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CENTRAL UNIVERSITY OF RAJASTHAN

Department of Architecture



Syllabus
for
M. Architecture
Effective from academic session 2011-2013




Central University of Rajasthan
City Road, Madanganj-Kishangarh-305802
Ajmer District
Masters Programme in Sustainable Architecture
Programme Design by Prof. Neeraj Gupta for Central University of Rajasthan
Finalized in Workshop held at Jaipur on 11-12 May 2011 (revised on 20/5/11)
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Title of the Programme: Masters Programme in Sustainable Architecture
(leading to “M. Arch. Sustainable Architecture” degree)

1. Preamble: Buildings consume vast amounts of resources during their construction,
operation and entire life cycle. Directly or indirectly, they account for nearly half of the
primary energy consumption of the nation. Emissions from making or operating buildings
damage the environment, create waste disposal problems and add to global warming.
Buildings occupants can face ill-health and discomfort if the internal environment and air
quality of buildings is improper.
Thus designing sustainable built environment both in rural as well as urban context is
important to provide good quality of life to inhabitants and to protect earth‟s environment.
Architecture education in India, especially at undergraduate level has very little emphasis to
integrate technical, economic, social and environmental aspects to design sustainable built
environment.

This Masters programme aims to train Architects – to understand issues associated with
Sustainable Architecture, including environmental concerns, assessment methods, energy
consumption, construction materials, health, economic and social concerns, and management
of buildings and other construction projects in a life-cycle perspective. This programme
encompasses residential, commercial and public architecture and planning of sites and
layouts as well as their effect on the urban and rural built environment.

The programme structure follows a multidisciplinary approach integrating technology,
architecture, engineering, physical sciences, ecology, management and legal framework. The
course follows a modular approach offering adequate flexibility to learners to choose from a
basket of courses according to their career interests.

2. Aim: The programme aims to produce Architects who are competent enough to combine
architectural design and planning principles with modern technology and traditional
community wisdom to design a sustainable project and manage implementation of such
projects.

The course is highly relevant for Architects who want to pursue a professional career in
Architectural and Planning practice, or in construction industry, or in the field of rural and
urban development or academics and multidisciplinary research or at policy making levels in
government and other organizations.

3. Duration : 4 Semesters (2 years). This is a two year full time programme divided into four
consecutive semesters of 18 weeks each including 2 weeks for exams. The first three
semesters will be blend of theory and project courses and the fourth semester will be equip
the participants with managerial knowledge skills for managing sustainable projects as they
prepare a Masters design thesis. Additional courses can be taken during summer / winter
breaks.

4. Eligibility: Bachelors Degree in Architecture or equivalent as recognized by Council of
Architecture with minimum 50% marks or equivalent grades.

5. Admission : Entrance Examination to be conducted on all-India basis.
Masters Programme in Sustainable Architecture
Programme Design by Prof. Neeraj Gupta for Central University of Rajasthan
Finalized in Workshop held at Jaipur on 11-12 May 2011 (revised on 20/5/11)
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6. Programme Structure and Courses offered:

The programme will lead to degree - “M. Arch. Sustainable Architecture”.
Semester 1: The first semester will provide an insight into the awareness and culture on which
sustainability is based, presenting the different contexts in which it can be applied. Theory
courses will cover building physics, environmental management, ecology, and concepts and
strategies related to design of energy efficient, sustainable and zero emission built environment.
Historical perspectives will expose students to traditional wisdom and passive building design
strategies besides retracing history of traditional architecture and settlement planning principles
that were in harmony with nature. Design project course will lay emphasis of climate and built
form and applying traditional community wisdom to achieve sustainable architecture.
Semester 2: Theory courses in this semester will cover Water and Waste management, Energy
systems and services and their integration in architectural design, and Sustainable building
materials and technology and Sustainable neighbourhood design. The design project course
will lay emphasis on application of modern technologies and integrated renewable energy
systems to design energy efficient buildings. Elective courses will allow students to pursue
their subject interests. During this semester students will finalize their topics for dissertation
and masters design thesis and work during summers on a project / research that enables them
to gather knowledge and skills required to accomplish their dissertation and thesis work with
ease.
Semester 3: In this semester students will be exposed to legal and policy issues concerning green
buildings, environmental impact assessment of projects. Relationship between economics and
sustainable development will be explored. Elective courses will allow students to choose their
thrust area. Design project will essentially consist of sustainable design of a large campus with
focus on site ecology, water management, landscaping and biodiversity, conservation of natural
resources and conservation of natural and built heritage of the region. In this semester students
will also write a dissertation. Summer project work will be evaluated in this semester though
formal presentations.
Semester 4: In the fourth and final semester students will work on a large scale project as a
Master design thesis. An theory course on Project Management for Sustainable Architecture will
build students‟ capacity to face the professional challenges as they pursue their career. Additional
elective course will help them strengthen their knowledge base in desired track.










Masters Programme in Sustainable Architecture
Programme Design by Prof. Neeraj Gupta for Central University of Rajasthan
Finalized in Workshop held at Jaipur on 11-12 May 2011 (revised on 20/5/11)
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Below is the detailed structure for the two year (4 semester) programme:
Year /
No.
Courses Credits
L-S-T (per
week)
1st Year 1st Semester
SA 1 Introduction to Sustainable Development and Architecture 3 3-0-0
SA 2 Sustainable Building Materials and Technology - I 3 1-3-0
SA 3 Ecology and Environmental Management 3 3-0-1
SA 4 Climatology and Building Physics 4 3-0-2
SA 5
Sustainable Architecture - Historical and Community
Perspectives
3 3-0-0
DSA 1 Sustainable Architecture Design I 8 0-8-0
Total for 1
st
Semester 24 13-11-3
1st Year 2
nd
Semester
SA 6
Energy Efficient Building Design – Theory and
Technologies
4 3-0-2
SA 7 Sustainable building materials and technology - II 3 1-3-0
SA 8 Building Services and Waste Management 4 3-0-2
SA 9 Water Management 2 2-0-0
SA OE Open Elective 3 3-0-0
DSA 2 Sustainable Architecture Design II 8 0-8-0
Total for 2
nd
Semester 24 12-11-4
DSA 3
SUMMER PROJECT (enabling next semesters
dissertation/Thesis) Credits to be added in 3
rd

semester)
(credit
in next
semester)
e-mentoring
support

L- Lecture / Integrated Learning, S- Studio / Lab, T-Tutorial; (Each unit of 55 minutes / as
per University norms). One semester is of 18 weeks (including two weeks for exams).




Masters Programme in Sustainable Architecture
Programme Design by Prof. Neeraj Gupta for Central University of Rajasthan
Finalized in Workshop held at Jaipur on 11-12 May 2011 (revised on 20/5/11)
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Year No. Courses Credits
L-S-T
(per week)
2
nd
Year 3
rd
Semester
SA 10
Economic, Legal and Policy Framework for Sustainable
Architecture
3 3-0-0
SA 11 Sustainable Neighbourhood Planning and Urban Design 3 2-2-0
SA E.. Elective 3 3-0-0
DSA 3 Summer Project Report and Formal Presentation

Dissertation
6 0-3-1
DSA 4
DSA 5 Sustainable Urban Design 9 0-10-0
TOTAL for 3
rd
Semester 24 08-15-1
2
nd
Year 4
th
Semester
SA E … Elective 3 3-0-0
SA 12 Project Management for Sustainable Architecture 3 3-0-0
DSA 6 Sustainable Architecture Masters Design Thesis 18 0-18-0
TOTAL for 4th Semester 24 6-18-0
List of suggestive electives:
 Simulation and Modeling
for Building Energy
Performance
 Electrical Systems and
Illumination in Buildings
 Technologies for Renewable
Energy
 Building Management
Systems
 Green Building Certification
 Carbon Trading or
International Treaties
 Environmental Appraisal of
Buildings and Sites
 Policy Perspectives for
Sustainable Habitat (will
deal with issues like
planning policies, urban
renewal and slum
improvement programmes)
 Mud Architecture
 Sustainable Landscape
Architecture
 Conservation of Built
Heritage
 Disaster-Resilient Design
 Integrated waste
management technologies

L- Lecture / Integrated Learning, S- Studio/lab, T-Tutorial; (Each unit of 55 minutes / as
per University norms) 18 weeks per semester including two weeks for exams
Masters Programme in Sustainable Architecture
Programme Design by Prof. Neeraj Gupta for Central University of Rajasthan
Finalized in Workshop held at Jaipur on 11-12 May 2011 (revised on 20/5/11)
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For passing a semester, the assessment of a student will be done as listed under each syllabus.
The broad framework will be:

A. For Theory Courses (code SA in the list above )

(i) Continuous Internal Evaluation (CIE) of 50% marks consisting of:

Assignment /Project 20 – 25 %
Quiz / Test (announced and unannounced) 10% - 15%
Papers 10% -15%
Class Participation 5%

(ii) Two Mid-Semester Exams and one End Semester Examination (ESE) of 50% of marks.

B. For Dissertation and Design Courses (code DSA in the list above except for Summer Project
DSA 3 and Master Design Thesis DSA 6)

(i) Continuous Internal Evaluation (CIE) of 50% marks consisting of:
a. Mid Semester Internal Review (two no.s) (20%)
b. Mid Semester External Review (two no.s) (30%)

(ii) End Semester External Jury (ESJ) of 50% of marks.

C. For Master Design Thesis (DSA 6)

(i) Continuous Internal Evaluation (CIE) of 40% marks consisting of:
a. Mid Semester Internal Review (20%)
b. Mid Semester External Review (two no.s) (20%)

(ii) End Semester External Jury (ESJ) of 60% of marks.

D. For Summer Project (DSA 3)
(i) Continuous Internal Evaluation (CIE) of 20% based on e-mentor‟s / faculty guide‟s
assessment based on reporting of progress by the student in the form of interim
report(s).
(ii) Project Report Internal Review (20%)
(iii) Project Report External Review (20%)
(iv) Formal Presentation before External experts (30%)


7. Unit-wise Detailed Syllabus: Prepared by different experts and approved by experts’
committee is given here after.

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Course SA1 (Prepared by Prof. Neeraj Gupta)
Introduction to Sustainable Development and Architecture
3 Credits L-S-T: 3-0-0

Broad Objectives and Outline

As governments and societies are becoming more environmentally conscious, architects and planners
are beginning to have greater concern about the built environment and its long term viability. Given
the need for conserving natural resources and to save environment, expectations from professionals
have increased manifold. Sustainability is, thus a critical concept and direction for the future architects
and planners.

However, quite often, sustainable architecture practice is guided by architects who have not been
formally trained in environment and sustainable development. With this background, this course aims
to impart an understanding of issues related to sustainable development, especially in Indian context,
that have implications on design of buildings and neighborhoods. The course will familiarize students
with current perspectives related to sustainability in built environment and help them analyze
challenges and opportunities for sustainable architecture.

This course offers a general review of concepts and principles of sustainable development and presents
the idea of sustainability as a paradigm change in the architectural design field. It gives a preview to
the practices, strategies and implementation processes that shape sustainable architecture.

Suggested Evaluation Procedure

Assignment / Project 20%
Quiz (announced and unannounced) 10%
Paper
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15%
Class Participation 5%
Two Mid Semester Exams @ 10% each 20%
End of Semester Exam 30%

Suggestive projects / assignments / papers
One short paper highlighting contemporary local issues and concerns of sustainable development,
gender perspectives etc
One long paper after due research, dealing with culture and lifestyles in India and other parts of the
world in the context of sustainability
Assignment: Documentation of examples of sustainable architecture and human settlements and /or
real life projects focusing on climate change, clean development mechanism, use of technology etc.


Topics to be covered:
1. Sustainable Development and Systems Thinking
a. Definitions, Principles, Challenges and Responses
b. Millennium Development Goals
c. Community Participation and Participatory Learning
d. Gender Equity

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All students will write a paper dealing with a topic related principles and/or practices of sustainable development as applicable to built
environment. The topic must be acceptable to the instructor and the paper must have at least five references.

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e. Measuring sustainability
2. Culture, Lifestyle and Sustainability – Overview of Indian Culture and Ancient Cultures of the
world in context of reverence to nature and ecological systems.
3. Overview of Climate Change, Clean Development Mechanism.
4. Sustainable Architecture
a. Definitions and Principles
b. Environmental Impact of Buildings
c. Sustainable design priorities
d. Cultural and Economic aspects
e. Life Cycle Design
f. Selected Examples of Sustainable Architecture – Vernacular, Historical and
Contemporary
5. Natural Resources‟ Conservation Systems – Energy and Water,
6. Overview of passive design strategies for reducing energy consumption (enhancing user
comfort while reducing or eliminating fossil fuel usage)
7. Introduction to Low Impact Design Strategies, LEEDS, and TERI-GRIHA,

References:
Givoni, B., 1969. Man, Climate and Architecture, Elsevier Publishing Company Limited.
Koenigsberger, O. H., Ingersoll, T. G., Mayhew, A., Szokolay, S. V., 1973. Manual of Tropical
Housing and Building Part 1. Climatic Design, Orient Longman Pvt. Ltd.
Krishnan, A. (ed.), Baker, N., Yannas, S., Szokolay, S., 2001. Climate Responsive Architecture – A
Design Handbook for Energy Efficient Buildings, Tata McGraw-Hill Publishing Company Limited,
New Delhi.
Minke, Gernot and Bansal, N. K. 1988. Climatic Zones and Rural Housing in India,
Kernforschungsanlage GmbH, Jülich.
Szokolay, S. V., 2004. Introduction to Architectural Sciences: The Basis of Sustainable Design,
Architectural Press, Oxford.
TERI, 2004. Sustainable Building Design Manual Volume 2, prepared under a European Union co-
funded ASIA-URBS project under the leadership of Institut Catala d‟Energia (Spain), The Energy &
Resources Institute, India.
Scott Drake, 2009, The Elements of Architecture - Principles of Environmental Performance in
Buildings, Earthscan, ISBN 9781844077175
Bob Doppelt, 2010, The Power of Sustainable Thinking, Earthscan, ISBN 9781849710794
Paul Appleby, 2010, Integrated Sustainable Design of Buildings, Earthscan, ISBN 9781849711173
Course SA2 (Prepared by Prof. Anil Dewan)
Sustainable Building Materials and Technology - I
3 Credits L-S-T: 1-3-0

Broad Objectives and Outline
Sustainable building materials and technologies are being introduced in the building industry every
day. These are being codified and standardized. We are living in an era of catalogue architecture, this
course being an introductory course would lay more emphasis on traditional building systems,
methodologies and on the use of alternate/substitute and environment friendly materials. The objective

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of this course is to make the students aware of local and/or low cost building materials which are cost
effective, environment friendly and appropriate to the context of the site, climate and culture.
It is important to understand the materials used in vernacular architecture, their physical and chemical
properties. Characteristics, durability, usability and performance specifications of the building systems
through live case studies, workshops, lab experiments, guest lectures, hands-on exercises. Exposure to
various provisions of bureau of Indian standards and other international standards like DIN, ASTM
and British standards will be given during this course.


Suggested Evaluation Procedure
Assignment /Project / Field study 25%
Quiz (announced and unannounced) 10%
Paper
2
10%
Class Participation 5%
Two Mid Semester Exams @ 10% each 20%
End of Semester Exam 30%


Suggestive projects / assignments / papers
Studio exercises to help prepare working details and specifications for non-conventional including
recycled construction materials.
One paper related to innovative use of vernacular materials by community and/or professionals.
Field Project: Case studies of existing buildings / settlements – vernacular as well as planned and
monumental
 One example from home state of the student
 One example of any other part of the country
Assignment: Documentation of best practices in the world and/or use of recycled material for
construction.


Topics to be covered:
1. Bamboo I
a. Traditional Methods
b. Rope joints and split bamboo const.
c. Bamboo as roofing, wall and floor material.
d. Insulation material and bamboo mats
2. Wood
a. Traditional methods and classification
b. International and National Certifications
c. Reconstructed timber
i. Plywood
ii. Blockboard
iii. MDF, HDF etc.
iv. Particle board
v. Veneers
d. Types of joints and workshops
3. Mud
a. Traditional and vernacular methods in India
b. Rammed earth const.

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All students will write a paper dealing with a topic acceptable to the course instructor and the paper must have at least five references.

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c. „Auroville‟ construction
d. Mud/clay bricks
4. Conventional construction material
a. Brick
b. Cement and concrete
c. Steel and iron
5. Contemporary Innovations in sustainable construction material
6. Recycled Building Materials.
7. Life cycle of construction material

References:

Bureau of Indian Standards – relevant codes.
National Building Code of India
(To be added)


Course SA 3 (Compiled by Prof. Neeraj Gupta with inputs from Ms. Meenakshi Dhote and Prof. Anil
Dewan)
Ecology and Environmental Management
3 Credits L-S-T: 3-0-1

Broad Objectives and Outline

With global warming and environment protection major areas of concern across nations,
environmental management course is a critical area of study for all Architects. This course, thus aims
to help students develop understanding of sustainable design and development with a special concern
for ecosystem benefits and impacts at the site, local, regional, and global scales.

This course will cover basic concepts of Ecology and different types of ecosystems and acquaints the
students with the relationship development with environment. It will help students to develop a
practical and analytical approach towards addressing design as they learn application of ecological
principles to various areas like ecological restoration, urban areas, climate change etc. This course
aims to provide students with appropriate knowledge to identify and analyze environmental problems
related to built environment both in rural and urban areas and implement sustainable solutions.


Suggested Evaluation Procedure

Assignment / Project / Field study 20%
Quiz / Test (announced and unannounced) 10%
Paper
3
15%
Class Participation 5%
Two Mid Semester Exams @ 10% each 20%
End of Semester Exam 30%


Suggestive projects / assignments / papers / exercises
Tutorial exercises to help students understand supportive use of mathematical modeling and/or
computing software.

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All students will write a paper dealing with a topic related to ecology and environmental management in context of buildings and
neighborhoods. The topic must be acceptable to the instructor and the paper must have at least five references.

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Field Project: Case study of existing settlements with reference to ecology and environment – from
different climatic zones of India
Paper / Assignment: Secondary source documentation of building / settlements in ecologically
sensitive areas.

Topics to be covered:

1. Basic Concepts of Ecology and Ecosystems
a. Introduction, concept of species population, communities
b. Ecological factors; Abiotic and Biotic
c. Concept of carrying capacity, ecological footprints
d. Types of ecosystems
e. Concept of productivity and biomass, factors affecting productivity,
f. Carbon balance of trees and ecosystems
2. Urban Ecology – components of urban ecosystems, factors controlling urban environment,
managing urban ecosystems
3. Resource analysis for various ecosystems and development imperatives (land, geology, soil,
climate, water, vegetation) characteristics, exploitation, causative factors for degradation,
analytical techniques
4. Resource Management: Including management of land, water bodies and water channels,
forests and wildlife, minerals,waste.
5. Basic concepts related to environmental Management of sensitive areas – hills, coasts, arid,
wetlands etc.
6. Environmental approaches to design and development of built environment
7. Environmental Monitoring and Assessment – Air, Water, Land, Noise; Overview of EIA.

References:
David Lloyd Jones, 1998, Architecture and the Environment: Bioclimatic Building Design, London:
Laurence King.
Givoni, B., 1969. Man, Climate and Architecture, Elsevier Publishing Company Limited.
Minke, Gernot and Bansal, N. K. 1988. Climatic Zones and Rural Housing in India,
Kernforschungsanlage GmbH, Jülich.
Scott Drake, 2009, The Elements of Architecture - Principles of Environmental Performance in
Buildings, Earthscan, ISBN 9781844077175
Paul Appleby, 2010, Integrated Sustainable Design of Buildings, Earthscan, ISBN 9781849711173

Course SA4
Climatology and Building Physics (prepared by Prof. Sanjay Prakash)
4 Credits L-S-T: 3-0-2

Broad Objectives and Outline
A very important component of sustainability in buildings has to do with the fact that they have to
respond to the climate in which they are sited. This course aims to cover the various climates, mainly
in India, and the implications of each for building design in these respective climates.
The course will cover the basic concepts of heat transfer with respect to buildings and point to
strategies that need to be incorporated to achieve climatically appropriate building. The course shall
also cover concepts of human thermal comfort and its measurement.

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Tutorials in this course are expected to create a confidence with the technical concepts so that the
students have a fundamental understanding of physics concepts that are used by building analysts and
scientists.
It is encouraged, in the form of an assignment, to undertake secondary research on existing buildings
in published literature and identify their climatically responsive features.
This course will be closely connected to SA7: Energy Efficient Building Design and they should be in
continuity, and if possible, led by the same faculty member.

Suggested Evaluation Procedure
Assignment /Project / Field study 20%
Quiz / Test (announced and unannounced) 15%
Paper
4
10%
Class Participation 5%
Two Mid Semester Exams @ 10% each 20%
End of Semester Exam 30%

Suggestive assignments and term papers
Paper on Human Thermal Comfort / Climates of India
Concept Tests on Physics concepts during the course delivery (no books allowed)
Assignment: Case studies of Existing Buildings in India in published Literature for identifying their
Climate Responsive Features

Topics to be covered:
1. Introducing Climate Science: factors such as
a. Air temperature
b. Air pressure
c. Humidity
d. Sky condition
e. Solar radiation
f. Night radiation
g. Greenhouse effect
h. Winds
i. Condensation and precipitation
j. Global warming and its effects
2. Describing Climate Zones of India:
a. Hot and Dry
b. Warm and Humid
c. Moderate
d. Composite
e. Cold – both Humid and Dry
3. Thermal Flows (with examples drawn from building applications):
a. Concepts of Heat Physics: Heat, Temperature, Thermal Mass and Capacity, Latent
Heat
b. Conduction

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All students will write a paper dealing with a topic acceptable to the instructor and the paper must have at least five references.

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c. Convection
d. Radiation
e. Evaporation
4. Psychrometry:
a. Properties of Air and Humidity, Dew Point, Saturation, Absolute Humidity, Enthalpy,
Sensible and Latent Heat, Specific Volume of Air
b. Psychrometric Chart: Familiarization with the Chart, Mapping Climate on the Chart,
Mapping processes of Evaporative Cooling, Chilling, Heating, Humidification on the
Chart
5. Human Thermal Comfort:
a. Main factors affecting thermal comfort: temperature, humidity, air velocity, radiation,
metabolic level and clothing
b. Other factors: ageing, expectation, adaptive comfort
c. Human Thermal Comfort indices: Operative Temperature, Effective Temperature,
Standard Effective Temperature, Tropical Summer Index, Adaptive Comfort,
Predicted Mean Vote, ASHRAE provisions
6. Steady state Heat Transfer through Building Fabric:
a. Thermal Transmittance, Surface Resistance, Environmental Temperature
b. U-value
c. Thermal Resistance of Cavities
d. Thermal Diffusivity
e. Sol-Air Temperature
f. Calculation of Steady State Heat Flow
g. Calculation of Seasonal Heating and Cooling Demand for Fixed Inside Conditions in
the Steady State (Degree Day Method)
7. Solar Geometry:
a. Relationship of Earth and Sun
b. Solar Movement, Sun Angles, Sun Path, Analytical and Graphical Determination,
Discussion of Elliptical error, Variations of standard Time and Solar Time
c. Solar Radiation: Measurement, Direct, Diffuse and Global Radiation
d. Surface properties of Materials with Respect to the Sun: Absorption, Transmission
(for transparent surfaces), Reflection, Emissivity and Emittance
8. Ventilation, Air Movement and Air Change:
a. Functions of ventilation: Health, Thermal Comfort, Structural Cooling
b. Mechanisms for Ventilation: Natural and Created Thermal Effects, Natural and
Created Pressure Differences, Forced Ventilation, Air Recirculation

References:
Bureau of Indian Standards, 1987. SP41(S&T): Handbook on Functional Requirements of Buildings
(Other than Industrial Buildings), New Delhi.
Bureau of Indian Standards, 2005. National Building Code of India, Part 8: Building Services, Section
1: Lighting and Ventilation, New Delhi.
Givoni, B., 1969. Man, Climate and Architecture, Elsevier Publishing Company Limited.
Koenigsberger, O. H., Ingersoll, T. G., Mayhew, A., Szokolay, S. V., 1973. Manual of Tropical
Housing and Building Part 1. Climatic Design, Orient Longman Pvt. Ltd.

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Krishnan, A. (ed.), Baker, N., Yannas, S., Szokolay, S., 2001. Climate Responsive Architecture – A
Design Handbook for Energy Efficient Buildings, Tata McGraw-Hill Publishing Company Limited,
New Delhi.
Minke, Gernot and Bansal, N. K. 1988. Climatic Zones and Rural Housing in India,
Kernforschungsanlage GmbH, Jülich.
Nayak, J. K., Prajapati, J. A., 2006. Handbook on Energy Conscious Buildings, Prepared under the
interactive R&D Project No. 3/4(03)99-SEC between Indian Instiute of Technology, Bombay and
Solar Energy Centre, Ministry of New and Renewable Energy, Government of India.
Szokolay, S. V., 2004. Introduction to Architectural Sciences: The Basis of Sustainable Design,
Architectural Press, Oxford.
TERI, 2004. Sustainable Building Design Manual Volume 2, prepared under a European Union co-
funded ASIA-URBS project under the leadership of Institut Catala d‟Energia (Spain), The Energy &
Resources Institute, India.

Course SA5
Sustainable Architecture – Historical and Community Perspectives (prepared by Prof. Neeraj
Gupta)
3 Credits L-S-T: 3-0-0

Broad Objectives and Outline

The architecture of 20th century in India, barring few exceptional cases widely adopted forms, styles
and patterns seen in western architecture. Contemporary architecture in India relies on hi-techs in
building materials and engineering technologies that often waste energy, and cause physical and
psychological harm in varying degrees to the human beings.

On the contrary compared to modern society, ancient people were more aware of ecological
importance and had greater reverence to nature. Ancient buildings were based on natural laws and
depend on natural forces in order to adapt to bad survival environments and improve survival
conditions. Thus traditional community wisdom can provide us with rich and valuable technological
experiences that can be good reference point for modern day architecture.

This course offers a general review of concepts and principles of vernacular, and historical architecture
that provide unique insights on sustainable development and can help in understanding the practices,
strategies and implementation processes that shape sustainable architecture. The course will cover
examples largely from Indian context and would draw reference from traditional community wisdom
from India and other parts of the world.

Suggested Evaluation Procedure

Assignment / Project / Field study 20%
Quiz (announced and unannounced) 10%
Paper
5
10%
Class Participation 5%
Two Mid Semester Exams @ 10% each 20%
End of Semester Exam 30%

Suggestive assignments / field study / papers

Paper(s) on Ancient Human Settlements / Community Architecture

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All students will write a paper dealing with a topic acceptable to the instructor and the paper must have at least five references.

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Assignment / Field Study: Visit to a community in group of 3-4 and using Participatory Learning and
Action (PLA) approaches understand survival strategies of communities and document them in form
of a presentation in any medium of choice.

Topics to be covered, in detail:

1. Ancient and Historical perspectives in neighborhood planning and architecture from Vedic
Culture; and other ancient cultures across the world.
2. Planning Principles of Ancient Indian cities,
3. Concepts and basic principles of Vasthu-shashtra, Feng-shui (may add similar concepts from
other cultures.
4. Sustainable Architecture in history – Forts, palaces, temples, monasteries etc in different geo-
climatic zones.
5. Human settlement Planning and Housing – Examples from vernacular and planned cities.
6. Climatic response of vernacular architecture - analytical studies including developing
scientific evidence.
7. Community Participation in developing sustainable designs, participatory approaches to
learning and development

References:

To be added.. Check for Ancient Indian Publications from Motilal Banarsi Dasand others


DSA 1 Sustainable Architecture Design

There will be two minor studio exercises that shall essentially include field studies to consolidate the
learning of the theory subject –Sustainable Building Materials and Technology and Ecology and
Environment taught during the semester. These may be done individually or in small groups of 3-4
students as may be decided by the faculty coordinating design studio.

One major design exercise will involve a Sustainable Architecture Design Project of medium scale
that reflects clear understanding of climatology and building physics taught during the semester. The
design should be able to synergize traditional wisdom with modern technologies and contemporary
context.

Note: I n order to ensure complete harmony between theory subjects and design studio exercises,
course instructors of the theory subjects shall be part of the design studio faculty team. Such faculty
members will provide regular subject related inputs and periodically review the design efforts of the
students in their specific context. .

Course SA6
Energy Efficient Building Design – Theory and Technologies (prepared by Prof. Sanjay Prakash)
4 credits L-S-T: 3-0-1

Broad Objectives and Outline
This course applies the fundamental learning of its earlier companion course (SA4: Climatology and
Building Physics) to familiarize the learners with the Theory and Technologies of Energy Efficient
Building Design, especially in the Indian context, economic, and social context. The intention is to
lead to buildings that will exhibit a low operating energy demand, especially for heating, cooling and
lighting.

16
The course will cover techniques for reducing loads, and passive/hybrid design strategies to provide
low energy heating and cooling in buildings while maximizing effective use of daylight.
Tutorials in this course are expected to create a familiarity with the technical concepts so that the
students have well-rounded information of what is happening in practice as well as theory.
It is encouraged, in the form of an assignment, to undertake secondary research on existing buildings
in published literature and identify their energy efficient features. Introduction to relevant softwares.

Suggested Evaluation Procedure
Assignment / Project / Field study 20%
Quiz / Test (announced and unannounced) 10%
Paper
6
15%
Class Participation 5%
Two Mid Semester Exams @ 10% each 20%
End of Semester Exam 30%

Suggestive assignments and term papers
Paper on Glare free Daylight in Office Buildings
Paper on a detailed Case Study of an Energy Efficient Building including primary observation and
research
Quiz / Tests on Low Energy Building Concepts covered during the course (no books allowed)
Assignment: Case studies of Existing Buildings in India in published Literature for identifying their
Energy Efficient Features
Open Book End of Semester Examination

Topics to be covered:
1. Climate Responsive Site Design:
a. Site Planning and Selection factors
b. Site Analysis: Landform, Density of Existing Built Area, Climate analysis (wind, sun,
rain),Vegetation, Existing Infrastructure, Urban Context, Site potential
2. Climate Responsive Building Design:
a. Built Form: Layout, Orientation, Surface Area/Volume Ratio, Zoning of Internal
Spaces, Buffer Spaces, Location of Openings
b. Building surface and fabric: Insulation, colour, window size location and details
c. Building Envelope and Fenestration Design: Transmission through Walls and Roof,
Transmission through Windows, Window orientation and size, Shading Coefficient,
Solar Heat Gain Factor, Visible Light Transmittance, Glazing Types
d. Design of Shading Devices: fins, overhangs, pergolas, green roofs and walls, space
frames, façade shading
e. Calculation and estimates of effectiveness of the same (shadow angles, sun path
analysis)
f. Shading by plants and soil
3. Daylighting:
a. Concepts (health and other benefits)
b. Design skies: Uniform Luminance Sky Distribution, CIE Standard Overcast Sky
Distribution, Clear Blue Sky Distribution, Tropical Design Sky

6
All students will write a paper dealing with a topic related to ecology and environmental management in context of buildings and
neighborhoods. The topic must be acceptable to the instructor and the paper must have at least five references.

17
c. Direct, diffuse and reflected components
d. Design Parameters: Glare, critical indoor and outdoor illuminance, daylight factor and
its calculation and distribution
e. Techniques of incorporating daylight in buildings: galleries, porches, courtyards, atria,
light-pipe and shafts, lateral pass-through components (windows, translucent wall,
curtain wall), zenithal pass-through components (north lights, clerestoreys, translucent
roofs, skylights, domes and lanterns), global pass-though components (membrane
envelope), optical daylighting,
f. Control devices: conventional divisions, optical division, prismatic division, awnings,
curtains, overhangs, light shelves, sills, fins, jails, lovers and shutters, photochromatic
and film controls
4. Passive and Low Energy Heating Systems:
a. Principles and types: Direct Gain, Indirect Gain (Trombe walls, thermal storage
walls), Isolated Gain (sunspaces, greenhouses, convective loops)
b. Principles, advantages and disadvantages, control, and operating characteristics for
each of the above systems
5. Passive and Low Energy Cooling Systems (based on shedding heat to air):
a. Principles and types: Comfort ventilation, selective ventilation, chimney and stack
exhaust, climates applicable, air circulation
b. Design Factors Affecting Ventilation: Opening orientation, Size, Location, Internal
Subdivision of Space, Cross Ventilation
c. Ventilation coupled with thermal storage mass
6. Passive and Low Energy Cooling Systems (based on shedding heat to evaporating water):
a. Principles of evaporation, climatic applicability
b. Direct evaporative systems: Passive/manually watered pads, mechanical evaporative
coolers and air washers, passive downdraft evaporative cooling including downdraft
chimneys
c. Indirect evaporative systems: Roof ponds, roof films, ground based ponds, mechanical
two-stage and three-stage evaporative systems
d. Plant based evapo-transpiration systems
7. Passive and Low Energy Cooling Systems (based on shedding heat to the ground):
a. Principles of earth cooling, soil temperatures and its variation, climatic applicability
b. Direct coupling of soil with buildings (berms, basements)
c. Indirect coupling of soil with buildings (earth tunnels and pipes)
d. Active coupling of soil with buildings (ground source heat pumps)
e. Treatment of soil to change temperatures
8. Passive and Low Energy Cooling Systems (based on shedding heat to the sky):
a. Principles of night-sky radiation, climatic applicability
b. Skytherm and night radiant systems

References:

Ander, G. D., 2003. Daylighting Performance and Design (second edition), John Wiley & Sons Inc.,
New Jersey.
Bureau of Indian Standards, 2005. National Building Code of India, Part 8: Building Services, Section
1: Lighting and Ventilation, New Delhi.

18
Crosbie, M. J., 1998. The Passive Solar Design and Construction Handbook, John Wiley & Sons Inc.,
New York.
Givoni, B., 1994. Passive and Low Energy Cooling of Buildings, John Wiley & Sons Inc., New York.
Guzowski, M., 2000. Daylighting for Sustainable esign, McGraw-Hill, New York.
Majumdar, Mili (ed.), 2001. Energy Efficient Buildings in India, Tata Energy Research Institute and
Ministry of Non-conventional Energy Sources, Government of India.
Nayak, J. K., Prajapati, J. A., 2006. Handbook on Energy Conscious Buildings, Prepared under the
interactive R&D Project No. 3/4(03)99-SEC between Indian Instiute of Technology, Bombay and
Solar Energy Centre, Ministry of New and Renewable Energy, Government of India.
Santamouris, M., 1996. Passive Cooling of Buildings, James & James (Science Publishers) Ltd.,
London.


Course SA7
Sustainable Building Materials and Technology - II (prepared by Prof. Anil Dewan)
3 credits L-S-T: 1-3-0

Broad Objectives and Outline

Sustainable building materials and technologies has been introduced in the course Sustainable
Building Materials and Technology - I. With the advancement in technology and research the new
smart building materials are being adopted by the industry gradually. This course being an advanced
course would lay more emphasis on intelligent building systems, methodologies and on the use of
Innovative solar technology materials e.g. building integrated PV, solar thermal and hybrid systems,
high performance composites, alloys, advanced vernacular e.g. treated bamboo, reconstructed timbers,
Nanotechnology materials like Nano-glass, low-e glass, water repellent glass, self cleansing glass.
The objective of this course is to study green and recycled/reconstructed building materials using
advanced technologies and testing methods.

It is important to understand the performance of a building element, component, sub-system and the
whole building system with regards to composition, physical, chemical properties. Characteristics,
durability, usability and performance specifications of the building systems through live case studies,
workshops, lab experiments, guest lectures, hands-on exercises, and visit to manufacturing plants.
Exposure to various provisions of bureau of Indian standards and other international standards like
DIN, ASTM and British standards will be integral part of teaching.

Suggested Evaluation Procedure

Assignment /Project / Field study 20%
Quiz (announced and unannounced) 15%
Paper
7
10%
Class Participation 5%
Two Mid Semester Exams @ 10% each 20%
End of Semester Exam 30%

Suggestive assignments and term papers
Studio exercises to help prepare working details and specifications.
One paper related to innovative use of hi-tech materials like SPV integrated building panels,
performance monitoring etc.

7
All students will write a paper dealing with a topic acceptable to the instructor and the paper must have at least five references.

19
Field Project: Case studies of examples of innovative architecture across the world using hi-tech
material and technologies
Assignment: Documentation of best practices in the world and/or use of recycled material for
construction.



Contents:
1. Hi-Tech Glass
a. Electrochemical glass
b. Nano-glass
c. Dye sensitive glass
d. Low-e-glass
e. Other types
2. Polymers
a. Polyurethane
b. Styrene
c. Teflon
d. Epoxy floorings
e. Different vinyls
3. Carbon Fibre Reinforced Carbon/Plastics
a. Uses and applications
b. Future aspects
4. Pre fabricated and pre-engineered buildings
a. Introduction
b. Case studies
5. Alloys and A.C.P

6. High performance concrete

7. Aerogels and composites

8. Advanced vernacular materials.

9. Contemporary innovative building materials and their applications in Architecture.



Refrences:

Product Manufacturers‟ manuals / specifications

National and International Codes and Design Standards










20


Course SA 8
Building Services and Waste Management (prepared by Dr. Vivek Agarwal)
4 Credits L-S-T per week: 3-0-2

Broad Objectives and Outline

The broad aim of this course is to impart relevant information sufficient enough to students so that, as
practitioners, they can work with multidisciplinary team of consultants / experts and harness their
design expertise and experience.

The first part of this course will introduce in detail all building services, safety, security and
management systems and the methodology to integrate these services and systems to enhance
sustainability of the developmental projects and buildings.

Second part deals with an important and critical area – Waste management. The focus is on treating
waste as a resource. In this context this course will look at solid and liquid wastes, their management,
recycling and reuse. Moreover the segregation and classification of the waste through scientifically
established waste management techniques would be encouraged as the part of the design programme.
Efficacy of community participation in effective management especially collection and segregation,
waste reduction, use of recycled waste etc will be impressed upon. In addition to this, the basic
concept of W-to-E i.e. waste to energy conversion and cradle to grave cycle would be considered.

Suggested Evaluation Procedure

Assignment /Project / Field study 20%
Quiz (announced and unannounced) 10%
Paper
8
15%
Class Participation 5%
Two Mid Semester Exams @ 10% each 20%
End of Semester Exam 30%

Topics to be covered

PART A - Building services:
1. Electrical Services
 Introduction to basic concepts
 Low voltage systems, Building management systems
 Building Sensors for natural forces, fire etc.
 Introduction to smart grids
 Equipments and their specifications
 Low cost and green technologies
 Innovative local design techniques (through live case studies)

2. HVAC systems and services
 Introduction to basic concepts.

8
All students will write papers dealing with a topic as guided by the instructor.

21
 Building Automation and performance monitoring systems
 Equipments and their specifications
 Low cost and green technologies
 Innovative local design techniques (through live case studies)
3. Fire Fighting systems
4. Sanitary and plumbing fittings
 Historical perspectives and Introduction to basic concepts
 Different valves and their working principle
 Equipments and their specifications
 Low cost and green technologies
 Innovative local design techniques (through live case studies)

Part B – Waste Management and Recycling

5. Introduction to Waste management
 Wastes generated by Human Habitat – Solid, liquid and Gaseous
 Types of Wastes- Municipal, Industrial, Agricultural, Toxic, Bio-Medical, Hazardous,
Electronic, Radioactive etc.
 Overview of laws /rules governing waste management in India
 Importance of Community participation in waste management
 Impact on health and sanitation

6. Municipal Solid Waste management
 Cradle-to-Cradle cycle of municipal waste – segregation at source, storage,
transportation, disposal and processing
 Waste management in India– Current scenario, challenges, responses and pitfalls,
 Waste management in difficult terrains – hilly areas, high rain fall areas, water fronts,
etc
 Overview of waste-management from other parts of the world
 Contemporary Technologies and infrastructure for waste management
 Designing infrastructure for efficient and effective solid waste management from
generation point to final disposal - Waste bins, cold rooms, transport mechanisms,
landfill sites, incinerators, composting, etc.
 Designing collection system for waste in different types of building structures
 Financial Models for Waste management
 Role of NGOs in effective waste management, sanitation and health

7. Waste as a Resource
 Recycling Industrial, agricultural and municipal waste
 Recycling waste as alternative material for buildings, landscape and other products.
Study of innovative practices for use of recycled material
 Specifications and construction methods for using recycled waste.
 Demonstrative architecture and landscape using waste

22
 Vermi-composting
 Liquid waste from residential and commercial buildings recycling and reuse,
Sewerage treatment plants

8. Energy from Waste
 Biological and Thermal energy options
 Energy from sanitary landfills
 Refuse derived fuel and other options



REFERENCES:
1. Ravindrarajah, R.S, Tam. T.C. Properties of concrete made with crushed concrete a coarse
aggregate, - Magazine of concrete Research, Vol-37, March 1985.
2. Arceivala. S.J., “Wastewater Treatment for pollution Control”- Tata-McGraw Hill, New
Delhi, 1986.
3. ERM.UK Municipal Solid waste Management, Study for the MMA-Vol-1 Interim Report,
August-1995.
4. R.Ambalavanan and A.Roja “Feasibility Studies on Utilisation of Wastelime, Gypsum with
Fly Ash - The Indian concrete Journal – Vol. – 70 Nov-1996.
5. Municipal Solid Waste (Handling & Management) Rules 2000
6. Bio Medical Wsate (Handling & Management) Rules 1998
7. Report of Ranganath Mishra Committee on recycling of PET.
8. Waste Management World: ISWA Publication


SA 9
Water Management
2 credits L-S-T per week: 2-0-0

With the growth of population and the development of economy and society, water has become a rare
resource in the whole world. To optimize the allocation of such a rare resource as water is an
important content of sustainable development.

This course thus brings to focus concepts related to resource-oriented water conservancy that takes the
optimized allocation of resources and the balance of environmental ecology as the system target. With
reference to sustainable architecture, urban design and settlement planning it is prudent to unified
planning of atmospheric water, ground water, underground water and sewage and, on this basis, to
scientifically develop, use, control, allocate, save and protect water resources.

Suggested Evaluation Procedure

Assignment /Project / Field study 25%
Quiz (announced and unannounced) 10%
Paper
9
10%
Class Participation 5%
Two Mid Semester Exams @ 10% each 20%
End of Semester Exam 30%

9
All students will write papers dealing with a topic as guided by the instructor.

23

Topics to be covered
1. Management of the water cycle as a single system.
2. Management of water supply, sanitation and drainage - social imperatives, environmental
considerations and economic challenges.
3. Technological Options for Water management, recycling, reuse, conservation and
teatment
4. Traditional community wisdom regarding water management from different climatic
zones of the world
5. Traditional Architecture of wells in Rajasthan – Stepped Wells, Baoris, Tankas etc
6. Planning of settlements and large campuses based on principles of sustainable watershed
development – water as a priority resource
7. Design for water conservation – building and products
8. Designing building services – plumbing, drainage and sewerage for effective water reuse,
recycling, and recharge
9. Strategies for Water pricing and its Regulation
10. Rain water harvesting techniques – Basic Concepts, Piping techniques and Pit design of
groundwater recharge wells,

References
John Briscoe, R.P.S. Malik Editors, 2007, Handbook of Water Resources in India: Development,
Management, and Strategies: OUP
Ramaswamy R. Iyer, Editor, 2009, Water And The Laws In India: Sage Publications India Pvt. Ltd.,
Jain, Sharad K., Agarwal, Pushpendra K., Singh, Vijay P. 2007, Hydrology and Water Resources of
India, Water Science and Technology Library, Vol. 57
Guy Honore, for, 2002, Principles and Practices of Integrated Watershed Management in India, Indo-
German Bilateral Project
Rao, K. Nageswara (Ed.), 2006, Water Resources Management : Realities and Challenges, Eastern
Book Corpn.
NATHANSON, JERRY A, 2002, Basic Environmental Technology : Water Supply, Waste
Management, and Pollution Control; Prentice Hall
Dr B C Punmia, Ashok Kr Jain, Arun Kr Jain; Water Supply Engineering, Laxmi,
Cunliffe, D. (ed) (2011). Water safety in buildings. Geneva, Switzerland, World Health
Organization. ISBN-13 9789241548106.
P.K. Singh Rainwater Harvesting, Macmillan Publishers India
R.N. Athavale, 2003, WATER HARVESTING AND SUSTAINABLE SUPPLY IN INDIA, Rawat
Publications

Web References :

NIUA Publications http://www.niua.org/publications.asp
UNEP Publications http://www.unep.or.jp/ietc/ws/index.asp
http://pollution.researchtoday.net/books-pollution.htm
https://washresources.wordpress.com/category/topics/water-supply-topics/water-distribution/
http://www.cseindia.org/taxonomy/term/20167/menu



24

DSA 2 Sustainable Architecture Design II


The Design Studio Exercises in this semester will focus on Technology Driven Buildings in the
modern context and how Architectural Design Principles can make them more effective and
efficient in terms of energy, water and waste.


There will be two minor studio exercises that shall essentially include field studies to consolidate the
learning of the theory subjects – Energy Efficient Building Design – Theory and Technologies (SA 6)
and Sustainable Building Materials and Technology – II (SA 7) taught during the semester. These may
be done individually or in small groups of 3-4 students as may be decided by the faculty coordinating
design studio.

One major design exercise will involve a Sustainable Architecture Design Project in contemporary
context that reflects clear understanding of energy efficient building designs, building services and
waste management practices. The students must be able to demonstrate their understanding of latest
technologies and building practices related to sustainable architecture.

Note: I n order to ensure complete harmony between theory subjects and design studio exercises,
course instructors of the theory subjects shall be part of the design studio faculty team. Such faculty
members will provide regular subject related inputs and periodically review the design efforts of the
students in their specific context. .



DSA 3 Summer Project
2 Credits L-S-T: 0-0-1 (One hour per week spread over the semester or in two three stretches
depending on logistics and availability of external reviewers)


Students will be finalize their dissertation and thesis topics and take up an enabling summer project
that helps them gather knowledge and understanding to be applied for Master Design Thesis and
Dissertation. These could be intensive documentation projects or Action Research projects or projects
involving community in sustainable architecture. Student will choose a faculty guide from the
University or outside (duly approved by the University) and undertake work in their supervision and
guidance. The students will be given face to face or e-mentoring support including periodic review by
their guides / university faculty.

As an output, students will present formal report and make presentations before an external jury for
evaluation. The credits will be added to the third semester.

Course SA 10
Economic, Legal and Policy Framework for Sustainable Architecture
3 Credits L-S-T : 3-0-0

Broad Objectives and Outline

With the world facing both man-made and natural disasters, it is important to understand the
regulatory and policy framework for development of human settlements and how economy and
development is to be balanced with environmental concerns. Economics of Sustainable Architecture
needs to be understood taking the full life cycle perspective.

25

This course will focus on issues related to governance, policy framework and economics of
development and how they support sustainable architecture. It will help students to understand the
ground realties associated with regulatory and economic environment of development implement
sustainable design of built environment.


Suggested Evaluation Procedure

Assignment /Project / Field study 20%
Quiz (announced and unannounced) 10%
Paper
10
10%
Class Participation 5%
Two Mid Semester Exams @ 10% each 20%
End of Semester Exam 30%

Suggestive assignments tests and term papers

Papers dealing with economic aspects of sustainability, international treaties etc.
Quiz / Test examining basic legal understanding (only bare acts allowed)
Project Work: A group of students (3-4) will choose / propose a developmental project and prepare a
Project Report on a topic given by the instructor.
Mid Semester exam and End of semester exam may allow bare acts as per the paper setters‟ discretion.


Topics to be covered:

1. Economic approaches of measuring sustainable development, Measuring Wealth, Social
capital
2. Project Life Cycle – Technical, Financial, Economic, Social and Institutional feasibility of
projects,
3. Concepts related to project financing, rate of return, pay back period etc.
4. Environmental Legislations
a. EP Act 1986
b. Air (Prevention and Control of pollution) Act
c. Water (Prevention and Control of pollution) Act
d. Mines and Mineral Act
e. Factories Act
f. Pesticides Act
g. Indian Forest Act
h. Wildlife Act
i. Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act
j. Hazardous Waste Management and Handling Rules / Biomedical Rules / Solid Waste
Management Rules
k. Environment Tribunal Act
5. Climate change Protocols and Conventions
6. MOEF Guidelines and Notifications
7. Overview of policies and development regulations governing sustainability issues.


10
All students will write a paper dealing with a topic as guided by the instructor.

26
References:

Relevant Acts and Publications of Government / Autonomous bodies and other Agencies
(Specific lists to be prepared)

Course SA 11
Sustainable Neighbourhood Planning and Urban Design
3 Credits L-S-T per week: 2-2-0

Broad Objectives and Outline

Given the rapid and haphazard growth of towns and cities and associated problems of environment it
is important to understand the macro and micro issues that connect environment and built human
habitat. This course looks at relationship of built environment with overall environment. Our ancient
traditional wisdom has been able to create a built environment that was responsive to climatic and
other local conditions and also aesthetically pleasant. Most of the human habitat that one comes across
in villages is built on sustainable design principles. Thus this course looks at strategies that have been
in use since historical times to create sustainable neighborhoods. At the same time it looks at how
modern technology can be used to achieve goals of sustainable development.

This course will thus look at vernacular as well as modern urban design strategies that can mitigate the
negative impacts of urban climate. In this course urban heat island effect and ways to overcome its
impact will be covered. The course will also delve into resource efficiency in terms of water, waste
and materials at micro and macro level. Site planning strategies and urban design issues covered in this
course will be simultaneously put to practice in the studio classes covering a Sustainable Urban design
project.


Suggested Evaluation Procedure

Assignment /Project / Field study 25%
Quiz (announced and unannounced) 10%
Paper
11
10%
Class Participation 5%
Two Mid Semester Exams @ 10% each 20%
End of Semester Exam 30%

Suggestive assignments / tests / projects / papers:

Papers may be research based or documentation of vernacular, traditional and modern architecture in
different climatic zones with special focus on energy efficiency.
Project Work: A group of students (3-4) will study a neighborhood or human settlement or existing
campus and undertake its detailed study in context of sustainability. The topics should be so designed
by the course instructor that collective output of the class can yield meaningful documentation on
specific topic / area / building typology/ geographic region.
One mid-semester exam may be replaced by formal presentation / viva voce by external experts on the
project work.



11
All students will write a paper dealing with a topic as approved by the instructor.

27

Topics to be covered, in detail:

1. Climate sensitive design in different climatic Zones of India
2. Traditional design strategies of human habitats in India and other parts of the world with
special focus on resource management and built forms in response to harsh climatic
conditions.
3. Concepts and Principles related to “Eco-Village”
4. Urban pollutants and their impact on air , water, land and micro climate;
5. Impact of built density, building footprint, urban form including height and geometry,
orientation of streets, etc on micro climate especially light, ventilation and temperature.
6. Improving environmental quality, energy efficiency, efficient resource management (soil,
water, waste and materials) through appropriate site selection, effective neighborhood
planning and Urban design strategies; transport planning, land-use zoning strategies,
landscape planning etc.
7. Concepts related to urban renewal namely inner city regeneration, revitalization of the
"townships" and informal settlement / slum upgrading.
8. Integrating renewable energy at neighborhood scale, smart grids, concept of solar cities,



References:

CIRIA, The SUDS Manual, CIRIA C 697
Emmanuel., R., 2005. An urban approach to climate sensitive design: strategies for the tropics, Span
Press, Taylor and Francis Group.
UDPFI Guidelines, Part I and Part II, 1996, Ministry of Urban development and Poverty Alleviation,
Government of India.

Course SA 12
Project Management for Sustainable Architecture
3 Credits L-S-T per week: 3-0-0


Broad Objectives and Outline

This course intends to impart the knowledge of the basics of science of project management in the
field of sustainable architecture. The basic objective is to impart skills, so that students can learn to
execute projects while dealing with all organizational, technical, financial, human resource and
sustainability issues.

Suggested Evaluation Procedure

Assignment /Project / Field study 20%
Quiz (announced and unannounced) 10%
Paper
12
15%
Class Participation 5%
Two Mid Semester Exams @ 10% each 20%
End of Semester Exam 30%

12
All students will write a paper dealing with a topic as approved by the instructor.

28

Suggested Exercises / Papers / Projects /Assigmnments

Assignment: Preparing project flow diagrams of real project Exercises – preparing on real projects
Paper on Cost benefit analysis of a sustainable building
Quiz / Class tests on safety, health and environment issues in project management, Teamwork and
other HR issues,



Topics to be covered:
1. Fundamentals of Management – Concepts and Principles
2. Introducing Project Management
3. Project planning and financing
4. Project implementation and site investigation.
5. Project Life Cycles
6. The Process Management Framework
7. Project Integration Management
8. Scope Management
9. Cost benefit analysis
10. Project management engineering, procurement and construction
11. HR & Communications Management and Networking Techniques.
12. Risk Management
13. PERT/CPM, LOD
14. Procurement Management, Safety and Labour laws
15. MS Project/Primavera


References:


Paul C. Dinsmore - PMP; Jeannette The AMA Handbook of Project AMACOM; 2nd edition,
Turner, Simister, 2000, Gower Handbook of Project Management, Gower Publishing Ltd,
Dr Vasant Desai, 2009, Project Management, Himalaya Publishing House,
K.K Chitkara, 1998 (reprinted-2009), Construction Project Management : Planning, Scheduling and
Control McGraw Hill,
K.K Chitkara, 2001, Construction Project Managemnet Techniques And Practice , McGraw Hill, 2001


DSA 4 Dissertation
4 credits

Each Student will undertake a primary research or an intensive documentation exercise as may be
guided by the instructor and prepare a report running into around 100 pages of main body
(excluding supportive pages and annexure).

Formal presentation (face to face or video-conferencing in exceptional cases) and viva voce
examination will be conducted by external expert as part of the final evaluation.


29

Suggested Evaluation Procedure:

1 Continuous Internal Evaluation (CIE) of 50% marks consisting of:
Two internal review in different stages of progress 20%
Two Mid-Semester External Review 30%

2. End Semester External Jury including viva-voce (ESJ) of 50% of marks.

DSA 5 Sustainable Urban Design

There will be one minor studio exercises that shall essentially include field studies to consolidate the
learning of the theory subject –Sustainable Neighborhood Planning and Urban Design taught during
the semester. This may be done individually or in small groups of 3-4 students as may be decided by
the faculty coordinating design studio.

One major design exercise will involve a Sustainable Urban Design Project of large scale that reflects
clear understanding of campus planning, sustainable settlement planning, landscape design and the
statutory framework related to waste management, environmental protection and sustainability.

Note: I n order to ensure proper grasp of statutory provisions related to environmental impact etc
special interactive session with experts including exposure visits may be integral part of studio
exercise. Technologists and experts working in the field of energy, environment, simulation and
modeling may also be invited to provide specific inputs and periodically review the students’ work in
their specific context.


DSA 6 Sustainable Architecture Masters Design Thesis
18 credits

The masters design thesis will be a real-life design project that shall be carried out under
supervision of an internal guide and a practicing Architect as professional external guide.

The design thesis will be presented in the form of report of about 100 pages presenting the
theoretical and technological framework of design and Architectural presentation drawings
supported by other material as may be required to explain the project.

Formal presentation of minimum of about 60 minutes shall be made by the student before a formal
jury of experts who shall after viva-voce evaluate the designs and presentation and award
marks/grades.


Course SA E 1
Technologies for Renewable Energy (Elective course) by Sanjay Prakash
3 Credits L-S-T: 3-0-0

Broad Objectives and Outline

This course will give a general understanding of the various renewable energy production technologies
especially with an emphasis on building integration in urban areas (mainly solar thermal and
photovoltaic).


30
Learners shall be able to understand the principles and applicability, and size and integrate solar
thermal and photovoltaic systems in buildings. In addition, they will be familiarized with other
renewable sources with an emphasis on India.

It is encouraged, in the form of an assignment, to undertake secondary research on existing buildings
in published literature and identify their renewable energy sources.

Suggested Evaluation Procedure
Assignment /Project / Field study 20%
Quiz (announced and unannounced) 10%
Paper
13
15%
Class Participation 5%
Two Mid Semester Exams @ 10% each 20%
End of Semester Exam 30%

Suggestive assignments tests and term papers
Paper on sizing solar hot water systems
Paper on sizing a solar photovoltaic system with batteries
Quiz / Test on Renewable Energy Concepts during the course delivery (no books allowed)
Assignment: Case studies of Existing Buildings in India in published Literature for identifying their
Renewable Energy Features
Examination at End of Semester may be open book

Topics to be covered:
1. Fundamentals:
a. Force, energy and power
b. First and second law of thermodynamics
c. Types of renewable energy sources
d. Firm and infirm sources
2. Solar thermal energy:
a. Solar thermal flux and the greenhouse effect
b. Types of collectors and components: flat plate, evacuated tube, concentrating,
tracking, storage, plumbing, maintenance, controls and instrumentation
c. Sizing, mounting and angling of collectors, building integration
d. Closed and open loop systems, active and passive systems
e. Eco-model of ownership
f. Maintenance and life cycle cost, annual output estimation
g. Solar ponds
h. Solar chimneys
i. Applications: for heat, power, and combined
3. Solar photovoltaic energy:
a. History of the technology, operating principles, structure of silicon cells
b. Types of PV cells and components: crystalline, thin films, storage batteries, storage in
water head, grid-interactive systems, stand-alone systems
c. Sizing, mounting and angling of collectors, building integration
d. Operating characteristics

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All students will write a paper dealing with a topic acceptable to the instructor and the paper must have at least five references.

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e. Maintenance and life cycle cost, annual output estimation
f. Solar PV farms
4. Wind energy:
a. Wind flow, power density
b. Types of turbines
c. Estimate of wind turbine rating, annual output
d. Integration with buildings
e. Hybridization with solar photovoltaic
5. Biomass energy:
a. Sources: woody and agriculture crops
b. Energy from various types of wastes
c. Biomass conversion: methanation, gasification, charcoal, incineration
6. Other renewable energy sources and carriers:
a. Geothermal
b. Tides
c. Waves
d. Biotechnological and algal storage
e. Hydrogen and fuel cells
7. Economics of Renewable Energy Technologies
8. Contemporary Government schemes/ programs for to give incentives for environmental up-
gradation and energy efficiency.

References:
Boyle, G., 2004. Renewable Energy: Power for a Sustainable Future (second edition), Oxford
University Press, Oxford.
Gevorkian, P., 2008. Solar Power in Building Design: the Engineer’s Complete Design Resource,
McGraw-Hill Companies Inc., USA.
Hodge, B. K., 2010. Alternative Energy Systems and Applications, John Wiley & Sons Inc., USA.
Kishore, V. V.N., 2008. Renewable Energy Engineering and Technology, TERI Press, New Delhi.
Solanki, C. S., 2009. Renewable Energy Technologies: A Practical Guide for Beginners, PHI Learning
Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi.
TERI, 2004. Sustainable Building Design Manual Volume 2, prepared under a European Union co-
funded ASIA-URBS project under the leadership of Institut Catala d‟Energia (Spain), The Energy &
Resources Institute, India

SA E 2 Eelective course
Sustainable Landscape Architecture. (prepared by Ar. Sudheer Seem)
3 Credits L-S-T 3-0-0


This course will cover the theory of landscape architecture, plants and design, landscape management/
economics, heritage and cultural landscapes. The main emphasis of the total outcome of the course
shall be site planning and landscape engineering.

Suggested Evaluation Procedure
Assignment /Project / Field study 20%
Quiz (announced and unannounced) 10%

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Paper
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15%
Class Participation 5%
Two Mid Semester Exams @ 10% each 20%
End of Semester Exam 30%

Suggestive assignments tests and term papers
Paper on plant ecology and stratification
Paper on landscape management on regional scale / biodiversity
Assignment: Case studies of sustainable landscape designs/ biodiversity parts / regional parks /
woodlands in different climatic zones.

Topics to be covered:

Theory of landscape architecture;
Developing analytical approach to study and response to designed and natural landscapes
Perceptions and man‟s relationship With natural landscapes.
Ancient and traditional landscape practices.
Historical landscapes (Middle east, Chinese and European landscape.)
Plants a design :
Planting design through historical perspective,
Visual and aesthetic design with plants.
Planting various environments (design with plants )
Plant ecology and stratification
Landscape management:
Landscape economics and cost benefits related open spaces.
Landscape management at regional scale.
Managements practices with emphasis on urban forest, urban ecology, river front development
green belts.
Regional open spaces, national parks, reserved forests, wet lands, coastal areas .
Horticultural practices.
Heritage and cultural landscapes:
Historical perspectives
Conservation of historical landscapes.
Eco tourism
Bio diversity, bio sphere reserves.
Landscape engineering:
Components of landscape engineering, site planning consideration
Land, water conservation. (watershed managements)
Landscape engineering techniques (contour interpolation, drainage and irrigatin design etc)

References:
To be added

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All students will write a paper dealing with a topic acceptable to the instructor and the paper must have at least five references.

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SA E 2 Elective Course: Simulation and Modelling for Building Energy Performance
3 Credits

Draft Course outline suggested by Dr. Vishal Garg (deferred from discussion during May 11-12
workshop due to absence of subject experts and thus to be finalized later)
1) Week 1:
a. Fundamentals of Simulation (in general) – Energy Simulation 1
b. Types of Simulation – Whole Building / Component
c. Case study – 1 – Overview (Walk thru one project)
2) Week 2:
a. Geometry
b. Weather file
c. Construction
d. Schedule
e. HVAC / Lighting
f. Basic data collection to start simulation
3) Week 3: Working on development of Templates – Assignment-1
4) Week 4: Shading and Massing Analysis of Arch. Forms
5) Week 5: Daylighting – 1 – Fenestration Size / Location
6) Week 6: Daylighting – 2 – Fenestration Material - Performance
7) Week 7: Artificial Lighting
8) Week 8: Assignment on Daylighting-2 / Artificial Lighting-3
9) Week 9: HVAC – 1 Conditioned Building – Purchase Air
10) Week 10: HVAC – 2 Conditioned Building – Basic Systems
11) Week 11: Natural Ventilation – 1
12) Week 12: Natural Ventilation – 2
13) Week 13 & 14: Assignment on HVAC 4 – Natural Ventilation-5
14) Week 15: Energy Simulation for ECBC
15) Week 16: Assignment 7: Analyzing Small Conditioned office for its energy performance and
ECBC compliance
Assignment 6: Parametric Analysis