then reviewed the
inmate report for June, 2014. There
were a total of 53 inmates held during
the month of June with days served
totaling 696. A total of 33 trips to
the Putnam County Jail were made,
totaling 2,747 miles.
The biannual report for the frst
half of 2014 was also reviewed. A
total of 213 inmates were held the frst
six months of 2014 with days served
totaling 3,767. A total of 267 trips
(18,373 miles) were made in the frst
half of the year.
Comparing the frst half of 2014 to
the same time frame in 2013, it was
noted the total number of inmates were
down by 13 in 2014. Sheriff Landers
commented there was a savings in out-
housing costs of $50,600.20 due to the
agreement made with Putnam County.
Landers also noted a total savings
of $51,854.48 in medical costs (billed
versus what was negotiated to pay).
He commended his staff member for
working with the medical providers to
negotiate a discount on services.
Sheriff Landers announced he has
scheduled informational meetings to
discuss the feasibility of reopening the
jail. His goal is for the meetings to be
“informative.” He noted he wants the
public to know the facts so they can
decide what they want for Paulding
County.
The commissioners updated
Sheriff Landers on the status of
Paulding County LEPC. Mr. Bohn’s
application has been submitted to
the state for approval. Once he is
approved, LEPC meetings should
resume on a regular basis. Sheriff
Landers commented the recent LEPC
training was very informative. He
personally participated and learned
the importance of designating duties
during an emergency situation.
He also commented having an EOC
(Emergency Operations Center) in
Paulding County should be a priority.
County Court Judge Suzanne Rister
reported traffic-related cases have
increased signifcantly. Criminal and
civil cases are both on the increase as
well.
Rister noted the process of making
her position full-time is slowly
progressing. The Supreme Court has
approved the change. The legislative
branch is next to act. Judge Rister said
she hopes to fnd out more when she
attends the judges’ conference next
week in Sandusky.
Klopfenstein reviewed the
blueprints for the proposed remodeling
of the CSEA half of their building.
Judge Rister briefly discussed
the law library and the county’s
requirements to maintain it. She talked
about the fees collected and what the
fees cover.
EMA director Edward Bohn
reported on the recent heavy rainfall in
the southwest section of the county. He
stated he was out and about and noted
good draining with no apparent serious
basement/home fooding situations.
He then presented a list of supplies
and equipment damaged by the recent
discovery of a mercury spill at the
EMA offce.
Bohn also reported he had attended
the fre chiefs’ meeting. He is currently
working on new SOG (Standard
Operating Guidelines) with the sheriff
and other frst responders.
He informed the commissioners
the fre chiefs have the capability of
alerting his own area of severe weather
conditions by activating their siren.
Tornado warnings/watches alerts will
still be the county EMA responsibility.
The commissioners informed Bohn
the report from the recent LEPC
training exercise is available at the
health department. Klopfenstein
updated Bohn on the SHSP (State
Homeland Security Program) grant,
telling him the grant has been used in
its entirety.
IN THE MATTER OF
AMENDING THE 2014 ANNUAL
APPROPRIATION (FUND 001-
015)
See JOURNAL, page 5A
Nicelley appointed
to Board of Health
PAULDING – At the Paulding County
district advisory council meeting held July 22
at the Paulding County Health Department,
Lisa Nicelley, RN, BSN was appointed to the
Paulding County Board of Health.
Nicelley replaces Gary Adkins and will
complete his term which expires March 2018.
Attending the meeting were district advisory
council president, Mark Holtsberry; Emerald
Township trustee, Kevin Anderson; Village
of Paulding mayor, Greg White; Paulding
County commissioner, Tony Zartman;
health commissioner, Larry Fishbaugh
and emergency response coordinator, Bill
Edwards.
We would like to thank all of
our friends and family for the
large amount of support they
have given us during this
rough time. No words could
ever express our appreciation
for the love and support
you have shown us afer the
passing of Harper. We would
like to say thank you to our
neighbors on Woodland Dr.
for the generous donation
and also to everyone that has
brought meals to our home. It
makes us so thankful that we
chose such a great community
to call home.
Jarod and Megan Martenies
47p1
4A - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, July 30, 2014
Police Report
For the Record
FORUM Reader’s Opinion
Express your opinion

The Paulding County Progress provides
a public forum through “FORUM Reader
Opinion” Letters to the Editor for area
residents to express their opinions and
exchange ideas on any topic of public
interest.
All letters submitted are subject to the
Publisher’s approval, and MUST include
an original signature and daytime tele-
phone number for verification. We won’t
print unsigned letters.
Letters should be brief and concise.
Letters must also conform to libel law and
be in good taste. Please limit letters to
no more than 500 words. We reserve the
right to edit and to correct grammatical
errors. We also reserve the right to verify
statements or facts presented in the let-
ters.
The opinions stated are those of the
writer, and do not necessarily reflect that
of the newspaper.
Where to write: Letters to the Editor,
Paulding County Progress, P.O. Box 180,
Paulding OH 45879; or drop them off at
the office, 113 S. Williams St. The dead-
line is noon Thursday the week prior to
publication.
See COUNTY COURT, page 5A
County Court
In good times business

people want to advertise.
In bad times they have to.
Learn how your commu-
nity newspaper can help
you – call the Progress
today at 419-399-4015.
Carol’s
Main Street
Makeovers
105 N. Main, Payne
419-263-2030
49c1
Millers grateful
to Antwerp
community
Dear Editor,
The Jim Miller family
wishes to express our sincere
gratitude to the Antwerp
community for the generous
support offered at our yard
sale for Tom Ulepic.
We are truly blessed to be
part of such a caring family
oriented community. Thank
you for your prayers, support
and contributions.
Jim and Joyce Miller
Antwerp
Support for the
livestock farmers
Dear Editor,
I’ve decided we need to
write in support of livestock
farmers in our area. We have
turkeys, hogs and mink all
within a mile of where we
live. We purchased our farm
in 1962 and at that time we
had livestock and the farms
around us some did also. I
see three of the complainers
all left here, made their
living some where else,
came back to their inherited
farm or ground, and are now
complaining about the quality
of air. We think farmers are
responsible here and hope
they stay.
We purchase manure to put
on our felds. Yes, it smells
a day or two. When you
live in the country, the big
machinery, the buzzing fies,
the smell of manure and the
mist of pesticides are all here.
We have several new
homes and people have
purchased existing homes
here. We have lots of people
riding bikes and walking here
that don’t live here. We don’t
feel our property value has
went down.
Our largest employer in the
county is a large livestock
producer and it doesn’t make
sense to run them out of the
county because a livestock
barn may go up west of
Paulding. I’ve seen people
that were struggling to make
a living now have jobs and
are thriving.
We support the livestock
industry in Paulding County.
Leon and Genelta Levos
Paulding
ACCIDENT REPORTS
Friday, July 18
1:30 p.m. Ronald Swary Jr., 31, of
Paulding, was cited for assured clear
distance following a two-vehicle
accident on North Williams Street.
Reports say he did not observe a 2014
Jeep Compass stopped in traffc near
the West Jackson Street intersection
and struck it from behind with his 2006
Toyota SUV. Damage was minor to the
Jeep, but disabled the SUV operated by
Frankie Rohrs, 60, of Van Wert. Neither
driver was injured.
INCIDENT REPORTS
Thursday, July 17
1:59 p.m. Family disturbance call to
North Cherry Street was unfounded.
7:02 p.m. Offcers were unable to
locate a juvenile missing from West
Perry Street. The parents called later to
report the child had returned home.
9 p.m. Theft of an air compressor
earlier in the month was reported from
Bryan’s Alley. The matter is under
investigation.
Friday, July 18
2:40 a.m. Offcers assisted sheriff’s
deputies at the Paulding Mobile Home
Park.
8:30 a.m. A car became stuck on a rock
in a North Williams Street business lot
resulting in minor damage to the car. The
owner got the vehicle free by themselves.
9:25 a.m. Neighbor problems
involving music were handled on South
Williams Street.
2:30 p.m. Junk notice was served on an
East Caroline Street address.
7:14 p.m. A North Cherry Street
resident told offcers their truck tire had
been slashed.
8:28 p.m. Police arrested a male subject
at a North Williams Street business for
four counts theft and resisting arrest.
Saturday, July 19
10:30 a.m. Unwanted subject was
reported from North Sherman Street.
They were gone when offcers arrived.
2:52 p.m. A man was arrested on West
Perry Street for domestic violence.
7:25 p.m. A male subject advised he
was threatened while in the 200 block of
West Perry Street.
7:32 p.m. Officers documented a
backing accident in the McDonald’s
parking lot.
11:04 p.m. Fireworks complaint was
lodged from Cherry and West Perry
streets, but offcers did not see any.
Sunday, July 20
6:15 a.m. An unwanted person
complaint from West Harrison Street
resulted in a man being warned.
1:40 p.m. Assault complaint was
investigated on North Cherry Street. A
report was forwarded to Job and Family
Services.
6:40 p.m. Female subject came on
station to report a large sum of cash had
been taken from her purse. Since the
incident occurred in Defance County,
she was advised to contact authorities
there.
9 p.m. Officers assisted Defiance
County Sheriff’s offce by delivering a
message on North Cherry Street.
11:30 p.m. Domestic situation was
handled on South Coupland Street.
Monday, July 21
1:44 a.m. An adult male was reported
missing from South Williams Street and
his information was entered into LEADS
as such. Later in the day he returned
home.
2:50 p.m. Domestic complaint came in
from East Wayne Street.
3:57 p.m. While investigating a 911
hang up, police discovered a man with a
bloody face. Parties involved requested
no charges be fled.
6:15 p.m. Officers responded to a
business alarm on North Main Street. It
had been set off accidentally.
9:35 p.m. A West Perry Street resident
requested a no contact order.
10:26 p.m. Police delivered a message
on North Cherry Street for Defance
County Sheriff’s offce.
Tuesday, July 22
5:40 p.m. A West Perry Street resident
requested a no contact order.
6:02 p.m. Officers received an
unwanted person complaint from North
Walnut Street. They located the subject
nearby with a cooler jug of alcohol. The
cooler was confscated and the man
transported to a relative’s home. His
probation offcer was notifed.
7:22 p.m. Unwanted person complaint
came in from West Baldwin Avenue.
He was gone when offcers arrived; his
probation offcer was notifed.
8:12 p.m. Joseph Hall was arrested
on a Lucas County warrant and taken to
Paulding County Jail.
Wednesday, July 23
2:56 a.m. Brookside South’s alarm
sounded. The building was found secure.
3:28 a.m. Several 911 calls came
in, apparently erroneously caused by
weather conditions.
2:25 p.m. Police were alerted to
an uneasy situation involving a man,
a child, and some women beginning
on West Caroline Street. The man’s
probation offcer was advised.
8:54 p.m. Theft of medication from
East Perry Street was investigated.
8:56 p.m. Offcers responded to an
alarm at the Paulding County Carnegie
Library. All was secure.
11:38 p.m. Possible prowler complaint
came in from North Main Street.
Offcers were unable to locate a suspect.
Thursday, July 24
12:16 a.m. Officers delivered a
message for Celina Police Department
on Nancy Street.
3:38 p.m. Peeping tom was seen on
Partridge Place Drive. Offcers were
unable to locate him.
3:35 p.m. Shoplifting complaint
came in from east Perry Street. It was
unfounded.
7 p.m. Offcers were called to West
Wayne Street where a woman was
observed with a bloody lip. Accusations
of assault were denied and a couple was
told to avoid one another.
10:25 p.m. A North Dix Street
resident reported a violation of a no
contact order. The matter occurred in
the county and was turned over to the
sheriff’s offce.
Friday, July 25
12:28 a.m. An East Baldwin Street
resident told offcers the yard had been
toilet papered.
Civil Docket:
Garbani, LLC, Defance vs.
Amanda Dempsey, Antwerp.
Small claims, satisfed.
The Antwerp Exchange
Bank Co., Antwerp vs. Robert
L. Werfal II, Payne. Small
claims, satisfed.
Garbani, LLC, Defiance
vs. Steven Steele, Antwerp.
Small claims, judgment for the
plaintiff in the sum of $525.48.
Michael S. Boggs, DDS,
Inc., Hicksville vs. Kelly J.
Miller, Antwerp. Small claims,
judgment for the plaintiff in
the sum of $216.50.
Cach, LLC, Denver, Colo.
vs. Susanna M. Baughman,
Paulding. Other action,
judgment for the plaintiff in
the sum of $9,617.80.
Iom Health System L.P., dba
Lutheran Hospital, Cincinnati
vs. Donna L. Ellis, Antwerp.
Other action, judgment for
the plaintiff in the sum of
$5,992.75.
The Antwerp Exchange
Bank Co., Antwerp vs. David
A. Rupert, Payne. Small
claims, dismissed.
Criminal Docket:
Kenneth E. Schlegel,
Paulding, criminal damage;
$250 fine, suspended, $129
costs, 60 days jail suspended;
make restitution in the amount
of $1,299.23 through the
clerk’s offce.
David O. Bidlack, Jr., Cecil,
criminal trespassing; $125
fne, $118 costs; 5 days jail
suspended; pay all by July 14;
pay restitution if requested,
no contact with victim or
property.
David O. Bidlack, Jr., Cecil,
criminal trespassing; $125 fne,
$118 costs; 5 days jail; pay
all by July 14, pay restitution
if requested, no contact with
victim or property.
Julian M. Zamora, Antwerp,
disorderly conduct; $668
costs; pay all costs within 30
days of the date of entry (July
17) or case will be sent to
collections, no fne is assessed
to the defendant.
John M. Upole, Payne,
paraphernalia; $210 costs; 30
days jail suspended; drivers
license suspended for 6 months;
complete an evaluation at
Westwood, complete Third
Millennium marijuana online
course, 20 hours community
service, complete high school
diploma or G.E.D. by the end
of probation term.
Nathan E. Gee, Oakwood,
failure to register; $25 fne,
$77 costs.
Nathan E. Gee, Oakwood,
failure to register; $25 fne.
Nicholas E. Richey,
Antwerp, assault; $100 fne,
$148 costs, 4 days jail, 176
days jail suspended; jail days
to run concurrent with other
case, complete Ridge project,
no contact with victim, submit
an evaluation with Westwood
and complete such counseling,
community control 2.
Merrill F. Cohan III,
Oakwood, disobey police
order; $500 fne, $120 costs,
4 days jail, 176 days jail
suspended; license suspended
for 6 months, probation
ordered, 40 hours community
service, complete an evaluation
and counseling at Westwood,
secure valid operator’s license
by end of probation, complete
Third Millennium course.
Ryan E. Hogans, Paulding,
fshing without license; $83
fne, $77 costs.
Jason A. Hogans, Payne,
fshing without license; $83
fne, $77 costs.
Traffc Docket:
Clarence M. Gordon, II,
Cincinnati, seat belt; $30 fne,
$50 costs.
Jacqueline D. Satterfield,
Berkley, Mich., 80/65 speed;
$43 fne, $80 costs.
Theodore J. Blanford, Fort
Wayne, 76/65 speed; $33 fne,
$80 costs.
Michael W. Herald, Fort
Wayne, 76/65 speed; $33 fne,
$80 costs
Theresa L. Bolin, Lafayette,
Ind., 80/65 speed; $43 fne,
$80 costs.
Thomas B. Eberhard, Fort
Wayne, 77/65 speed; $33 fne,
$80 costs.
Albert G. Grieve, Windsor,
Ont., 77/65 speed; $43 fne,
$77 costs.
Chauncey E. Kinder, Taylor,
Mich., 87/65 speed; $43 fne,
$80 costs.
Katrina M. Brown,
Indianapolis, 79/65 speed; $33
fne, $77 costs.
Karissa J. Clark, Marshall,
Ill., 80/65 speed; $43 fne, $80
costs.
John G. Gillis, Alliston,
Ont., 82/65 speed; $43 fne,
$80 costs.
Philip J. Recker, Latty, seat
belt; $30 fne, $47 costs.
Joann M. Smity, Clinton
Township, Mich., seat belt;
$30 fne, $47 costs.
Rachel C. McVicker,
Toledo, 86/65 speed; $43 fne,
$80 costs.
Katherine R. Pessefall,
Paulding; domestic violence;
case dismissed per State with
prejudice, costs waived.
Daniel Wayne Crosser,
Antwerp, O.V.I.; dismissed at
State’s request.
Daniel Wayne Crosser,
Antwerp, physical control;
$450 fine, $137.46 costs;
ALS terminated, pay $100
per month, POC of Dec. 19,
community control ordered,
evaluation at Westwood,
secure a valid driver’s license,
40 hours community service,
180 jail days reserved.
Daniel Wayne Crosser,
Antwerp, plate light; dismissed
at the State’s request.
Yuriy G. Golbraykh,
Pembroke Pines, Fla., 67/55
speed; $33 fine, $77 costs;
pay all by July 31 or sent to
collections.
Ricardo F. Marchesini,
Lauderdale Lakes, Fla., 80/65
speed; $43 fne, $77 costs; pay
all by July 31.
Janice S. Carlisle, Cecil,
failure to control; $68 fne, $77
costs; pay all by Oct. 31 or sent
to collections.
Janice S. Carlisle, Cecil,
seat belt; dismissed at State’s
request.
Vincent Valdize Holston Jr.,
Roseville, Mich., 96/65 speed;
$43 fne, $82 costs.
Wesley E. Cummings, Flint,
Mich., 89/65 speed; $43 fne,
85 costs.
Tessa Elyse Edwards,
Whitby, Ont., 80/65 speed;
$43 fne, $77 costs.
Dwight S. Carroll, Bluffton,
Ind., seat belt; $30 fne, $47
costs.
Angela D. Porter, Fishers,
Ind., 80/65 speed, $43 fne,
$80 costs.
Edgar V. Perdue,
Indianapolis, 75/65 speed; $33
fne, $77 costs.
Scotty J. Vertz, Fort Wayne,
78/65 speed; $33 fine, $80
costs.
Alyse L. Hallett, Fort
Wayne, 78/65 speed; $33 fne,
$80 costs.
Di o L. Sur i ano,
McLordsville, Ind., 88/65
speed; $43 fne, $80 costs.
Lakhvir Singh, Avon, Ind.,
88/65 speed; $43 fine, $77
costs.
Kimberly L. S. Brooks,
Kennesaw, Ga., 79/65 speed;
$33 fne, $80 costs.
Ebony R. Thomas,
Indianapolis, 86/65 speed; $43
fne, $77 costs.
Devyn Mishell Caroline,
East Haven, Conn., 85/65
speed; $43 fne, $80 costs.
Andrew C. Kolberts, Ann
Arbor, Mich., failure to yield
to emergency vehicle; $68
fne, $80 costs.
Christine M. Nerad, Van
Wert, 71/55 speed; $43 fne,
$77 costs.
Benjamin M. Allen, Royal
Oak, Mich., 78/65 speed; $33
fne, $80 costs.
Arena C. McDaniel,
Perrysburg, 78/65 speed; $33
fne, $80 costs.
Susan Beth Bauer, Cedar
Park, Texas, 80/65 speed; $43
fne, $80 costs.
Inderjit S. Dhaliwal,
Wappinger Fall, N.Y., 82/65
speed; $43 fne, $80 costs.
Christian A. Mehregan,
Monroe, Mich., 86/65 speed;
$43 fne, $80 costs.
Deante A. Honaker,
Indianapolis, 89/65 speed; $43
fne, $85 costs.
Theodore W. Jackson Jr.,
Churubusco, Ind., 80/65 speed;
$43 fne, $77 costs.
Theodore W. Jackson Jr.,
Churubusco, Ind., seat belt;
$30 fne.
Cale Kullan Coke,
Perrysburg, 80/65 speed; $43
fne, $85 costs.
Kati Bienbenida Carter,
Virginia Beach, Va., 82/65
speed; $43 fne, $85 costs.
Daryl T. Tinnon, Detroit,
seat belt; $30 fne, $47 costs.
Hassan Basil Hassan,
Ballwin, Mo., 75/65 speed;
$33 fne, $80 costs.
Kenisha P. Thomas, Detroit,
seat belt; $30 fne, $50 costs.
Aisha K. Mitchell,
Huntington, Ind., 92/65 speed;
$43 fne, $80 costs.
James C. Smith, Macomb,
Mich., 85/65 speed; $43 fne,
$80 costs.
Annie Louise Anthony,
Rockwood, Mich., 75/65
speed; $33 fne, $77 costs.
Shai H. Naylor, Bessemer,
Ala., 81/65 speed; $43 fne,
$80 costs.
Tommy J. Sherlock, North
Augusta, S.C., seat belt; $30
fne, $47 costs.
Jeffrey D. Parker,
Bloomington, Ind., seat belt;
$30 fne, $50 costs,
Clayton A. Conley, Muncie,
Ind., failure to control; $68
fne, $85 costs.
Ryan V. Glaze, Toledo,
84/65 speed; $43 fine, $85
costs.
Jose Antonio Cervantes-
Zamora, Frankfort, Ind., 90/65
speed; $43 fne, $85 costs.
Zachary J. Hernandez, Scott,
68/55 speed; $33 fine, $85
costs.
Nathan D. Johnson,
Paulding, FRA suspension;
$500 fine, $87 costs; $300
suspended if defendant gets
valid operator’s license within
6 months, pay $50 per month,
pay all by Dec. 19 or sent to
collections.
Alyssa Dawn Mobley,
Paulding, FRA suspension;
$300 fine, $80 costs; $150
suspended on condition
defendant provide proof of
valid operator’s license within
6 months, pay $25 per month,
pay all by Dec. 19 or sent to
collections.
Alyssa Dawn Mobley,
Paulding, child restraint; $25
fne, shall pay $25 per month,
pay all by Dec. 19 or sent to
collections.
Earnest B. Payne, Berkley,
Mich., 76/65 speed; $33 fne,
$85 costs.
Nicholas E. Richey,
Antwerp, OVI (breath low);
$375 fine, $132 costs; 3
days jail; 6 month license
suspension; ALS vacated,
pay $50 per month, POC
date of Dec. 19, community
control ordered, evaluation
at Westwood, 20 hours
community service, Third
Millennium online, 87 jail days
reserved, proof of insurance
shown.
Nicholas E. Richey,
Antwerp, failure to control;
$50 fne; pay $50 per month,
POC date of Dec. 19.
James H. Langham, Payne,
70/55 speed; $125 costs.
Michael P. Politte, Imperial,
Mo., 79/65 speed; $33 fne,
$85 costs.
Dustyn M. Richards,
Indianapolis, 91/65 speed; $43
fne, $80 costs.
Maria C. Gasca-Defores, Ft.
Worth, Texas, failure to yield
to emergency vehicle; $68
fne, $80 costs.
Shanese M. Lewis, Marietta,
Ga., 85/65 speed; $43 fne, $80
costs.
Samantha N. Richman,
Defiance, 85/65 speed; $43
fne, $77 costs; pay $50 per
month, POC date of Oct. 31.
Virender K. Sarin, Carmel,
Ind., 83/65 speed; $43 fne,
$80 costs.
Jimmy Edward Woody,
Casco, Mich., 79/65 speed;
$33 fne, $80 costs.
Jonathon D. Davis,
Defiance, 77/55 speed; $43
fne, $77 costs; pay $50 per
month, POC date of Oct. 31.
Andrew J. Kneller,
Alexandria, Ind., 79/65 speed;
$33 fne, $80 costs.
Tracey H. Sims, Springfeld,
Ill., 75/65 speed; $33 fne, $80
costs.
Lee S. Coronado, Perryton,
Texas, 79/65 speed; $33 fne,
$80 costs.
David A. Burnett, Westfeld,
Ind., 87/65 speed; $43 fne,
$80 costs.
Albert Colon, Toledo,
failure to yield to emergency
vehicle; $53 fne, $77 costs.
Michelino Lio, Burlington,
Ont., 79/65 speed; $33 fne,
$80 costs.
Thomas R. Moore,
Oakwood, 66/55 speed; $33
fne, $77 costs.
Nolan S. Ritter, Brecksville,
seat belt; $30 fne, $50 costs.
Igo Zhigun, Waterford,
Mich., seat belt; $30 fne, $50
costs.
Haley Marie Emenhiser,
Monroeville, Ind., 77/65
speed; $33 fne, $80 costs.
Kayla Marie Nolan,
Bowling Green, 66/55 speed;
$33 fne, $80 costs.
Keith Edward Lane,
Paulding, child restraint; $68
fne, $77 costs; pay $50 per
month, POC by Oct. 31.
Keith Edward Lane,
Paulding, seat belt; $30 fne;
pay $50 per month, POC by
Oct. 31.
Tammy Lou Wilder,
Oakwood, seat belt; $30 fne,
$50 costs.
Tracy B. Richardson,
Antwerp, driving under
suspension; $100 fine
suspended.
Tracy B. Richardson,
Antwerp, seat belt; $30 fne,
$87 costs.
Megan E. Schuman,
Indianapolis, 80/65 speed; $43
fne, $80 costs.
Timothy R. Puls, Fort
Wayne, 70/55 speed; $63 fne,
$80 costs.
Regan T. Henderson,
Chesterfield, Mich., 79/65
speed; $33 fne, $80 costs.
Kevin J. Herren, Defance,
failure to control; $43 fne, $77
Wednesday, July 30, 2014 Paulding County Progress - 5A
Property Transfers Sheriff’s Report
Common Pleas
For the Record
It is the policy of the
Paulding County Prog-
ress to publish pub-
lic records as they are
reported or released
by various agencies.
Names appearing in
“For the Record” are
published without ex-
ception, to preserve the
fairness and impartial-
ity of the Progress and
as a news service to our
readers.
Weather report weekly summary as recorded at Paulding Village’s water treat-
ment plant
Observations recorded for the 24 hours ending at 7:30 a.m. on the morning of:
DATE HIGH LOW PRECIPITATION
July 22 87 60 -0-
July 23 90 62 1.16”
July 24 77 58 0.02”
July 25 79 52 -0-
July 26 77 54 -0-
July 27 81 61 0.33”
July 28 83 60 0.05”
n COUNTY COURT
Continued from Page 4A
n JOURNAL
Continued from Page 3A
E
O
E
M
/F
/D
/V
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costs.
Mary C. Whitaker,
Indianapolis; 80/65 speed; $43
fne, $77 costs.
Shonique Love, Flint, Mich.,
105/65 speed; $93 fne, $80
costs.
Cody C. Si mpson,
Manchester, Mich., 73/55
speed; $63 fne, $77 costs.
Michael P. Visser, Fort
Wayne, 52/35 speed; $43 fne,
$80 costs.
Jennifer S. Zartman,
Paulding, improper backing;
$53 fne, $80 costs.
Julia R. Hill, Beech Grove,
Ind., 80/65 speed; $43 fne,
$80 costs.
Jonathan C. Clark, Westland,
Mich., seat belt; $30 fne, $50
costs.
Sara S. Sharik, Beaver Falls,
Pa., 87/65 speed; $43 fne, $80
costs.
Bryn I. Toyama, N. Olmsted,
seat belt; $30 fne, $50 costs.
Susan M. Zeeduk, Ney,
81/65 speed; $43 fine, $80
costs.
Jasmin Jastin Amedavadi,
Fort Wayne, 90/65 speed; $43
fne, $85 costs.
Nestor Alredo Carillo, III,
Bluffton, Ind., 77/65 speed;
$33 fne, $85 costs.
Mark S. Weis, Gibsonia,
Pa., 83/65 speed; $43 fne, $80
costs.
ACCIDENTS:
Monday, July 21
6:50 p.m. Robert Ray Long, 38, of Oakwood,
was cited for failure to yield following a
single-vehicle accident near the intersection of
Ohio 111 and Ohio 49 in Harrison Township.
He was traveling west on 111 in a 1998 Ford
Escape when he told deputies he lost control.
The vehicle left the right side of the road
striking a business sign. Damage to the vehicle
was moderate. He was not hurt.
INCIDENTS:
Friday, July 18
8:02 a.m. Dog complaint was handled in
Latty Village.
11:03 a.m. A South Main Street resident in
Latty lodged a dog complaint.
11:07 a.m. Dog complaint came in from
Road 15 in Carryall Township.
8:38 p.m. Deputies assisted Paulding police
with a shoplifter at a North Williams Street
business A man fed on foot. The offcer also
requested an EMS for a male with cuts to his
hands.
9:17 p.m. A general alarm sounded on Ohio
613 in Jackson Township.
10:21 p.m. Cecil resident reported a juvenile
who may be in need of assistance.
Saturday, July 19
1:46 a.m. Defance County Sheriff’s offce
relayed information about an Auglaize
Township resident who had someone knocking
on the windows and doors of their home along
Ohio 111.
1:51 p.m. A deputy assisted Paulding police
with an aggressive dog.
2:55 p.m. Seven deputies assisted the adult
probation department in Paulding, as did a
Paulding fre unit and an EMS unit. Some
were on the scene up to two hours.
10:48 a.m. Dog complaint was handled on
Road 72 in Washington Township.
11:27 a.m. A complainant came on station
from Brown Township to report fraudulent
activity.
6:18 p.m. Two pigs were seen playing on
Road 144 in Paulding Township.
8:06 p.m. K9 unit was deployed on North
Williams Street in Paulding.
8:15 p.m. A positive alert by the K9 unit was
indicated.
9:09 p.m. Deputies responded to an alarm on
Road 151 in Latty Township.
Sunday, July 20
6:07 a.m. An Emerald Township resident
of Road 232 told deputies their car had been
stolen or repossessed.
7:51 a.m. Theft of a motorcycle and two
bags of aluminum cans was reported from
Brown Township’s Road 179.
2:48 p.m. Littering was noted on Road 139
in Brown Township.
3:13 p.m. Interior alarm sounded on Road
82 in Paulding Township.
7:04 p.m. An Auglaize Township resident of
Road 163 told deputies they found a bullet in
the bottom of their pool.
10:33 p.m. Mike Wilhelm was arrested on a
Defance County warrant.
11:37 p.m. Assistance was provided to
Paulding police with a domestic call.
Monday, July 21
2:31 p.m. Sheriff’s personnel entered a male
as missing for the Paulding Police Department.
10:36 a.m. Dog complaint was handled on
Road 166 in Auglaize Township.
1:12 p.m. Deputies arrested a subject on
Road 171 in Auglaize Township on a warrant
out of Alabama.
4:06 p.m. A subject came on station to report
possible child abuse in Carryall Township.
4:28 p.m. Theft of a 55-inch television
from Road 178 in Auglaize Township was
investigated.
4:49 p.m. Dog complaint was handled on
West Perry Street in Paulding.
5:13 p.m. A complainant came on station
to tell deputies about a theft of Ohio 114 in
Benton Township.
Tuesday, July 22
9:05 a.m. Paulding EMS was called for a
woman who had been run over by a forklift in
a feld along Road 162.
9:13 a.m. A motor vehicle accident on Ohio
637 at Road 138 in Jackson Township was
investigated. Paulding EMS made a transport.
Paulding Fire Department assisted at the
scene. No further information was available.
11:19 a.m. Deputies arrested Ryan Fraley on
a warrant.
12:02 p.m. A motor vehicle accident on
Ohio 111 west of Road 87 was handled.
Paulding EMS and fre assisted at the scene.
No further information was available.
12:32 p.m. Deputies assisted another
department in Grover Hill.
1:48 p.m. Dog complaint came in from near
the intersection of Ohio Highways 114 and
637 in Latty Township.
2:15 p.m. Criminal damage was noted on
Ohio 114 in Benton Township.
4:27 p.m. Damage to a bean feld was
reported from Road 187 north of Road 72 in
Washington Township.
5:29 p.m. Breaking and entering of the
Oakwood ballpark concession stand was
investigated.
7:26 p.m. Threats were reported a location
on McDonald Pike in Paulding Township.
8:04 p.m. Deputies assisted with an
unwanted person on Road 142 in Paulding
Township.
10:10 p.m. Paulding police requested
assistance with a domestic disturbance.
10:52 p.m. Neighbor problems were looked
into on Ohio 111 in Auglaize Township.
Wednesday, July 23
12:32 a.m. Tyler Barnes was arrested on a
warrant.
6:28 a.m. Dog complaint was handled on
US 127 in Paulding Township.
9:39 a.m. Theft of a dirt bike from a garage
was investigated in Grover Hill.
10:24 a.m. Backing mishap on South Main
Street in Payne was documented.
10:38 a.m. Pigs were on the road on Ohio
111 in Harrison Township.
12:47 p.m. Defance County Sheriff’s offce
advised they had arrested Jimmy Martin on a
local warrant.
1:26 p.m. Litter was noted by Charloe
Bridge in Brown Township along Road 179.
1:31 p.m. An Auglaize Township resident
of Road 1048 told deputies their car had been
keyed.
1:40 p.m. Theft complaint was lodged from
Road 171 in Brown Township.
3:35 p.m. Deputies assisted Defance County
Sheriff’s offce on Road 175 in Auglaize
Township.
4:18 p.m. Possible child abuse in Emerald
Township was reported.
8:27 p.m. Damage to a mailbox was looked
into on Road 1021 in Auglaize Township.
Thursday, July 24
2:58 a.m. Defance Regional Medical Center
called in reference to a possible sexual assault
in Auglaize Township.
6:16 a.m. Paulding EMS was called to a
car/deer crash on Road 133 south of US 24
in Emerald Township. Post 81 handled the
investigation.
11:14 a.m. Theft of medications while at
work was reported from Road 171 in Auglaize
Township.
1:11 p.m. Deputies delivered a message in
Melrose for Allen County (Ohio) Sheriff’s
offce.
The term “et al.” refers to and
others; “et vir.,” and husband; “et
ux.,” and wife.
Auglaize Township
James S. and Mary J. Porter
to James S. and Mary J. Porter
Life Estate, et al.; Sec. 30, 3.78
acres. Quit claim.
Brown Township
Marlin and Paul Winchester
to Helen J. Winchester; Sec. 3,
48.07 acres. Quit claim.
Kathy J. Rippetoe by sheriff
to Kathy J. Rippetoe, et al.;
Sec. 35, 36.97 acres. Sheriff’s
deed.
Stephanie A. Wessels (Cox)
to Cinda Lou Hubert, et al.;
Sec. 35, 36.97 acres. Quit
claim.
Carryall Township
Wanda C. Rodman to Joseph
R. Graber & Sons Inc.; Sec.
30, 5 acres. Warranty deed.
Crane Township
Jerry L. Foust, dec. to Ruth
V. Foust; Sec. 13, 1.65 acres.
Certifcate of transfer.
Donna Pieper, et al. to
Douglas A. and Diane S.
Goyings; Sec. 35, 74.858
acres. Warranty deed.
Donna Pieper Life Estate,
et al. to Donna L. Pieper Life
Estate, et al.; Sec. 35, 2.925
acres. Quit claim.
Emerald Township
Jeffrey G. Meyer to Patricia
L. Bevins; Sec. 2, 6.55 acres.
Quit claim.
Harrison Township
Pauline E. Klinker, dec. to
Major C. Klinker; Sec. 36, 80
acres. Affdavit.
Antwerp Exchange Bank
Co. to St. James Church; Sec.
34, 1.5 acres. Warranty deed.
Major G. Klinker to Peter A.
and Amy L. Klinker; Sec. 36, 3
acres. Warranty deed.
Oakwood Village
Marlin and Paul Winchester
to Helen J. Winchester; Lot
32, Taylor Addition, 0.17 acre.
Quit claim.
Paulding Village
Jimmy D. and Pamela D.
Smith to Timothy R. Bakle,
trustee; Lots 11 and 12,
Homeside Addition, 0.32 acre.
Warranty deed.
Pamela K. and Stephen F.
Young to Scott L. and Leslie
K. Good; Lot 10, Noneman’s
Northside Allotment, 0.344
acre. Warranty deed.
Civil Docket
The term “et al.” refers to and others; “et vir.,” and
husband; “et ux.,” and wife.
JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., Columbus vs.
Andrew J. Wharry and his unknown spouse if
any, Oakwood and Laura S. Herr, aka Wharry
and her unknown spouse if any, Oakwood
and Paulding County Treasurer, Paulding.
Foreclosures.
David W. Gordon, Antwerp vs. Connie M.
Gordon, Antwerp. Divorce.
Fifth Third Mortgage Company, Cincinnati
vs. Chad E. Critten and unknown spouse if
any, Grover Hill and Tracy L. Critten and
unknown spouse if any, Van Wert and Larry
E. Hall, Defance. Foreclosures.
Talmer Bank and Trust, Lake Zurich,
Ill. vs. Bobby Dewayne Melton, Oakwood
and Charlotte Ann Melton, Oakwood.
Foreclosures.
Hicksville Bank, Hicksville vs. David
W. Bradtmueller, Antwerp and Tamara S.
Bradtmueller, Antwerp and Ohio Department
of Taxation, Columbus and Paulding County
Treasurer, Paulding and The Antwerp
Exchange Bank Company, Antwerp.
Foreclosures.
Marriage Licenses
Michael John Zielke, 29, Cecil, farmer and
Kali Rachel Wirth, 22, Cecil, homemaker.
Parents are John Zielke and Darlene Cline; and
Scott Wirth and Misty Williams.
James Leslie Manz, 25, Paulding, software
engineer and Elizabeth Marie Schrenk, 25,
Antwerp, self-employed. Parents are Kenneth
Manz and Gwendolyn Steiner; and Steven
Schrenk and Linda Hodgin.
Richard Allen Font, 60, Paulding, laborer and
Rosanne L. Shumaker, 65, Paulding, retired.
Parents are Forrest G. Font and Marjorie L.
Rogers; and Homer Adams and Irene Riley.
Administration Docket
In the Estate of Altha D. Reighter, application
to administer fle.
Criminal Docket
David Mendieta, 51, of Hicksville, will be
sentenced for felony DWI (F3) on Aug. 25
after changing his plea to the charge to guilty.
Jason A. Brown, 36, of Oakwood, entered
a not guilty plea to theft (F5) recently. He
was assigned court dates of Aug. 25 pretrial
conference and a Sept. 23 jury trial. He waived
extradition and was released on his own
recognizance on the conditions of no arrests,
no contact with his victim, comply with drug
and alcohol prohibitions and have no change
of address without Court’s consent.
Chad M. Adkins, 36, of Continental, had
three charges of receiving stolen property (F4)
dismissed without prejudice upon a motion of
the State due to the co-defendant saying the
defendant did not know the trailers were stolen.
The Court waived costs.
James B. Jeffrey, 21, of Hicksville, was
sentenced recently to intervention in lieu
of conviction after being found guilty of
three counts possession of drugs (F5). The
intervention period is two years. He must
comply with conditions of community
control, abstain from illegal drugs and
alcohol, complete treatment and recovery
support services, submit to random tests, pay
$1,000 fee to be divided equally between the
prosecutor’s offce and the sheriff’s offce drug
enforcement efforts. Failure to comply with
these will result in a prison term with the Ohio
Department of Rehabilitation and Control for
up to 12 months for each count. The posted
bond will be returned minus a 10% fee. Court
costs totaled $1,302.50.
Martin G. Alejo, 26, address unavailable,
is scheduled to be in Court Aug. 18 for a
hearing on a change of plea to possession of
methamphetamine (F5).
Ariel A. Chandler, 21, of Continental, will
have a hearing on her motion for intervention
in lieu of conviction on Sept. 8 to determine
her availability. Her Sept. 9 jury trial date was
vacated. She is accused of possession of meth
(F5).
Romil J. Frison, 33, of Detroit, was arraigned
on charges of receiving stolen property (F4)
and traffcking in drugs (F5). His bond was set
at $50,000 with no cash privilege. Court dates
were set for an Aug. 25 pretrial conference and
a Sept. 23 jury trial.
Aroso O. Busuyi, Guelph,
Ont., 80/65 speed; $43 fne,
$77 costs.
Mckinsey R. Gosman,
Indianapolis, seat belt; $30
fne, $47 costs.
Tal i s ha McKni ght ,
McKinney, Texas, 78/65
speed; $33 fne, $80 costs.
Leslie G. Arechiga,
Indianapolis, 83/65 speed; $43
fne, $80 costs.
Jeremiah K. Ellison, Fort
Wayne, 75/65 speed; $33 fne,
$80 costs.
Michael R. Mahoney,
Anderson, Ind., seat belt; $30
fne, $47 costs.
He Kyong Kang, Carmel,
Ind., 85/65 speed; $43 fne,
$77 costs.
Benjamin A. Vanhook,
Taylor, Mich., 85/65 speed;
$43 fne, $80 costs.
Kelli Mary Elya, Harrison
Twp., Mich., 79/65 speed; $33
fne, $77 costs.
Youlian Ivanov, Brossard,
Quebec, 75/65 speed; $33 fne,
$77 costs.
Matthew Clark Mead,
Oakwood, 65/55 speed; $33
fne, $77 costs.
Amy Goodman, Fort
Wayne, 76/65 speed; $33 fne,
$77 costs.
Trinidad B. Hutton,
Cooperas Cove, Texas, 79/65
speed; $33 fne, $80 costs.
Kalib Brett Chime,
Pittsoboro, Ind., 80/65 speed;
$43 fne, $77 costs.
David P. Dickmeyer, Fort
Wayne, following too close;
$53 fne, $77 costs.
William E. Sharp, III, Ann
Arbor, Mich., 75/65 speed;
$33 fne, $77 costs.
Christopher K. Speelman,
Paulding, 66/55 speed; $33
fne, $77 costs.
Mohammad N. Hamoudeh,
Brownsburg, Ind., 90/65
speed; $43 fne, $80 costs.
Patrick Shane Kierst, East
China, Mich., 79/65 speed;
$33 fne, $80 costs.
Thuong A. Pham,
McCordsville, Ind., 102/65
speed; $93 fne, $80 costs.
J os hua Hat heway,
Anderson, Ind., 81/65 speed;
$43 fne, $80 costs.
Scott E. Finthel, Farmington
Hills, Mich., 80/65 speed; $43
fne, $80 costs.
Rep. Burkley
appointed to debt
study committee
COLUMBUS – State Representative Tony Burkley
(R-Payne) last week announced that he has been appointed to
serve on this summer’s Unemployment Compensation Debt
and Reducing Burdens on Ohio Businesses Study Committee.
The committee will focus on the State of Ohio’s
Unemployment Trust Fund and the effects it’s had on the state
and the business community. Topics of discussion include
how to repay back the debt faster and what structural issues
exist within the system that led to the insolvency of the fund.
“Addressing our unemployment compensation debt is vital
to maintaining fscal responsibility in our state,” Burkley said.
“I’m grateful to Speaker Batchelder for this appointment and
look forward to what is ahead as we travel Ohio.”
The frst hearing will be held on Aug. 5 in Room 121 at
the Ohio Statehouse. This committee serves as one of two
bipartisan summer committees traveling the state this summer
to hold hearings discussing state policies and initiatives
with citizens and experts. The information collected will
assist in formulating a fnal report and possible legislative
recommendations.
Mr. Fred Pieper moved to adopt the
following resolution:
BE IT RESOLVED, that the Board
of County Commissioners does hereby
direct the County Auditor to amend
the 2014 Annual Appropriation by
appropriating the following, to-wit;
001-015-00013/General Fund/Election
Board/Redistricting AMOUNT:
$4,568.26.
IN THE MATTER OF
AMENDING THE 2014 ANNUAL
APPROPRIATION (FUND 089)
Mr. Fred Pieper moved to adopt the
following resolution:
BE IT RESOLVED, that the Board
of County Commissioners does hereby
direct the County Auditor to amend
the 2014 Annual Appropriation
by appropriating the following
in Prisoners’ Subdivision Fund
(Fund 089), to-wit; 089-001-00001/
Prisoners’ Subdivision/Prisoner’s
Housing Expense AMOUNT: $1,000.
“It’s a short road that has no
advertising signs” – Anony-
mous. Learn how your com-
munity newspaper can help
you – call the Progress today
at 419-399-4015.
6A - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, July 30, 2014
Community
Birthdays
Engagement
Engagement
Anniversaries
(The Paulding Progress maintains
a fle of birthdays and anniversaries.
To make any changes, please call
our offce at 419-399-4015 during
business hours, email to progress@
progress newspaper.org, or drop us
a note to P.O. Box 180, Paulding.)
Aug. 2 – Lillian Betz,
Marissa Fockler, Alex
M. Graf, Logan A. Graf,
Perry Hobart , Paul a
Kochensparger, Morgan
Mobley, Shelia Schwartz,
Ruth Snodgrass, Brion
Stoller, Amy Wirts.
Aug. 3 – Jim Clemens,
Lorene Eagleson, Paul
Gallagher, Chad Huebner,
Katie Mericle, Bethany
Miller, Braden Miller,
Brooklyn Miller, Andrew
Stanford, Dustin Wiswell,
Troy Zeller.
Aug. 4 – Nathan “Bubba”
Aldrich, Becky Bear,
Matthew Brown, Tara
Erford, Laura Jewel, John
Henry Kauser, Dan Knapp,
Donna J. Miller, Andrew
Rager, Dustin Wiswell.
Aug. 5 – Helen Burtch,
James Cl ark, Bet t y
Donaldson, Niki Fulk, Aaron
Griffiths, Junior Gonzales,
Richard Parrish, Ryan
Whitman.
Aug. 6 – Keith Centers,
Richard Grunden, Kendra
Kauser, Robert Lontz,
Hannah McIntosh, Chris
Price, Brooke Rothenbuhler.
Aug. 7 – Scott Crisp,
Damon Egnor, Stacie L.
Etzler, Phyllis Hawkey, Ross
J.H. Webb.
Aug. 8 – Lizzie Bond,
Chelsea Dempsey, Jim
Densmore, Hannah English,
Gloria Escobedo, John R.
Gilbert, Cara Lou Handy,
Brion Hanen kratt, Tyler
Lynn Leatherman, Peggy
Porter, Jonathan Wiswell.
Aug. 3 – Robert and
Barbara Laukhuf.
Aug. 4 – Michael and Joan
Mapes, John and Carolyn
Mohr.
Aug. 5 – Lawerance and
Beverly Gross, Bud and
Betty Lichty, Alex and Darcy
Stoller.
Aug. 6 – Norbert and
Lucille Klima.
Aug. 7 – Rollin and
Sharon Cooper, Don and
Ruby Crossland, Joseph and
Rebecca Guyette, James and
Virginia Lhamon, Darwin
and Sharon McClure, Bob
and Shirley Miller.
Aug. 8 – Jerry and Carol
Retcher.
KRISTIE PHLIPOT
and
TODD SCHWELLER
John and Deb Weisenbuger,
of Oakwood, are pleased to
announce the engagement
and approaching marriage of
their daughter, Kristie Nicole
Phlipot, to Todd James
Schweller, son of Jeannie
Schweller and the late Donald
Schweller of Paulding.
The bride-elect is employed
at Paulding Exempted Village
Schools.
The groom is the owner of
Schweller Electric.
The couple will exchange
vows at 6:30 p.m. Aug. 9,
2014 on Crescent Beach,
Siesta Key, Fla.
ELYSE MYERS
and
ZACH BOYER
HAVILAND – John and
Camille Myers of Haviland
wish to announce the
engagement and upcoming
marriage of their daughter,
Elyse, to Zach Boyer,
son of Tony and Kristine
Hemmelgarn and the late
Chris Boyer of Cincinnati.
Elyse is a 2009 graduate of
Wayne Trace High School.
She graduated from Miami
University in 2013 with a
bachelor’s degree in middle
childhood education. She is
currently employed at Grover
Hill Elementary.
Her fancé Zach is a 2009
graduate of Turpin High
School. He graduated from
Miami University in 2013
with a bachelor’s degree
in special education. He is
currently employed at Wayne
Trace High School.
The couple will exchange
vows at 2:30 p.m. on Aug. 2,
2014 at St. Paul’s Lutheran
Church in Paulding.
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THE PAULDING POOL PRESENTS
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Fri. August 8
Doors open at 9 pm
Movie starts at Dusk
Concessions and popcorn
will be available.
Admission $3 for everyone
The movie will be cancelled if it rains.
Bring your floaties and inner tubes and
enjoy the movie from the pool or kick
back and relax on the deck. All children
under the age of 12, must be accompa-
nied by an adult to enter the movie.
CARD SHOWER
The family of Karen
Schwab is requesting a card
shower for Karen’s 75
th
birthday. Karen resides at
the Vancrest Payne facility.
Her birthday is August 11
th
.
Cards should be sent to:
Karen Schwab
C/O Vancrest Payne
650 N. Main
Payne, OH 45880
Presbyterian and Paulding
Nazarene Church
VBS 2014
Game Plan
Basketball, Soccer,
Volleyball & Cheerleading
Learn basic fundamentals and
how God can use you when
playing any sport.
Aug. 11
th
-15
th
6:00 - 8:30
Paulding Nazarene Church
210 Dooley Dr.
49c1
Pet Grooming
Large & Small
We do them all
Cats & Dogs Grooming
419-399-3389
9ctf
Call: 1-888-484-2104
Kahn & Associates, LLC – 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste 215, Cleveland, Ohio 44131
Craig A. Kahn (OH Lic. #63988)
Under Federal Law, You Can STOP THE CALLS and
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Sen. Brown urges Obama Admin. to
protect Paulding County cement jobs
WASHINGTON, D.C. –
Last week, U.S. Sen. Sherrod
Brown (D-OH) urged the
Obama Administration to
protect Paulding County’s
cement industry and the
thousands of local jobs it
supports.
In a letter to United States
Trade Representative (USTR)
Michael Froman, Brown
called for the Administration
to crack down on Canada’s
attempt to illegally subsidize
a cement plant in Quebec,
which would specifically
target the U.S. market,
hurting the ability of local
manufacturers to compete.
U.S. cement companies would
be affected, including Lafarge
North America, which has a
plant in Paulding.
“Paulding County workers
can compete with anyone
when given a level playing
feld,” Brown said. “But if
countries like Canada illegally
subsidize their industries,
and target the U.S. market,
it gives their products an
unfair advantage. I urge the
administration to investigate
the nearly $500 million
subsidy package proposed
for the Quebec plant, which
will directly compete with
Lafarge North America’s
facility in Paulding. Actions
must be taken in order to
protect Paulding jobs and the
economy of northwest Ohio.”
Specifcally, the Canadian
federal government and
Quebec are seeking to offer
a nearly half billion dollar
fnancial package to McInnis
Cement to help its startup
in Port-Daniel-Gascons,
Quebec. The size and nature
of these subsidies could
violate Canada’s World
Trade Organization (WTO)
obligations and give its
cement industry an unfair
advantage in the U.S. market.
That is why Brown is calling
for the USTR to investigate
these subsidies and put a stop
to them in order to protect
Paulding’s workers and
businesses.
“Lafarge North America
appreciates the inquiry to
the United States Trade
Representative to address a
serious threat to U.S. cement
producers and their workers,”
said John Stull, president
and Chief Executive Offcer
of Lafarge North America.
“Given the excess cement
capacity in the Province of
Quebec, the McInnis Cement
plant makes no economic
sense. Lafarge believes
that the plant would not
be built without enormous
support from the federal
and provincial government.
Lafarge joins Senator Brown
in urging the U.S. government
to engage with the Canadian
government regarding the
provision of subsidies that
appear to be prohibited by
WTO rules and threaten
material harm to the U.S.
cement industry.”
Brown continues to fght
for Ohio manufacturers’
ability to compete on a level
playing field. Described as
“Congress’ leading proponent
of American manufacturing,”
Brown is a member of
the Senate Manufacturing
Caucus, currently vice-chair
of the Senate Auto Caucus,
and was recently named
incoming chair of the Senate
Steel Caucus.
In April, bipartisan
manufacturing jobs legislation
introduced by Brown and
U.S. Sen. Roy Blunt (R-MO)
moved one step closer to
becoming law. Brown-Blunt
would establish a National
Network of Manufacturing
Innovation (NNMI) and create
thousands of high-paying,
high-tech manufacturing
jobs while enhancing the
United States’ role as the
world’s leader in advanced
manufacturing.
ODOT projects
The following is a weekly
report regarding current
and upcoming highway
road construction projects
in the Ohio Department of
Transportation District One,
which includes Paulding
County:
• U.S. 24 from U.S. 127 and
the Ohio-Indiana state line
westbound will experience
lane restrictions for pavement
repairs.
• Ohio 111 west of County
Road 21 will be restricted to
one lane through the work zone
for drainage tile replacement.
• Ohio 49 in Payne is now
open after the completion of
the railroad crossing repair
project.
Wednesday, July 30, 2014 Paulding County Progress - 7A
Phone: 419-393-4690
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Weekend Pass - $25 (advance sale only)
Designated Driver - $5 (gate sale only)
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Watershed: Understanding
what is and its purpose
By Mark Holtsberry
Education specialist
Paulding SWCD
The general population has
heard of this term, or have
they? This word seems to be
the main topic of interest these
days in Paulding County.
A watershed is all the land
area that contributes runoff to
a particular body of water. It
is a catch basin that guides all
the precipitation and runoff
into a specifc river system. A
watershed is the geographic
locus of a water-driven
dynamic that affects all living
and nonliving things within its
boundaries.
Watersheds come in many
different shapes and sizes and
have many different features.
Watersheds can have hills or
mountains or be nearly fat.
They can have farmland,
range land, small towns
and big cities. Parts of your
watershed may be so rough,
rocky, or marshy that they’re
suited only for certain trees,
plants and wildlife.
Part of the natural process of
a watershed is self-destructive.
The rivers that give it its form
are engaged in the gradual
erosion and wearing down of
the highlands that contact it.
The key here is a “gradual”
part of a natural dynamic
balance. Most natural erosion
is a gradual process. Recent
intensive watershed use and
impact by people has led
to increased degradation of
watershed quality.
Human settlement began
to affect the gradual rate
at which watersheds erode
and other conditions within
watersheds through actions
such as land clearing, farming
and industrial development.
Patterns of consumption vary
from watershed to watershed.
The quality of water in most
watersheds has deteriorated
during the past 200 years.
Contaminants may be the
result of natural processes
that have been accelerated
like soil erosion, or human
activities. A range of materials
including nutrients as well as
toxins, found anywhere in a
watershed will eventually
show up in the waterways
and water cycle.
Bo t h a g r i c u l t u r e
and industry use water
commercially. Both release
water back into the watershed
that has been altered by their
use. Fertilizers and pesticides
are the major sources of
agricultural contamination.
Industrial wastewater can
contain a wide range of
contaminates from oil
and PCBs to mercury and
radioactive wastes. Now, I
don’t believe we will fnd
those ranges or contamination
here in our county watershed
system, but as a citizen of
this county, we all need to be
aware of our surroundings.
There are many things you
and your farming operation
can do to keep the county
watershed healthy and
productive.
To learn what you can do
to take care of our watershed,
call the local Natural
Resources Conservation
Service (NRCS) offce.
Color Chaos
at the Payne
Branch Library
Payne Branch Library
wrapped up this year’s
Summer Reading Program
with “Color Chaos!” Twenty-
two very enthusiastic kids read
a book about Russian artist
Kadinsky and his abstract art,
the science behind mixing
colors, and created an their
own awesome abstract mural
by mixing their own colors.
A huge thank-you to the
Friends of the Payne Branch
Library, Payne Super Valu, and
Denning’s Drive-In for their
contributions to this program.
For upcoming events at the
Payne Branch, follow them on
Facebook.
Use of Saylor gift decided
at PEVS Board Meeting
Press box to get $200,000 overhaul
JOE SHOUSE
Progress Staff Writer
PAULDING - In their recent Board of
Education meeting, the Paulding Exempted
Village Board made their decision on how
to use the Bev Saylor estate gift given to
the district last March. The new athletic
director was named and several personnel
appointments were approved.
The board voted to establish the Panther
Pride Scholarship Fund and the Panther
Pride Capital Improvement Fund using the
Saylor gift. The scholarship fund begins with
$25,000 from the estate gift and will award
$1,000 scholarships annually.
The capital improvement fund will have
most of the balance of the estate with the
following improvements slated to be made:
$25,000 for an electronic sign; two trophy
cases to be located at the Paulding Middle
School with an estimated cost of $15,000; the
concession area in the school’s common area
will be upgraded at a cost of approximately
$15,000.
In other action concerning the donation,
the board will allocate $2,500 toward the
cafeteria fund with the remaining funds (just
under $200,000) being designated towards
the construction of a press box at the football
complex.
Voting for the expenditures using the estate
donation was approved by James Foltz, Mark
Manz, Clint Vance and Bob Burkley. Greg
Reinhart voted against the action.
In executive session the board agreed to
hire Matt Carr as athletic director and dean
of students at Paulding Elementary. Carr has
been at Paulding for fve years and has served
as the varsity girls softball coach as well as
ffth grade math and social studies teacher.
Carr replaces Chris Etzler, who was hired in
May as principal of the middle school.
In other business, the board voted and
approved the following personnel items
effective for the remainder of the 2014-15
school year except as noted:
• One year limited contracts for Derrick
Baksa, high school English teacher; Tanya
Bok, seventh grade English/language arts
teacher; David Bryan, bus driver (effective
Aug. 25); and one year limited interim contract
for Darcy Breier, Paulding Elementary
kindergarten.
• Revised the previous extra-curricular
contracts for Andrea Mead, from seventh
grade girls basketball coach to JV girls
basketball coach and for Angie Burtch,
seventh grade football cheer advisor, from
2.5, four year to 2.25, four year.
• Accept the resignation of Matt Mead,
assistant varsity football and assistant varsity
wrestling and Nicholas Alvarez, Paulding
Elementary preschool teacher.
• Rescind the previous extra-curricular
contract of Kathy Kuckuck, eighth grade girls
basketball coach.
• Approved one year limited extra-
curricular contracts for Derrick Baksa, varsity
assistant football coach; Randy Crawford,
boys junior varsity basketball coach; and
Travis McGarvey, boys varsity basketball
assistant (volunteer).
• One year contract for Abigail Woods,
middle school intervention specialist.
The following new positions were
considered: Part- time (1 1/2 hours) Paulding
Elementary aide position; High school credit
recovery teacher; Paulding Elementary third
grade teacher; and Paulding Elementary Title
I teacher.
• Approved Matthew Carr, Paulding
athletic director/dean of students, effective
Aug. 1, 2014 to July 31, 2016.
In other action the board approved:
• Rates for offcials and umpires: varsity
football, basketball, baseball and softball
$60 (NWC rate); varsity volleyball (NWC
rate) $70; junior varsity basketball, football,
grade 7-9 football and junior high wrestling
$40; ninth grade basketball $35; junior high
volleyball, basketball, varsity wrestling,
track, junior varsity baseball and softball $50;
varsity baseball and softball double header
$120; junior varsity baseball and softball
double header $100 and junior high track $45.
• Revisions to the employment policies for
non-bargaining unit employees.
• Raises for administrative and confdential
employees: 2014-15, 2 percent stipend; 2015-
16, 1 percent stipend, 1 percent base raise;
2016-17, 1 percent stipend, 1 percent base
raise.
Recommendations from the superintendent
included the following:
• Board member James Folz was selected
delegate to the Capital Conference.
• Accepted the memorandum of
understanding between PEVS and Northwest
State Community College regarding the
Project Jump Start.
• In lieu of transportation it was resolved
that nonpublic transportation by bus may
be considered unreasonable and that the
superintendent shall inform eligible parents
of this action so that payment in lieu of
transportation may be arranged. Payment
to eligible parents would be the minimum
rate calculated by the Ohio Department of
Education.
• The purchase of bread products from
Nickels Bakery and milk from Schenkel’s
Dairy for the 2014-15 school year.
• Student fees for 2014-15 were approved.
Fees for kindergarten through eighth grade
will remain the same as the previous year.
• Fall season athletic ticket prices were
approved.
• The athletic handbook was approved
and was noted of having no changes from the
previous year.
• Updates to the agreement with Vantage
Vocational School for the satellite program
for this school year was approved.
Concerning fnancial matters the board
adopted the following:
• Created a fund for the purpose of
accounting for the receipts and expenditures
for the class of 2021.
• The Oakwood Elementary Cooper grant
for fscal year 2015 in the amount of $4,000.
• The PEVS Cooper grant for fscal year
2015 in the amount of $3,000.
• Changed the petty cash funds for fscal
year 2015 for various funds.
Schools release free,
reduced price meal info
Paulding Exempted Village, Antwerp Local and Wayne
Trace Local schools have announced their 2014-15 program
year policy for free and reduced meals for students unable to
pay the full price of meals or milk served under the National
School Lunch and School Breakfast, After School Care Snack
or Special Milk Program. Each school offce and the central
offce has a copy of the policy, which may be reviewed by any
interested party.
The Federal Income Eligibility Guidelines will be used for
determining eligibility. Children from families whose annual
income is at or below the Federal Guidelines are eligible
for free and reduced price meals or free milk if the school
participates in the Special Milk Program.
For full details, read the entire media release on our website
at www.progressnewspaper.org
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8A - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, July 30, 2014
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Paulding County Church Directory
Paulding United Methodist Church, 321 North Williams Street,
Paulding, church telephone number is 399-3591, Rev. Ben Lowell,
Worship service at 9:45 a.m.; Sunday School, 11:15 a.m.; Wed. wor-
ship at 6 pm. Church offce is located at 308 N. Main St.
Pentecostal Church of God, 601 W. Caroline St., Paulding, Elder
George Robinson, Sunday school at 10 a.m., worship service at noon,
prayer services Monday at 6 p.m. and Thursday at noon, Bible study
at 6 p.m. Tuesday.
Pioneer Christian Ministries, County Road 108 and Ohio 637, Pauld-
ing, Rev. Chuck Oliver, Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday worship at
10:30 a.m., and Wednesday evening at 7 p.m. including a youth service
on at least three Wednesday evenings.
Rose Hill Church of God, corner of SR 637 and Charloe Trail, Pauld-
ing, 399-3113, Pastor Ron Hofacker, Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday
worship at 10:30 a.m., Wednesday service from 7-8 p.m. with children’s
hour.
St. John Lutheran Church–ELCA, 7611 Road 87, Briceton, Pastor
Karen Stetins, church telephone number is 419-399-4962 or 419-399-
2320. Sunday worship at 8:30 a.m., Sunday school at 9:30 a.m.
St. Paul Evangelical Lutheran Church, 601 Flat Rock Drive (P.O. Box
156), Paulding, Pastor Karen Stetins, church telephone number is 399-
2320, Sunday Worship at 10:30 a.m., Sunday school at 9:15 a.m.
PAYNE AND OUTLYING AREAS
Divine Mercy Catholic Parish, 203 W. Townline, Payne, 399-2576,
Pastor Very Rev. G. Allan Fillman, Masses: Saturday at 4 p.m.
Edgerton Wesleyan Church, 1717 Bertha St., Woodburn, (Edgerton)
Ind. 46797, Pastor Dave Dignal, church telephone number is 260-632-
4008, Sunday school at 9 a.m., children’s church at 10 a.m., worship at 10
a.m., home groups at 6 p.m., Wednesday evening services at 6:30 p.m..
Living Water Ministries, Contemporary worship service Sunday nights
at 10 a.m. & 6:30 p.m., The “Well” church for kids, Sunday mornings from
10-11:30 a.m. The church is currently in the process of relocating. For
location information, contact Pastor Rich Phelan, 419-263-2728.
Payne Church of Christ, 220 West Merrin Street, Payne, Pastor Mikeal
George. Sunday worship at 9:30 am. 419-263-2092; 419-574-2150 (cell).
Payne Church of the Nazarene, 509 E. Orchard St. (Ohio 500) Payne,
Pastor Mike Harper, 263-2422, Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday wor-
ship at 10:30 a.m. Sunday night service at 6:30 p.m., Wednesday prayer
meeting at 7:30 p.m.
St. Jacob United Church of Christ, southwest corner of Oak and
Hyman streets, Payne, Rev. Jim Langham, 263-2763. Sunday School 9
a.m, Church service-10 a.m.
St. James Lutheran Church– NALC, West Townline Street (P.O.
Box 42), Payne, 263-2129, Pastor Fred Meuter, 260-492-2581. Sunday
School at 9 a.m., Sunday worship at 10 a.m.
St. Paul United Methodist Church, (P.O. Box 154) 312 South Main
Street, Payne, Rev. David Rohrer, church telephone number is 263-2418,
parsonage telephone number is 263-2017, Sunday school at 9 a.m., Sun-
day worship at 8 a.m. and 10 a.m.
Editor’s Note: If your church doesn’t have service times listed, please
contact the Paulding County Progress offce to notify of Sunday service
times.
evening worship at 6 p.m., Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m.
PAULDING AND OUTLYING
Bethel United Methodist, Forders Bridge, Cecil, Pastor Kevin Doseck
(419) 899-4153, worship service at 10:30 a.m., Sunday school at 9:30 a.m.
Bethlehem Temple Pentecostal, 818 West Jackson Street, Paulding,
399-3770, Rev. Burpo, Sunday school at 10 a.m., Sunday worship at 12
p.m.
Calvary Bible Church, Ohio 111 West across from Paulding County
Hospital, 399-4919, elders John Mohr, 260-632-4356, Bob Fessel 419-
399-3398, Don Baer 419-399-5805. Sunday school at 9 a.m., morning
worship at 10:15 a.m.
Cecil Community Church, 203 S. Main St., Cecil. Pastor Ted
Ramey. Sun. school 10:00 am, Worship service 11 am, Sun. eve. 6
pm, Wed. eve. 6 pm.
Cecil First Presbyterian Church, Main Street, Cecil, Sunday wor-
ship at 8 a.m., Sunday school at 9 a.m.
Christian Fellowship Church, Paulding High School Auditeria, 10
a.m. Sunday. Pastor Greg Cramer.
Divine Mercy Catholic Parish, 417 N. Main, Paulding, 399-2576,
Pastor Very Rev. G. Allan Fillman, Masses: Saturday at 6 p.m.; Sun-
day at 10:30 a.m.
Emmanuel Baptist Church, 1275 Emerald Road, Paulding, 419-
399-5061, Sunday School at 9:30 a.m., worship services at 10:45 a.m.
and 6 p.m. Sunday and 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. Pastor Drew Gardner.
First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), 1233 Emerald Road,
Paulding, 419-399-4576, Sunday school 9 a.m., Worship service 10
a.m. Interim pastor is Rev. Dr. Paul Biery.
First Presbyterian Church, 114 West Caroline Street, Paulding,
399-2438, Rev. David Meriwether, 9:00am Sunday school (youth and
adult), 9:15 a.m. praise singing, 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship. Commu-
nion 1st Sunday each month. No 1st Wednesday supper.
House of Love Ministries, 220 N. Williams St., Paulding. Pastor
Predest (Dwayne) Richardson or Sister Brenda Richardson, 419-
399-9205 or 419-796-8718, Sunday worship at 3 p.m. Jail Ministry,
Food Ministry, Outreach Ministry. Overcomer Outreach - a Christian
12-steap meeting, Sundays at 5 p.m.
New Beginnings Church (Church of God), Cecil, Pastor Roy Burk,
399-5041, Sunday worship at 11 a.m.
Paulding Church of Christ, East Perry Street, Paulding, Minister
Christopher Reno, 419-399-4761. Bible school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday
worship at 10:30 a.m.
Paulding Church of the Nazarene, 210 Dooley Dr., Paulding, 399-
3932, Pastor Jeremy Thompson, Sunday school at 9:15 a.m., Sunday
worship at 10:30 a.m., Sunday evening at 6 p.m.: Kids’ Summer Jam
(ages 4-4th grade), Preteen class (5th-6th grade), Teen group (7th-
12th grade), and adult service. Wednesday at 7 p.m.: Teen group
(7th-12th grade), adult bible study and prayer. Nursery available for
all services.
Paulding Family Worship Center, 501 West Perry Street, Paulding,
399-3525, Rev. Monte Moore, Sunday worship at 10:30 a.m.
Pastor Jonathan L. Hoagland, 587-3376, Sunday school at 9:30 a.m.,
Morning worship at 10:30 a.m., Sunday evening gospel hour at 6 p.m.,
Wednesday evening service at 7 p.m.
Grover Hill Zion United Methodist Church, corner of First and Harrison,
587-3941; Pastor Mike Waldron, 419-238-1493 or 419-233-2241 (cell).
Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday worship at 10:20 a.m., nursery avail-
able during all services.
Mandale Church of Christ in Christian Union, Ohio 66, Pastor Justin
Sterrett, 419-786-9878, Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday worship at
10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m., Wednesday prayer meeting at 7 p.m.
Middle Creek United Methodist Church, County Road 24, Grover Hill,
Pastor William Sherry, Sunday worship at 9 a.m., Sunday school at 10:15
a.m., Sunday evening Bible study at 6 p.m.
Mt. Zion United Methodist Church, Grover Hill, County Road 151, Sun-
day school at 9:30 a.m., Pastor David Prior, Sunday worship at 10:30 a.m.,
Wednesday evening prayer meeting at 7:30 p.m.
Roselms Christian Church, Ohio 114, Pastor Gary Church, 594-2445,
Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday worship at 10:30 a.m.
HAVILAND/LATTY/SCOTT
Apostolic Christian Church, 12867 Road 82, Haviland, 399-5220, wor-
ship service at 10:30 a.m.
Country Chapel United Methodist Church, Haviland, 419-622-5746,
Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday worship at 10:15 a.m.
Latty Zion Baptist Church, Latty, Pastor Levi Collins Jr., 399-2748,
Sunday school at 10 a.m., worship service at 11:15 a.m.
Harvest Field Pentecostal Church of God, 13625 Road 12, Scott, Pas-
tor Terry Martin, 419-622-2026, Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday morn-
ing worship at 10:30 a.m., Sunday Evening worship at 6 pm, Wednesday
evening worship at 7:00 pm, Wednesday Youth Group at 7 pm.
Friends United Methodist Church, Latty, Pastor Ron Johnson. Sunday
worship at 9 a.m., Wednesday Bible Study at 7 p.m.
OAKWOOD/MELROSE AREAS
Auglaize Chapel Church of God, rural Oakwood, 3 miles south and half
mile west on County Road 60, Pastor Stan Harmon, 594-2248, Sunday
worship at 9:00 a.m. Sunday school at 10:30 a.m., Wednesday services
for children, youth and adults at 7:00 p.m.
Melrose United Methodist Church, Melrose, 594-2076, Pastor Eileen
Kochensparger 399-5818; Sunday school 9:30 a.m., Sunday worship at
10:30 a.m., Wednesday Bible study and prayer at 7 p.m.
Twin Oaks United Methodist Church, corner of Harmon and Second
streets, Oakwood, Pastor Eric Dailey. 419-594-2992. Sunday worship at
9:30 a.m., Sunday school at 10:45 a.m., Bible Study Wednesdays at 10
a.m.
Prairie Chapel Bible Church, one mile east and a half-mile north of
Oakwood on the corner of Roads 104 and 209, Pastor Earl Chapman,
594-2057, Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday worship at 10:30 a.m.,
ANTWERP AND SURROUNDING
Antwerp Community Church, 704 S. Erie St., SR 49, Antwerp; Pastor
Ricky L. Grimes 419-258-2069. Bible Study Fellowship 9:30 am; Contem-
porary Worship 10:30 am, Wednesday Discipleship Study, 7:00 pm
Antwerp United Methodist Church, East River Street, Rev. Pastor Mike
Schneider, church telephone number is 258-4901, Comtemporaty service
Sunday 8:30a.m., Sunday school 9:30a.m., Traditional Service 10:30a.m.
Divine Mercy Catholic Parish, 303 S. Monroe, Antwerp. Offce: 417
N. Main, Paulding, 399-2576, Pastor Very Rev. G. Allan Fillman, Masses:
Sunday at 8:30am.
First Baptist Church, 5482 CR 424, Pastor Todd Murray, 258-2056,
Sunday school at 9 a.m., Sunday worship 10 a.m.; evening service 6 p.m.,
Wednesday Bible Study 6:30 p.m.
First Presbyterian Church, 126 W. River St., Pastor Mike Pennington,
258-2864, Sunday school at 11:15 a.m., Sunday worship at 10:00 a.m.
Kingdom Hall of Jehovah’s Witnesses, 2937 US 24, 258-2290. Public
talk 10 a.m. Sunday, Congregation Bible Study, Theocratic Ministry School
& Service Meeting, Theocratic school 7:30 p.m. Thursday.
Mt. Calvary Lutheran Church, Pastor Robert Becker. Sunday school at
9 a.m., Sunday worship at 10 a.m.
Riverside Christian Church, 15413 St. Rt. 49, (corner Ohio 49 and
Road 192), Antwerp. 258-3895, Pastor Regan Clem.
ARTHUR/FIVE SPAN AREA
Apostolic Christian Church, 13562 Road 147, Defance (Junction), 399-
3121, William Schlatter, Elder, Sunday services at 10:15 a.m. and 12:30
p.m., Sunday school at 1 p.m., Wednesday services at 7:30 p.m.
Bethel Christian Church, Ohio 66, Defance (Arthur), Pastor Christo-
pher Baker, Sunday worship at 10:30 a.m.
Church of Christ, corner of County Roads 166 and 191, Evangelist
Lonnie Lambert, 399-5022, Sunday worship at 10:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m.,
Bible study at 9:30 a.m. Sunday.
Junction Bible Christian Church, County Road 111, Defance (Junc-
tion), 393-2671 or JunctionBible@copper.net, Rev. C. Joseph Fifer, Sun-
day school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday worship follows at 10:30 a.m & Bible
Study on Wed. at 7pm.
Pleasantview Missionary Baptist Church, County Road 180, Defance
(Junction), Rev. Alan Ray Newsome, Sunday worship at 11 a.m., evening
service at 6 p.m.; Wednesday evening services at 7 p.m.
Rock Church, SR 637, Five Span-Arthur area, Pastor Bobby Branham
393-2924, Sunday school at 10 a.m., Sunday worship at 10:45 a.m., Sun-
day evening worship at 7 p.m., Wednesday evening worship at 7 p.m.,
Youth Service Wednesday at 7 p.m.
GROVER HILL AND OUTLYING
Bible Baptist Church, corner of Cleveland and Perry streets, Grover
Hill, Pastor Pat Holt, 587-4021, Sunday school at 10 a.m., Sunday worship
at 11 a.m., Sunday evening worship at 6 p.m.; Wednesday prayer meeting
at 7 p.m.
Grover Hill Church of the Nazarene, Maple and East Jackson streets,
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HOMESPUN
By
JIM LANGHAM
Elnora brings the gift of
a special mother moment
A few days ago, when I got
out of my car in the parking
lot in the beloved Limberlost
Loblolly where I fnd solitude
nearly every day now, I heard
a cry somewhat foreign to
marsh life.
The howling of a cat was
coming from beneath the
canopy of fowers on Trail
One. Suddenly, a tiger-
striped rustic brown cat
appeared, crossed the parking
lot and came to me like I was
a long-lost friend.
It was very obvious this
cat was fond of humans.
It immediately started to
nuzzle its face against my leg
and rub its body against my
ankles. I was startled with
many quick questions such
as, “Who are you? Where
did you come from? Why
did you come to me in such
a friendly manner?”
I reached down and in
a friendly motion let the
cat know I was its friend,
expecting our encounter to
be brief. But the cat had other
ideas. As I started down the
trail, the cat sprinted along
beside me, with a playful
spirit and seeking friendship.
At times, I almost tripped
between the walking stick
and the insistent cat.
As I sat on a bench about
halfway along the trail to take
a few pictures, surprisingly,
the cat jumped on my lap
and started licking my face.
At that point, two things
dawned on me. This cat had
been a lap cat somewhere and
its appreciation for human
contact could mean that it
was going to walk with me
through the entire two-mile
trail system.
With that realization, I
speculated that the cat must
have an “Almighty name” of
some kind. Just that quick,
the name “Elnora” came to
me – Elnora as in the book
Girl of the Limberlost, and
as in my mother’s frst name.
From that point on, the walk
took on an entire different
dimension.
Elnora quickly took to her
“real name” and indeed stayed
with me for the entire two-
mile walk. But even more so,
thoughts of memories of my
beloved mother started to fll
my mind. Elnora Langham,
who used to take walks with
me in the Rainbow Bottom,
and to the old Ceylon Covered
Bridge, who prayed with me
at bedtime and had homemade
cookies and a glass of milk
waiting when I stepped off the
school bus, my eyes moistened
with sentiment.
At that point, I realized the
earthly affection of Elnora,
the cat, and the heavenly
connection of Elnora,
my mother. It was one of
those “heaven and earth”
experiences at the “Lob,” my
beloved walking place.
But it wasn’t over at the end
of the trail. Elnora jumped
into my car, put her head on
my knee, and started to purr
as I drove away. For two
hours I looked for and found a
good home for my new feline
friend, probably the ultimate
purpose of fnding me, as far
as Elnora was concerned.
And with her, she brought the
surprise gift of an unexpected
special moment embracing the
love of my mother.
We Buy Gold
TURN YOUR GOLD
INTO IMMEDIATE CASH
Fessel Jewelers
on the square - Paulding
Store Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 9-5:30; Fri. 9-6; Sat.9-2:30
419-399-3885
FRICKE TRUST MAKES DONATIONS – Trustee Connie Rassman-Burke, on behalf of the Fred
Fricke Trust, distributed checks over $2,000 each to the Paulding County K-9 Offcer Fund,
Animal Clinic of Paulding, and Canine Mercy Fund handled by Lynn Mansfeld. Here are, Sheriff
Jason K. Landers accepts a check from Connie Burke, along with Lisa Fortney on behalf of Lynn
Mansfeld, Dog Warden Mark Rassman with “Chevy” and Audrey Hanenkratt, offce manager of
the Animal Clinic.
O N T H E W E B
Week in
Review
Catch this past week in slideshow
format at www.progressnewspaper.org
$120 that was also approved.
The fire department
approached council at an
earlier meeting seeking
permission to have a gun
raffle. After receiving
information from the village
solicitor, it was agreed
that a gun raffe would be
permissible providing certain
stipulations be followed. The
village council nor the fre
department cannot handle
the gun to be raffed. It was
suggested that a gift certifcate
be given in the amount for
a particular weapon. The
winner would then deal
directly with the gun dealer.
The department plans to raffe
off two guns with the drawing
taking place at the town’s fall
festival.
Chad Lyons resigned
from his lieutenant position
on the fre department and
will continue to serve as the
EMS assistant coordinator.
In his place, as lieutenant,
the council approved the
recommendation from Fire
Chief Jamie Mansfield to
promote Josh Anderson.
Council approved the $400
expense in order that four
EMTs can receive needed
refresher training. The 30
hours of work for each EMT
will cost $100 per person
and will need to be competed
before the year ends.
Kyle Wobler has passed
his physical and drug testing
and will now be placed on
active duty with the police
department.
Mayor Smith reported that
a gas smell located behind
the village offces has been
reported and a contractor will
be replacing the defective
line.
In other business:
• Fire hydrant testing will
take place Aug. 4 from 6-8
p.m. south of the railroad
tracks and west of Ohio 49.
On Aug. 18, hydrants will be
nPAYNE
Continued from Page 2A
tested at the same time south
of the railroad tracks and east
of Ohio 49.
• Zoning inspector Tom
Sinn approved the building
permit allowing for new
signage for Antwerp Bank.
• The fre, police and light
committee will meet with
EMS on July 30 at 7 p.m.
• The street committee
reported several places along
village streets where sight
obstruction exists due to the
over growth of trees, shrubs
and bushes. Property owners
are encouraged to check their
property area and if areas
need trimmed or cut, to please
make the improvements.
• The next Good Time
Cruise In is scheduled for
Wednesday, Aug. 6.
• Concrete estimate in the
amount of $1,200 to repair
playground equipment was
approved.
Sheriff: No jail
levy this year

Paulding County Sheriff Jason Landers issued the following
press release on Tuesday morning, July 29:
“Over the past two weeks, I have traveled all over the county
speaking with my constituents in regards to a potential operating
levy being placed on the November 2014 ballot. I have come to
the conclusion, after speaking with the commissioners, that this
upcoming election is not the best time to place a levy in front of
the voters.
“I have heard from some really good people along the way
and taken their concerns to heart. The vast majority of the 180
residents that attended one of the meetings support putting a
levy on this election. There were several folks that voiced their
opposition, and I appreciated hearing their concerns.
“For those residents that spoke up about putting this on the
ballot and letting the voters decide, I understand, but my heart
tells me this is the right thing to do at this time. Rest assured
my staff will continue to work with the numbers and keep the
public informed. I will continue to work hard on the best deal
for Paulding County.
“I was able to beneft from these meetings by taking away
some very important concerns from the public. I will work on
those concerns and continue to evaluate the need for our jail as
time goes by. By working together as a community we will be
better informed and continue to make Paulding County a better
place to live.”
Wednesday, July 30, 2014 Paulding County Progress - 9A
Wednesday, August 30, 2014 Paulding County Progress - 9A
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11:30-3:30
Kids Games
11:30-5:00
Kids Goofy Ball Game - Registration
11:30-12:00
Magician And Balloon Sculptures
by Aaron Roehm
12:30-2:30
Face Painting by
Paulding Library Book Mobile
12:30-3:30
Coed Soft Ball Games
1:00-4:00
Bingo
4:00
Sat., August 2nd
11:30 am - 5:00 pm
Bressler Park
Scott, Ohio
For more
information contact:
Chris Martinez
520-227-6878
ckego614@gmail.com
Hull fnds ‘right time’ to retire from Paulding Library
Jim Langham/Paulding County Progress
Vicky Hull, currently assistant director at Paulding County
Carnegie Library, will be retiring at the end of this week.
By JIM LANGHAM
Feature Writer
PAULDING – After nearly 19 years of
employment with the Paulding Library,
Vicky Hull, assistant director and head
of adult services at the library, will be
retiring as of Aug. 1. Hull began working
for the library on Sept. 25, 1995.
“Three years ago we lost our youngest
son (Jeff). That made me step back and
re-prioritize my life,” said Hull. “I have
prayed and prayed about this. I feel that
this is the right time. I’m in a position,
now, when I can retire. I have seven
grandchildren I would like to spend more
time with.
“I have other things under my hat,” said
Hull. “I feel that I am young enough that I
can do that.”
Hull chuckled when she said that she
actually started working when she was 10
years old.
“I started babysitting,” Hull said.
“During that time, I would also do dishes
and other household chores.”
Employment in earnest came for Hull
when she was 16 years old. Howard
Mawer at Ducat’s store in Paulding had
told her that he would hire her when she
was 16. That day, she got out of study hall
early, went to Mawer and was hired on
the job.
For many years, Hull and her husband,
Bill, took care of foster children.
Eventually, they adopted two foster girls;
plus they had the responsibility of their
own three boys.
Prior to that, Hull had been working at a
preschool, but she stayed home during the
crucial times with her children. Finally,
she was invited to apply for a part-time
library clerk position. This time she
accepted the opportunity and was hired.
“I worked part-time until Susan
(Pieper) came. Diana Coy was promoted
to assistant director and Susan asked me
to step up to where I am working now,”
said Hull.
Hull said that she views her retirement
with mixed emotions because she loves
her job and enjoys the people that she
works with.
“I love working with the public and
talking to people,” said Hull. “I enjoy
retrieving what people ask for. Trying to
fnd what they need is a challenge; I want
to keep looking.”
Hull said that one dynamic of her work
that she fnds particularly fascinating is
that of weeding shelves, taking books off
the shelf that are no longer ft to be there
and replacing them with new attractive
books.
“As books get tattered, they need to
come down. In the case of medical and
science information, you need to keep the
top information on the shelf,” observed
Hull.
“I like seeing books with their jackets
out, looking neat on the shelves,”
continued Hull. “That makes books stand
out and people are more apt to check them
out and read them.”
Vicky was instrumental in planning,
organizing and administrating the
library’s speaker program which has
included numerous authors, special
guests, and two visits by William Meyer,
one of the last known Holocaust survivors
in Indiana.
“I will miss Vicky tremendously,”
stated Susan Pieper, library director.
“Vicky has been an invaluable employee
and dear friend over the years and I wish
her all the best.”
While Hull has dedicated her time to
library work, her husband, Phil, is the
plant manager at Herbert Orr Co. During
their time of fostering children, they had
a collective total of eight kids.
“I have things at home I want to do.
I didn’t plan to retire this early. I went
to Columbus, talked to them and came
home and cried. Then I went to the Social
Security offce and came back and cried.
But when I prayed about it, it seemed like
this is the thing that God wants me to do,”
said Hull.
Stop by the main historic library
in Paulding and bid Vicky a happy
retirement during a reception from noon-3
p.m. on Friday, Aug. 1.
NAME ________________________________________
ADDRESS______________________________________
______________________________________________
CITY_____________________________STATE________
ZIP___________________PHONE _________________
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NEW
M.L. Zehr Construction
The quality of our work speaks for itself
and will remain long after.
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Commercial & Residential
25720 Notestine Rd., Woodburn, IN 46797
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Estimates
30+ Years
Experience
19c1
10A - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, July 30, 2014
GORRELL BROS
1201 N. Williams St., • Paulding, OH 45879
Sandra J. Mickelson &
Tamyra L. Humes
Cell: 419-506-1015
www.gorrellbros-paulding.com
Over 40 Years Combined Real Estate Experience
“Serving you from Sign Up to Sign Down!”
Farm Equipment Auction
Thurs., Aug. 7 @ 5:00 P.M.
Location: 18987 Rd. 15, Hicksville, OH …. . 2
mi south of Hicksville (4 mi north of Antwerp)
on Rt 49 to C-8 (Defiance / Paulding Co Line);
then west for 1 ½ mi. to auction - watch for
signs
IH 1086 Tractor; Diesel, Cab, Frt Wts,
18.4x38 tires, Dual Hyd, 3 pt., hr meter reads
4,210 hrs (bought new by Kemerer family) SN
2610181437550 ….……. AC 180 Tractor,
Diesel, Wd Ft., 3 pt., 16.9-28 tires, hr meter
reads 4,950 hrs ……… 1936 JD Model A
Tractor ……. 2001 JD MaxEmerge 1780
Planter; 16/31 row, half width shutoff, cast
closing wheels, unit mounted coulters, corn &
bean meter …… 1988 Hesston 8400 Self Pro-
pelled Windrower, 16 ft. double drive head, cab,
air, with manuals ……. 1984 Hesston 4800
Big Square Baler 4x4, spare billhooks, manuals,
used in 2013 in wheat straw …… New Holland
451 Mower 9’ …. 30’ & 40’ Bale Elevators …..
20’ Hyd Poly Transport Seed Auger …….. AC
2300 Hyd Fold 20’ Disc ….…. 12’ Case Chisel
Plow ….. 12’ Case Wheel Disc …… 18’ Hyd
Fold Danish Tine Field Cultivator With Roll-
ing Basket ……. Double & Single Cultipackers
….. IH 300 Rotary Hoe 15’ ….. Bush Hog 20’
Hyd Fold Harrogator …… 20’ Remlinger Har-
row…… 15’ Harrow …… 6 Gravity Wagons
(includes 2 Kilbros 350 w/ 10 t gear, 3 Kory w/
10 t gear, small McCurdy) …… (2) 12’ Snow
Mobile Trailers …… 2008 US Cargo Dual Axle
Model 1850 Implement Trailer, 18 ’ with ramp
….. Heavy Dual Axle Implement Trailer ……
Ford 9 Shank Disc Chisel ……. Clark 6 Row
Anhydrous Applicator Tool Bar…… 12 Row 3
pt. 28% Tool Bar …… 6 Row Lilliston Roll-
ing Cultivator ….. 3 Pt. 6’ Blade …… Wagon
Corn Head Carrier …… Steam Jenny ……Bob
Sleds …….. Power Washer …..12 V Sprayer
and Trailer …… Buzz Saw …….. Hog Oiler
……. Hydraulic Cylinders …… Hand Corn
Sheller …. Yard Sprayer …. Old Heavy Metal
Office Safe …… Spare Wagon Tires ……
Duals & Spacers from 1086 & 180 tractors ……
Bolt Bins and other small Items … visit our
web site or call for brochure …. Terms: Cash
or approved check day of auction …… Seller:
Mary Lou Kemerer - Peter Trust, Thomas
Kemmerer & Richard Shininger, Co-Trust-
ees and Various Neighbors….. Don Gorrell,
Aaron Timm; Larry Gorrell, Sandra Mick-
elson; Nolan Shisler, Auctioneers


Farm Equipment Auction
Thurs., Aug. 7 @ 5:00 P.M.
Location: 18987 Rd. 15, Hicksville, OH …. . 2 mi south of Hicksville (4 mi north of Antwerp)
on Rt 49 to C-8 (Defiance / Paulding Co Line); then west for 1 ½ mi. to auction - watch for
signs
IH 1086 Tractor; Diesel, Cab, Frt Wts, 18.4x38 tires, Dual Hyd, 3 pt., hr meter reads 4,210 hrs
(bought new by Kemerer family) SN 2610181437550 ….……. AC 180 Tractor, Diesel, Wd
Ft., 3 pt., 16.9-28 tires, hr meter reads 4,950 hrs ……… 1936 JD Model ATractor ……. 2001
JD MaxEmerge 1780 Planter; 16/31 row, half width shutoff, cast closing wheels, unit mounted
coulters, corn & bean meter …… 1988 Hesston 8400 Self Propelled Windrower, 16 ft. double
drive head, cab, air, with manuals ……. 1984 Hesston 4800 Big Square Baler 4x4, spare
billhooks, manuals, used in 2013 in wheat straw …… New Holland 451 Mower 9’ …. 30’ & 40’
Bale Elevators ….. 20’ Hyd Poly Transport Seed Auger …….. AC 2300 Hyd Fold 20’ Disc ….
…. 12’ Case Chisel Plow ….. 12’ Case Wheel Disc …… 18’ Hyd Fold Danish Tine Field
Cultivator With Rolling Basket ……. Double & Single Cultipackers ….. IH 300 Rotary Hoe
15’ ….. Bush Hog 20’ Hyd Fold Harrogator …… 20’ Remlinger Harrow…… 15’ Harrow ……
6 Gravity Wagons (includes 2 Kilbros 350 w/ 10 t gear, 3 Kory w/ 10 t gear, small McCurdy)
…… (2) 12’ Snow Mobile Trailers …… 2008 US Cargo Dual Axle Model 1850 Implement
Offered In 2 Parcels Of 121+- acres & 40+- acres & Combination
Auction Parcel 1 --- 121+- acres ….. FSA indicates 117.77 tillable acres; USDA Soil Survey indicates
all Latty type soil - nice “square” level and productive 121 acre parcel with frontage on Rd. 95 and Rd. 98;
drainage sump pump in northeast corner with shade trees and old well …… Auction Parcel 2 --- 40+-
acres ….. FSA indicates 38.35 tillable acres ---- USDA Soil Survey indicates mostly Latty type soil with areas
of Nappanee. Rager Ditch meanders through this parcel. ….. Call for Brochures, Surveys, FSA and other
auction information or visit our web site …. The farm has been farmed by a professional farmer for many
years - look at the corn ……Auction Procedure & Terms: Multi Parcel Bidding with bidder able to bid on either
or both Auction Parcels … $10,000 earnest money for Parcel 1 and $5,000 earnest money for Parcel 2 on
the day of the auction; Closing on before Sept. 15, 2014, upon delivery of Deed and Attorney’s Certificate Of
Title; Possession at closing as the 2014 crops are harvested. ……….. Farm Location: 1 mi. southwest of
Paulding, OH on Rt. 500 to Rd. T-95; Then south on T-95 for 1 ½ mi. ………Auction Location: Gorrell Bros.
Auction Facility - 1201 N. Williams St., Paulding, OH ….. Seller: Dwight E. Smith and Rae M. Smith Rev-
ocable Living Trusts; Robert C. Hall, Successor Trustee ------- James M. Sponseller, Attorney For
Seller …… Gorrell Bros. Auctioneers; Don Gorrell, Sale Mgr; Larry D. Gorrell, Broker; Sandra
Mickelson - Aaron Timm - Nolan Shisler - Auctioneers
Farm Land
Auction
Sat., Aug. 9th @ 10:00 A.M
161 Acres
Sec. 27, Paulding Twp.
Paulding Co., OH
Offered In 3 Parcels Of 40+- acres, 38.5+- acres & 40+- acres & Combinations
Auction Parcel 1 --- 40.8+- acres ….. FSA indicates 39+- tillable acres - frontage on Rd. 140 and
Paulding/Putnam Co. Line; wheat planted for 2014 …… Auction Parcel 2 --- 38.5+- acres ….. FSA indicates
37+- tillable acres - frontage on Rd. 140 and Co. Line; corn planted for 2014……. Auction Parcel 3 ---
- 40+- acres ….. FSA indicates 39+- tillable acres - frontage on Rd. 140; beans planted for 2014 ----
Auction Parcels 2 & 3 are contiguous tracts located north of Rd. 140 - Auction Parcel 1 is located south of Rd.
140 ….USDA Soil Survey indicates all Toledo type soil for all tracts ----- Call for Brochures, Surveys, FSA and
other auction information or visit our web site …… Auction Procedure & Terms: Multi Parcel Bidding with
bidder able to bid on individual or combination of Auction Parcels … $5,000 earnest money for each Parcel
on the day of the auction; Closing on before Sept. 20, 2014, upon delivery of Deed and Attorney’s Certificate
Of Title; Possession at closing as the 2014 crops are harvested. ……….. Farm Location: 3 mi. north of Oak-
wood, OH on Rt. 66 to Rd. 140; Then east on Rd. 40 for 1 ½ mi. ……… Auction Location: Twin Oaks Fellowship
Hall, Corner Main & 2nd St., Oakwood, OH (1 block east of the Cooper Community Library ……Seller: Mickey
G. Mowery Estate, William M. Mowery Ex., Pldg Co. Probate Crt Case 20131115 and William & Betty
Mowery------- James M. Sponseller, Attorney For Seller ……. Gorrell Bros. Auctioneers; Nolan Shisler, Sale
Mgr; Larry D. Gorrell, Broker; Sandra Mickelson - Aaron Timm - Don Gorrell - Auctioneers
Farm Land
Auction
Thurs., Aug. 14th @ 6:00 P.M
119 Acres
Sec. 12 & 13, Brown Twp.
Paulding Co., OH
Offered In 1 Parcel ….. FSA indicates 61.07+- tillable acres - USDA Soil
Survey indicates approximately 21.5 acres of highly productive Mermill soil with
areas of Toledo, Granby and Bixler - this is where the “tall corn grows” ----- Call
for Brochure, Survey, FSA and other auction information or visit our web
site …… Terms: $10,000 earnest money on the day of the auction; Closing
on before Sept. 23, 2014, upon delivery of Deed and Attorney’s Certificate Of
Title; Possession at closing as the 2014 crops are harvested. Possession of
wheat field on day of auction to prepare for 2015 crops; Seller reserves the
2014 crops ……….. Farm Location: ¾ mi south of Arthur, OH or 6 mi. north
of Oakwood, OH on Rt. 66 to Rd. 178; Then east on Rd. 178 for 1 mi. - farm
has frontage on Rd 209 and Rd. 178 ……… Auction Location: Gorrell Bros.
office and auction facility at 1201 N. Williams St., Paulding, OH Seller: Family
Of Irvin & Dolores Retcher ……. Gorrell Bros. Auctioneers; Don Gorrell Sale
Mgr; Larry D. Gorrell, Broker; Sandra Mickelson - Aaron Timm - Nolan
Shisler - Auctioneers
65 Acres
Sec. 25, Auglaize
Twp.
Paulding Co., OH
Farm
Land
Auction
Sat., Aug. 23rd
@ 10 A.M
Offered in 4 Parcels Of 54+- acres, 50+- acres, 40+- acres & 38+- acres & Combinations
Parcel 1 --- 54.065+- acres in Sec. 36, Benton Twp. - 6 mi. south of Payne on Rt. 49 to Pauld-
ing/Van Wert Co. Line; then east for 1 ¼ mi. …… Parcel 2 --- 50+- acres in Sec. 30, Blue Creek
Twp. - 5 mi south of Payne, OH on Rt. 49 to C-24; then east on C-24 for 2 ½ mi ………Parcel 3 -----
40.609+- acres in Sec. 1, Benton Twp.- 1 mi south of Payne on Rt. 49 to C-72; then east on C-72
for 1 ¼ mi…….. Parcel 4 ----- 40.609+- acres in Sec. 1, Benton Twp. - 1 mi. south of Payne, OH
on Rt. 49 to C-72; then east on C-72 for 1 ¼ mi. to T-55; then north ¼ mi. - north of and adjacent
to Parcel 3 ……These parcels are nearly all Tillable Hoytville type soil …. Call for Brochure,
Surveys, FSA, Hand Written Tile information and other auction information ….. Multi Parcel
Bidding System with the bidder being able to bid on one, all, or any combination Terms: $10,000
earnest money each parcel; Closing on or before Sept. 20, 2014; Possession at closing as the 2014
crops are harvested …. Auction Location: Divine Mercy Catholic Church Reception Hall / Gym - 203
W. Townline St. (Rt. 613) Payne, Ohio - ½ block west of Rt. 49 …… Seller: Virgil W. and Helen R.
Thompson Trusts, Marvin V. Thompson, Trustee --- Steve Keister of Keister & Baker, Attorney ….
Gorrell Bros. Auctioneers; Larry D. Gorrell, Broker; Don Gorrell - Sandra Mickelson - Aaron Timm
- Nolan Shisler - Auctioneers
Farm Land
Auction
183 Acres
Benton & Blue
Creek Twp.
Paulding Co., OH
Sat., Aug. 16th
@ 10 A.M
Auction
Contents Of 2 Story House & Large Barns
Sat., Aug. 2 - 10 A.M.
Location: 4560 Rd. 52, Payne, OH …. 2 ½ mi
south of Payne on Rt 49 to Rd 52; then west on
Rd. 52 for ½ mi- watch for signs
2002 Chevy 1500 Pickup; Automatic; Odometer reads
147,897 mi. ……… Stevenson .22 cal Model 62 Rife
……. 20-60x60 Prismatic Spotting Scope & 10x50 Bin-
ocular …… Emerson Telescope …… Knives, Outdoor
Items & Related …….. Craftsman 21 HP Lawn Tractor
……Lawn Trailers ……. 3500 E Portable Electric Gen-
erator ….. 7 Sections of Scaffolding & Accessories …..
3 wagons full of hand & shop tools & related including
jacks, battery charger, shovels, rakes, hoes, extension
cords, power tools, wrenches, etc., etc., etc. …… Step
& Extension Ladders …… Wagon Full Of Primitives and
related including large crock, old tins & boxes, rug beat-
ers, wash board, Haskins and Allen “Little White Kitties”
picture and other related, old leather jackets, wall mir-
rors, old tools & kitchen items, wood rake, LP records,
Hager Pitcher, ……Old Kennedy Kit tackle or tool box
…… Sigma Guitar …… Dog Cages, Bird Cages &
Related ….. Horse Saddle & Tack …… Feed Tubs,
Buckets, etc. ……Hay Slings & Old Barn Items ……
Oak Plant Stand ….. Metal Trunk …… Oak Chest Of
Drawers …… Newer Chests Of Drawers …… Samsung
Flat Screen TV & Other Electronics …… Acer Computer
……. Frigidaire Washer & Dryer ….. Kelvinator Refrig-
erator …… Wagon Full Of Small Kitchen Appliances
& Related Household ……. Sofa ….. 3 Pc Bedroom
Suite ……. Side Chairs ……. Duncan Phyfe Style Din-
ing Table …… Other Household including pots, pans,
general household, etc., etc., etc. ….. plus wheel chair
and related ……Many, Many, Many more items - still
unboxing and looking through drawers, closets and
barns ….. Partial List ------ Call for brochure
or visit our web site ……. Terms: Cash or ap-
proved check day of auction …… Seller: Richard
K. Zierten Estate, Paulding Co. Probate Crt
Case 20141020, Daniel Zierten, Executor;
Shane Lee, Attorney….. Don Gorrell, Aar-
on Timm; Larry Gorrell, Sandra Mickel-
son; Nolan Shisler, Auctioneers


Auction
Contents Of 2 Story House & Large Barns
Sat., Aug. 2 - 10 A.M.
Location: 4560 Rd. 52, Payne, OH …. 2 ½ mi south of Payne on Rt 49 to Rd 52; then west on
Rd. 52 for ½ mi- watch for signs
2002 Chevy 1500 Pickup; Automatic; Odometer reads 147,897 mi. ……… Stevenson .22 cal
Model 62 Rifle ……. Binoculars, Knives, Outdoor Items & Related …….. Craftsman 21 HP
Lawn Tractor ……Lawn Trailers ……. 3500 E Portable Electric Generator ….. 7 Sections of
Scaffolding & Accessories ….. 3 wagons full of hand & shop tools & related including jacks,
battery charger, shovels, rakes, hoes, extension cords, power tools, wrenches, etc., etc., etc. ……
#1639 Now Reduced!
11091 Rd 93, Paulding.
2 1/2 bath, brick home.
Newer roof, windows, pole
barn & more. $164,900.
Call Aaron 419-769-5808
#1635 118 Bittersweet,
Pldg., newer lg. 2 BR,
2 bath condo, applianc-
es remain, sunroom,
w/ patio, 2 car garage
NEW PRICE Call Don
Gorrell 419-399-7699
To see nice color pictures & interior shots of properties offered
by Gorrell Bros. go to: www.gorrellbros-paulding.com
Multiple Listing
Service
#1653 Newer Home, 10
acres w/lg. pond! 1,424
sq. ft. w/bsmt. walls
insulated, partitioned,
& ready for dry wall. 3
bdrms, 2 baths, fireplace,
hickory kitchen, rear
patio, Antwerp/Paulding.
$189,900. Call Sandra/
Tamyra 419-506-1015
#1654 New Listing.
5941 SR 111. 3 bdrm,
2 bath. New in 2007,
natural gas, neat
and clean. Move in
ready. $179,900. Call
Aaron 419-769-5808
#1656 2 Bdrm. Home,
corner lot, Antwerp.
$49,900. Tastefully
decorated, bright kitch-
en, lg. utility, detached
garage. Call Sandra/
Tamyra 419-506-1015
#1655 Country Living
at an Affordable Price!
Newer metal roof, out-
buildings, lots of inte-
rior work done, 3 Bdrm
Home! NE of Payne.
$57,500. Call Sandra/
Tamyra 419-506-1015
NEW LISTING #1652 Lg.
4 bdrm, 2 bath Victorian
style home w/ corner lot,
det. garage, gourmet
kitchen w/ walk-in pantry,
formal dining, formal liv-
ing & family room, orig-
inal hardwood flooring
and trim thru-out, third
floor could be a rec room
or another bedroom,
3,200 sq. ft., new elec-
tric $184,900... 607 N.
Williams St., Paulding Call
Don Gorrell 419-399-
7699
#1561 9574 SR 500,
Paulding....3 BDRM, 1.5
Bath home w/finished ptl.
bsmt., family room, C/A,
wood deck. New Price
$129,000...Call Joe Den
Herder
#1616 Previous doctor’s
Office. Zoned commer-
cial. Many uses. Will look
at all offers. New price -
$27,500. 602 Emerald
Rd., Paulding Call Don
Gorrell 419-399-7699
GOOD-BETTER-BEST!
17430 Road 48, Grover Hill
North of Grover Hill – 5 miles east of Wayne Trace;
7 year young 3bed/2 bath ranch on 1.8 acres; pole
building – price of ownership evident throughout;
video tour at straleyrealty.com #409; $142,900;
Call Warren Straley; 419-979-9308
419 W Ervin, Van Wert, OH
419.238.9733 | 800.727.2021
EVERYTHING WE TOUCH—TURNS TO SOLD
NO MONEY DOWN - VA - RD
754 Water Street, Paulding
Modern 3 bed 2 bath ranch on huge lot at the north
end of Paulding; great sunroom; attached 2 car and
huge lot; near the park and city pool; # 376; $110,000;
call Bill Priest; 419-786-9440;
HOMES FOR SALE
PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD
QUICKLY...EASILY...
JUST PHONE 419-399-4015
FOR SALE

BUILDING LOT FOR SALE.
Great location in Payne.
Close to town. Call 260-249-
7848 for more info. 46p3
$150 QUEEN PILLOWTOP
MATTRESS SET. New in
plastic, can deliver 260-493-
0805. 49p4
THERMAL TECH EXTERI-
ORS - Vinyl Siding, Window
& Roofing Blowout Sale!
FREE Estimates. All Credit
Accepted. 99.00 per month,
no payments for 6 months.
Call Today! 740-385-6511
ANTIQUES

YEARS AGO ANTIQUE
MALL, 108 W. Main Street,
Van Wert (419) 238-3362,
30+ Dealers. Closed Tues-
days. Buy & Sell. 27ctf
FOR RENT

3 BEDROOM HOME with
garage in Paulding, $500 a
month/$500 deposit. No
pets. 419-594-2485 49p2
2 BDRM. 1 BATH APART-
MENT in Antwerp, OH. $475
per month includes water,
sewer, trash and use of the
onsite laundry facility. Call
Bob at 419-796-9940. 47p4
NICE 1 BDRM. UPSTAIRS
APT. - water/sewer /trash
included. $325 mo./deposit.
Antwerp. 260-373-2340 42c7
ROOMMATE WANTED
to share expense, sepa-
rate bathrooms, in-ground
pool. 419-263-2780. 35ctf
2 BDRM. APARTMENTS
FOR RENT in Pauld-
ing and Defiance. Please
call Al at 419-399-2419
for more details. 43ctf
IN PAULDING - Whispering
Pines - 2 bdrm. Call 419-670-
4655 or 419-399-2419 47ctf
NOW LEASING: ONE &
TWO BEDROOM APART-
MENTS. in Paulding. Please
call Straley Real Estate at 419-
399-4444 or 419-399-3721
for more information 25ctf
PAULDING STORAGE
CENTER: Now renting
storage units. Different
sizes available. Call 419-
399-2419 for info. 18ctf
PAULDING MINI STOR-
AGE UNITS. For more in-
formation please call Straley
Real Estate at 419-399-4444
or 419-399-3721 25ctf
HELP WANTED

VANTAGE CAREER CEN-
TER IS ACCEPTING RE-
SUMES for part time
instructors in the following
areas: Electricity, PLC, Basic
Welding, and Pipe Welding
(AWS welding certifcation
required). Please send re-
sume to: Vangtage Career
Center, ATTN: Pete Weir,
818 N. Franklin St., Van
Wert, OH 45891 49c2
AUGLAIZE GOLF CLUB is
looking for a beverage cart
and or inside help with deli
and bar service. Must be
21 years of age and have
references. Call 419-393-
2211 and ask for Michelle or
Frenchie. Applications can be
picked up at the course. 49c2
EMPLOYMENT OPPOR-
TUNITIES AT MORNING
STAR CONVENIENCE
STORE, Melrose, Ohio. Full
time and part time. Various
shifts. Applications avail-
able at the store. 49p3
LPN NEEDED at Fritz House
in Paulding, OH. Submit re-
sume to Buckeye Family,
Inc. Attn: Bradley Belcher
- 170 Fairfax Rd., Marion,
OH 43302 49c5
CAREGIVER NEEDED.
Apply in person at the
Fritz House, 451 McDon-
ald Pike, Paulding. NO
PHONE CALLS 49c5
H.W AT BROOKSIDE
DRIVE THRU & gas sta-
tion. Apply in person M-F,
8-5; 602 E. Perry St. Offce
directly behind Valero. 49c2
DRIVERS! NEW PAY
PACKAGE, Tractor Owner
Operators $1,500 Sign-On
Bonus, Outbound Colum-
bus, OH. Reimbursement
Tolls, Scales, 2,500-3,000
miles/week 888-888-7996
NEW PAY-FOR-EXPERI-
ENCE program pays up to
$0.41/mile. Class A Pro-
fessional Drivers Call 866-
979-1402 for more details or
visit SuperServiceLLC.com
DRIVERS: CDL-A DRIVER
PAY INCREASE. Exp.
Solos-$.40/mile, Teams-up
to $.51/mile, CDL Grads-
$.34/mile. $.01/mile increase
each yr. NO CAP! Extra
Pay for Hazmat! 888-928-
6011 www.Drive4Total.com
CDL-A DRIVERS Boyd
Bros. offers: OTR or ask
about Regional Routes, Exp.
Drivers avg. 54 cpm. Up
to $5,000 Sign on Bonus.
Apply Today! 888-342-
4221 Dri veforBoyd.com
IT’S THE LONG HUAL!
3000+ miles per week. Com-
petitive pay. Late model
equipment. Paid weekly. NO
East Coast. Paid practical
miles. Call 800-645-3748
GORDON TRUCKING -
CDL-A Truck Drivers Up to
$5,000 Sign On Bonus &
$.56 CPM! Solo & Team Po-
sitions, Great Miles & Time
Off! No East Coast. EOE
Call 7 days/wk! 866-954-
8836 GordonTrucking.com
“Partners i n Excel -
lence” OTR Drivers. APU
Equipped Pre-Pass EZ-pass
passenger policy. 2012 &
Newer equipment. 100%
NO touch. Butler Trans-
port 1-800-528-7825
www.butl ertransport.com
PAINTING
ErIc’S PAINTwOrkS &
PRESSURE WASHING. In-
terior and Exterior Painting.
Commerci al /Resi denti al .
Bonded & Insured. Offce #
419-594-3674; Cell # 1-704-
557-6723. 33p12
SERVICES

CONCRETE CONTRAC-
TOR SPECIALIZING IN:
sidewalks, patios, driveways,
old concrete demo. Call
Mitch for a free estimate.
419- 786- 9626. 46p8
B&W GRAPHICS - We
specialize in custom vinyl
lettering, signs and truck/
semi lettering. For more
info., call Michele Laney
at 419-576-9153 47ctf
AL GRIFFITHS CON-
STRUCTION: Windows, light
electrical, drywall, siding,
doors and more. Call Al for
your repair or construction
needs. 419-506-2102 51ctf
BUSINESS SERVICE
REACH 2 MILLION NEWS-
PAPER READERS with one
ad pl acement. ONLY
$295.00. Ohio’s best com-
munity newspapers. Call
Mitch at AdOhio Statewide
Classifed Network, 614-486-
6677, or E-MAIL at:
mcol ton@adohi o.net or
check out our website at:
w w w . a d o h i o . n e t .
REACH OVER 1 MILLION
OHIO ADULTS with one ad
placement. Only $995.00.
Ask your local newspaper
about our 2X2 Display Net-
work and our 2X4 Display
Network $1860 or Call Mitch
at 614-486-6677/E-mail
mc o l t o n @a d o h i o . n e t .
or check out our web-
site: www.adohio.net.
MISC.

WANTED COMIC BOOKS:
Pre-1975, sports, non-sports
cards, original art & movie
memorabilia ESPECIALLY
1960’s Collector/Investor,
paying cash! Call MIKE: 800-
273-0312 mikecarbo@gmail.
c o m
H O M E O W N E R S
WANTED!!! Kayak Pools
is looking for demo home
sites to display our main-
tenance-free pools. Save
thousands of $$$ with our
Year-End Clearance Sale.
CALL NOW! 800-315-2925
kayakpool smi dwest . com
discount code: 897L314
Meet singles right now! No
paid operators, just real peo-
ple like you. Browse greet-
ings, exchange messages
and connect live. Try it free.
Call now: 1-877-485-6669
SAWMILLS from only
$4397.00- MAKE & SAVE
MONEY with your own
bandmill- Cut lumber any di-
mension. In stock, ready to
ship. Free Info/DVD: www.
Nor woodSawmi l l s. com
1-800-578-1363 Ext. 300N
VACATI ON CABI NS
FOR RENT IN CANADA.
Fish for walleyes, perch,
northerns. Boats, motors,
gasoline included. Call
Hugh 1-800-426-2550
for free brochure. Web-
site www.bestfishing.com
TRAINING/EDUC.

HVAC TECHNICIANS. 4
Week Accelerated Hands
On Training Program. We
Offer 6 National Certifca-
tions and Lifetime Job Place-
ment Assistance. VA
Benefts Eligible! 877-994-
9904 49k1
AIRLINE JOBS begin
here-Get Trained as FAA
certified Aviation Techni-
cian. Housing/Financial
aid for qualifed students.
Job Placement assistance.
Aviation Institute of Main-
tenance. 1-877-676-3836
RV’s FOR SALE
2010 PARK MODEL 12X38,
2 BED, 1 Bath. Vinyl siding,
Shingle roof, Electric heat
and air. ONLY $15,900.
1 - 8 0 0 - 6 8 6 - 1 7 6 3
CHILDCARE

MOM OF THREE LOOKING
to babysit in my home rea-
sonable prices CPR and First
Aid Certifed. 260-267-1291.
4 9 p 2
FREE ZONE

FREE KITTENS. 419-594-
3 4 1 1 . 4 9 k 1
GARAGE SALE

DOWNSIZING - JULY 30 -
AUG. 1. 10 AM TO ?.
MYLES RESIDENCE IN
HEDGES. SOUTH OF
HEDGES CEMETERY 49k1
Antique table & chairs, tod-
dler bed, bikes, games toys,
girls newborn & 18-24 mo.,
boys clothes size 16 to in-
fant, men XL to plus, women
plus sizes to juniors clothes,
housewares, knick knacks,
Vera Bradley, alot misc. FRI.
AUG 1, 9-5; SAT. AUG 2,
9-2. 501 W. GASSER RD
If it’s time to
get rid of it...
sell it
quick with
& WEEKLY REMINDER
P PROGRESS ROGRESS
P PAULDING AULDING C COUNTY OUNTY
CLASSIFIEDS
reaching up to
10,500 homes
every week
TO PLACE
YOUR AD,
CALL US AT
419-399-4015
WE ARE GROWING!
Join a team focused on quality and excellence!
ENGINEERING MANAGER
Responsible for the leadership of design engineering activities
including the development of staff and processes for the
corporation. Qualifications include an Engineering Bachelors
degree with five years’ experience, familiarity with DOT &
FMVSS regulations. Prior management experience required.
ELECTRICAL ENGINEER
Responsible for engineering and computer programming of multiplex
electrical systems; qualifications include an electrical degree (or
equiv) and experience in CAD of wiring diagrams, use of electrical
test equipment, and designing of 12v DC and 125v AC electrical
systems in a mobile application.
ADMINSTRATIVE SALES SUPPORT
Provide administrative coordination for the sales operations;
qualifications include HS diploma, proficient in Microsoft office and
prior clerical experience required.
We are also accepting applications for several
production positions including but not limited to -
welders, bodywork, electrical, and assembly operators.
Applications are available online at braunambulances.com or you
may apply at: Braun Industries, Inc., 1170 Production Drive, Van Wert
OH 45891, or fax resumes to 419-232-7066.
BLUE STREAM
DAIRY, INC.
Utility/
Maintenance
Full Time
Valid Driver’s License
18+ years old
Please apply in person
from 8am-5pm at
3242 Mentzer Church Rd.
Convoy, OH
Wednesday, July 30, 2014 Paulding County Progress - 11A
FOR SALE
BY OWNER
Home located at
535 Fox. Ave.,
Payne
2 bedroom, full
basement, 2 car
attached garage,
new furnace
installed, fresh
paint & some new
carpet.
Appointment can
be made by calling
260-750-2803
48p3
CLASSIFIEDS.........
Place Your Ad Today!
419-399-4015
40
¢
a word ($6 minimum)
Runs In Both
Weekly
Reminder
And Progress
Deadline: 3:00 pm on Thursday
Customer Relationship Specialist
Job #11241
Farm Credit Mid-America is seeking a Customer Relationship
Specialist to serve Delphos, Ohio. The Customer Relationship
Specialist provides exceptional first-level internal and external
customer service. Responsibilities include helping market, cross-sell
and deliver credit and other fnancial services to our customers and
prospective customers. This position also provides administrative
support for others in the feld business development division and
maintains information and reporting as directed.
CUSTOMER RELATIONSHIPS: Establishes, develops and maintains
strong internal and external customer relationships by consistently
providing quality service that is timely, thorough and responsive, and
exceeds customer expectations. Receives walk-in customers and
incoming customer calls and provides administrative support to feld
business development division team members, including sales offce
staff, and crop insurance and Agribusiness team members.
This is an entry-level position for a Customer Relationship Specialist.
The primary responsibility is to coordinate customer information and
become a fully functional Customer Relationship Specialist through
training and on-the-job experience.
Minimum Qualifcations: High school diploma and at least one year
of experience in two or more of the following areas: administrative
support, fnancially related customer service or computer operations.
To be considered an applicant, you must:
• Meet minimum qualifcations for the position
• Submit your resume by 08/08/2014 to: www.e-farmcredit.com
Careers, Job Opportunities, indicating the specifc position for
which you are applying
Check out our Benefts!
• Once on our Web site, click on Careers, Employee Benefts, then
click on Employee Benefts Presentation
© 2014 NAS
(Media: delete copyright notice)
Paulding Progress
Delphos Herlad/Putnam Sentinel
2.5" x 5"
B&W
We are proud to be an EEO/AA employer, M/F/D/V.
FULL AND PART TIME
Our company is
growing and we
need your help!
We have openings
for full and part
time hours, flexible
schedules, fun com-
munity activities and
an overall satisfac-
tion of making a dif-
ference in the lives
of individuals with
developmental dis-
abilities.
Please call Dawn
at 419-523-5810
for job
opportunities in
Putnam County.
Please call Jaime
at 419-567-4131
for job
opportunities in
Paulding and
Van Wert Counties.
EOE/DFWP
00097805
Huge Garage Sale
Wed., July 30 - Fri., Aug. 1
9am-5pm
7 pc. patio set, houseware,
blankets, wedding decorations,
glassware, seasonal items,
purses, shoes (size 9), teen girl
& jr. clothing (name brand) thru
adult size 14, toys, Vera Bradley,
stuffed animals, Coach jewelry,
pictures, dune buggy, Goldwing
trike /trailer.
Take SR 111W to Rd 87 turn left
7th house on left. Slattman
42c1
DRIVERS WANTED
Hornish Bros. Inc. is currently ac-
cepting applications for CITY WORK/
SHUTTLE DRIVER for work in the De-
fiance area. This is an hourly position
with benefits. If being home daily is im-
portant to you and you have a Class A
CDL with at least 2 years tractor-trailer
experience, please fill out an applica-
tion at 2060 E. Second St., Defiance,
OH (west side of office building).
www.hornishgroup.com. E.O.E.
40 CUSTOM COLORS OF
SEAL COAT AVAILABLE
RESIDENTIAL
DRI VEWAYS
COMMERCIAL
PARKING LOTS
CONCRETE
SE ALI NG
ASPHALT SEAL
COATING
CUSTOM LINE
S T R I P I N G
567.204.1427
FULLY INSURED
OUR PRICES WILL NOT BE BEAT!
A Star-Seal Preferred
Contractor
EATON in
Van Wert has an
opening for a
•Multi-Craft Maintenance
Tech on 2nd shift 
•Quality Engineer
on 1st shift
For position
requirements and
to apply go to
www.eaton.com/careers. 
Eaton Corporation is an
Equal Opportunity
Employer, F/M/D/V. 
No phone calls or
applications will be
accepted at the facility.
49c2
7469 Rd 187, Oakwood
3-Bedroom, 3-Bath home on
2.5 Acres. $199,499
MLS #5069684
Call Tabbetha Scott,
419-969-0997
505 Burt, Oakwood
3-Bedroom, 2-Bath
Fixer upper. $19,900
MLS #5073541
Call Tabbetha Scott,
419-969-0997
180 S Third, Oakwood
2-Bedroom, 2-Bath ranch.
$45,900 MLS #5070004
Call Tabbetha Scott,
419-969-0997
203 S Main, Grover Hill
3-Bedroom, 2-Bath
Manufactured Home
$49,800 MLS# 5068544
Call Tabbetha Scott,
419-969-0997
106 N Sixth, Oakwood
3-Bedroom, 1-Bath,
Central Air $34,900
MLS #5075825
Call Tabbetha Scott,
419-969-0997
13176 Nancy, Paulding
3-bedroom, 2-bath
completly remodeled ranch.
$72,000 MLS #5075517
Call Chris Switzer,
419-438-3073
322 Clinton Street
Defiance, OH 43512
Phone: (419) 782-4116
HOUSE AUCTION
Wednesday, August 20, 2014 – 6:00 p.m.
Visit our Web site at www.BeeGeeRealty.com
to view the Auction Calendar and see more information/
photos of this auction and all upcoming auctions.
122 N Washington St., Van Wert, OH 45891
Auctioneers: Bob Gamble, CAI, Broker, Dale Butler; Ron
Medaugh; DD Strickler, Gary Richey & Andy Schweiterman
Member of Ohio & National Auctioneers Associations
18972 Wetzel Rd., Middle Point, Ohio
Located 1 mile East of St. Rt. 637 on Wetzel Rd.
Northeast Van Wert County
SPACIOUS BRICK RANCH – FULL BASEMENT
Description: Mark your calendar for Wednesday, August 20th so
you don’t miss your opportunity to own a very nice brick ranch home
– AND IT WILL BE AFFORDABLE! You will love the elbow room the
1950 sq. ft. floor plan offers. There are 3 bedrooms, 1 ½ baths, 2 car
attached garage, full basement and two sheds with a one acre lot.
CALL BEE GEE AT 419-238-5555 TO VIEW
Check out the photo and information sheet on our website. Go
to www.beegeerealty.com and click on Auction. Call your banker
now to arrange financing prior to auction as no financing or other
contingencies are permitted.
LINCOLNVIEW SCHOOLS –
NORTHEAST VAN WERT COUNTY
If you desire to live in the country now is the time to act while interest
rates to borrow money are very attractive. GOOD HOME – LOW
INTEREST RATES AND AFFORDABLE PRICE – what more could
you ask for?
See Photos at www.auctionzip.com
AuctionZip Auctioneer ID # 6413
Terms: $5,000.00 deposit day of auction. Balance due by September
20, 2014. Selling subject to Trust approval.
Owner: Rosemary Thatcher Trust Estate, Julie Romine Trustee, Bob
Young, Attorney, Young & Yarger
Federal-Mogul is a leader in design and
manufacture of industrial truck, rail and
automotive sealing solutions.
Applications for
full time production
positions will be accepted in person or
by mail beginning July 28th at the plant,
150 Fisher Ave. Van Wert, OH 45891.
Pay for these positions starts at $12.46/hr
and will support production on any of the 3
shifts. Comprehensive beneft package offered
including medical, dental, vision, short term
disability, 401k, vacation and holidays.
This work may include overtime and weekends.
Those interested must also apply online at:
www.federalmogul.com/careers
High School Diploma or GED; or 10 years
manufacturing experience required. Experience
in a manufacturing environment preferred but
not necessary. Applicants will be required to
pass a criminal background check and drug test.
Federal-Mogul is an Equal Opportunity
Employer. No telephone calls please
JUNE
June 6-7 – Payne Commu-
nity Garage Sale. Contact
Nancy Speice at 419-263-
2863.
June 13-14 – Antwerp Com-
munity Garage Sales & Side-
walk Sales. Contact Antwerp
Chamber of Commerce,
419-258-1722
AUGUST
Aug. 7-10 – Highway 127
Corridor Sale, also called the
“World’s Longest Yardsale,”
covering Michigan to Ala-
bama along U.S. 127. Visit
www.127sale.com
Aug. 7-9 – Annual Lincoln
Highway BUY-WAY Yard Sale
in Ohio. Visit www.historicby-
way.com
Aug. 21-22 – Paulding
County Senior Center’s an-
nual garage sale, 401 E.
Jackson St., Paulding
JUNE
June 6-7 – Payne Commu-
nity Garage Sale. Contact
Nancy Speice at 419-263-
2863.
June 13-14 – Antwerp Com-
munity Garage Sales & Side-
walk Sales. Contact Antwerp
Chamber of Commerce,
419-258-1722
AUGUST
Aug. 7-10 – Highway 127
Corridor Sale, also called the
“World’s Longest Yardsale,”
covering Michigan to Ala-
bama along U.S. 127. Visit
www.127sale.com
Aug. 7-9 – Annual Lincoln
Highway BUY-WAY Yard Sale
in Ohio. Visit www.historicby-
way.com
Aug. 21-22 – Paulding
County Senior Center’s an-
nual garage sale, 401 E.
Jackson St., Paulding
The Campbell Soup Company, the
world’s leading maker and marketer of
soup, seeks quality and safety conscious
individuals to join our Napoleon opera-
tions team for the current season. Ideal
candidates will have manufacturing work
experience, be willing to work any shift
and must be able to work overtime as
needed. Forklift experience is preferred.
Most positions require the ability to lift/
carry 50 lbs. repeatedly.
Applications for this season’s general la-
bor and distribution center/forklift posi-
tions can be completed and returned at
your local Ohio Means Job’s county of-
fice.
If an applicant has completed a Work-
Keys assessment prior to applying, they
should bring a copy of their scores when
they apply.
Seasonal positions start at
$14.00/hour. Season may run from
August through February. Employees will
be required to satisfactorily complete a
background check, physical and drug
screen. Applicants who have already ap-
plied for the 2014 season do not need to
reapply.
Veterans are strongly encouraged to ap-
ply.
Equal Opportunity Employer.
12A - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, July 30, 2014
Harlan Days
July 31st, Aug. 1 & 2nd
www.harlandays.com
Arena Events
Tursday 7/31 Motorcross at 7pm
Friday 8/1 King Brothers Rodeo at 7pm
Saturday 8/2 Demolition Derby
*see website for a full list of events
Raffle tickets are available
through 8/1/14
at the Headquarters Tent.
Enter to win a 2014
Chevy Spark
*see website for details
General
Admission $8
8 and Under
FREE!
KIWANIS
SOCCER
Registration deadline is
August 1st
Cost is $30
GAMES WILL BE PLAYED SAT. MORNINGS
SEPT. 6 - OCT. 11
AGES 4 YRS. OF AGE THROUGH 5TH GRADE
Registration forms available at the Paulding
County Carnegie Library & Paulding Pool
45c5
Thursday Special
18 Holes - $24 Play all day for $29
For Tee
Times
419-393-2211
IN THE COURT OF
COMMON PLEAS
OF PAULDING
COUNTY, OHIO
PROBATE
DIVISION
In the Estate of:
Charles Lee Bernard
Randy Bernard
Administrator of the
Estate of Charles
Lee Bernard
Plaintiff
vs.
Charles L. Bernard,
Jr., et. al. Defendants
Case No. 20141032(A)
LEGAL NOTICE
All persons who claim
to be a child or a grand-
child, great grandchild,
great great grandchild
or other descendent of
Charles Lee Bernard
of 14511 Co. Rd. 31,
Antwerp, OH 45813,
who died on July 25,
2008, will take notice
that Randy Bernard, the
administrator of Charles
Lee Bernard’s estate,
has fled a petition to
determine heirship in
the Paulding County
Probate Court. The
deceased, Charles Lee
Bernard, had two chil-
dren by his frst wife,
Rebeccah Bernard, to
wit: Charles L. Bernard,
Jr. and Randy Bernard.
He also had four (4)
children by his second
wife, Bonnie Walters
Bernard, to wit: Robert
(Bobby) L. Bernard,
Toni Katschke, An-
thony Quinn Bernard
who left a daughter,
Brittany (last name
unknown), and Shawn
Allen Bernard who is
deceased and whose
children are unknown.
Charles Bernard was
also alleged to have
a son by the name of
Gregory Bernard who
is deceased and his
children are unknown.
He had a son by the
name of Scott Bernard
whose last known ad-
dress was either Ten-
nessee or Kentucky.
It is believed he had a
daughter by the name
of Tamara Thompson
who’s deceased and
children are unknown.
It is believed he is the
father of Sharon Ber-
nard whose address and
children are unknown.
The deceased children
of Charles Lee Bernard
may have had children
or grandchildren that
the administrator is not
aware of. Any person
who claims to be a rela-
tive of Charles Lee Ber-
nard of Antwerp, Ohio,
who died on July 25,
2008, should fle a re-
sponse with the Pauld-
ing County Probate
Court, Courthouse, 115
N. Williams St., Room
202, Paulding, OH
45879-1284 (419) 399-
8255 and send a copy
of the response to James
E. Hitchcock, Attorney
for Randy Bernard, 650
W. First St., Defance,
OH 43512 (419) 782-
5134. If you fail to
fle a timely response,
any claim you have in
the estate of Charles
Lee Bernard would not
be recognized, and you
may be barred from
inheriting any property
or assets or monetary
benefts from Charles
Lee Bernard’s estate.
This ad will run once
a week for six weeks.
You have 28 days after
thelast publication to
fle a response. 44c6
LEGAL NOTICE
The Village of Pauld-
ing will he accepting
sealed bids for the
sale of the following
described real estate,
to-wit:
Inlot Number One
Hundred Eighty-nine
(189) in the Original
Plat of the Village of
Paulding, Paulding
County, Ohio, save
and except die North-
west Quarter (1/4) of
said Lot, more par-
ticularly described as
follows:
Beginning at the
Northwest corner of
said Inlot Number One
Hundred Eighty-nine
(189)... running thence
East on the North line
of said Lot, Sixty-six
(66) feet; thence South
on a line parallel with
the West line of said
Lot, Thirty-three (33)
feet; thence West on
a line parallel with
the aforesaid North
line. Sixty-six (66)
feet, thence South on
a line parallel with the
West line of said lot,
Thirty-three (33) feet;
thence West on a line
parallel with the afore-
said North line, Six-
ty-Six feet (66) to the
West line of said Lot;
thence North on said
West line. Thirty-three
(33) feet to the place of
beginning.
Together with all the
appurtenances and he-
reditaments thereunto
belonging.
Parcel No.: 30-248-
064-00
The real estate being
sold is the former
“Barnes Hotel” prop-
erty and is located at
110 South Williams
Street, Paulding, Ohio
All bids must be
placed in a sealed en-
velope and be iden-
tifed as “BID FOR
BARNES HOTEL
PROPERTY” and
received by Harry
Wiebe, Village Ad-
ministrator, Village of
Paulding, 116 South
Main Street, Pauld-
ing, Ohio 45879 by
12.00 P.M (Noon)
on Wednesday. Sep-
tember 10, 2014, at
which time they will
be opened and read.
The real estate is to
be sold and conveyed
to the highest bidder
by quit claim deed on
the following terms:
1. Bids must be in a
minimum amount of
$8,000.00.
2. The successful bid-
der and the Village of
Paulding will each,
pay one-half (54) of
the cost of replac-
ing the sidewalk in
front of the property
on South Williams
Street.
3. Ten percent (10%)
of the purchase price
to be deposited with
the bid by certifed
check, and the bal-
ance to be paid to the
Finance Director of
the Village of Pauld-
ing within thirty (30)
days after the accep-
tance of the bid by
the Council of the
Village.
4. The successful bid-
der for the property
must agree, in writ-
ing, to comply with
all ordinances of the
Village of Paulding,
Ohio, that pertain to
possible uses for said
real estate.
The Village of Pauld-
ing reserves the right
to accept or reject any
and all bids
Please contact Harry
Wiebe, Village Ad-
ministrator, at 419-
399-2806 with any
questions. 49c5
Sports
Matt Carr was named Paulding High School athletic director
at the last school board meeting. Carr will offcially begin his
new duties on August 1.
Carr named new athletic
director at Paulding
By JOE SHOUSE
Progress Staff Writer
PAULDING – New
leadership comes to the
Paulding athletic department
as Matt Carr was recently
named the school’s athletic
director as well as the
elementary school’s dean
of students. Carr replaces
Chris Etzler who was named
middle school principal in
May.
Carr, who will begin his
new position on Aug. 1,
is familiar with the sports
program at Paulding, serving
as the girls varsity softball
coach for the past three
years. Prior to that, Carr
also coached the softball
team and girls basketball
team at the junior varsity
level. In the classroom, Matt
taught ffth grade math and
science. He gives that up in
order to serve in the school’s
administration.
Carr recei ved hi s
administration degree in
Educational Leadership back
in May 2013. His credentials
allow him to be a principal in
grades kindergarten through
12 as well.
“There are few positions
available in our area that has a
combination athletic director/
administration position. Most
often you have to also teach.
At age 29 I feel very fortunate
to be able to do what I want,”
said Carr.
Although Carr will miss
the one-on-one connection
with his students in the class
room, he looks forward to
the new challenges that await
him as the dean as well as the
athletic director. “I
have met with Chris (Etzler)
and he has been fantastic in
helping me grasp the many
different aspects of the job.
Right now it does seem a
little overwhelming but I am
ready to get started,” Carr
said.
As an athletic director
the hours are long and for
Carr he feels he has some
of the qualities to make the
transition and to continue to
build the athletic program at
Paulding.
“Well, I’ve been a coach
and I know what it’s like to
be in school all day and then
go on a road trip and return
late at night. Coaches put in
long hours as well,” he said.
Carr has been associated
with sports his entire life. A
2004 graduate from Tinora,
Carr played baseball and golf
and was named all league his
senior year.
“I know this is something
I will enjoy and I’m looking
forward to the opportunity. I
believe I can strengthened the
department by bringing my
organizational skills, energy
and communication to the
table,” he said.
A graduate of Defiance
College, Matt and his wife
Jaaci live in Defiance and
have a 2-year-old daughter,
Raymi.
LEGALS
Wayne Trace flag
football skills camp
HAVILAND – The Wayne Trace flag
football camp will be held on Aug. 9 for all
second, third and fourth graders in the district.
There will be a session in the morning and will
be repeated in the afternoon. Participants will
need to attend just one session.
Camp schedule
morning session
9 - 9:30 a.m. Sign in
9:30 - 9:45 a.m. Instruction and break into
groups
9:45 - 10:45 a.m. Camp workouts
10:45-11 a.m. Closing instructions (parents are
encouraged to join so questions can be answered.)
Afternoon Session
12:30 - 1 p.m. Sign in
1 - 1:15: Instruction and break into groups
l:15 - 2:15 p.m. Camp workouts
2:15 - 2:30 p.m. Closing instructions (parents
are encouraged to join so questions can be
answered.)
This camp is designed to show the camp
student/athletes their strengths and weaknesses.
They will do a series of three skills including
throwing, catching, and running. The purpose
of the three events is to help evaluate the kids
and divide them evenly on teams.
This is not a tryout. If players sign up and
make the payment of $40, they will be placed
on a team. Cash payment is preferred, however
checks will be accepted and need to be made
payable to Wayne Trace Flag Football.
The $40 payment fee pays for each players
shirt, fags, and awards that are handed out
at the end of the season. Each child needs to
wear a shirt (t-shirt or short sleeve), shorts or
pants, and either shoes or cleats. If cleats are
worn they must be molded. No metal cleat
tips will be permitted. Players are responsible
for bringing their own drinks. Breaks will be
allowed between each sessions.
Volunteers are still needed for the camp.
Anyone interested or having any questions,
concerns or comments, contact Brett
Beckman at 419-263-8219 or join the Wayne
Trace Flag Football group on Facebook for all
the latest updates.
If a participant is unable to attend skills
camp, contact Beckman before Aug. 9. No
applicants will be accepted after Aug. 9.
Corn hole tournament to benefit WT flag football
PAYNE – The Wayne Trace
fag football organization will
hold its frst ever cornhole
tournament on Aug. 2 at the
Payne baseball felds at 9 a.m.
The fundraiser will beneft the
fag football organization and
will allow them to purchase
footballs, equipment and a
new score board system.
The double elimination
tournament will consist of
two-person teams and the
entry fee is $30 per team.
Each round will be a best of
three game series with the
winner advancing.
A $60 prize will be awarded
to the winners and $30 to
second place. Regular rules
will apply and will be posted
the day of the tournament.
No alcoholic beverages
will be permitted due to the
nature of the event and the
beneft being the area youth.
To sign up for the corn hole
tournament contact Brett
Beckman at 419-263-8219 or
Dan and Terri Bland at 419-
786-0798. Forms are also
available at Payne Marathon,
Puckerbrush Pizza or N and N
Quick Stop in Grover Hill.
A pulled pork dinner
will also be available by
purchasing a presale ticket for
$7. Dinners include pork, two
sides and a dinner roll. For
tickets call Beckman, Bubba
and Michelle Davis at 419-
399-8416; Mike and Melanie
Forrer at 419-263-0164 or
Dan and Terri Bland.
Twin Oaks United Methodist Church in Oakwood held Vacation Bible School from July 21-25. They had an average of 75 kids
and 30 adults each night. This year’s VBS collection was for the local Red Cross, which brought its truck to the church to show
attendees (above). The church collected water, Gatorade, tube socks and blankets for the agency.
Take us on vacation
Are you headed to some ex-
otic foreign destination, another
state or even Ohio for a vaca-
tion? Take the Progress with
you, along with your camera,
and send us a photo and infor-
mation. Email progress@pro-
gressnewspaper.org
The Progress ...
is Paulding County’s
newspaper of record.
Wednesday, July 30, 2014 Paulding County Progress - 13A
Adopt a Dog
YFC AUCTION IS COMING • YFC AUCTION IS...
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YFC AUCTION IS COMING • YFC AUCTION IS...
THE ANNUAL DEFIANCE AREA
YOUTH FOR CHRIST
AUCTION
“YOUR BID HELPS KIDS”
9:30 A.M. Saturday, August 16, 2014 9:30 A.M.
Location: Extension Building, Paulding County Fairgrounds,
Paulding, Ohio (Air Conditioned Building)
All money raised will go toward local Youth for Christ ministries. Youth for Christ
presented the gospel of Jesus Christ to approximately 3,000 students last year.
MAJOR AUCTION ITEMS INCLUDE:
TICKETS TO ALL OHIO STATE HOME FOOTBALL GAMES, Ohio State items:Urban
Meyer Autographed full size perfect season helmet, 5-Autographed mini-helmets (Urban
Meyer, Braxton Miller, Eddie George,Carlos Hyde & Kenny Guyton), Archie Griffin
16x20 Autographed framed picture, “Hopalong”Cassidy autographed football, 2-Auto-
graphed Urban Meyer framed pictures 16x20 & 8x10, Aaron Craft autographed Jersey
and 2-framed pictures 8x10 , porch pole solar lights, Brutus solar light, glass birdbath, car
magnets, cooler, car emblems, chrome trailer hitch cover, coasters, Helmet yard sign, win-
dow flags, shower mat, child’s quad chair, car emblems, chrome trailer hitch cover, coasters,
bobble heads, picnic basket, wind spinner and more. - 1991 Mazda hatchback 1.6 liter engine
129,322 miles (New exhaust, front mid-pipes and muffler, new brakes, new alternator & water
pump - another car donated by Estle Chevrolet in Defiance, Cub Cadet RTZ zero-turn mower,
Cub Cadet LT 1045 riding mower, 2006 4’x8’ utility trailer, Canoe, self-propelled lawn mower,
laptop computer: Lenovo, Many Vintage items, packaged whole hog sausage patties, whole steer
ground for hamburger, 2 sides of pork (processed to your request), 2 new chest freezers, 6 melody
Seiko chime clock, Seiko men’s watch, Pretty Place Bed and Breakfast (3 mi. from Shipshewana)
Wannemacher Auctioneers
“Call Us–We’re the Other Guys”
106 N. Williams St., Paulding, OH
419-769-9090
Auctioneers
Maurice Wannemacher
Jeff Strahley
Kevin Anspach
Waters Insurance LLC
Bruce Ivan
46c8
AUTO • HOME
COMMERCIAL • BUSINESS
FARM
1007 N. Williams St.
Paulding, OH 45879
419-399-3586
600 South Main St.
Payne, OH 45880
419-263-2127
Thank you
To the following businesses and individuals for donating
and assisting with my eagle scout project
Paulding County Commissioners Lisa Clinton
Kauser Trucking Verl Dasher
The Greenhouse Effect Tim Santo
Gorrell Bros. Auctioneers Josh Cox
Arend, Laukhuf, and Stoller Alan Kohart
Indiana Small Business IT, LLC Margaret Phlipot
Natural Design and Graphics Herb and Sandy Zeller
All Boys in Scout Troop 315 Phillip Jackson Family
Brian Knapp
I greatly appreciated your help, Luke Jackson
CHIEF HELPS PANTHERS RAISE OVER $1,500 – On July 12, the Paulding Chief Supermarket hosted the Paulding Panthers
football team for a summer fundraiser. The football team and cheerleaders washed cars while coaches and parents manned a
cookout. The event raised $1,537 for the organization. The money will go toward feeding the team during away games, a senior
billboard, and equipment needs. Tom Eickhoff, store director of Paulding Chief, stated, “This was a fun event for Chief to be a
part of. The team and parents did a remarkable job of putting this together and our customers really enjoyed it. We’re happy we
were able to give them this opportunity to raise funds for their sport.”
LETTER OF INTENT – Taylor Deatrick, a 2014 graduate of Paulding High School, has been
accepted to the Tiffn University to study business equine management. Taylor has signed his
letter of intent to be a member of the Tiffn University Equestrian Team in the fall. Deatrick also
received an equestrian scholarship. From left are Tiffn coaches Claire Johansen, head coach
Julie Vogel, Deatrick and coach Ali Havrilla.
Jared Deatrick, a 2010
graduate of Paulding High
School, recently received
his varsity letter from the
University of Findlay. Deatrick
participated for four years on
the university’s equestrian
team.
Hello, my name is Molly and I am a really sweet and loving
girl! I am a shepherd mix and weigh about 45 pounds. I am pretty
young, somewhere between one and two years old. Everyone
tells me how beautiful I am, especially my ears! I just love
everyone and I get along well with other dogs. I am very playful
and I really enjoy playing in water and love to “get” the water as it
is coming out of the garden hose! I have been here at the kennel
for a pretty long time so I am hoping that I will fnd a new loving
family soon! Please come by the kennel and visit with me! For
more information about me, please contact the Paulding County
Dog Kennel at 419-399-3791.
Gleaners Black Swamp Arbor #780 recently sponsored the
CHEPC homeschool group in an educational experience at
the Paulding fre station. Several EMS personnel were there to
tell the students about what they do for those who need their
services. The students were able to see the ambulances as
well as various equipment used by the frst responders. The
Black Swamp Arbor also made a donation to the Paulding EMS.
Pictured are many of the students watching demonstrations by
the EMTs.
Chicken BBQ &
Antique Tractor
Show
August 2, 4-7pm
John Paulding Historical
Society
1/2 chicken meal
$7.50
1/4 chicken meal
$4.00
Eat in or Carry out
49c1
14A - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, July 30, 2014
The
Church Corner
Saturday, Aug. 2
Mini-VBS
MELROSE – A mini-Vacation Bible
School will be held at Melrose UMC from
10 a.m.-noon on Aug. 2. The theme will
be “Fired Up Moses.” Kelly Tumblin and
Michelle Horstman have some exciting
events planned. There will be singing, story
time, crafts and snacks. Bring the children,
ages kindergarten through ffth grade. Call
Eileen Kochensparger 419-399-5818 with any
questions or if any children need a ride.
Sunday, Aug. 3
Evening of magic
PAYNE – Payne United Methodist Church
invites everyone to attend an evening of magic
featuring Tim Mabis. This program will be held
at 7 p.m. Aug. 3. Refreshments will be served.
Aug. 4-8
Vacation Bible School
GROVER HILL – Pioneer Christian
Ministries is having VBS from 6:30-8:30
p.m. Aug. 4-8. A totally fun VBS – Weird
Animals – where Jesus’ love is one-of-a-
kind. The church is located at 17936 Road
108, Paulding intersection of Road 108 and
Ohio 637, which is six miles north of Grover
Hill. All children ages 3-12 are welcome and
invited to come. If transportation is needed,
call 419-303-7449 or 419-771-0432.
“Church Corner” listings are free. If your
church is having any special services or
programs, please email us your information
at progress@progressnewspaper.org or call
the Paulding County Progress at 419-399-
4015.
THE PAULDING COUNTY PROGRESS GOES TO ALASKA – Floyd and Ann Furrow of Paulding, along with their daughter, Mary,
son-in-law, Richard, and granddaughter, Lauryn, went on an Alaskan land tour and cruise. They were gone nearly two weeks.
Their source for exclusive Paulding County news while in Alaska was, of course, the Paulding County Progress! Are you headed
to some distant, exotic destination? Take the Progress along with your camera and send a photo and a little information about
your trip to progress@progressnewspaper.org.
Oakwood arbor group meets in July
OAKWOOD – Oakwood
Arbor #749 met at the Cooper
Community Library on July
24. Members were refreshed
on the activities that the group
had been doing within the
community.
On June 26, they played
bingo with the residents of
The Gardens of Paulding. The
homeschoolers also helped out
that evening. On June 28, they
invited the homeschoolers to
a TinCaps ball game along
with their parents and the
Arbor members. This was hot
dog and soda night and the
freworks were spectacular.
A group also did some
mulching and roadside
pickup.
On Aug. 25, Arbor members
will be sponsoring the
Paulding County bloodmobile
at the John Paulding Historical
Society.
For every activity that the
Arbor members do, they
are reimbursed financially
through the Gleaner Insurance
Company. They then return
that money back to the
community in a variety of
ways.
The calendar for the new year
is in the planning stages. They
hope to hear from the candidates
running for commissioner and
from those who will have levies
on the ballots.
Also on July 24, Ron
Eakins, Oakwood EMT and
freman, was present to share
information about the new
item they are wanting to install
on the department’s boat. It is
used to help people stranded
in the water. A deck is being
considered at this time.
New offcers for the 2014-15
year were installed by Karen
and Ron Cooper: president
John Pier, vice president
Helen Maddox, secretary
treasurer Bonnie Pier, chaplain
Bill Bidlack and news reporter
Eileen Kochensparger.
Next meeting will be
Aug. 28 and will be a night
out at Henry’s in Ottawa.
Members will be celebrating
a very successful and learning
experience year.
Leadership in Action
classes now forming
PAULDING – Sponsored by the Paulding Chamber of
Commerce, the latest edition of Leadership in Action (LIA)
will commence on Sept. 24.
The purpose of the program is develop and strengthen
leadership skills while expanding knowledge of community
structure.
This year, there will be one session each month for eight
months with graduation held in May 2015.
The introductory class on Sept. 24 will be a held at Camp
Clay near Van Wert and will include team building exercises
that allow participants to build trust within the group.
Other monthly sessions will include:
• Oct. 15, “Know Yourself, Know Your Team” led by
Terry Wehrkamp, general manager, Cooper Farms.
• Nov. 19, “Focused Intensity” with life coach Sandy
Kessler as the facilitator. Following the session, a tour of
Paulding-Putnam Electric led by CEO George Carter will be
given.
• Dec. 10, “Confict Resolution” led by Brenda Wieland
from Paulding County Hospital. Lunch and hospital tour will
be included in this session.
• Jan. 14, 2015, “Let’s Talk About Ethics” will be held at
the Paulding County Sheriff’s Offce and will feature a panel
of professionals in the areas of medicine, law enforcement,
investments, banking, insurance, education and religion.
Following lunch a tour will be given of governmental entities.
• Feb. 18, “Building Communication Skills.” Trish Fuller
will share information on how to market your business
and organization by using social media. A tour of local
manufacturing plants will be on tap for the LIA participants.
• March 11, “What Is Real Leadership And Can I Achieve
It?” Melanie Rittenour from Paulding County hospital will
lead the group as they try to answer this diffcult question.
Following the presentation will be a tour of the wind turbines
and other manufacturers.
• April 15, “High Ropes Initiative.” A tour of Vantage
Career Center and a trip to Camp Clay to conquer the high
ropes course.
• May 20, Graduation.
The personal and professional development program
is limited to 20 participants with an approved application
submitted to attend. A one-time tuition fee of $275 covers
all program fees, materials and meals. Payment is to be made
prior to the September session.
For additional information, call the Paulding Chamber of
Commerce, 419-399-5215.
Members of the LIA steering committee are chairman
Sonya Herber, Jason Landers, Dave Kline, Kevin Stahl,
Brenda Wieland, Melinda Walters and chamber director Erika
Willitzer.
Commissioners’ Journal
Business News
Commissioners’ Journal July 14,
2014
This 14th day of July, 2014, the
Board of County Commissioners met
in regular session with the following
members present: Tony Zartman, Roy
Klopfenstein, Fred Pieper, and Nola
Ginter, Clerk.
MEETI NG NOTES OF
APPOINTMENTS
Sheriff Jason Landers and
Jim Langham, Paulding Progress
– Langham interviewed Sheriff
Landers about his recent press release
announcing meetings scheduled
at the fre stations throughout the
county. Landers noted the meetings
are scheduled for the purpose of
informing the general public of their
options for the Paulding County Jail.
The sheriff further stated his
intentions are to provide the facts as
he knows them. In return, he hopes
to learn the public’s opinion as to
whether the commissioners should
pursue an operating levy for the jail
in the November general election.
Sheriff Landers said reopening
the jail will defnitely require “new
money” in the form of levy revenue.
The meetings will give the public a
chance to ask questions and voice
their opinion. Those who attend the
meetings should expect to hear a
report on current out-housing costs.
The sheriff also intends to present his
projected budget in the event the jail
was to reopen.
Although reopening the jail would
be more costly to taxpayers, it would
bring economic growth to Paulding
County in the form of employment
opportunities.
Sheriff Landers noted there is a
time line to reopening the jail. If a
jail operating levy passes, its revenue
would not be collected until 2015.
He estimates the hiring and training
process to take several months, with
no inmates housed for probably a year
after a levy passes.
The sheriff noted the jail bond (for
the building) will not expire until
2023. He also stated it is fscally
responsible to build a “cushion”
through the levy. He noted having a
better handle on what the jail needs to
operate.
The sheriff emphasized, based
on what he learns at the upcoming
meetings, he will go the direction the
general public leads. He encourages
all registered voters to attend the
meeting most convenient for them.
Meeting dates, times, and places will
be in the local news.
Recorder Carol Temple reported
the digitization of her records will
begin soon. She requested permission
to set up a couple of long tables in the
north rotunda area of the main foor
where workers could scan the records.
She estimated the project will take
two to three weeks to complete.
Rick Weaver and Ron Elliott,
Poggemeyer Design Group – Weaver
opened and read the bids for the
Paulding County CSEA/Law Library
renovation project (see resolution
below).
IN THE MATTER OF
AMENDING THE 2014 ANNUAL
APPROPRIATION (FUND 024)
Klopfenstein moved to adopt the
following resolution:
BE IT RESOLVED, that the
Board of County Commissioners
does hereby direct the County
Auditor to amend the 2104 Annual
Appropriation by appropriating the
following in the Permissive Tax Fund
(Fund 024, to-wit; 024-001-00001/
Permissive Tax/MVR Expenses
AMOUNT: $9,183.34.
IN THE MATTER OF
ACCEPTING A PROPOSAL
FOR ANNUAL COURTHOUSE
LAWN AND LANDSCAPING
MAINTENANCE
Pieper moved to adopt the
following resolution:
BE IT RESOLVED, that the
Board of County Commissioners
does hereby accept the Annual
Maintenance Proposal from Jim’s
Handyman Service LLC, Paulding for
landscaping and lawn maintenance at
the Paulding County Courthouse.
IN THE MATTER OF
RECEIVING BIDS FOR THE
PAULDING COUNTY CSEA/
LAW LIBRARY INTERIOR
RENOVATIONS PROJECT
This 14th day of July, 2014, being
the day advertised in the West Bend
News, a paper of general circulation
within the County, as per Section
307.86 of the Ohio Revised Code,
bids were received and opened for the
Paulding County CSEA/Law Library
Interior Renovations Project, to-wit;
Bidder/Location; General Trades;
Mechanical Trades; Electrical
Trades; Combined Trades
Alexander & Bebout Inc.,Van Wert; $
85,183.50; No Bid; No Bid; $116,248
Heyne Construction, Minster; $
92,800; No Bid; No Bid; $143,900
Schimmoeller Construction Inc.,
Kalida; $102,616; No Bid; No Bid;
$144,796
Schlatter Plumbing & Heating,
Defance; No Bid; $41,500; No Bid;
No Bid
Muhlenkamp Building Corp.,
Coldwater; $ 92,900; No Bid; No
Bid; No Bid
McDonald Design & Build, Defance;
$ 88,268; No Bid; No Bid; $129,678
Fitzenrider Inc., Defance; No Bid;
$28,640; No Bid; No Bid
Kingfsh Electric LLC, Paulding; No
Bid; No Bid; $10,000; No Bid
Kuhlman Builders, Ottawa; $ 84,962;
No Bid; No Bid; No Bid
Poggemeyer Design Group,
engineers of the project, will study the
specifcations with a recommendation
to be made later.
Mercy Health is new
name for Defance facility
DEFIANCE – Catholic Health Partners
(CHP), the parent healthcare system of Mercy
Defance Clinic and Mercy Defance Hospital,
has changed its name to Mercy Health. The
system’s name change is part of a ministry
evolution to one unifed team, focused on
high-quality care, increased effciencies and
lower patient costs. Mercy Health is Ohio’s
largest health system and fourth-largest
employer.
“Our new name is a symbol of the new
way we are working together to improve
the health of the communities we serve,”
said Michael D. Connelly, Mercy Health’s
president and CEO. “It is a key component
of our vision to empower those we serve
to achieve their optimal well-being and
health, and to maximize our quality and cost
effciency by simplifying our structure. This
approach to serving and healing demonstrates
our commitment to making healthcare easier
as our more than 1,000 physicians and 32,000
employees strive to make lives better – mind,
body and spirit – to help our patients be well.”
The system already operates under the
“Mercy” name in fve of its current seven
markets, including Cincinnati, Toledo,
Lorain, Springfeld and Paducah, Ky.
Over the next several years, the Mercy
Health name will be phased into all system
facilities, including Mercy Defance Clinic
and Mercy Defance Hospital. This allows
patients to retain the trust, confdence and
security they currently have in physician,
hospital and outpatient facilities that have
served their communities for more than a
century.
In addition, the ministry’s website will
change to mercy.com.
“We start with our patients at the center of
every decision,” said Kristen Hall Wevers,
Mercy Health’s chief brand, marketing and
communications offcer. “Simplifying our
operating structure improves our ability
to maximize our clinical quality and cost
effectiveness, and allows us to improve the
overall experience patients and their families
have when they seek our services in times of
need.”
The new name also will help Mercy Health
more effectively communicate its mission,
results and stories. Mercy Health is a national
leader in quality, safety and cost-effectiveness.
True to its mission, Mercy Health provides
more than $1 million per day in community
beneft to those patients who need services,
but cannot otherwise afford them. Mercy
Health is a major economic force in all of the
communities it serves, providing nearly $9
billion in annual economic beneft in Ohio
alone, according to a recent independent
survey.
‘Winning the Battle for a Generation’
By Rick Jones
Defance Area Youth for
Christ executive director
What ingredient makes a team great?
Whether it’s a church, a team sport, a
company or a family, what ingredient makes
a great team? I read the following historical
example from preachingtoday.com that offers
an answer to that question.
Boys in the Boat is the thrilling true story
of the 1936 University of Washington crew
team, which went from backwater obscurity
to a gold medal at the 1936 Berlin Olympics.
Few sports carry the aristocratic pedigree of
crews from Yale, Harvard, and Princeton. But
no one imagined that a crew from Washington,
of all places, could be competitive. And yet
the University of Washington built a team from
kids raised on farms, in logging towns, and near
shipyards. They blew away their Californian
rivals and bested the cream of New England to
become the American Olympic Team and won
the gold medal at the 1936 Berlin Olympics.
How did they manage to win the gold medal?
Author Daniel James Brown explains it in one
word – teamwork. Brown explains how a crew
team works best…
“The greatest paradox of the sport has to
do with the psychological makeup of the
people who pull the oars. Great oarsmen and
oarswomen are necessarily made of conficting
stuff—of oil and water, fre and earth. On the
one hand, they must possess enormous self
confdence, strong egos, and titanic willpower
… Nobody who does not believe deeply in
himself or herself—in his or her ability to
endure hardship and to prevail over adversity—
is likely even to attempt something as audacious
as competitive rowing at the highest levels. The
sport offers so many opportunities for suffering
and so few opportunities for glory that only the
most tenaciously self-reliant and self-motivated
are likely to succeed at it. And yet, at the same
time—and this is key—no other sport demands
and rewards the complete abandonment of the
self the way that rowing does. Great crews may
have men or women of exceptional talent or
strength; they may have outstanding coxswains
or stroke oars or bowmen; but they have no stars.
The team effort—the perfectly synchronized
fow of muscle, oars, boat, and water; the single,
whole, unifed, and beautiful symphony that a
crew in motion becomes—is all that matters.
Not the individual, not the self.”
The scriptures teach us the importance of
team, when we see how the many become
one… 1 Corinthians 12:14;20 (NIV), “14 Now
the body is not made up of one part but of
many. 20 As it is, there are many parts, but one
body.”
Wednesday, July 30, 2014 Paulding County Progress - 15A
Decks • Fences • Gazebos
DECKS-N-PLACE
Defiance• 419-782-5514
Paulding• 419-399-2703
15804 St. Rt. 613
Paulding, OH 45879
Mark Holtsberry
419-782-4116
322 Clinton St., - Defiance, OH 43512
www.samswitzerrealty.com
TAZConstruction Services LLC
Tony Zartman
4376 Rd. 33, Payne, Ohio 45880
Ph. 419-263-2977
Customer Satisfaction Is Our Speciality
*Remodeling & New Construction
*Free Estimates
*Insured
1Co 10:31- whatever you do, do it all for the glory of God.
Buckle Up * Drive Safely * Don’t Drink & Drive
Breakdown or
Mishap. Request
Gideon’s for all
your towing needs.
GIDEON’S
24/7 Towing
& Recovery
419-399-4242
FITZENRIDER, INC
HEATING•AIR CONDITIONING•
REFRIGERATION•SHEET METAL
Cut your heating and cooling cost with a High
Efficiency Trane Heating and Cooling System.
827 Perry St.
Defiance, OH
Call 419-784-0828
Your business card will publish twice per month in either the Weekly
Reminder or the Paulding Progress at a cost of ......... Only $35.00 per month!
*Three month minimum.
ERWIN J. BANDY
ATTORNEY AT LAW
108 East Jackson St., PO Box 174
Paulding, OH 45879
PH: 419-399-2351• FAX 419-399-4067
Email: ebandy@paulding-net.com
Bankruptcy - Traffic–DUI
Real Estate - Divorce
“Your Alternative Heating Specialists”
RURAL ENERGY PRODUCTS, L.L.C.
9296 Van Wert - Willshire Rd.
Van Wert, Ohio 45891
1-800-546-3319
Fax: 1-419-232-4200
e-mail:
staywarm@earthlink.net
www.ruralenergyproducts.com
STOVES–INSERTS–FIREPLACES–FURNACES–BOILERS
• CORN
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• GAS
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KROUSE CHIROPRACTIC
110 West Oak, Payne
419-263-1393
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419-263-2110
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419-523-3000
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Hours; M,T,Th,F 10-6; Wed 10-8; Sat 10-2
After 60 years, Carolyn Spangler has no plans to quit
Staff Photo/Paulding County Progress
Carolyn Spangler began working at Brune Printing in 1954 as a machine operator. Some of the
same equipment is still used today for certain jobs.
Staff Photo/Paulding County Progress
Carolyn Spangler has worked a total of 55 years working for
Brune Printing in Paulding.
By JAROD ROSEBROCK
Correspondent
PAULDING – In a
time when job turnover is
incredibly high and staying
with a job for 10 years is
a rare feat, the story of
Paulding resident Carolyn
Spangler is made that much
more amazing.
Spangler was born in
1933, and when she was 21
she started working at Brune
Printing in Paulding. Now,
60 years later, Spangler is
still in that same position that
she enjoys so much and has
no plans on leaving it any
time soon, explaining that
she wants to work as long as
she is able.
“Unless they decide to fre
me,” she jokes knowing that
after 60 years, her job is pretty
secure. “I enjoy coming to
work every day,” she adds.
Brune Printing was
opened in 1922 by the late
Henry Brune, and Spangler
started working as a machine
operator at the facility in
1954. She would go to school
in the morning and to work
in the afternoon. Then, for 20
of those years, she worked
in the school cafeteria while
working at Brune Printing at
the same time.
She has taken a few years
off since she started in 1954 to
stay home with her children,
but still in total, Spangler has
spent 55 years off-and-on at
Brune Printing.
She has been through four
different owners in her time
at the printing business, and
each one has kept her with
them and benefited from
her experience. After Henry
Brune retired, the company
went to Ralph Reinhart
followed by Mike Reinhart,
both of whom have since
passed away. The current
owner is Mark Brant.
In the early years of Brune
Printing under Henry Brune,
the company specialized in
rectangular scale tickets,
printing nearly 2.5 million
a month. At that time, there
were 16 employees, and
Spangler points out that all
but three or four of those
colleagues have passed away.
Throughout the years,
Brune Printing has upgraded
and stayed current with
state-of-art technology, and
therefore Spangler has had
to learn new machines, such
as booklet binding machines
and perforating machines.
However, she mainly still uses
two machines that she started
with when she was 21 years
old.
Those two machines, which
Spangler calls pasters, also
known as bracket tipping
machines, paste two scale
tickets together. Scale tickets
are approximately 2x6-inch
rectangular tickets on which
information is recorded. The
machines Spangler runs put
two or more of these tickets
together in a booklet by
pasting them on the edge.
The machines can also fold
a protective flap over the
tickets.
The scale tickets start out
with fve on a full piece of
paper. Spangler’s job while
running these machines
consists of taking two, three
or four (depending on how
many will go in the booklets
she is making) pages of scale
tickets, stacking them with the
numbers in correct order, and
inserting them in the machine
over and over again, loading
them all by hand.
With the pages of tickets
all pasted together, she takes
them to a cutting machine
that cuts the pages into fve
booklets of scale tickets. She
inputs the sizes, puts each set
of tickets in the machines, and
the cutters slices them apart.
This job might sound
like it would get repetitive,
but Spangler loves it. In
fact, when asked what her
favorite part of the job is, she
couldn’t decide because she
likes everything she does.
She stands at the machine all
day, and again many people
might get tired of standing all
day, but Spangler sees it as a
beneft of the job saying she
enjoys her work because it is
“something I can stand and
do.”
She calls Brune Printing
her second home, with her
frst home being the house
she shares with her husband
James of 43 years. The home
in which she raised her twin
son and daughter, Dr. Wendell
Spangler and Elizabeth
Reinhard.
While Spangler still mainly
uses the machines she started
on, Brune Printing has
upgraded their printing facility
in stay current. According
to owner Mark Brant, the
company started with simple
letter press, basically the same
type of printing invented by
Gutenberg. That printing is
actually still done today for
specialty jobs.
It moved forward to offset
printing and toner based
printing, each of which
have their own niche. Brant
explains that offset printing
duplicates more quickly, is
more economical, but only
prints in a couple colors.
Toner based printing is full-
color and each copy can be
printed differently, but it takes
longer to print and copy.
A lot more than just the
printing process has changed
since Henry Brune started his
business. While 16 employees
worked at the company at that
time, now there are about
four. That is because it used
to take 12 people to produce a
printing job, and now, with all
of the new technology, it only
takes two.
Brune Printing also
expanded its products. It is
one of the only companies in
the area that can completely
produce a full and fnished
booklet from start to fnish.
One machine can gather,
print, fold, bind and trim
the book to the correct size.
From a few sheets of paper
to booklets to apparel, pens,
cups, etc., Brune Printing can
print just about anything.
Make Room
for Change!
With the Classifieds, you can
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and find great deals on the
things you really want!
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Weekly Reminder &
Paulding County Progress
419-399-4015
www.progressnewspaper.org
freman, was present to share
information about the new
item they are wanting to install
on the department’s boat. It is
used to help people stranded
in the water. A deck is being
considered at this time.
New offcers for the 2014-15
year were installed by Karen
and Ron Cooper: president
John Pier, vice president
Helen Maddox, secretary
treasurer Bonnie Pier, chaplain
Bill Bidlack and news reporter
Eileen Kochensparger.
Next meeting will be
Aug. 28 and will be a night
out at Henry’s in Ottawa.
Members will be celebrating
a very successful and learning
experience year.
16A - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, July 30, 2014
200 S Main Continental, OH
Sales & Service: (800) 596-3808
View All of our new and used vehicles at
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“Over 35,000 vehicles sold and counting”
Now Accepting New Customers
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419-399-4445
Locally Owned • 8622 US 127, Paulding
48c1
Alex, Andy & Jim Stoller
Specializing
in Customer Service
Ask About our
Budget Program
House of Love
Ministries
49c1
We would like
to thank all who
support and pray
for this ministry.
The Bluegrass Godspell
was a great success for
the Kingdom of God!
Three More Baptisms:
Shawn Bradford,
Dylan Leidigh & Mara Vielma
Brings our total to 120
added to the Book of Life
To God Be the Glory!
Thank you!
By
Kylee Baumle
In The
Garden
Kylee Baumle/Paulding County Progress
In midsummer, this beautiful plant grows in a roadside ditch in rural Paulding County. Its good
looks belies the nuisance it is for wetlands.
Being a responsible gardener
Once upon a time, I grew
a pretty violet-pink plant in
my garden. It was given to
me by a fellow gardener and
I was happy to have it when I
was building the repertoire of
plants in my new garden.
When gardeners and
gardens are young, it’s
helpful when others share
the abundance from their
own plots. Buying all new
plants can be expensive.
Usually the passalong plants
are those that reproduce
well, and while most of them
are beautiful and useful,
sometimes it’s not a great
idea to plant others.
That pretty pink plant that
once grew in my garden
is a great example. It was
purple loosestrife (Lythrum
salicaria). You may have it
in your own garden, not even
aware that it really shouldn’t
be there.
But why, you ask? The
bees love it, the birds love
the seedheads, it’s easy to
grow, and it’s gorgeous. Who
wouldn’t want a plant like
that?
I’ll cut straight to the chase.
It’s on the Noxious Weeds
List for Ohio and lots of
other states and it’s causing
environmental problems in
wetlands. Invasiveplants.net
says:
“Invasion of L. salicaria
into a wetland can result
in the suppression of the
resident plant community
and the eventual alteration of
the wetland’s structure and
function. Large monotypic
stands of L. salicaria
jeopardize various threatened
and endangered native
wetland plants and wildlife
by eliminating natural foods
and cover. Dense plant
establishments in irrigation
systems have impeded the
fow of water.”
But it hasn’t spread much
in your own garden, you say.
It didn’t spread in mine either.
But the problem lies in the
fact that purple loosestrife,
like many other plants, isn’t
just propagated in its own
immediate area.
One purple loosestrife plant
can produce over two million
seeds a year. Birds that eat
its seeds spread them far and
wide and the only way to
control that is to make sure the
fowers get cut from the plant
before they go to seed. That
requires diligence that most
of us can’t be certain to have
100 per cent of the time.
In some states, supposedly
sterile varieties of Lythrum
are allowed to be sold (Ohio
included, with a permit),
but there’s a problem with
that, too. A University of
Minnesota study of these
sterile varieties showed that
they may not be sterile after
all, and that they contribute
to the environmental problem
as well. That has led many
states to prohibit the sale of all
varieties of Lythrum. Hybrids
often revert to the species.
The problem got its start in
the early 1800s when the plant
was imported from Europe
for use as an herbal remedy
for diarrhea, dysentery and a
number of other conditions.
However, the native insects
and birds that kept it in check
in Europe were not imported
along with it.
As gardeners and stewards
of our environment, I believe
we have a duty to behave
in a responsible manner. I
didn’t really want to dig up
and dispose of my purple
loosestrife years ago, but I
also didn’t want to contribute
in any way to a known
problem. There are so many
more beautiful plants to
choose from, it doesn’t hurt
me one bit not to have it in my
garden anymore.
Besides, if I want to enjoy
its blooms, all I have to do is
drive north towards Paulding
on County Road 95 right now
and see it in the ditch for a
half-mile stretch. It’s been
growing there for several
years and I noticed it has now
jumped the road and is in the
creek on the other side. I’m
rather surprised that someone
with the authority to do so
hasn’t taken steps to eradicate
it there.
In spite of what I’ve said
here, you won’t find me
standing in judgment of what
you choose to grow in your
gardens. They’re your gardens
after all. Many choices are
made for many different
reasons, but sometimes we
should consider the bigger
picture when making them.
Read Kylee Baumle’s
blog, Our Little Acre
at www. ourl i t t l eacre.
com and on Facebook
at www. f acebook. com/
OurLittleAcre. Contact her at
PauldingProgressGardener@
gmail.com.
Seven 2014 graduates traveled to 4-H Camp Palmer as last year counselors for this year’s 4-H
Camp. “Baking up a Good Time” were,: front from left – Arlen Stoller, Matthew Klopfenstein,
Kandee Manson, Sylvia Young, back row – Mackenzie Haney, Alec Kuhn and Austin Conlon.
4-H Camp a great success
FAYETTE – The 2014 Paulding County
4-H Camp, “Baking up a Good Time at 4-H
Camp Palmer” has successfully come to a
close. 100 campers and 14 Cloverbuds, led
by 30 counselors, got to experience many
great events that will be in their memories for
a long time.
From high-ropes to creek seining, from
line dancing to outdoor cooking, from the
archery range to the flying squirrel, the
campers lived the magic of 4-H Camp Palmer.
The Cloverbuds’ day was flled with great
excitement as well. They got to make crafts,
learn dances, and participate in the camp-wide
water carnival.
Meeting new people and gaining new
friends was the best thing that occurred all
week long. By the end of camp, it became
quite clear how amazing these friendships
were. These bonds of friendship, forged
through team building, skits, and group-
living, have been made strong. Many campers
were sad to leave camp, and their counselors
were not ready to let them go. The only good
part of leaving camp is knowing that everyone
can come back next year!
The dates of 2015 4-H Camp are set for July
9-13. There is less than a year until everybody
can meet again — dream of camp and keep in
touch with all of the great friends until then.
THE PAULDING COUNTY PROGRESS GOES TO HAWAII – Steve and Kathy Fitch of Oakwood
and granddaughter Kayla Kauser visited the National Tropical Botanical Garden on the island of
Kauai, Hawaii. Their source for exclusive Paulding County news? The Paulding County Progress!
Are you headed to some distant, exotic destination? Take the Progress along with your camera
and send a photo and a little information about your trip to progress@progressnewspaper.org.
Be a Facbook fan
The Progress has a Face-
book page as a way for read-
ers to get more information
from its community news-
paper. Go to facebook.com/
pauldingpaper then click the
“Like” button.

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