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MEETING

BUMP UP!
Facilitating Successful Meetings
with Design Management Methods

YIRUN XU | DMGT 748 Final Project | 2015 Winter

Figure 1. Meeting Bump Up! Process bool cover. Authors image, 2015.

MEETING BUMP UP!


Facilitating Successful Meetings with Design Management Methods

YIRUN XU
Candidate for Master of Arts, Design Management
DMGT is the culture, strategic and operational use of design resources (internal
and external) available to an organization, and directed towards the facilitation of
transformational change and design-driven innovation.
Adapted from DMIs definition
and Professor Peter McGrory, University of Art & Design Helsinki Taik
Final Project submitted to the faculty of the Design Management Program at the Savannah College of
Art and Design on March 11, 2015 in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of
Arts in Design Management.

INTRODUCTION

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Introduction

Abstract
In the effort to participate in the schools governance, university students
lead a lot of self-guided meetings that are not conducted efficiently, do
not yield the desired outcomes, and do not lead to a positive experience
of the participants. This research project has been undertaken to offer a
model and methods for successful collaborative student-led meetings.
Based on the research findings the Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Suite
has been developed, tested, and validated. The suite includes the fourphased MBU! Model & Process , the MBU! Toolkit , the MBU! Workshop ,
and the MBU! Virtual Collaboration Space . The strategic Meeting Bump
Up! (MBU!) Toolkit includes creative engagement processes for each
particular phase.
While the MBU! Suite was designed for student leaders, it can also be
successfully applied to all kinds of meetings where collaboration and
shared leadership are desired.

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Dedication and Acknowledgment

Dedication
I would like to dedicate this project to my dear parents, who always
sought to provide the best for me and support me to the best of their
ability. They provide me the chance to broaden my horizon in another
culture and support every decision I made.
This project is also dedicated to all my friends. They offer supports,
hugs, encouragement and understand which I am positive needed.

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Dedication and Acknowledgment

Acknowledgement
I am using this opportunity to express my gratitude to everyone who
supported me throughout the Design Management final project.
Special thanks to Prof. Regina Rowland, Ph.D. Thanks for your aspiring
guidance, invaluably constructive criticism and friendy advice during
the project work. Thanks for your patience and dedication toward my
education. Thanks for taking time to help me edit my writing. This
project wouldn't be perfect without your help.
Thanks to all of my classmates. I am sincerely grateful to you guys
for sharing your truthful and illuminating views on my project. Special
thanks to my team members: Kangjun Seo and Enrique Von Rohr. Thank
you for oering thorough and excellent feedback on my project. It was
great to have class with you guys!
Thanks to David Sobin, Syafiq Azmy, Maria De La Vega, Miao Yu and
Tian Wang, who are always willing to discuss my project with me. Thank
you for giving me your time to participate in the interviews and testing,
and thank you for your full support!

TABLE OF CONTENTS
9 PROJECT FRAMING
9
9
9
9
9

Subject of Study
Problem Statement
Target Audience
Purpose of Project
Scope of Project

11-29 PROJECT POSITIONING


11 Opportunity Statement
12 ZAG Steps
15 Competitor &
Collaborator Analysis
29 Value Proposition
29 Onliness Statement

31-55 RESEARCH ACTIVITIES


AND SYNTHESIS
31
32
33
36
37
39
39
40
44
54
55

Research Space
Research Methodology
Research Questions
Interview Questions
Survey Questions
Research Activities
Data Processing & Analysis
Primary Research
Research Synthesis
Research Insights
Research Findings at a Glance

57-62 DESIGN OPPORTUNITIES


AND CRITERIA
57 Opportunities for Design
61 Design Criteria for Prototype
62 Reframing

64-78 PROTOTYPE DEVELOPMENT


AND TESTING
Prototype Ideas
Chosen Concepts Development
Chosen Concepts Exploration
Concept Assessment with
Target Audience
77 Prototype Testing Insights
78 Design Criteria for Final Prototype
64
67
68
72

80-105 FINAL DESIGN TO MARKET

110-114 REFERENCES
110 Annotated Bibliography
114 Additional Sources

116-144 APPENDICES
116
117
118
119
120
122
131
140

Appendix A: Project Gantt Chart


Appendix B: Research Questions Matrix
Appendix C: Signed Consent Forms
Appendix D: Observation Notes
Appendix E: Interview Transcriptions
Appendix F: MBU! Toolkit Visual Maps
Appendix G: Business Model Canvas SWOT
Appendix H: Working Wall

146-150 LIST OF FIGURES AND TABLES


146 List of Figures
150 List of Tables

80 Meeting Bump Up!


101 Business Model Canvas
102 Implementation Plan

107-108 CONCLUSIONS AND


RECOMMENDATIONS
107 Conclusions
108 Recommendations

PROJECT FRAMING

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Framing

Subject of Study

Target Audience

The subject of this study is to apply Design Management methods in


student-led meetings in order to increase meeting participation and
achieve desired meeting outcomes.

Two groups were identified as the target audience of this project, based
on the purpose of achieving positive meeting experiences and desired
outcomes by applying creative engagement methods.

Problem Statement

Primary audience: students working in collaborative environments


Secondary audience: other people who are seeking to improve the
quality of group meetings and their own meeting facilitation skills

In universities, students lead a lot of self-guided meetings to participate


in the schools governance. At large institutions with lots of international
students cultural exchange takes place through collaboration across
disciplines where they exchange ideas, share knowledge, and plan joint
activities to achieve desired results. Leading and participating in these
meetings help students build leadership skills and provide them with all
kinds of techniques that are beneficial for their future careers.
Unfortunately, many of these student-led meetings are not lead efficiently
and/or are not effective, so that students lack positive experiences and/
or do not achieve the desired outcomes. In unsuccessful meetings,
participants are not able to make decisions by consensus, resulting
in meetings running overtime and behind schedule, and unpleasant
experiences. These undesired results are caused by a lack of meeting
facilitation skills, such as creating unclear meeting purpose, unbalanced
task allocation, and uncertain team roles.

Purpose of Study
The main focus of the project was to design structures and methods for
achieving positive meeting experiences and desired outcomes.

Scope of study
The scope of the project was to engage students at the Savannah
College of Art and Design who lead and participate in student-led
meetings. The project was completed within 10 weeks, lasting from
January 5, 2015, to March 12, 2015.

PROJECT POSITIONING

10

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Positioning

Opportunity Statement
Opportunities exist to apply Design Management methods to these
student-led meetings. Both, the quality of the experience and the
efficiency of the meeting might be improved by applying innovative
creative engagement methods. The outcome of this project might help
meeting participants to:



Develop facilitation and leadership skills


Learn about and practice Design Management methods
Achieve positive meeting experiences and desired outcomes
Increase meeting participation and level of collaboration

Through this project Design Management methods were be applied to


improving meeting facilitation, and the developed toolkit contributes to
making student-lead meetings more pleasant and more efficient. Since
the kit can be offered to a variety of institutions and student groups,
these methods can spread to non-design oriented fields where Design
Management is currently less known. Personally, the project allowed
me to gain knowledge of working in a collaborative environment and
organizing and facilitating meetings.

11

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Positioning


Zag Steps

WHO MA I ?

The purpose of MBU! Suite is to guide


students in designing and facilitating
successful meetings, so that participants
collaborate, are fully engaged, have a
positive experience, and achieve their
desired meeting outcomes together.

Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Suite is a


toolkit for guiding meeting facilitators who
are seeking to improve their group and
meeting facilitation skills.

WHAT WAVE AM I
RIDING?
The era of open innovation
Creative meeting facilitation
Transdisciplinary collaboration
Student leadership development
Design Management methods applied
across a variety of genres

WHAT DO I DO ?

WHO ELSE SHARES


MY BRANDSCAPE?
There are many small and large consulting
firms that offer meeting facilitation services
and/or facilitation training for all kinds of
organizations (businesses, governmental
agencies, non-profit organizations, etc).
There are also many facilitation tips
published in a variety of books.

WHAT IS MY VISION ?

MBU! Suite is a strategic tool for


developing leadership skills in meeting
design and facilitation.

WHAT MAKES ME
THE ONLY ME?

MBU! Suite is the only strategic toolkit


that applies design management methods
to meeting facilitation for college students
in the United States, who seek to improve
their meeting design and facilitation skills
in order to inspire greater collaboration,
instill a positive experience in participants,
and achieve desired meeting outcomes
in the era of shifting the paradigm of
competition to collaboration.
Figure 2. ZAG steps 1-6. Authors image, 2015.

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M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Positioning


Zag Steps

WHAT SHOULD YOU


ADD OR SUBTRACT?

The strategic toolkit should have clear


instructions and suggestions for each phase
in the meeting facilitation process, which
helps the meeting facilitator and participants
use the toolkit in a more effective way. It
should subtract the wordy description of the
definition for the new collaboration concepts
cited in the toolkit and switch them into visual
presentations.

10

WHAT DO THEY
CALL YOU?

Meeting Bump Up!


A strategic toolkit for high collaboration
performance

WHO LOVES YOU?


Students working in collaborative
environments will appreciate the benefit
of this strategic toolkit. Also other people
who are seeking to improve the quality of
group meetings and their own meeting
facilitation skills will love the creative
facilitation methods.

11

HOW DO YOU
EXPLAIN YOURSELF?

MBU! Suite is a strategic toolkit that uses


creative facilitation approaches to improve
the efficiency of group meetings, achieve
desired outcomes and increase the
positive experience of participants.

WHO IS THE ENEMY?

The main enemy is the participants who


are afraid of breaking the traditional
collaboration concept/methods and trying
the creative facilitation methods in a shared
leadership collaboration environment.

12

HOW DO YOU
SPREAD THE WORD?

MBU! Suite will firstly be distributed in education


environments, reaching the primary target
audience of participants in student-led meetings.
The strategic toolkits will be a part of leadership
training resources spread by related workshops
and published on the school website, in order
to support students in collaborative projects. In
order to reach people out of school, the strategic
toolkit will be spread and pitched in the facilitation
community through facilitation related social
media, workshops, and websites.
Figure 3. ZAG steps 7-12. Authors image, 2015.

13

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Positioning


Zag Steps

13

HOW DO PEOPLE
ENGAGE WITH YOU?

As a creative-oriented facilitation toolkit,


the visual communication methods
running through the whole process
will create an active and accessible
environment to engage participants. A
booklet will be available to help meeting
participants understand the strategic
toolkit and perform with the instructions.

16

HOW DO YOU EXTEND


YOUR SUCCESS?

In the early stages, the MBU! Suite was


designed for improving student-led
meetings and it will be tested in a studentled collaboration environment. But at
the same time, the innovative, creative
engagement methods provided in the
toolkit are also appropriate for leading
successful meetings across various
disciplines.

14

WHAT DO
THEY EXPERIENCE?

Meeting participants will be provided with


creative meeting facilitation methods based on
four meeting phases to facilitate their meeting
process. In the shared leadership collaborative
environment created within these methods, the
participants will gain high quality meetings with
positive experiences and desired outcomes. The
experiences brought by the toolkit will provide
individuals with the improvement of facilitation
skills and personal development.

17

15

HOW DO YOU
EARN THEIR LOYALTY?

Through MBU! Virtual Collaboration


Space, MBU Practitioners can learn
together, share ideas and experiences,
co-develop new tools and processes,
and collaborate on projects. In this way,
the MBU! Suite can be improved and
enhanced to earn users loyalty.

HOW DO YOU PROTECT


YOUR PORTFOLIO?

The MBU! Suite is encouraged to


continue developing and testing new
MBU! Processes and Tools to evolve the
work further. The collaboration between
designers and facilitators can be protected
through the interaction in the large MBU!
Community.

Figure 4. ZAG steps 13-17. Authors image, 2015.

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M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Positioning


Competitor and Collaborator Analysis
For-profit Creative Facilitation Corporations

IDEO

Frog

Continuum

IDEO is a global innovation design


consultancy. IDEO takes a humancentered, design-based approach to helping
organizations in the public and private
sectors innovate and grow.

Frog is a global product strategy and design


firm. Frog combines research, strategy,
technology, and design to create products
and services for improving the human
experience.

Continuum is a global innovation and design


consultancy. Continuum focuses on helping
organizations drive business innovation
through the design of products, services and
experiences that become part of the fabric of
peoples lives.

XPLANE

Meeting Facilitators
International

XPLANE is a business design consultancy.


XPLAN leverages visual thinking, humancentered design, co-creation, and multidisciplinary teams to help clients solve
complex problems.

Meeting Facilitators International is a meeting


facilitation business consultancy.
Meeting Facilitators International provides
facilitators for strategic planning sessions,
corporate retreats, and customer advisory
board meetings.

The Hayes Group


The Hayes Group is a full-service
organizational consulting firm. The Hayes
Group provides the highest quality services,
designed especially to help organization
achieve its organizational goals.

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M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Positioning


Competitor and Collaborator Analysis

IDEO

http://www.ideo.com

Objective:

Members:

Lessons:

Help organizations build creative culture


and the internal systems required to
sustain innovation and launch new
ventures

Public and Private business in branding,


digital experiences, energy, engineering,
financial services, food, health, medical
products, and etc

Identify new way to support working


Build creative culture and internal
systems required
Design thinking approach
Impact through design

Approach:

Entry:

Collaboration Opportunities:

Consultation business
IDEO website
IDEO workshop/program

Facilitate by creative approaches


Design Management methods (design
thinking)
Impact through design/ start from
design side

What is their facilitation value?

How do they create value?


Design thinking
Human-centered approach
Design-based approach
Innovation

What categories do they fall into?

What is they entry point to their facilitation?

What can they teach us for our facilitation?

Facilitation Approaches:
Design Thinking
Design thinking is a human-centered
approach to innovation that draws from the
designer's toolkit to integrate the needs of
people, the possibilities of technology, and
the requirements for business success.
Tim Brown, president and CEO

Where or how do we overlap?

Figure 5. Competitor and collaborator analysis, IDEO, Authors image, 2015.

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M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Positioning


Competitor and Collaborator Analysis

Frog

http://www.frogdesign.com

Objective:

Members:

Lessons:

Innovation that advances the human


experience

Public and Private business in experience


strategy, product and service design,
product realization, and growth strategy

Using an open crowd sourced


approach to design
People around the world submit
pictures from moments in everyday life
that provide a quick visual pulse on
behaviors, trends, and artifacts

Approach:

Entry:

Collaboration Opportunities:

FrogThink: build alignment and


generate fresh ideas
Frog Foucs: identify space for
innovation ethnographic research and
quantitative analysis
FutureCasting: takes clients outside of
current business realities
FrogMob: an open, crowd sourced
approach to design research.

Consultation business
Frog website
Frog App (FrogMob)

Beyond design consulting, frogs facilitate


practical education and engage in
provocative innovation

What is their facilitation value?

How do they create value?

What categories do they fall into?

What is they entry point to their facilitation?

What can they teach us for our facilitation?

Facilitation Approaches:
FrogThink
FrogFoucs
FutureCasting
FrogMob
FrogImmersive
FrogFilm

Where or how do we overlap?

Figure 6. Competitor and collaborator analysis, Frog, Authors image, 2015.

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M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Positioning


Competitor and Collaborator Analysis

Continuum

http://continuuminnovation.com

Objective:

Members:

Lessons:

Continuum satisfaction lies in tackling


new-to-the-world challenges and
executing growth through innovation.

Public and Private business in branding,


digital design, business design, service
design, product design and growth
strategy

Connect the working process to


experiences
Tell stories for creating emotionally
compelling experiences

Approach:

Entry:

Collaboration Opportunities:

Creating a storyline that brings


strategy to life
Creating an emotionally compelling
experience
Integrate creative process during
innovation projects
Choreographing the interactions
between people and projects
Fresh thinking and global connection

Experience focused story telling


working process
Integrate creative process during
innovation projects

What is their facilitation value?

How do they create value?

What categories do they fall into?

What is they entry point to their facilitation?

Consultation business
Continuum website
Continuum online community
Continuum advanced system

What can they teach us for our facilitation?

Facilitation Approaches:
Story telling
People-centered approach
Creating an emotionally compelling
experience
Creative process
Fresh thinking and global connection

Where or how do we overlap?

Figure 7. Competitor and collaborator analysis, Continuum, Authors image, 2015.

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M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Positioning


Competitor and Collaborator Analysis

XPLANE

http://www.xplane.com

Objective:

Members:

Lessons:

Help clients solve complex problems by


using visual thinking, human-centered
design, co-creation, and multi-disciplinary
teams.

Public and Private business in vision and


strategy planning, visual communication,
process improvement and adoption and
behavior change

Visual communication focus


Process improvement

Approach:

Entry:

Collaboration Opportunities:

Consultation business
XPLANE website
XPLANE events

Visual communication approach


Co-creation

What is their facilitation value?

How do they create value?


Visual thinking
Storytelling
People-Centered design
Co-creation
Multidisciplinary teams
Interactive design

What categories do they fall into?

What is they entry point to their facilitation?

What can they teach us for our facilitation?

Facilitation Approaches:
Visual thinking
Storytelling
People-Centered design
Co-creation
Multidisciplinary teams
Interactive design

Where or how do we overlap?

Figure 8. Competitor and collaborator analysis, XPLANE, Authors image, 2015.

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M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Positioning


Competitor and Collaborator Analysis

Meeting Facilitators International

http://www.facilitators.com

Objective:

Members:

Lessons:

Right facilitator can make all the difference


in the world

Public and private business in meeting


facilitation

Focus on strategic planning facilitation


Facilitation proposal (good meeting
facilitation takes preparation)

Approach:

Entry:

Collaboration Opportunities:

Consultation business
MFI website

Clear facilitation approaches


Pre-work for meeting facilitation

What is their facilitation value?

How do they create value?


Initial consultation
Facilitation proposal
Pre-work
Planning session, corporate retreat
Meeting report
Follow-up

What categories do they fall into?

What is they entry point to their facilitation?

What can they teach us for our facilitation?

Facilitation Approaches:
Initial consultation
Facilitation proposal
Pre-work
Planning session, corporate retreat
Meeting report
Follow-up

Where or how do we overlap?

Figure 9. Competitor and collaborator analysis, MFI, Authors image, 2015.

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M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Positioning


Competitor and Collaborator Analysis

The Hayes Group

https://www.thehayesgroupintl.com

Objective:

Members:

Lessons:

Solving real time business problems and


having a direct impact on the human
capital

Public and private business in government


services, health care and mergers

Workshops that engage people,


business and organizations
Category business by industry

Approach:

Entry:

Collaboration Opportunities:

Analyze and diagnose organizational


and individual developmental needs
Provide consulting and training that is
sensitive to unique environment
Assist clients in meeting specific
objectives

Consultation business
The Hayes Group website
The Hayes Group workshops

Workshop in case study for facilitation


starters

What is their facilitation value?

How do they create value?

What categories do they fall into?

What is they entry point to their facilitation?

What can they teach us for our facilitation?

Facilitation Approaches:
Analyze and diagnose organizational and
individual developmental needs
Provide consulting and training that is
sensitive to unique environment
Assist clients in meeting specific objectives

Where or how do we overlap?

Figure 10. Competitor and collaborator analysis, The Hayes Group, Authors image, 2015.

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M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Positioning


Competitor and Collaborator Analysis
Facilitation Associations

IAF

INIFAC

IIFAC

The International Association of Facilitators


(IAF) is a professional association that
promotes, supports, and advances the
art and practice of professional process
facilitation.

The International Institute for Facilitation


(INIFAC) is a facilitation certification
association. Developed from a facilitation
certification program at the masters level.

International Institute for Facilitation and


Change (IIFAC) is a facilitation association.
IIFAC offers facilitation services and training
to help groups make better use of the time
spent in meetings.

(International Association of Facilitators)

(International Institute for Facilitation)

(International Institute for Facilitation and Change)

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M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Positioning


Competitor and Collaborator Analysis

IAF (International Association of Facilitators)

http://www.iaf-world.org/index.aspx

Objective:

Members:

Lessons:

Unleashing the power of Facilitation and


Facilitators

All those who facilitate, for the good of


others, wherever and however they do it

Create an International platform


that provide the opportunities for
facilitators communication
Collect and share facilitation resources
on the platform

Approach:

Entry:

Collaboration Opportunities:

IAF Online open resources (Journal,


flipchart, member blogs)
Grow the community of practice for all
those who facilitate
Establish internationally accepted
professional standards

Create the category for facilitation


starters (tools and resources)
Cases study

What is their facilitation value?

How do they create value?

What categories do they fall into?

What is they entry point to their facilitation?

IAF Website
IAF Membership
IAF Certification Events
International Facilitation Week
Facilitation Impact Awards

What can they teach us for our facilitation?

Facilitation Approaches:
IAF Online open resources (Journal,
flipchart, member blogs)
Grow the community of practice for all
those who facilitate
Establish internationally accepted
professional standards

Where or how do we overlap?

Figure 11. Competitor and collaborator analysis, IAF, Authors image, 2015.

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M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Positioning


Competitor and Collaborator Analysis

INIFAC

(International Institute for Facilitation)

http://www.inifac.org

Objective:

Members:

Lessons:

Maintain and advance certification for


facilitators at the Masters level

Facilitation professionals

Facilitator skill certification


Training for certification base on
facilitation standard

Approach:

Entry:

Collaboration Opportunities:

Certification courses for facilitation


starters

What is their facilitation value?

How do they create value?


Facilitator certification
Training courses for certification
Platform for certified facilitator career
Facilitator resources

What categories do they fall into?

What is they entry point to their facilitation?

Apply for facilitator certification


INIFAC website
INIFAC training courses
Collaborate with CCF and CMF

What can they teach us for our facilitation?

Facilitation Approaches:
Facilitator certification
Training courses for certification
Platform for certified facilitator career
Facilitator resources

Where or how do we overlap?

Figure 12. Competitor and collaborator analysis, INIFAC, Authors image, 2015.

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M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Positioning


Competitor and Collaborator Analysis

IIFAC

(International Institute for Facilitation and Change)

http://english.iifac.org

Objective:

Members:

Lessons:

Help groups find new pathways to


communicate with each other, to become
both more disciplined and more creative
in the ways work and to make decisions

Public and private business in facilitation,


training and coaching

Innovate to improve systems and


services, thinking facilitation wider
Build international facilitation network

Approach:

Entry:

Collaboration Opportunities:

Respect people and the earth


Passing on information and inspiration
through teaching, publishing and
mentoring of new colleagues
Innovate and strive to constantly
improve systems and services

Consultation
IIFAC website
IIFAC workshop/program

Develop and innovate the facilitation


starter training in system

What is their facilitation value?

How do they create value?

What categories do they fall into?

What is they entry point to their facilitation?

What can they teach us for our facilitation?

Facilitation Approaches:
Respect people and the earth
Passing on information and inspiration
through teaching, publishing and
mentoring of new colleagues
Innovate and strive to constantly improve
systems and services

Where or how do we overlap?

Figure 13. Competitor and collaborator analysis, IIFAC, Authors image, 2015.

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M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Positioning


MEETING EXPECTATIONS VS. FACILITATION METHODS

High Creativity

IDEO
2X2 AXIS CHART

XPLANE

Meeting Expectations vs. Facilitation Methods


Most creative innovation consultancies focus on
the participants expectation of meeting experience
rather than outcome. Associations like INIFAC,
which focus on the facilitator training, were more
experience oriented. The for-profit facilitation
services consultancies showed concentration on
meeting outcome.
There is great opportunity in the area that balances
positive experience and outcome in meetings by
applying relatively creative facilitation methods.

CONTINUUM

FROG

IAF
International
Association of
Facilitators

Experience
Oriented

Opportunity

IIFAC
INIFAC

International
Institute for
Facilitation &
Change

International
Institute for
Facilitation

Outcome
Oriented
Meeting
Facilitators
International

The
Hayes
Group

Low Creativity
Figure 14. 2X2 axis chart for market positioning, Meeting Expectations vs. Facilitation Methods, Authors image, 2015.

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M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Positioning


FACILITATION GUIDANCE VS. FACILITATION PURPOSE

Strategic Guidance

IDEO
2X2 AXIS CHART

FROG

IAF

Facilitation Guidance vs. Facilitation Purpose


It is interesting to note that creative facilitation
methods in strategic level applied by innovation
consultancies showed advantage in improving
meeting participation rather than training group
leadership.
There is a white space in the area of providing stepby-step guild for participatory leadership.

XPLANE

International
Association of
Facilitators

CONTINUUM

International
Institute for
Facilitation

IIFAC
International
Institute for
Facilitation &
Change

Participatory
Leadership
Style

Opportunity
Meeting
Facilitators
International

INIFAC

Traditional
Leadership
Style
The
Hayes
Group

VIANOVA

Step-by-step Guidance
Figure 15. 2X2 axis chart for market positioning, Facilitation Guidance vs. Facilitation Purpose, Authors image, 2015.

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M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Positioning

Positioning Summary
After evaluating the various facilitation consultancies, both in innovationoriented and business-oriented, some key findings become evident:
Creative facilitation methods were widely used by innovation
consultancies, which led positive meeting/collaboration experience.
These methods showed an advantage in improving meeting
participation and brought great collaboration.

The new trend that more and more facilitation consultancies are
considering is creative engagement methods. But there was still
a long distance to chase up creative innovation consultancies. It
was a great opportunity in the area to filling the gap, creating the
collaborations.

The existing leadership training program/courses are basically


provided by business oriented consultancies or facilitation
certification organizations; the methods included were general but
behind the times. This caused the methods to be unable to help
improve participation effectively in recent meetings.

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M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Positioning

Value proposition

Onliness Statement

For participants in student-lead meetings

Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Suite is the only strategic toolkit that applies
design management methods to meeting facilitation for college students
in the United States, who seek to improve their meeting design and
facilitation skills in order to inspire greater collaboration, instill a positive
experience in participants, and achieve desired meeting outcomes in the
era of shifting the paradigm of competition to collaboration.

Who are seeking to improve their group and meeting facilitation skills
Our toolkit provides a strategic approach for applying innovative creative
engagement methods for leading successful meetings across various
disciplines
We do this by offering a set of easy steps to open meetings, to create
and decide upon an appropriate meeting agenda, to collaboratively
define a desired meeting outcome, and to choose processes for
achieving the defined outcome, so that participants are fully engaged
throughout and leave the meeting with a positive experience, clarity, and
next steps for potential action.
Unlike other existing meeting facilitation methods that require the
guidance of strong leadership our toolkit guides facilitators-intraining, step-by-step, in designing and facilitating collaborative
processes toward successful meeting outcomes based upon equality of
participants.

WHAT: the only strategic toolkit

HOW: that applies design management methods to meeting facilitation


WHO: for college students

WHERE: in the United States

WHY: who seek to improve their meeting design and facilitation skills
in order to inspire greater collaboration, instill a positive experience
in participants, and achieve desired meeting outcomes

WHEN: in the era of shifting the paradigm of competition to collaboration

29

RESEARCH ACTIVITIES AND SYNTHESIS

30

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Research Activities and Synthesis


MEETING

Meeting
Outcome

Research Space
This project focused on the subjects of
(student-led) meeting, facilitation and
Design Management. An ecosystem
map has been generated base on
the secondary research to show the
research space of the project and the
positions and relationships of these
subjects.

MEETING

Meeting
Experience

FACILITATION
Hawes, J. M. (1999)
Falkman, G. (2013)
Northridge, R. (1994)
Paulsen, D. (2004)
Rees, F. (1992)
Sibbet, D. (2010)

StudentLed

Collaboration

Koonce, R. (1995)
Clifton, W. (1992)
Laflamme, E. (2003)
Levasseur, R. E. (1992)
Pelletier, S. (2004)
Eckes, C. (2009)

Meeting

DESIGN
MANAGEMENT

Participation

Csikszentmihalyi (1997)
Dorst/Cross (2001)
Johansson (2006)
Lockwood (2006)
Osterwalder/Pigneur (2010)
Schensul/Schensul/
Lecompte (1999)

Leadership
Meeting
Facilitation

Personal
Leadership

Methods
Creative
Engagement

FACILITATION

CoFacilitator

Facilitation
Mthods
Team
Building

DESIGN
MANAGEMENT

Design

Creativity
Business

Figure 16. Ecosystem map of research space, Authors image, 2015.

31

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Research Activities and Synthesis

Research Methodology
The methodology of this project was a case study with an ethnographic lens.
This methodology is appropriate for the project because the research was
bounded to a specific location and pool of research subjects at the Savannah
College of Art and Design. The primary research included working with student
meeting leaders and participants to collectively develop appropriate solutions
for problems observed by the researcher and defined by the subjects who
represented a diverse spread of cultural backgrounds, beliefs and values.

32

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Research Activities and Synthesis

Main Research Question


How might Design Management Methods be applied to meeting
facilitation in order to increase participation in meetings, so that
desired outcomes are achieved and participants have positive
experiences?

Sub Research Question


1. What are Design Management Methods?
How are people using Design Management Methods?
What is the benefit of using Design Management Methods?

2. How might we apply Design Management Methods to


meeting facilitation?
What is meeting facilitation?
What is the purpose of meeting facilitation?
What kinds of methods have already been applied in meeting facilitation?
What is the main task for a meeting facilitator?

3. How might we increase participation in meetings?


What does participation mean in a meeting environment?
What emotional expressions or behaviors demonstrate that participants
are fully engaged in meetings?
What will influence group members participation in meetings?
What methods will be used to increase participation in meetings?
Who or what might encourage more participation besides the facilitator?

4. What determines success in meetings?


What is the definition of success in meetings (for instance, desired
outcome is achieved)?
What methods are used to evaluate success?
Who determines whether meetings were successful?
How do participants evaluate success (versus facilitator)?

5. What is the definition of positive experience in


meetings?
What variables impact the experience?
What kind of experience do participants expect?
What is the relationship between positive experience and desired outcome?
What methods can be used to improve the meeting experience?

33

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Research Activities and Synthesis


Consent Forms

Figure 17. Interview consent form, Authors image, 2015.

34

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Research Activities and Synthesis


Research Protocols

Figure 18. Research protocols, Authors image, 2015.

35

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Research Activities and Synthesis


Interview Questions

For Meeting Participants

For Experienced Meeting Facilitator

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.

Tell me a little about yourself, your major/career, profession, character and lifestyle.
Please tell me about a recent meeting experience.
Please tell me about a meeting that impressed you the most.
What influences your mood during meetings?
What experience do you expect to have from being in meetings?
What would you like to experience?
How do you connect a positive experience with success in a meeting?
How can meeting leaders or other participants impact your meeting experience? What can
they do to make it better or worse?
9. How do you define a success meeting?
10. How would you know when a meeting was successful?
11. Who can say that a meeting was successful (leader/participant/visitor/boss?)
12. What makes meetings successful and how would you evaluate it?
13. How would you describe the meaning of participation in meetings?
14. What do people look like that participate heavily?
15. How do you define meeting leadership?
16. How do you think the leader can get people to participate more?
17. What other methods than creative engagement have you experienced in meeting facilitation?
18. Have you ever heard of DMM?
19. When have you seen DMM in action? How was it done?
20. What was inspirational about DMM in action?

Tell me a little about yourself, your major/career, profession, character and lifestyle.
Please tell me about a recent meeting experience.
Please tell me about a meeting that impressed you the most.
What influences your mood during meetings?
What experience do you expect to have from being in meetings?
What would you like to experience?
How do you connect a positive experience with success in a meeting?
How can meeting leaders or other participants impact your meeting experience? What can
they do to make it better or worse?
9. How do you define a success meeting?
10. What methods are used to evaluate success?
11. Who can say that a meeting was successful (leader/participant/visitor/boss?)
12. What makes meetings successful and how would you evaluate it?
13. How would you describe the meaning of participation in meetings?
14. How might you recognize people fully engaged in meetings?
15. How do you define meeting leadership?
16. How might you make meetings more creative, more fun, and more effective?
17. How do think the leader can get people to participate more?
18. What other methods than creative engagement have you experienced in meeting facilitation?
19. Have you ever heard of DMM?
20. Have you ever heard and used DMM?
21. What was inspirational about DMM in action?

36

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Research Activities and Synthesis


Online Survey Questions
Online Consent Form
I voluntarily agree to participate in this survey performed by
students at the Savannah College of Art and Design. I understand
that this survey is being conducted by Yirun Xu in order to identify
opportunities for design as part of DMGT 748 M.A. Final Project,
Winter 2015.
I grant permission for the evaluation data generated from the above
methods to be used in an educational setting. I understand that any
identifiable information in regards to my name and/or company name
will be removed from any material that is made available to those not
directly involved in this study.
The procedure involves filling an online survey that will take
approximately 10 minutes. By completing this survey, I agree to
participate in the research. Confidentiality will be maintained to the
degree permitted by the technology used. My participation in this
online survey involves risks similar to a persons everyday use of the
Internet.
Please select one
O I agree
O I do not agree

1. What's you job field?


a. Art Creative
b. Business
c. Communication
d. other __________
2. Are you a experienced meeting facilitator?
a. Yes
b. No
3. What is more important to you in a meeting?
a. Outcome
b. Experience
c. Both
4. What do you think a successful meeting outcome looks like?
a. Follow the meeting agenda, complete meeting on time
b. Complete the meeting task perfectly
c. Express the personal opinion to others, and got feedback
d. Inspired by others idea, generate new thinking
e. Task allocated properly

37

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Research Activities and Synthesis


Online Survey Questions

5. What kind of experience can be a positive meeting experience for you?

7. If you are meeting facilitator, what will you do to increase the participation?

6. What will you usually do in a meeting that show your participation in it?

8. Have you heard about Design Management Method?


For you, Design Management Method is __________.

a. Learn knowledge from others


b. Personal ides are recognized
c. The realization of self-worth
d. Spiritual fulfillment
e. Nothing suck in meeting

a. Take the initiative to become leader, facilitate the meeting.


b. Participate in discussion, exchange ideas with others.
c. Listen to other participants idea, sometimes discussion with others.
d. Listen to other participants idea only.

a. Use positive comments


b. Use creative activities
c. Focus on one issue, shorten meeting time
d. Ask an assistant to facilitate the meeting
e. Using informal topics warming up meeting
f. Other ____________

a. Research methods
b. Design methods
c. Business models
d. Management principles
e. Methods used to manage design process
f. Have no idea about Design Management Method

38

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Research Activities and Synthesis

Research Activities

Data Processing & Analysis

Secondary research was conducted into five aspects, which were


connected with main research question closely.

Primary research data was collected through interviews, surveys, and


observations. Data was mapped onto working walls, triangulated,
analyzed and further processed. Eventually, the found patterns were
presented in data visualization maps, such as word clouds, SWOT
analysis, journey maps, personas and affinity. The insights gained from
this data analysis led to an opportunity map and criteria for designing
potential prototypes.

An online survey was conducted from January 15, 2015 to January


23, 2015 using Survey Monkey
Face-to-face interviews were conducted with students in the
Savannah College of Art and Design from January 17, 2015 to
January 23, 2015, in Savannah, GA
Participatory Observations were conducted in student-led meetings
from January 14, 2015 to January 23, 2015

39

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Research Activities and Synthesis

"

Primary Research

Interview

about student-led meetings


Interview as a main primary research methods
in this project. Interviews were believed to
provider a deeper understanding of how
interviewees looking at student-led meetings.
Through the interaction between interviewer
and interviewee, more sensitive topics like
personal meeting experience were explored in
this phase.

Findings:

David S.

DMGT Student

"
Syafiq A.

"
Maria D.

What I expect going to a meeting is like everybody goes in there


knowing that they are coming in a meeting and they are there to
share collaborate and negotiate.

The experience of the meeting itself would tell you what


the outcome would goanna be. So if you dont have a good
experience in the meeting, there was no real good outcome.

So as soon as you accomplish whatever goals you set up to


accomplish, even if it is just a tiny little thing, even if its like it
wasnt what I expect but at least we moved an inch. Then the
inches are mile really in the end.

There is no communication
between us, even we do in the
same studio, communication
is very important things. But if
we dont have communications,
everything doesnt work really
well.

What really important is chemistry, thats it. For example you and
me, we are in the same group and we have chemistry, so we can
work together, I feel comfortable thats good enough. If I dont
know you, you dont know me, we feel a little awkward, so you
will feel this kind of tense.

If you want to create an engaging meeting, first of all, I think you


need to know every participant.

It is very because every assignment you need to go to a meeting


and discussion, then you put sticky notes, if you have any ideas
and if you make changes, if you have any other ideas later.

If you have someone maybe has a very light personality, like


maybe someone else is not feeling it but that person will
encouraging them to participate or change the attitude that
affects meeting.

I think that when a meeting has a purpose, and everyone is


working towards that purpose and creating a good working
environment that really affects the outcome of the meeting.
Knowing where you goanna get.

Establishing goals. So that we know what we will get done. Not


just meet-to-meet, but meet to accomplish something.

"

"

ARLH Student

Students moods were always influenced by


how other participants treated the meeting.
(They wanted a positive environment, but
negative members always infused their moods.)

The biggest thing that would


affect my mood is the people
who come into the meeting, if
they are there against a will or
at least coming in with a cynical
attitude, then its goanna affect
my mood.

A successful meeting is not only


one that reaches the goals, but
maybe found different things
that would not expected in it.

SERV Student
See more interview transcriptions in appendice

"

Figure 19. Interviews' quotations, Authors image, 2015.

40

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Research Activities and Synthesis


Primary Research

Observation
on student meetings

Observation was conducted as a part of primary


research activities. It required the researcher as
a meeting participant in the student-led meeting
context. By observing meeting participants
behaviors, interaction, pain point and happy
point, gained the data from an objective
perspective.

Findings:
In the situation of student meetings, the role of
leader was not clear.
The group meetings were conducted in equal
environment. The so-called leader was always
the person knew more about the topic, and
talked more in discussion.

Fashion Management Major


Student-Led Meeting
5:45 pm

Participant 1 Arrived

5:52 pm

Participant 2 Arrived

6:00 pm

Scheduled
Meeting Time

6:12 pm

Participant 3 Arrived

6:20 pm

Get Ready for Meeting

Observation Notes:

Discussion Time

6:38 pm
Short Silent
6:43 pm

Discussion Time

6:50 pm

6:58 pm

Meeting Ended

See more meeting Observation records in appendice

Figure 20. Journey map of meeting observation, Authors image, 2015

41

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Research Activities and Synthesis


Primary Research

Online Survey

about student-led meetings


Online survey was conducted as one of the
primary research activities. The purpose of this
online survey was to get a basic understanding
on peoples perception of meeting.

Research Subject:
The survey was open to members of every
target audience group. There were total 28
people who took this survey including 17
students in the Savannah College of Art and
Design and 11 participants from other job fields.

Findings:
Most people were unfamiliar with Design
Management Methods; their understanding on
it was limited by its literal meaning.

1. What's you job field?


a. Art Creative
b. Business
c. Communication
d. other __________

17/28
6/28
5/28

2. Are you a experienced meeting facilitator?


a. Yes
5/28
b. No
23/28
3. What is more important to you in a meeting?
7/28
a. Outcome
2/28
b. Experience
19/28
c. Both
4. What do you think a successful meeting outcome looks like?
a. Follow the meeting agenda, complete meeting on time
b. Complete the meeting task perfectly
c. Express the personal opinion to others, and got feedback
d. Inspired by others idea, generate new thinking
e. Task allocated properly

23/28
25/28
19/28
20/28
13/28

42

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Research Activities and Synthesis

5. What kind of experience can be a positive meeting experience for you?


a. Learn knowledge from others
b. Personal ides are recognized
c. The realization of self-worth
d. Spiritual fulfillment
e. Nothing suck in meeting

13/28
19/28
9/28
5/28
8/28

6. What will you usually do in a meeting that show your participation in it?
a. Take the initiative to become leader, facilitate the meeting.
b. Participate in discussion, exchange ideas with others.
c. Listen to other participants idea, sometimes discussion with others.
d. Listen to other participants idea only.

8/28
28/28
8/28
3/28

7. If you are meeting facilitator, what will you do to increase the participation?
a. Use positive comments
b. Use creative activities
c. Focus on one issue, shorten meeting time
d. Ask an assistant to facilitate the meeting
e. Using informal topics warming up meeting
f. Other ___________

25/28
18/28
2/28
4/28
23/28

8. Have you heard about Design Management Method?


For you, Design Management Method is __________.
a. Research methods
b. Design methods
c. Business models
d. Management principles
e. Methods used to manage design process
f. Have no idea about Design Management Method

7/28
28/28
9/28
26/28
14/28
19/28

43

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Research Activities and Synthesis


Research Synthesis

Word Cloud

of students perception of meeting


A word cloud was a visual representation for
text data gathered in primary research. By colorcoding these single words upon the categories
of DMM (Design Management Methods),
leadership and perception of meeting, it was
useful for quickly perceiving the most prominent
word and determining its relative prominence.

Findings:
Students commonly believed that meeting is
the synonym of collaboration, and leadership is
the role can reach everyone in discussion.
Most students were unfamiliar with Design
Management Methods; their understanding on
it was limited by its literal meaning.

Goals Visual Manage

Connect Contribute

Patient

Perspectives

Task Facilitate Environment


Productive Map

Models

Communication

System
Collaborate Vision Share
Understanding

Building

Tools

Create

Outcome

Meeting Leadership
Perception of Meeting
Design Management
Figure 21. Word cloud of students' perception of meeting, Authors image, 2015.

44

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Research Activities and Synthesis


BEFORE MEETING

Research Synthesis

DURING MEETING
Start

Journey Map

Warm Up

of students actions in a meeting


Based on data collected from observation of
students meeting process in primary research,
the journey map was created to describe every
step in the meeting process. This oriented
graph represented the different touch points in
the meeting process, and helped researchers
analyzing interactions between students.

Findings:
In the situation of student meetings, the role of
leader was not clear. The group meetings were
conducted in equal environment. The so-called
leader was always the person knew more about
the topic, and talked more in discussion.

AFTER MEETING

Start with informal topics

Participant 1

Potential Leader
Observent

Plan a Meeting

Conduct
Maintain the focus of
discussion
Present ideas
Comments

Schedule
Next Meeting

Open
Discussion

Participant 2

Clarify Purpose

Extrovent

The last one


present ideas
Comments

1st present ideas


Comments

Close
Prepare Meeting

Participant 3
Introvent

Make Decisions

Agree on Action Items

Carry out Assignments

Figure 22. Journey map of students' actions in a meeting, Authors image, 2015.

45

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Research Activities and Synthesis


Research Synthesis

SWOT Analysis

of current situation in student meetings


In order to improve both the experience and
outcome of student meetings, the SWOT
diagram was used to understand the current
situation in student meetings. SWOT analysis
enabled the researcher to identify both internal
and external influences.

Findings:
Phenomena in the current situation (like no
specific leadership role existed in meeting)
brought both positive and negative influence to
the development of meeting facilitation. There
is need to find appropriate methods to shift the
negative to the positive side.

Strengths

Weakness

There is no specific leadership role in current


student meeting, which creates a relative equal
discussion environment. (Everyone feel free to
present own ideas)
Students in the learning phase are open to
accepting new concepts, ideas and methods for
facilitating their study.
In order to create more possibilities for future
career, students are willing to find new methods
developing leadership
Different creative facilitation methods are easy
to spread in majors through elective classes and
collaboration projects.

Huge instability exists in meetings due to lack of


specific leader role.

Instead of meeting for achieving long-term goals,


student meetings are tending to plan for shortterm tasks. (Which is not good for the progress of
large projects)

Due to the equal discussion environment, each


idea is valued by others, which leads them hard
to agree on one ideas for future pursuing.

SWOT

Opportunities

Meeting facilitations workshops can be used to


introduce more methods to students.

CLC (Collaborative Learning Center) projects can


provide collaboration experience for students in
different majors, also develop the leadership.

A lot of resources about creative facilitation


are available for students on line and on
ground. (Workshops conducted by facilitation
professionals)

Threats

More companies hire the third-party meeting


facilitators; this lead student loses sight of the
importance of leadership as a self-promotion.

In order to connect school study to real world


business, students tend to practice business
methods (used by companies for profit) in student
meetings, which lose creativity and possibilities in
learning phase.

Figure 23. SWOT analysis of current situation in student meeting, Authors image, 2015.

46

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Research Activities and Synthesis


Research Synthesis

Affinity Map

Meeting
Participation

Successflu
Meeting

Meeting
Leadership

Experience VS.
Outcome

The biggest thing that would affect


my mood is the people who come
into the meeting, if they are there
against a will or at least coming
in with a cynical attitude, then its
goanna affect my mood. - David S.

Successful meeting is depending


on what you are trying to get
done in the meeting. But at least
a successful meeting is a meeting
I wish people came out with
either new ideas and new outlook
or alignment with in the group
you know that is usually what a
meeting about.-David S.

I tried to keep positive face whole


time. I smiled every time they tried,
anytime the person competitive
with me I smiled to get a challenge
and I think that kept the meeting
stable and at least productive.
-David S.

The experience of the meeting


itself would tell you what the
outcome would goanna be. So if
you dont have a good experience
in the meeting, there was no real
good outcome, expect more
bad juju, or bad vibes you know.
-David S.

Inspiration of
DMM

students perception of meeting


Based on the data collected in the interview,
the analysis process was confronted with
many facts and ideas in apparent chaos.
The affinity map was used to organize this
large number of ideas into their natural
relationships. Here, an affinity map was
created with quotations from the interview
to see the relationship between different
thoughts.

Findings:
Students expectation on leadership was
basically about connecting the one who might
not connected on their own.
The precondition of a good collaboration was
to know each other.
Design Management Methods were thought
to provide a comprehensive way to think
problems and giving people different aspects
to look at it.

I tried to keep myself be positive


and I was always to keep the
environment, I didnt let the
negative take control. - David S.

Maybe you can do something


better, but I dont know. So that
meeting lost the value. -Syafiq A.

Everyone is willing to listen to each


other, and no ones opinion is more
important than another persons
opinion like we are all equal. And
we build upon whatever others
saying. -Maria D.

I like people all waiting to listen,


thats important, because if
someone being very aggressive
saying like I am only want to push
my idea instead I am listing to
everybody. -Bingjie Q.

So as soon as you accomplish


whatever goals you set up to
accomplish, even if it is just a tiny
little thing, even if its like it wasnt
what I expect but at least we
moved an inch. Then the inches
are mile really in the end. -David S.

there is no communication
between us, even we do in the
same studio, communication
is very important things. But if
we dont have communications,
everything doesnt work really
well. -Syafiq A.

For me it is like everyone achieves


the outcome at the end of the
meeting. -Syafiq A.

A successful meeting is not only


one that reaches the goals, but
maybe found different things that
would not expected in it. -Maria D.

Meeting leadership, its the person


who is willing whether he is a
facilitator or that person with in the
group that just seems to be able
to reality people. That person has
ability to stand up and connect
others who might not connected
on their own.-David S.

Thats the true leader and against


the communication its that willing
to take the confirmative and
competitive as well as the passive
and get them to at least talk and
share whatever it is that feelings
are. -David S.

If you want to create an engaging


meeting, first of all, I think you
need to know every participant.
-Syafiq A.

If you dont reach a specific


outcome or output, so that mean
the meeting is useless. So at the
end of day, if you reach something,
that is I can see a successful
meeting. -Syafiq A.

I think that when a meeting has a


purpose, and everyone is working
towards that purpose and creating
a good working environment that
really affects the outcome of the
meeting. Knowing where you
goanna get. -Maria D.

As a student here the most


important part for us is the
process, how we come out with
idea, so the progress of the
meeting is important. Of cause
also the outcome is important too,
-Bingjie Q.

It is interesting to see so many


perspectives working through
visual communication. -David S.

It is very good because every


assignment you need to go to a
meeting and discussion, then you
put sticky notes, if you have any
ideas and if you make changes, if
you have any other ideas later.
-Syafiq A.

When you say DMM, I would more


think like journey map, something
likes that. -Bingjie Q.

I think its more about the tool


already thought by the designer
who designs the DMM. Its like
when you think a problem, it gives
you different aspects to look at it.
-Bingjie Q.

It brings more a complete field.


So if a user use it, it remind dont
forget this part and that part.
-Bingjie Q.

David S.
Maria D.
Syafiq A.
Bingjie Q.

DMGT Student
SERV Student
ARLH Student
SERV Student

Figure 24. Affinity map, Authors image, 2015.

47

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Research Activities and Synthesis


Research Synthesis

Persona

of target audience
Based on the previous data and
analysis from the primary research,
personas were created helping
researchers to connect data with the
target audience. By creating fictional
characters to represent the different
user types, more specific details and
insights were shown to bridge the gap
with target audiences.

David Sobin

Kelli Peterson

Experienced
meeting facilitators

Potential
group leaders

"I want my participants to


think creatively, I will do
whatever to get their minds
jazzed."

"I tried to keep myself positive


and I didnt let the negative
environment take control."

Yan Lee

Syafiq Azmy

Experienced
meeting participants

Inexperienced
meeting participants

I dont want to take center


stage, but Id like to listen to
everyone whenever you think
and then participation.

If we dont have
communications, everything
doesn't work really well.

Figure 25 - Figure28. Persona photos, Authors image, 2015.

48

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Research Activities and Synthesis


Demographics Mapping
Extrovert

Experienced
Facilitator

Introvert

Inexperienced
Facilitator

David Sobin
Experienced
meeting facilitators

Yan Lee
Experienced
meeting participants

Kelli Peterson
Experience
Oriented

Outcome
Oriented

Creative

Tradition

Seldom
Meeting

Frequently
Meeting

Leader

Participant

Potential
group leaders

Syafiq Azmy
Inexperienced
meeting participants

In order to show the comprehensiveness of personas, a demographics mapping was used here
to show the reasonable selection of four characters.
Figure 25 - Figure28. Persona photos, Authors image, 2015.

49

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Research Activities and Synthesis


Narrative:
David Sobin has worked in the real estate industry for
six years. He finished his business masters degree in
Boston University and then went back to Puerto Rico,
the place contained all sweet memories of his childhood.

David Sobin










32 years old
Single
Design Management Major in study
Manager in a medium-sized real estate
company
Business background
70k annually income
Puerto Rico, US
Lives in an apartment near beach
Takes 30 minutes to drive to work
everyday
Likes surfing and playing video games, all
depends on moods
Moment of impact: how to design
strategy conversations that accelerate
change in reading

In Puerto Rico, he started his career in a small


real estate company and accumulated business
experiences. Usually they had one formal meeting and
several informal department meetings in a week. The
meetings were not long, but efficiency due to the small
scale of business and well communication among
colleagues. He became eloquent and happy to be work
in a collaboration environment. This made him become
passionate to achieve leadership in a higher level. Two
years later, he got the chance to work in a medium-sized
real estate company. As a manager, more and more
meetings came to him, with boss, subordinates and
clients.
Now he always struggles to generate new ideas and
solutions in the meeting by using his facilitation skills.
Almost every participant looks so tired and cant focus
on the discussion. This made him realized that the
traditional facilitation skills are no longer working that
good. He needs to look for new facilitation methods
increasing meeting participation and drive his colleagues
think creativity.

Needs:

New facilitation methods to increase meeting


participation
A new approach to spur colleagues creativity
Effective communication among colleagues and
bosses
Integrate his design management knowledge to the
business field

Motivations:



Make business creative


Acquire the facilitation skills at the manager level
Believing in the value of collaboration
Pursue the way of thinking comprehensively,
considering stake in all aspects

Pain Points:

Limited by background, sometimes difficult to break


the vertical thinking habit
Need the support from boss to apply new creative
engagement into meetings
Passionate about creating creative meeting
environment, but hard to engage colleagues in
creative thinking process

Satisfaction Points:

Happy to know the new world of creativity thinking in


the study of design management major
Have a chance to participate in IDEOs workshop to
see how those professionals facilitate innovation
Passionate to connect design thinking (creative
thinking) to the real estate business
Figure 25. Persona photo, David Sobin, Authors image, 2015.

50

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Research Activities and Synthesis


Narrative:
Kelli Peterson used to work as an UX designer in a
software development company; this was her dream job
at that time when she graduated as a graphic designer.
She was passionate about integrating visual factors into
the human-machine interaction experience. Here she not
only embodied her value of a visual designer, but also
learnt about the human-centered design process.

Kelli Peterson
26 years old
Single
Service Design Major Student
(Freelance graphic designer)
Used to be an UX designer in IBM
Graphic design background
20k annually income
Vancouver, BC
Lives in an apartment downtown
President of the student union
Enjoys going to exhibitions and museums
and is interested in finding the new trends
in design
How to Kill a Unicorn: How the World's
Hottest Innovation Factory Builds Bold
Ideas That Make It to Market in reading

Needs:

The knowledge of meeting facilitation


The culture of collaboration, and creative
collaboration
A new creative approach to engage attendees in
participation
A deeper understanding of the relationship between
meeting experience and meeting outcome
Effective communication methods with participants

She worked in a sub-group with five members. They had


quiet a lot of meetings every week, some are creative
and engaged, but some are boring and inefficient. What
impressed her most were the methods that the leader
used to facilitate the creativity generated in a successful
meeting. Through these meetings, Kelli saw the value of
collaboration and realized that leadership really matters.

Motivations:

For achieving her long-term career goal, she continues


her studies in service design in order to improve her
major skills and ability of leadership. She thinks, the
leader basically has to create the environment. Thats the
magic, thats the design. Its creating the environment,
create the models, visual communications models
that can help, but also create the social and the air of
collaborative culture, understand that its the part of the
experience.

Under the pressure to create a positive meeting


environment for negative participants
Choosing the facilitation methods that can best fit the
meeting situation
As a facilitator-in-training, some times feel powerless
in the role of facilitator and participant

Knowing the value of meeting facilitator to


collaboration
Seeing the facilitation methods affect the generation
of creative ideas
Getting to the next step in the career

Pain Points:

Satisfaction Points:

Seeing the progress of facilitating skills


Achieve both positive experience and desired
meeting outcome
Participants get inspired by the facilitation process
Work in creative facilitation companies, like IDEO
Figure 26. Persona photo, Kelli Peterson, Authors image, 2015

51

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Research Activities and Synthesis


Narrative:
Yan Lee was a graphic designer. After she achieved her
Bachelors degree, she chose to further study in the US.
Accepted the education in different culture. Bordered
the horizon, and at the same time got the influence of
creative thinking. Six years English learning made her
read and write fluently, but she is still not confident to
speak English in public. She is introverted by nature.

Yan Lee
23 years old
Single
Design Management Student
(Work-study, greeter in faculty office)
International student
Feels unconfident to speak English in
public
Graphic design and branding background
300 monthly income
Charlotte, NC
Lives in an apartment in downtown
Enjoys country music, traveling and
reading fictions
Leaving Time: A Novel in reading

The study of design management major, which most


projects were worked in collaboration and need lots
of communication for discussion. Due to lack of
confidence and introversion, she was always quiet in the
meetings, even though she had prepared great ideas
for the project. This made her group members think she
wasnt prepared for the meeting and was unwilling to
participation in discussion.
She has talent in the branding and visual communication
aspect, which can have a great help to analyze data and
organize presentation documents. But nobody knew
that. Now she is trying to talk with others no matter if the
English grammar is correct or not, but some times she is
still in trouble to fully participation in meetings.

Needs:

Practising public speaking skill


Encouraging by others to talking aloud in front of
public
Find her own way to get connected with others in the
discussion

Motivations:

Knowing her idea is good, but needs to present it to


others
The passion of participating in discussion
Understanding the importance of communication
The requirement of self-improvement

Pain Points:

Under pressure to talk in public


People are inpatient to listen to her
Her advantages are not valued by others

Satisfaction Points:

When somebody listens to her patiently, and can


understand her
Ideas are valued by group members in meeting
Fully expressed what she is thinking
Talks like a native speaker

Figure 27. Persona photo, Yan Lee, Authors image, 2015

52

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Research Activities and Synthesis


Narrative:

Syafiq Azmy
28 years old
Single
Architect Student
(Freelance interior designer)
International student
Interior design background
Houston, TX
Lives in a student dorm next to
architecture building
Always stays in studio sketching all night
Enjoys going to museums
Dreams to go to Europe, see the amazing
structures in person
Leaving Time: A Novel in reading

Syafiq Azmy used to be an interior designer; he chose


to further his study in order to realize his dreams of
being an architect. In the architecture collaboration,
they always had specific and defined roles. Usually,
one short meeting was schedule at the beginning of the
project to discuss the ideas and then they determined
very quickly which concept they would pursue in the
future, then everyone worked on their own part. Every
phase is organized by the industry roles seriously. Syafiq
Azmy didnt have a lot meeting experience and what
he thought the most important thing in collaboration is
chemistry among group members.
Things happened in the summer of 2014, he took
one class in design management major to broadern
his knowledge, which the class requested to working
in groups. This provocatively subverted his working
methods. He struggled in meetings. He found a lot of
issue in the process he had never thought about. In the
process, they used different models to analyze data,
used stickers to help organizing and totally worked in
physical. He felt painful to working with the methods he
wasnt familiar with, but at the same time he found the
advantage of using these creative facilitation methods.
The methods provide a comprehensive way to think
problems; they give people different aspects to look
at it. That really make sense to integrate them into
architectural thinking.

Needs:

New design methods to facilitate creativity in


architecture
A new understanding of the value of meetings
Knowledge of creative facilitation methods
Knowledge of design management methods

Motivations:

Integrate new methods to architect working process


Improve meeting experience
Great innovations in architecture

Pain Points:

Passionate about bring new creative facilitation


methods to colleagues, but finds it difficult to engage
others from their traditional methods
Struggle in the methods that are unfamiliar with
The limitation of knowledge in creative facilitation
methods

Satisfaction Points:

Having opportunities to collaborative with other


majors
Helping to improve meeting experience
Finding new methods to facilitate thinking outside the
box

Figure 28. Persona photo, Syafiq Azmy, Authors image, 2015

53

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Research Activities and Synthesis


Research Insights
Create Environment

Build Relationship

Meet Expectation

Bump Up

Positive Environment: Participants


(positive and negative) attitudes influence
the co-creation of the meeting environment.
A positive atmosphere is inspiring, and
once the atmosphere in the room becomes
negative, the entire meeting turns quickly
into a struggle for all participants.

Safe Space: Both, facilitators and


participants, are responsible for creating
a safe environment where everyone feels
invited, appreciated, connected, and
therefore able to speak their minds freely.

Equalization: Balance the focus on creating


a positive experience for participants
with the focus on achieving the desired
outcomes. Both goals are equally important
and go hand in hand.

Interaction: In order to build relationship,


participants need interactions that bring
them closer together and allow them to get
to know each other. The process of building
relationship equals the playing field and
builds good chemistry.

Sustaining Energy: Participants face


various issues in different collaboration
phases, such as, for instance, fun
experience during brainstorming and
mundane budgeting tasks. The individual
level of contribution may vary during
different phases, but the group, as a whole
must sustain a certain level of engagement
in each of the phases.

Stretch: Meetings are highly successful


when participants grow beyond their own
expectations of themselves and/or the
group and discover totally new possibilities
or reach goals that stretch them beyond
their own envelope.

Multiple Roles: Every meeting participant


should be able and be willing to play both
roles, that of the facilitator and of an active
participant. The expectation of multiple
roles serves as a reminder to do both,
contribute and co-lead.
Equal Voices: In meeting compositions
there are extroverts and introverts, each of
whom may take up an unbalanced amount
of time, energy, or air. If the group does not
find a way to balance this inequality and
make sure every voice is heard equally, they
may lose the opportunity to arrive at most
creative and feasible outcomes.

54

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Research Activities and Synthesis

Methods

Research Findings
at a Glance
The pyramid structure in the adjacent Research-Findings-at-aGlance Map demonstrates that the categories of the research
insights (create environment, build relationship, meet expectation
and bump up) should be placed in sequential order because
they build upon each other. For each category there are ideal
methods that catalyze the desired experience so that the ultimate
outcome of bump up can be achieved.

Methods

Stretch

Bump Up

Sustaining Energy
Equalization

Meet Expectation

Methods

Interaction
Safe Space

Build Relationship
Equal Voices

Methods

Multiple Roles
Positive Environment

Create Environment

Figure 29. Research-Findings-at-a-Glance Map, Authors image, 2015.

55

DESIGN OPPORTUNITIES AND CRITERIA

56

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Design Opportunities and Criteria

Opportunities for Design


Bump Up

Meet Expectation

Build Relationship

Create
Environment

Positive Environment

Multiple Roles

Equal Voices

Participants (positive and negative)


attitudes influence the co-creation of
the meeting environment. A positive
atmosphere is inspiring, and once
the atmosphere in the room becomes
negative, the entire meeting turns quickly
into a struggle for all participants.

Every meeting participant should be able


and be willing to play both roles, that of
the facilitator and of an active participant.
The expectation of multiple roles serves
as a reminder to do both, contribute and
co-lead.

In meeting compositions there are


extroverts and introverts, each of whom
may take up an unbalanced amount of
time, energy, or air. If the group does not
find a way to balance this inequality and
make sure every voice is heard equally,
they may lose the opportunity to arrive at
most creative and feasible outcomes.

How might we: increase the positive


atmosphere and mitigate potentially
negative elements in the situation, so that
a supportive environment emerges?
There is an opportunity to: warm up
the meeting by a sincere check in and a
number of creative relaxation activities
that may help participants to transition
into the meeting.

Figure 30. Opportunities for design Map, Create Environment, Authors image, 2015.

How might we: share the responsibility


of participating and leading, so that
participants experience both and
therefore may realize the importance of
taking turns throughout meeting events?
There is an opportunity to: offer
participants a way to volunteer for
different roles.

How might we: share the stage and


assure that extroverts are willing to give
up their sometimes dominant orientation,
and create conditions for introverts to feel
invited to share, so that the group can
benefit from the collective wisdom?
There is an opportunity to: design
activities where mutual sharing (between
extroverts and introverts) is built into the
meeting structure.

57

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Design Opportunities and Criteria

Opportunities for Design


Bump Up

Meet Expectation

Build
Relationship

Safe Space

Interaction

Both, facilitators and participants,


are responsible for creating a safe
environment where everyone feels invited,
appreciated, connected, and therefore
able to speak their minds freely.

In order to build relationship, participants


need interactions that bring them closer
together and allow them to get to know
each other. The process of building
relationship equals the playing field and
builds good chemistry.

How might we: create the conditions


for deep dialogue (in various forms) so
that participants may feel safe to share
authentically from their hearts.

How might we: offer ways for


participants to get to know each other
casually as part of the meeting structure?

There is an opportunity to: develop


activities for multi-sensory dialoguing.

There is an opportunity to: design a


meeting structure that includes informal
interactions as part of the meeting (but
not necessarily part of the agenda).

Create Environment

Figure 31. Opportunities for design Map, Build Relationship, Authors image, 2015.

58

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Design Opportunities and Criteria

Opportunities for Design


Bump Up

Meet
Expectation
Build Relationship

Equalization

Sustaining Energy

Balance the focus on creating a positive


experience for participants with the focus
on achieving the desired outcomes. Both
goals are equally important and go hand
in hand.

Participants face various issues in


different collaboration phases, such
as, for instance, fun experience during
brainstorming and mundane budgeting
tasks. The individual level of contribution
may vary during different phases, but
the group, as a whole must sustain a
certain level of engagement in each of the
phases.

How might we: pay attention to both


objectives simultaneously?
There is an opportunity to: alter the
focus on desired meeting outcome and
participant experience and/or design
activities where both objectives receive
attention.

Create Environment

Figure 32. Opportunities for design Map, Meet Expectation, Authors image, 2015.

How might we: help the group know its


strengths and weaknesses so that the
participants can optimize their levels of
enthusiasm?
There is an opportunity to: design
methods for the group to learn about
its strengths and weaknesses, and
consequently balance the skills available
in the group.

59

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Design Opportunities and Criteria

Opportunities for Design


Bump Up

Meet Expectation

Build Relationship

Create Environment

Stretch
Meetings are highly successful when
participants grow beyond their own
expectations of themselves and/or
the group and discover totally new
possibilities or reach goals that stretch
them beyond their own envelope.
How might we: conduct meetings so
that individual participants are challenged
and surprise themselves and the group
achieves otherwise considered impossible
outcomes?
There is an opportunity to: design and
facilitate meetings that lead to breakthroughs and generate the experience
of high group performance so that
participants walk away with a new sense
of excitement, are inspired and motivated
to act.

Figure 33. Opportunities for design Map, Bump Up, Authors image, 2015.

60

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Design Opportunities and Criteria

Bump Up

Design Criteris for Prototype


s

iti e

warm up the meeting


offer participants a way to volunteer for different roles
have mutual sharing (between extroverts and introverts) built into the
meeting structure
include multi-sensory dialoguing activities
include opportunities for informal interactions
alter the focus between desired meeting outcome and participant
experience or create conditions where both objectives receive
attention
help the group learn about its strengths and weaknesses, and
consequently help the participants to balance the skills available in
the group
create conditions for break-throughs and collaboratively generate the
experience of high group performance

Meet Expectation

Op p o r t u n

The prototype should:

Stretch

Sustaining
Energy

Equalization

Build Relationship
Safe Space

Interaction

Create Environment
Equal Voices

Positive
Environment

Multiple
Roles

Figure 34. Opportunities for design Map, Authors image, 2015.

61

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Design Opportunities and Criteria

Reframing
Summary

Reframing

Based on my main research question, data about meeting facilitation,


participation, outcome, experience and Design Management Methods
was collected and affinitzed. Research findings, insights, and
opportunities were organized into four categories:
create environment
build relationship
meet expectations
bump up
Based on these four categories, above listed design criteria were
generated.

The data showed that successful meetings need activities that meet a
multitude of objectives. These activities are part of the plethora of Design
Management methods and must include ways for participants to get
to know each other in formal and informal ways, to take different roles
in the meeting structure, to balance their strengths and weaknesses,
skills and aptitudes, to engage will all their senses, and, ultimately, to
stretch beyond their own envelopes. Facilitating successful meetings is
the responsibility of the entire group, not just the leader, and requires
a certain level of personal development in all participants meaning
that personal leadership development needs to be fostered above and
beyond merely offering methods for facilitating meetings. This new
insight requires exploration into the genre of leadership development.

62

PROTOTYPE DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING

63

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Prototype Development and Testing

Concept 1
Visual Map Sequence
Concept 1 is a collection of visual maps for increasing productivity in
meeting facilitation. The maps guide the facilitator and participants
through a series of sequential steps. By using visual maps as a bridge
for addressing the pain-points identified in the primary research,
participation in meetings might increase due to creative visual mapping,
and engaging and leading the group toward their desired outcomes by
adhering to a logical sequence that leads them to high performance.

Plus




Various methods are


included for facilitating
meetings (+4)
User-friendly, meeting
facilitation methods with
instruments (+5)
Accumulating experiences
of shared leadership
collaboration (+2)
Improving meeting
facilitation skills (+3)
Achieving personal
development (+3)

Minus

Visual communicationoriented methods may not


be accepted by everyone
(-4)
Time-consuming mapping
processes (-3)
Needs facilitating
participants to be familiar
with the toolkit (-3)

Interesting

Participants are using


creative engagement and
visual communication
methods (+4)
The work integrates team
building activities and
personal development
efforts (+3)

Total: +14
Figure 35. Prototype concept 1 sketch, Authors image, 2015.

64

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Prototype Development and Testing

Concept 2 + 3
Meeting Facilitation Learning Workshop
Concept 2 is a series of five meeting facilitation workshops for people seeking
to improve their meeting facilitation skills in order to increase the quality of the
collaborative meetings they either lead and/or in which they participate. In the
workshops, participants are first introduced to the research that lead to the
development of the Bump Up model, and subsequently, they are led through the
four phases of the model: creating environment, building relationship, meeting
expectations and bumping up.

Consideration of Facilitation Toolkit


Concept 3 is the creation of a facilitation toolkit that is offered during the facilitation
learning workshops. It will contain the maps to be used for each phase and
instructions how to use them.

Plus

Offering hands-on practice for


(potential) meeting facilitators
to develop creative facilitation
skills (+4)
Meeting and getting to know
other people interested in
meeting facilitation (+4)
Developing an understanding
about shared leadership and
team development (+3)

Minus

Running all the activities in


one workshop would take a lot
of time (-2)
The workshop series are built
upon each other (getting out
of sequence might jeapordize
the benefits) (-2)
Visual maps are large and take
up a lot of wall space (-1)
Due to spatial needs the
number of participants is
limited (-1)

Interesting

Workshop activities force


participants to collaborate (+3)
Creativity is boosted (+3)

Total: +10
Figure 36. Prototype concept 2-3 sketch, Authors image, 2015.

65

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Prototype Development and Testing

Concept 4
Dissemination of Facilitation Toolkit
Concept 4 is about disseminating the facilitation toolkit to the target
audience. The toolkit needs to be affordable, easily accessible, and lead
to opportunity for evolving the kit. The original audience was students
at SCAD. However, the prototype can be used in any situation where
creative facilitation is called for, leading to high quality collaboration. For
the original target audience, a digital platform would be most accessible
and is therefore explored here.

Plus



Creating a hub for creative


facilitation within the scope
the project (+3)
Creating a participatory
learning environment (+4)
Building a platform for
sharing and developing
ideas and resources (+3)
Connecting experienced
facilitators with people new
to creative engagement
and meeting facilitation (+3)

Minus

Management of platform
might be challenging (for
instance, if a student
organization is responsible,
the leaders will change
every year) (-3)
Emotional interactions are
limited behind screen (-3)
Online community requires
advocacy to increase
membership (-2)
Expenses for collaborative
online project management
tools (-1)

Interesting

Open source options are


available for sharing with
the larger community (+3)
Potentially spreads from
student-led meeting
participants to broader
audience by those students
taking the practice into the
professional world (+4)

Total: +11
Figure 37. Prototype concept 4 sketch, Authors image, 2015.

66

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Prototype Development and Testing

Chosen Concept for Development


Visual mapping is at the core of these four concepts that are based on
research insights. The four concepts work best when combined into one
effort to create and develop creative collaborative meeting facilitation
methods and nurture the community using them. This combination of
the four concepts goes even above and beyond the original goals of this
project: to increase meeting participation, to shape a positive experience
for participants, and for the group to achieve their desired outcome.
Therefore, the chosen concept for final prototyping is a combination of
all four concepts.

67

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Prototype Development and Testing

Exploration of Chosen Concept


1
2

Phase 1: Create Environment


In this phase, the concept of shared leadership will be introduced to all meeting
participants through living principles and processes that establish an ideal
meeting environment for participation and lead to the following outcomes:
Participants feel encouraged to contribute and want to collaborate
Participants can take any role needed for successful meetings
The Stage is shared equally between introverts and extroverts

Tools:

3
4

Shared Leadership Spectrum


Participants locate themselves on a continuum of leadership options.
The map demonstrates the more or less diverse perspectives and is food for
a group dialogue about their desired ways of leading and following.

Shared Leadership Spectrum


Participants Stories
Daily Leader

Participants Stories
Participants map their personal profiles in visual language.
Participants learn about each other as they complete a gallery walk through
all the story maps.
Meeting Agenda
Participants complete this map showcasing the purpose, the meeting
agenda, and the desired outcome of the specific meeting taking place, as
well as the overarching vision for the whole project.

Figure 38. Visual maps for CREATE ENVIRONMENT phase, Authors image, 2015.

68

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Prototype Development and Testing

Exploration of Chosen Concept


1
2
3
4

Phase 2: Build Relationship


In this phase, meeting participants will have a chance to build deeper
relationships with each other by completing two peer-led personal development
activities, so that:
participants learn about each others levels of interest and capacity
the motivation for participation is clearly communicated
the expectations about participation are aligned with personal capacity and
therefore it is clear to the group how much participants can contribute
the group develops good chemistry for high performance collaboration

Tools:
Cross Section
This map includes the time allocations of one week in participants lives, in
particular, pain-points, happy moments, and times for fulfilled passion are color
coded.
Personal Vision
Completing this map leads participants to getting to know themselves better
by creating a personal vision regarding seven areas of their lives: relationships,
experiences, accomplishments, joys, contributions, environments they want to
live in, and inner qualities.

Cross Section
Personal Vision

Figure 39. Visual maps for BUILD RELATIONSHIP phase, Authors image, 2015.

69

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Prototype Development and Testing

Exploration of Chosen Concept


1
2
3
4

Phase 3: Meet Expectation


In this phase, meeting participants will generate a clear definition of their desired
outcomes and experiences, their strengths and weaknesses, their opportunities
and threats, and eventually, then collaborate on the steps toward success.
Through these activities, participants will:
Balance the focus on creating positive experiences and achieving desired
outcomes
Know the groups strengths and weaknesses so that the participants can
optimize their levels of engagement

Tools:
Energy Sustaining Map
Participants set goals, determine their strengths and weaknesses as a group,
and design action steps.
E&O Map
Participants collaboratively optimize their actions so that they balance the
emphasis on experiences and meeting outcomes.
Energy Sustaining Map
E&Q Map

Figure 40. Visual maps for MEET EXPECTATION phase, Authors image, 2015.

70

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Prototype Development and Testing

Exploration of Chosen Concept


1
2
3
4

Phase 4: Bump Up
In this phase, the Team Performance Model (TPM) by Drexler
and Sibbet (2011) is introduced to participants for reviewing their
collaboration process and helping them evaluate and possibly
improve their team dynamic.

Tools:
TPI Assessment Tool
The Team Performance Indicator (TPI) by Drexler and Sibbet (2011)
assessment tool to review team members perception of team
performance and possible bumps the road.
Bump Up Map
A map for meeting participants to evaluate their collaboration
process based on their experience of the team dynamic and
compared to desired meeting outcome.
Combined with the TPM and TPI the group discovers their current
stat and can discuss new possibilities or goals collaboratively.
TPI Assessment Tool
(Team Performance Model by Drexler and Sibbet)
Bump Up Map

Figure 41. Visual maps for BUMP UP phase, Authors image, 2015.

71

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Prototype Development and Testing

First Concept Assessment with


Target Audience
Overview
The Meeting Facilitation Visual Maps were assessed by one
experienced and two inexperienced meeting facilitators.

Step 1

Preparations

Meeting facilitation visual maps


Journey map of Bump-Up Model
Pen and Post-it notes
Consent forms

Step 2

Introduction

A brief introduction about the


purpose and process of the project
and goals of the assessment of this
toolkit prototype
Consent is given by collecting
signatures on consent forms
Agenda for the assessment process
An introduction to the concept of
shared leadership

Step 3

Step 4

Tools

Feedback

(Visual Mapping)

Shared Leadership Spectrum,


Participants Stories Map & Daily
Leader Map
Cross Section Map &
Personal Vision Map
Energy Sustaining Map & E&O Map
TPI Assessment Tool &
Bump Up Map

Participants review the maps and


give feedback directly on maps by
use of post-its

Figure 42. Flow of the chosen prototype concept testing, Authors image, 2015.

72

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Prototype Development and Testing

Test 1 (Phase 1-4)


Time: Sunday, Feb15, 4:00-5:00pm
Location: Personal studio of the subject
Testing Subject: A current student in Design Management major,
experienced workshop facilitator

Findings:
Before starting mapping, the subject went through all maps in four
phases and read carefully on those details.
The subject preferred to use Post-it notes rather than sketch
directly on the map.
The subject moved several Post-it notes in his mapping process.
The subject took a long time and looked confusing when working
on Experience and Outcome Map in the third phase.
Need more detailed introduction on TPS Model and instructions for
Group Collaboration Evaluation Map

Figure 43. Photo in prototype concept testing process with David. S, Authors image, 2015.

73

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Prototype Development and Testing

Test 2 (Phase 1-2)


Time: Sunday, Feb15, 6:00-6:30pm
Location: Personal studio of the subject
Testing Subject: A current student in Advertising major, inexperienced
meeting facilitator, one of the interviewee in primary research

Findings:
The subject preferred to use colorful pens randomly when
sketching (without color coding).
The subject took a long time to finish the Personal Vision Map.
The maps need to be created in bigger size paper.
The subject asked about the more role maps other than Daily
Leader Map.

Figure 44. Photo in prototype concept testing process with Miao. Y, Authors image, 2015.

74

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Prototype Development and Testing

Test 3 (Phase 1-2)


Time: Monday, Feb16, 11:00-11:30am
Location: A classroom in Montgomery Hall
Testing Subject: A current student in Motion Media major,
inexperienced meeting facilitator

Findings:
The subject took a long time to read and understand the four
phases in Bump Up Model.
More introductions were need for better understanding the Shared
leadership concept for the subject.
Before the peer-led personal development section, a little
facilitation skill should to be provided for the subject.
Time should be controlled for each map.

Figure 45. Photo in prototype concept testing process with Xiaochun. S, Authors image, 2015.

75

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Prototype Development and Testing

Test 4
(Facilitation Toolkit Learning Workshop testing)
Time: Saturday, Feb 21, 1:00-2:30pm
Location: Gulfstream, Room 114
Testing Subject: Current SCAD students in industrial design and
interactive design and game development major, inexperienced
facilitators

Findings:
The temporary collaborative project content should be created
at the beginning of the workshop in order to help the participants
step into characters.
The instructions for the Cross Section map should be detailed.
The subjects felt a little confuse to filling the items on the Group
SWOT and Game Plan map, the sequence of the items should be
adjusted.
The team performance model in the Bump Up phase should be
introduced at the beginning of the workshop.

Figure 46. Photo in prototype concept testing process with Olive&Luie, Authors image, 2015.

76

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Prototype Development and Testing

Prototype Testing Insights

An overview of Bump-Up Model, the concept of shared leadership,


the TPM and TPI and all visual maps should be provided at the
beginning of the learning workshop in order to contextualize the
process for participants.
It is the facilitators job to pace the participants so that the intended
content can be presented and the desired outcome completed.
The size of the available wall space in the meeting room is a critical
element.
The agenda of the meeting should be created collaboratively at the
beginning of the workshop so that participants own the work.
Peer-led personal development sessions should be introduced with
the basics of meeting facilitation.
Each map should be accompanied by instructions so that
participants understand the intent and process for each activity
better.

Figure 47. Summary photo in prototype concept testing process, Authors image, 2015.

77

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Prototype Development and Testing

Design Criteria for Final Prototype


Based on the insights from prototype testing process, the design criteria for final
prototype were generated. The final prototype should:
offer participants experiences of shared-leadership collaborations and
practices of visual communication methods
offer participants training of personal development facilitation skill
have mutual sharing (between extroverts and introverts) built into the meeting
structure
alter the focus on desired meeting outcome and participant experience or
create conditions where both objectives receive attention
help the group learn about its strengths and weaknesses, and consequently
help the participants to balance the skills available in the group
create conditions for break-throughs and generate the experience of high
group performance

78

FINAL DESIGN TO MARKET

79

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Final Design to Market


MBU! Model
MBU! Process
MBU! Toolkit

Meeting Bump Up !

Print, Digital, Workshop

A strategic for collaboration

MBU! Website

Virtual Collaboration Space

Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Strategy


hosted on the MBU! Platform .
The MBU! Platform includes:
MBU! Model & Process
MBU! Toolkit (includes sequential steps to an MBU! Workshop )
MBU! Virtual Collaboration Space

MBU! Platform

Figure 48. Visual presentation of Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Suite , Authors image, 2015.

80

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Final Design to Market


The MBU! Process described in the MBU! Toolkit leads to:
improving the efficiency in group meetings
achieving desired outcomes
increasing the positive experience of participants

The MBU! Toolkit includes:





Information about the MBU! Model and Processes


Information about the concept and practice of shared leadership
Team Performance Model (TPM) and Team Performance Indicator (TPI)
Four process phases with visual maps
1. Create Environment
2. Build Relationship

3. Meet Expectation
4. Bump Up

Strategy

Platform

Process

Toolkit

Value

Groups using the MBU! Process for their group meetings reach
their desired outcomes by following a series of sequential steps and
collaborative visual mapping tasks.

Through the use of the MBU! Strategy participants may experience


high quality team performance, may gain a positive experience, and
achieve the desired meeting outcomes efficiently. Additionally, there is
the opportunity to practice shared leadership and collaborative meeting
facilitation.

MBU! Virtual Collaboration Space

Feature

Through this space MBU! Practitioners can learn together, share ideas
and experiences, co-develop new tools and processes, and collaborate
on projects.

MBU! Processes have been designed to offer creative, visual and fun
group processes that both experienced and inexperienced meeting
facilitators can easily apply to any kind of meetings.

Figure 49. Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Suite logo, Authors image, 2015.

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M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Final Design to Market


1

MBU! Toolkit

MBU! Learning Workshop

MBU! Virtual Collaboration Space

Meeting Facilitation Toolkit

Figure 50. Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Toolkit, Authors image, 2015.

82

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Final Design to Market

MBU! Model

Table of Contents

MBU! Process
MBU! Toolkit

Print, Digital, Workshop

MBU! Website

Virtual Collaboration Space

Introduction

MBU! Model
The Concept of Shared-leadership
TPM and TPI
The Four Phases of the MBU! Process
Phase I
Phase II

MBU! Platform

Phase III
Phase IV

Visual Maps for all four phases


Reference

Figure 51. Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Toolkit, Content, Authors image, 2015.

83

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Final Design to Market

MBU! Processes have been designed to offer creative, visual and fun
group processes that both experienced and inexperienced meeting
facilitators can easily apply to any kind of meetings.

Introduction

The MBU! Process described in the MBU! Toolkit leads to:


improving the efficiency in group meetings
achieving desired outcomes
increasing the positive experience of participants
Strategy

Platform

Process

Toolkit

What is the Meeting Bump Up! Strategy (MBU! Strategy) ?


Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Strategy hosted on the MBU! Platform .
The MBU! Platform includes:
MBU! Model & Process
MBU! Toolkit (includes sequential steps to an MBU! Workshop )
MBU! Virtual Collaboration Space

The MBU! Toolkit includes:





Information about the MBU! Model and Processes


Information about the concept and practice of shared leadership
Team Performance Model (TPM) and Team Performance Indicator (TPI)
Four process phases with visual maps
1. Create Environment
2. Build Relationship

3. Meet Expectation
4. Bump Up

Groups using the MBU! Process for their group meetings reach
their desired outcomes by following a series of sequential steps and
collaborative visual mapping tasks.

Figure 52. Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Toolkit, Introduction, Authors image, 2015.

84

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Final Design to Market

The MBU! Model

Bump Up

The pyramid structure of the MBU! Model emerged from research


addressing meeting facilitation challenges. Empirical research lead to the
recognition that successful meetings evolve over four phases:



create environment
build relationship
meet expectation
bump up

These four phases evolve in sequential order and build upon each other.
For each of the MBU! Phases there are constructive methods that catalyze
the desired experience so that the ultimate outcome of bump up can be
achieved.

MUP! Proce
ss e
s

Stretch

Meet Expectation
Sustaining
Energy

Equalization

Build Relationship
Safe Space

Interaction

Create Environment
Equal Voices

Positive
Environment

Multiple
Roles

Figure 53. Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Toolkit, MBU! Model, Authors image, 2015.

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M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Final Design to Market

Shared leadership in Collaboration

Commitment
to change

Shared leadership can be explored as a reciprocal social process that emerges from
people working together in harmony toward common goals (Doyle, 2007). Shared
leadership does not depend on individual performance, although individuals may
influence the dynamic. Rather, the experience of shared leadership is shaped by
how people act together and make sense of their experience (Smith, 2007).

Systems
Community
Organizations

Shared leadership may be broadly distributed, such that people within a team
and organization lead each other. It has frequently been compared to horizontal
leadership, distributed leadership, and collective leadership and is most contrasted
with more traditional "vertical" or "hierarchical" leadership which resides
predominantly within individuals instead of the group (Bolden, 2011).
Shared leadership requires a certain amount of individual and organizational
maturity. The most successful participants started with four common characteristics:
An explicit commitment by senior leadership to change;
An up-front investment of time to educate and plan;
Fundamental management practices in place; and
Engagement and accountability.

Policy

Investment
of Time

Self

Sound
Management

Engagement &
Accountability

Four Prerequisites for Shared Leadership

Figure 54. Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Toolkit, Shared-leadership, Authors image, 2015.

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M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Final Design to Market

TPM and TPI


The Drexler/Sibbet Team Performance Model TM (TPM) &
The Forrester/Drexler Team Performance Indicator TM (TPI)
The TPM is a comprehensive model for outlining seven stages of team
development.
The TPI is a comprehensive assessment tool for teams to identify the positions team
members occupy at various times throughout a team experience. This realization
helps to move the team into high performance.
Allan Drexler and David Sibbet spent 10 years refining the TPM that shows the
predictable seven stages involved in both creating and sustaining teams. The first
four stages serve to develop team alignment and the next three describe increasing
levels of sustained performance. This powerful model can be used as a framework
and common language for supporting a team-based culture, and can be combined
with the associated self-scored TPI assessment tool.

Team Performance Model


Drexler | Sibbet

1.
Orientation

7.
Renewal

WHY
am I here?

WHY
continue?

6.
High
Performance

2.
Trust
Building
WHO
are you?

WOW!

3.
Goal
Clarification

5.

Implementation

WHAT

WHO, does WHAT,


WHEN, WHERE

are you doing?

4.
Commitment
HOW
will we do?

CREATING

SUSTAINING

TPModel 1991-2004 Allen Drexler & David Sibbet

Figure 55. Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Toolkit, TPM & TPI, Authors image, 2015.

87

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Final Design to Market

The Four Phases of the MBU! Process


The characteristics of each MBU! Phase are listed below:

MBU! Phase I:
Create Environment

MBU! Phase II:


Build Relationship:

MBU! Phase III:


Meet Expectation:

MBU! Phase IV:


Bump Up!

Positive Environment: Participants (positive


and negative) attitudes influence the cocreation of the meeting environment. A
positive atmosphere is inspiring, and once the
atmosphere in the room becomes negative,
the entire meeting turns quickly into a struggle
for all participants.

Safe Space: Both, facilitators and participants,


are responsible for creating a safe environment
where everyone feels invited, appreciated,
connected, and therefore able to speak their
minds freely.

Equalization: Balance the focus on creating


a positive experience for participants with the
focus on achieving the desired outcomes.
Both goals are equally important and go hand
in hand.

Interaction: In order to build relationship,


participants need interactions that bring
them closer together and allow them to get
to know each other. The process of building
relationship equals the playing field and builds
good chemistry.

Sustaining Energy: Participants face various


issues in different collaboration phases,
such as, for instance, fun experience during
brainstorming and mundane budgeting tasks.
The individual level of contribution may
vary during different phases, but the group,
as a whole must sustain a certain level of
engagement in each of the phases.

Stretch: Meetings are highly successful


when participants grow beyond their own
expectations of themselves and/or the group
and discover totally new possibilities or reach
goals that stretch them beyond their own
envelope.

Multiple Roles: Every meeting participant


should be able and be willing to play both
roles, that of the facilitator and of an active
participant. The expectation of multiple roles
serves as a reminder to do both, contribute
and co-lead.

Bump Up! Experience is a highly energetic


state that also leads to deep appreciation of
each other in the process of high performance.

Equal Voices: In meeting compositions there


are extroverts and introverts, each of whom
may take up an unbalanced amount of time,
energy, or air. If the group does not find a
way to balance this inequality and make sure
every voice is heard equally, they may lose
the opportunity to arrive at most creative and
feasible outcomes.

Figure 56. Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Toolkit, MBU! Process, Authors image, 2015.

88

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Final Design to Market

Visual Maps for all four phases


Bump Up

MBU! Phase I:
Create Environment
Shared Leadership Spectrum
MBU! Phase I | Create Environment

ONE LEADER

Participants Stories

MAP INSTRUCTIONS

Read the definition of shared-leadership


collaboration concept

Share your thinking with participants


about the shared-leadership

Rotate the ADAPTIBILITY indicator to


adjust leadership level of your group
between ONE LEADER and MANY
LEADERS

Write down what the selected leadership


level mean to you on the post-it notes
and then stick in that spectrum area

Discuss with participants to reach an


agreement about the leadership level for
the later collaboration

MANY LEADERS

ADAPTIBILITY

MBU! Phase II:


Build Relationship:
Meeting Agenda

MAP INSTRUCTIONS

MBU! Phase I | Create Environment

Divide the space equally base on


the amount of the group members

Take one of the dotted line circles


and draw a self-portrait in it

Use visual way to describe a story


that can present you most, such
as background, interest, character
and etc.

GROUP MEMBER SELFIE


Describe a story that can
present you most, such
as background, interest,
character and etc.

Date:
Host:

Fill the map within the lead of the


selected daily leader

Daily leader fill in the basic


information DATE and HOSTERof the meeting

Members write down / draw their


thinking on the post-it notes and
post them in the appropriate
blocks

Project
Vision

Agenda:

Share the visualized stories


about yourself with other group
members

The sequence is: MEETING


PURPOSE VISION AGENDA
OUTCOME CHALLENGES
DECISION IN THE MEETING

Share your thinking with other


members and daily leader
summarize all the ideas into
meeting criteria

NOTES

Chanllen

NOTES

:
Outcome

Cross Section

MAP INSTRUCTIONS

MBU! Phase I | Create Environment


eting
Me rpose
Pu

Personal Vision

MAP INSTRUCTIONS

MBU! Phase II | Build Relationship

A Week
In My Life

Divide the group into 2-3 peoples


subgroups base on the amount
of the group members, and the
subgroup members need to
facilitate each other to complete
the map

List your one-week activities


and color appropriate areas by
different colors in the sector base
on the time you assigned for each
activity

Accomplishment

Joys

Divide the group into 2-3 peoples


subgroups base on the amount
of the group members, and the
subgroup members need to
facilitate each other to complete
the map

Use visual way to describe


your ideal RELATIONSHIPS,
EXPERIENCES,
ACCOMPLISHMENTS,
JOYS, CONTRIBUTIONS,
ENVIRONMENT and INNER
QUALITIES for your future life

Share the visualized stories with


other group members

Relationships

Share the visualized stories with


other group members

NOTES
Environments

NOTES

ges

Happy-Point

Contributions

Use visual way to describe your


PAIN-POINT, HAPPY POINT, and
PASSION of your life

NOTES

Decisions in
the Meeting:

MAP INSTRUCTIONS

MBU! Phase II | Build Relationship

Experiences

Pain-Point

Inner
Qualities

SHARED LEADERSHIP NORM

Meet Expectation

Shared Leadership Spectrum

Cross Section

Participants Stories

Personal Vision

Meeting Agenda

Build Relationship

MBU! Phase III:


Meet Expectation:

MBU! Phase IV:


Bump Up!
E&O Map

MAP INSTRUCTIONS

Targe

ry
Prima

Members write down / draw their


thinking on the post-it notes and
post them in the appropriate
blocks
The sequence is: TARGET GROUP SWOT STAGE/TASK
CHALLENGES SUCCESS
FACTORS

MBU! Phase III | Meet Expectation


OUTCOME

Share the visualized information


with other group members
Discuss the SWOT as a group
in the project context and
distribution group energy
reasonably to each project phase

NOTES

Participant 2

Members write down / draw their


personal expectations they want
to achieve in the meeting process
in both experiences and outcome
side

Share the expectations with other


group members

Use visual way to list the


expectations to achieve as a
group in the meeting process
base on the conclusions of group
discussion

NOTES
GROUP
E&0
EXPECTATION

TPI Assessment Tool

MAP INSTRUCTIONS

Participant 1

Drexler | Sibbet

WHY
continue?

Read the introduction of The


Team Performance Indicator (TPI)

Members look back their


collaboration process base
on the phases showed in the
indicator, write down / draw their
collaboration experiences on the
post-it notes, and post them in
the appropriate blocks

WHO
are you?

Share the experiences with other


group members

5.

Implementation

WHAT

Use the TPI map finished before


as a part of criteria to evaluate the
collaboration experiences

Move the posit-it notes of their


collaboration experiences on
TPI Map to Bump Up Map and
posit them based on the level of
satisfaction

Based on the past collaboration


experiences, members write down
/ draw their ideal collaboration
experience and outcome on the
post-it notes and post them in the
appropriate phases

Share the thinking with other


group members and generate
the Bump Up space for the
collaboration as a group

NOTES

WHO, does WHAT,


WHEN, WHERE

are you doing?

NOTES

WOW!

3.
Goal
Clarification

Stage /
Task

MAP INSTRUCTIONS

MBU! Phase IV | Bump Up

4.
Commitment
HOW
will we do?

/ Tas

Challeng

es

Create Environment

6.
High
Performance

2.
Trust
Building

Participant 3

Stage

7.
Renewal

WHY
am I here?

Bump Up Map

MAP INSTRUCTIONS

MBU! Phase IV | Bump Up

1.
Orientation

ess
rs
Succ
Facto

CREATING

Participant 4

EXPERIENCES

SUSTAINING

1.
Orientation
WHY
am I here?

2.
Trust
Building
WHO
are you?

3.
Goal
Clarification
WHAT

are you doing?

4.
Commitment
HOW
will we do?

5.

Implementation
WHO, does WHAT,
WHEN, WHERE

6.
High
Performance
WOW!

7.
Renewal
WHY
continue?

TPModel 1991-2004 Allen Drexler & David Sibbet

Energy Sustaining Map

TPI Assessment Tool

E&O Map

Bump Up Map

Figure 57. Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Toolkit, Visual map overview, Authors image, 2015.

89

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Final Design to Market

MBU! Phase I
Create Environment
Participants Stories

In this phase, the concept of shared leadership will be introduced to all


meeting participants through living principles and processes that establish
an ideal meeting environment for participation and lead to the following
outcomes:
Participants feel encouraged to contribute and want to collaborate
Participants can take any role needed for successful meetings
The Stage is shared equally between introverts and extroverts

Shared Leadership Spectrum


MBU! Phase I | Create Environment

ONE LEADER

ADAPTIBILITY

MANY LEADERS

Read the definition of sharedleadership collaboration concept

Share your thinking with


participants about the sharedleadership

Rotate the ADAPTIBILITY


indicator to adjust leadership
level of your group between ONE
LEADER and MANY LEADERS

Write down what the selected


leadership level mean to you on
the post-it notes and then stick in
that spectrum area

Discuss with participants to


reach an agreement about the
leadership level for the later
collaboration

ng
eti
Me rpose
Pu

Date:
Host:

Take one of the dotted line circles


and draw a self-portrait in it

Use visual way to describe a story


that can present you most, such
as background, interest, character
and etc.

Share the visualized stories


about yourself with other group
members

NOTES

e:

Outcom

Fill the map within the lead of the


selected daily leader

Daily leader fill in the basic


information DATE and HOSTERof the meeting

Members write down / draw their


thinking on the post-it notes and
post them in the appropriate
blocks

The sequence is: MEETING


PURPOSE VISION AGENDA
OUTCOME CHALLENGES
DECISION IN THE MEETING

Share your thinking with other


members and daily leader
summarize all the ideas into
meeting criteria

NOTES

es

Decisions in
the Meeting:

Participants Stories
Participants map their personal profiles in visual
language.
Participants learn about each other as they
complete a gallery walk through all the story
maps.

MAP INSTRUCTIONS

Project
Vision

Agenda

ng
Chanlle

NOTES

SHARED LEADERSHIP NORM

Meeting Agenda

Participants locate themselves on a continuum of


leadership options.
The map demonstrates the more or less diverse
perspectives and is food for a group dialogue
about their desired ways of leading and following.

Divide the space equally base on


the amount of the group members

Describe a story that can


present you most, such
as background, interest,
character and etc.

MBU! Phase I | Create Environment

Shared Leadership Spectrum

GROUP MEMBER SELFIE

MAP INSTRUCTIONS

MAP INSTRUCTIONS

MBU! Phase I | Create Environment

Meeting Agenda
Participants complete this map showcasing the
purpose, the meeting agenda, and the desired
outcome of the specific meeting taking place,
as well as the overarching vision for the whole
project.

Figure 58. Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Toolkit, Phase1, Authors image, 2015.

90

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Final Design to Market

MBU! Phase I
Create Environment
Shared Leadership Spectrum
MBU! Phase I | Create Environment

ONE LEADER

ADAPTIBILITY

MANY LEADERS

Participants Stories

MAP INSTRUCTIONS

Read the definition of sharedleadership collaboration concept

Share your thinking with


participants about the sharedleadership

Rotate the ADAPTIBILITY


indicator to adjust leadership
level of your group between ONE
LEADER and MANY LEADERS
Write down what the selected
leadership level mean to you on
the post-it notes and then stick in
that spectrum area

Divide the space equally base on


the amount of the group members

Take one of the dotted line circles


and draw a self-portrait in it

Use visual way to describe a story


that can present you most, such
as background, interest, character
and etc.

Share the visualized stories


about yourself with other group
members

GROUP MEMBER SELFIE

Describe a story that can


present you most, such
as background, interest,
character and etc.

Discuss with participants to


reach an agreement about the
leadership level for the later
collaboration

Meeting Agenda

MAP INSTRUCTIONS

MBU! Phase I | Create Environment

g
etin
Me rpose
Pu

Date:
Host:
Ag

Fill the map within the lead of the


selected daily leader

Daily leader fill in the basic


information DATE and HOSTERof the meeting

Members write down / draw their


thinking on the post-it notes and
post them in the appropriate
blocks

The sequence is: MEETING


PURPOSE VISION AGENDA
OUTCOME CHALLENGES
DECISION IN THE MEETING

Share your thinking with other


members and daily leader
summarize all the ideas into
meeting criteria

Project
Vision

enda:

NOTES

Chanll

NOTES

MAP INSTRUCTIONS

MBU! Phase I | Create Environment

e:

Outcom

NOTES

enges

Decisions in
the Meeting:

SHARED LEADERSHIP NORM

Shared Leadership Spectrum


NOTES:

Participants Stories
NOTES:

Meeting Agenda
NOTES:

Figure 59. Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Toolkit, Phase1 visual maps, Authors image, 2015.

91

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Final Design to Market

MBU! Phase II
Build Relationship
In this phase, meeting participants will have a chance to build deeper
relationships with each other by completing two peer-led personal
development activities, so that:
participants learn about each others levels of interest and capacity
the motivation for participation is clearly communicated
the expectations about participation are aligned with personal capacity
and therefore it is clear to the group how much participants can
contribute
the group develops good chemistry for high performance
collaboration

Cross Section

MAP INSTRUCTIONS

MBU! Phase II | Build Relationship

A Week
In My Life

Divide the group into 2-3 peoples


subgroups base on the amount
of the group members, and the
subgroup members need to
facilitate each other to complete
the map

List your one-week activities


and color appropriate areas by
different colors in the sector base
on the time you assigned for each
activity

Use visual way to describe your


PAIN-POINT, HAPPY POINT, and
PASSION of your life

Share the visualized stories with


other group members

NOTES

Happy-Point

Pain-Point

Personal Vision
Joys

Divide the group into 2-3 peoples


subgroups base on the amount
of the group members, and the
subgroup members need to
facilitate each other to complete
the map

Use visual way to describe


your ideal RELATIONSHIPS,
EXPERIENCES,
ACCOMPLISHMENTS,
JOYS, CONTRIBUTIONS,
ENVIRONMENT and INNER
QUALITIES for your future life

Experiences
Contributions

Relationships

Share the visualized stories with


other group members

NOTES
Environments

Inner
Qualities

This map includes the time allocations of one


week in participants lives, in particular, painpoints, happy moments, and times for fulfilled
passion are color coded.

MAP INSTRUCTIONS

MBU! Phase II | Build Relationship


Accomplishment

Cross Section

Personal Vision
Completing this map leads participants to getting
to know themselves better by creating a personal
vision regarding seven areas of their lives:
relationships, experiences, accomplishments,
joys, contributions, environments they want to live
in, and inner qualities.

Figure 60. Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Toolkit, Phase2, Authors image, 2015.

92

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Final Design to Market

MBU! Phase II
Build Relationship
Cross Section
MBU! Phase II | Build Relationship

A Week
In My Life

MAP INSTRUCTIONS

Divide the group into 2-3 peoples


subgroups base on the amount
of the group members, and the
subgroup members need to
facilitate each other to complete
the map

List your one-week activities


and color appropriate areas by
different colors in the sector base
on the time you assigned for each
activity

Use visual way to describe your


PAIN-POINT, HAPPY POINT, and
PASSION of your life

Share the visualized stories with


other group members

Personal Vision
MBU! Phase II | Build Relationship
Accomplishment

Joys

Pain-Point

Cross Section

Divide the group into 2-3 peoples


subgroups base on the amount
of the group members, and the
subgroup members need to
facilitate each other to complete
the map

Use visual way to describe


your ideal RELATIONSHIPS,
EXPERIENCES,
ACCOMPLISHMENTS,
JOYS, CONTRIBUTIONS,
ENVIRONMENT and INNER
QUALITIES for your future life

Share the visualized stories with


other group members

Experiences
Contributions

Relationships

NOTES

NOTES

Happy-Point

MAP INSTRUCTIONS

Environments

Inner
Qualities

Personal Vision

Figure 61. Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Toolkit, Phase2 visual maps, Authors image, 2015.

93

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Final Design to Market

MBU! Phase III


Meet Expectation
In this phase, meeting participants will generate a clear definition of their
desired outcomes and experiences, their strengths and weaknesses, their
opportunities and threats, and eventually, then collaborate on the steps
toward success.
Through these activities, participants will:
Balance the focus on creating positive experiences and achieving
desired outcomes
Learn about the groups strengths and weaknesses so that the
participants can optimize their levels of engagement

Energy Sustaining Map


MBU! Phase III | Meet Expectation

MAP INSTRUCTIONS

Members write down / draw their


thinking on the post-it notes and
post them in the appropriate
blocks

The sequence is: TARGET GROUP SWOT STAGE/TASK


CHALLENGES SUCCESS
FACTORS

Share the visualized information


with other group members

Discuss the SWOT as a group


in the project context and
distribution group energy
reasonably to each project phase

t
Targe

GROUP

S W
O T

ary

Prim

NOTES

Stage

/ Task

Participants set goals, determine their strengths


and weaknesses as a group, and design action
steps.

s
ces
Succtors
Fa

Challenge

E&O Map
MBU! Phase III | Meet Expectation
OUTCOME

MAP INSTRUCTIONS

Members write down / draw their


personal expectations they want
to achieve in the meeting process
in both experiences and outcome
side

Share the expectations with other


group members

Use visual way to list the


expectations to achieve as a
group in the meeting process
base on the conclusions of group
discussion

Participant 1

Participant 2

NOTES
GROUP
E&0
EXPECTATION

Energy Sustaining Map

E&O Map

Experience and Outcome Map

Stage /
Task

Participant 3

Participant 4

EXPERIENCES

Participants collaboratively optimize their actions


so that they balance the emphasis on experiences
and meeting outcomes.

Figure 62. Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Toolkit, Phase3, Authors image, 2015.

94

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Final Design to Market

MBU! Phase III


Meet Expectation
Energy Sustaining Map
MBU! Phase III | Meet Expectation

Members write down / draw their


thinking on the post-it notes and
post them in the appropriate
blocks

The sequence is: TARGET GROUP SWOT STAGE/TASK


CHALLENGES SUCCESS
FACTORS

t
Targe

GROUP

S W
O T

ar
Prim

E&O Map

MAP INSTRUCTIONS

Share the visualized information


with other group members

Discuss the SWOT as a group


in the project context and
distribution group energy
reasonably to each project phase

NOTES

MBU! Phase III | Meet Expectation


OUTCOME

MAP INSTRUCTIONS

Members write down / draw their


personal expectations they want
to achieve in the meeting process
in both experiences and outcome
side

Share the expectations with other


group members

Use visual way to list the


expectations to achieve as a
group in the meeting process
base on the conclusions of group
discussion

Participant 1

Participant 2

NOTES
GROUP
E&0
EXPECTATION

Stage /
Task

Participant 3

Stage

/ Tas

Challeng

es

s
ces
Succtors
Fa

Energy Sustaining Map

Participant 4

EXPERIENCES

E&O Map

Figure 63. Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Toolkit, Phase3 visual maps, Authors image, 2015.

95

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Final Design to Market

MBU! Phase IV
Bump Up!
In this phase, the Team Performance Model (TPM) by Drexler and Sibbet
(2011) is introduced to participants for reviewing their collaboration process
and helping them evaluate and possibly improve their team dynamic.

TPI Assessment Tool

MAP INSTRUCTIONS

MBU! Phase IV | Bump Up


Drexler | Sibbet

Read the introduction of The


Team Performance Indicator (TPI)

Members look back their


collaboration process base
on the phases showed in the
indicator, write down / draw their
collaboration experiences on the
post-it notes, and post them in
the appropriate blocks

7.
Renewal

1.
Orientation
WHY
am I here?

WHY
continue?

6.
High
Performance

2.
Trust
Building
WHO
are you?

Share the experiences with other


group members

NOTES

3.
Goal
Clarification

The Team Performance Indicator (TPI) by Drexler


and Sibbet (2011) assessment tool to review team
members perception of team performance and
possible bumps the road.

5.

Implementation

WHAT

WHO, does WHAT,


WHEN, WHERE

are you doing?

4.
Commitment
HOW
will we do?

CREATING

SUSTAINING

TPModel 1991-2004 Allen Drexler & David Sibbet

Bump Up Map

MAP INSTRUCTIONS

MBU! Phase IV | Bump Up

Use the TPI map finished before


as a part of criteria to evaluate the
collaboration experiences

Move the posit-it notes of their


collaboration experiences on
TPI Map to Bump Up Map and
posit them based on the level of
satisfaction

Based on the past collaboration


experiences, members write down
/ draw their ideal collaboration
experience and outcome on the
post-it notes and post them in the
appropriate phases

Share the thinking with other


group members and generate
the Bump Up space for the
collaboration as a group

NOTES

1.
Orientation
WHY
am I here?

2.
Trust
Building
WHO
are you?

TPI Assessment Tool

WOW!

3.
Goal
Clarification
WHAT

are you doing?

4.
Commitment
HOW
will we do?

5.

Implementation
WHO, does WHAT,
WHEN, WHERE

6.
High
Performance
WOW!

7.
Renewal
WHY
continue?

Bump Up Map

Group Collaboration Evaluation Map


A map for meeting participants to evaluate their
collaboration process based on their experience
of the team dynamic and compared to desired
meeting outcome.
Combined with the TPM and TPI the group
discovers their current stat and can discuss new
possibilities or goals collaboratively.

Figure 64. Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Toolkit, Phase4, Authors image, 2015.

96

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Final Design to Market

MBU! Phase IV
Bump Up!
TPI Assessment Tool
MBU! Phase IV | Bump Up
Drexler | Sibbet

Read the introduction of The


Team Performance Indicator (TPI)

Members look back their


collaboration process base
on the phases showed in the
indicator, write down / draw their
collaboration experiences on the
post-it notes, and post them in
the appropriate blocks

Share the experiences with other


group members

7.
Renewal

1.
Orientation
WHY
am I here?

WHY
continue?

6.
High
Performance

2.
Trust
Building
WHO
are you?

Bump Up Map

MAP INSTRUCTIONS

MAP INSTRUCTIONS

MBU! Phase IV | Bump Up

5.

Implementation

WHAT

Move the posit-it notes of their


collaboration experiences on
TPI Map to Bump Up Map and
posit them based on the level of
satisfaction

Based on the past collaboration


experiences, members write down
/ draw their ideal collaboration
experience and outcome on the
post-it notes and post them in the
appropriate phases

Share the thinking with other


group members and generate
the Bump Up space for the
collaboration as a group

NOTES

WHO, does WHAT,


WHEN, WHERE

are you doing?

Use the TPI map finished before


as a part of criteria to evaluate the
collaboration experiences

NOTES

WOW!

3.
Goal
Clarification

4.
Commitment
HOW
will we do?

CREATING

SUSTAINING

1.
Orientation
WHY
am I here?

2.
Trust
Building
WHO
are you?

3.
Goal
Clarification
WHAT

are you doing?

4.
Commitment
HOW
will we do?

5.

Implementation
WHO, does WHAT,
WHEN, WHERE

6.
High
Performance
WOW!

7.
Renewal
WHY
continue?

TPModel 1991-2004 Allen Drexler & David Sibbet

TPI Assessment Tool

Bump Up Map

Figure 65. Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Toolkit, Phase4 visual maps, Authors image, 2015.

97

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Final Design to Market

Reference
Allen and Morton, Generating Self-Organizing Capacity; Patrick Lencioni,
Overcoming the Five Dysfunctions of a Team: A Field Guide for Leaders,
Managers, and Facilitators (San Francisco: Jossey- Bass, 2005).
Sibbet, D. (2010). Visual meetings: How graphics, sticky notes and idea
mapping can transform group productivity. John Wiley & Sons.
Doyle, M. E., & Smith, M. K. (2007). What is leadership?. Leading Work with
Young People, 7.
Sibbet, D. (2002). Best practices for facilitation. Grove Consultants
International.
Sibbet, D. (2006). Graphic facilitation: Transforming group process with the
power of visual listening. San Francisco: Grove Consultants International.

Sibbet, D. (1999). Team Performance: Creating and Sustaining Results.


Lambert, L. (2002). A framework for shared leadership. Educational
leadership, 59(8), 37-40.
Carson, J. B., Tesluk, P. E., & Marrone, J. A. (2007). Shared leadership
in teams: An investigation of antecedent conditions and performance.
Academy of management Journal, 50(5) , 1217-1234.
Pastor, J. C., & Mayo, M. (2002). Shared leadership in work teams: A
social network approach (No. wp02-10). Instituto de Empresa, Area of
Economic Environment.
Drexler, A. B., Sibbet, D., & Forrester, R. H. (1988). The team
performance model. Team building: Blueprints for productivity and
satisfaction, 45-61.

Figure 66. Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Toolkit, Reference, Authors image, 2015.

98

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Final Design to Market


1

MBU! Toolkit

MBU! Learning Workshop

MBU! Virtual Collaboration Space

MBU! Learning Workshops are the section provided for meeting


participants to know and understanding the MBU! Process better in
firsthand experience.

Figure 67. Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Workshop Poster, Authors image, 2015.

Figure 68. Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Workshop process photos, Authors image, 2015.

99

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Final Design to Market


1

MBU! Toolkit

MBU! Virtual Collaboration Space :

www. meetingBumpUp.com

MBU! Learning Workshop

MBU! Virtual Collaboration Space

Through MBU! Virtual Collaboration Space MBU Practitioners can


learn together, share ideas and experiences, co-develop new tools and
processes, and collaborate on projects.

Figure 69. Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Virtual Collaboration Space , Authors image, 2015.

100

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Final Design to Market


Business Model Canvas
The Business Model Canvas
as a strategic management
tools was used to describe,
refine and improve the
meeting facilitation toolkit
final prototype. By filling key
elements into nine blocks, the
model provided audiences an
overview of how the meeting
facilitation toolkit functions.

Key Partners

Key Activities

Value Propositions

Customer Relationships

Customer Segments

Facilitation corporations

Facilitating meetings

Increasing meeting
participation

Personal assistant

Students

Meeting facilitation
communities
Creative facilitation
organizations
Human resources
department

(in educational institutions and


corporations)

(by creative engagement


methods)

Education

(facilitation methods learning


workshops, step-by-step
facilitation guide)

Visual mapping

Achieving positive
experiences
Achieving desired
outcomes
Improving meeting
facilitation skills

(learning workshops,
facilitation consulting)

Facilitation communities
(facilitation connections,
shared-leadership groups)

Co-creation

Key Resources

Channels

Social media platform

Meeting facilitation maps

Meeting facilitation
learning workshops

Office supplies

(paper, markers, post-its, pins)

Workshop space

Creative meeting
facilitation mentors
Visual communication
facilitators
Cost Structure
Office supplies

(paper, markers, post-its, pins,


etc.)

Workshops venue rental

Student-led meeting
participants
Meeting facilitators
Educational institutions

Publishers

(Bump Up maps)

(work in the collaborative


environment)

(schools, facilitation learning


organizations)

Meeting facilitation
consultancies

Virtual platforms

(website & social media)

Physical booklet
(printed toolkit)

Partner organizations

Revenue Streams
Publishing Fee
Workshop facilitators salaries
Marketing fees

Bump Up creative facilitation


toolkit copyright
Facilitation learning workshops
fee
Facilitation e-learning
membership fee

Creative facilitation consulting fee


Meeting facilitation related
sponsorship
Educational institutions
sponsorship

Figure 70. Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Business model canvas, Authors image, 2015.

101

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Final Design to Market

Implementation Plan
Overview

Vision Statement

The MBU! Suite represents a strategic approach for designing and


facilitating successful meetings. The ultimate goal is to facilitate teams
achieving high collaborative performance. The following section
describes an overview of MBU! Suites business structure and how the
suite maintains the sustainable development as it is driven forward by
the business market.

The vision of the MBU! Suite is to facilitate participants in studentled meetings to achieve high quality collaboration and develop their
facilitation skills through creative engagement methods.

Mission Statement

Value Statement

The mission of the MBU! Suite is to introduce the shared leadership


collaboration concept to meeting participants and guide them in
applying the creative engagement methods to their team building
process in order to achieve high quality team performance, gain a
positive meeting experience, and achieve the desired meeting outcomes
efficiently.

Through the implementation of the MBU! Suite , the values of facilitation,


team building and collaboration are cultivated by the MBU! Practitioners.

The MBU! Suite


The MBU! Suite
The MBU! Suite
The MBU! Suite
facilitators

helps improve the efficiency in group meetings


helps achieve desired outcomes
helps increase the positive experience of participants
helps drive the collaborations for designers and

102

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Final Design to Market

Marketing Mix
PRODUCT

PRICE

PLACE

PROMOTION

The Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Suite


includes: MBU! Model & Process,
MBU! Toolkit, MBU! Workshop and
MBU! Virtual Collaboration Space ,
represents a strategic approach for
designing and facilitating successful
meetings.
The suite offers a series of strategic
guides for meeting participants to
apply creative engagement methods
(MBU! Toolkit ) in team building
process, in order to achieve the
positive meeting experiences and
desired outcomes.
The MBU! Suite has been designed
to offer creative, visual and fun group
processes that both experienced and
inexperienced meeting facilitators
can easily apply to any kind of
meetings.

Through the use of the MBU! Suite ,


participants may experience high
quality team performance, may gain
a positive experience, and achieve
the desired meeting outcomes
efficiently. Additionally, there is
the opportunity to practice shared
leadership and collaborative meeting
facilitation.
Due to the primary target audience
of the strategic suite is students and
student-led meeting participants,
the product will firstly be released in
educational environments, as a part
of education resources for facilitating
student collaboration and free to use
for all registered students.
In the later stage, after the suite is
released to a broader audience, it
will benefit from the extension of the
product, such as, MBU! Workshop .

The MBU! Suite will firstly be


released in educational environments
as a part of education resources for
facilitating student collaboration,
which the primary target audience
can easily access.
Further, the collaborations will be
created with both creative facilitation
corporations and facilitation
associations in workshops and
events. The target audience can
easily access the MBU! Suite
through the professional facilitation
channel.
Finally, the target audience can
access the MBU! Suite and get
information through social media and
MBU! Virtual Collaboration Space .

The MBU! Virtual Collaboration


Space as a part of the MBU! Suite
will be one of the most powerful
platforms for promotion. Through
the MBU! Virtual Collaboration
Space, MBU Practitioners can
learn together, share ideas and
experiences, co-develop new tools
and processes, and collaborate on
projects.
Further, the MBU! Suite will
develop its strategic partnership
with educational organizations,
creative facilitation corporations and
facilitation associations to achieve
the promotion in professional areas.

Figure 71. Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Marketing mix, Authors image, 2015.

103

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Final Design to Market

Business SWOT Analysis


Based on the business model canvas generated as an
overview introduction shows how the Meeting Bump
Up! (MBU!) Suite functions in market, more detailed
analysis according to the nine key elements in the
canvas are developed here to help conduct the MBU!
Suite implementation plan.
According to the primary research and 2X2 analysis
on the current facilitation market, the Meeting
Bump Up! (MBU!) Suite is positioned as a strategic
facilitation suite, which is built upon shared leadership
collaboration concept and creative engagement
methods.
The suite is designed for students in collaboration
environments. A step-by-step guidance is provided
for them to engage in the team building process
and facilitate them to achieve high collaboration
performance.

Strengths



The MBU! Suite is designed as a comprehensive


system, which provides a series of learning facilitation
platforms for users to understand the toolkit easier.
The MBU! Suite encourages users to continue
developing and testing new MBU! Processes and Tools
to evolve the work further.
The MBU! Suite helps drive the collaboration between
designers and facilitators.
The MBU! Suite is designed to offer creative, visual
and fun group processes that both experienced and
inexperienced meeting facilitators can easily apply to
any kind of meetings.

Opportunities

Weakness

SWOT

Create the collaboration with educational organizations,


and send the suite closer to the target audience. The
suite would have more opportunities to be practice in
that environment.
Creating the collaboration with creative facilitation
corporations and facilitation associations, the suite can
be spread through their professional platforms.
Connect the designers and facilitators to develop the
creative engagement methods.
Group the MBU! Suite material suppliers to create the
new business collaboration.

More facilitation methods need to be developed for The


MBU! Suite so that the suite can be appropriate for any
kind of meetings.
The release of a new toolkit usually needs a powerful
feature to hit the target audience. Otherwise, the new
toolkit will need a long time to be accepted by target
audiences.
The MBU! Suite needs to be tested in more multiple
meeting situations, so that the suite can work in broader
environments.
The MBU! Suite is new to the market, needs strong
financial support for the market exploring phase.

Threats



The target audience of the MBU! Suite would be shared


with other existing facilitation toolkits in the market.
The new toolkits developed by those creative facilitation
corporations and facilitation associations.
The MBU! Suite is new to the market and needs to build
the partnership with existing creative facilitation industry.
The MBU! Suite can be easily copied.

Figure 72. Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Business SWOT analysis, Authors image, 2015.

104

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Final Design to Market

Implementation Roadmap
STEP 1
Task
Duration

Involved
Organizations

Step
Actions

STEP 2

STEP 3

STEP 4

STEP 5

Identify Market

Plan for Collaboration

Build Partnership

Introduce to Audience

Enable Adoption

2-3 months

2 months

Ongoing

Ongoing

Ongoing

MBU! Suite Marketing Team


MBU! Suite R&D Team

MBU! Suite Marketing Team


MBU! Suite R&D Team
MBU! Suite Advocacy Team

MBU! Suite Marketing Team


Educational Organizations
Creative Facilitation
Corporations and
Associations

MBU! Suite R&D Team


MBU! Suite Collaboration
Partners

MBU! Suite R&D Team


MBU! Suite Collaboration
Partners
Creative Facilitation
Community

Research the existing


creative facilitation related
toolkits, associations and
corporations in the market

Advocacy team develops


the MBU! Suite visual
presentation

Contact the chosen


collaboration partners

Release the MBU! Suite to


the market

MBU! Suites presentation


to potential partners for
collaboration

Create MBU! Suite lectures,


learning workshops and
events with collaboration
partners

The MBU! Suite will be


widely used as collaboration
sources in schools,
corporations to facilitate the
team building process.

Analyze the MBU! Suite


SWOT to the market
Generate the business
development strategy
based on the feature of the
MBU! Suites

Select the potential


collaboration partners
Deeper research on the
chosen partners
Develop the collaboration
documents

Further collaboration details


Explore the unexpected
partnership

Activate the MBU! Virtual


Collaboration Space, open
the platform for audience

The larger MBU! Community


is encouraged to continue
developing and testing new
MBU! Processes and Tools
to evolve the work further.

Table C2. Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Implementation roadmap, Authors image, 2015.

105

CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATION

106

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Conclusions and Recommendations

Conclusions
This research project emerged from personal interest of the researcher
after she participated in many student-led meetings that did not achieve
the desired outcomes and did not lead to positive experiences. As a
blossoming Design Manager the researcher was eager to improve the
situation by offering creative engagement methods to student leaders.
Secondary research built a foundation for developing the primary
research question: How might Design Management Methods be applied
to meeting facilitation in order to increase participation in meetings, so
that desired outcomes are achieved and participants walk away with
positive experiences?
Data were collected by multiple research methods, processed and
analyzed through a variety of data mapping steps. The research findings
led to insights and an opportunity map used for defining the design
criteria for a potential prototype.

Several prototype concepts were developed, tested, and validated


by engaging the target audience in the assessment process. The final
prototype was generated, refined, and integrated into the MBU! Suite
and includes:
1.
2.
3.
4.

MBU! Model & Process


MBU! Toolkit
MBU! Workshop
MBU! Virtual Collaboration Space

The MBU! Process unfolds in four phases that are described in the
strategic MBU! Toolkit and the MBU! Workshop . The phases build upon
each other and lead to Bump UP! a state of high team performance
whereby desired outcomes are achieved and participants gain positive
experiences.
Originally, the MBU! Suite was created for student-led meetings.
However, it is applicable to all kinds of meetings, and the business
model canvas was applied to bringing it to market.

107

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Conclusions and Recommendations

Recommendations
The MBU! Suite represents a strategic approach for designing and
facilitating successful meetings. Additionally, MBU! Practitioners
continuously hone their shared leadership skills, meeting design skills,
and facilitation skills, and they have the opportunity to co-develop the
suite further through the MBU! Virtual Collaboration Space .
The larger MBU! Community is encouraged to continue developing and
testing new MBU! Processes and Tools to evolve the work further.

108

REFERENCES

109

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: References

Annotated Bibliography
Clark, J., & Koonce, R. (1995, November 1). Meeting go in high tech.
Training and Development, 32-38.
By entering the high technology era, the group-meeting environment also changed with
this background. Face-to-face meeting can meet the needs of crossover fields. Teamwork
breaks the limitation of geographic, and more and more software are used to organize
the online meeting. In this situation, the meeting facilitators skill shows more important
role. There are no substitutes for people power. The meeting facilitators need to learn
the technology before the session, working with technology experts and make the high
technology work for you. This article provides the aspect of the meeting environment
changes with technology, what skill does a meeting facilitator need to fit but still keep the
methods used in general meeting.

Clifton, W. (1992). Increasing participation in meetings. Baylor Business


Review., Vol. 10(Issue 1), 13-15.
This article analyzed how to lead a meeting possessed in leaders purpose. The author
talked about the phenomenon that some group leaders dont want great participation in
their meeting due to avoid challenges to their authority or ideas. Actually, participation
is most valuable in meetings that are called for the purpose of problem solving and in
meeting where members are sufficiently informed to make contribution. In order to avoid
this happen and increase the participation at the same time, the author suggested that the
meeting facilitator should practice open communication rather than secretive, need-to-know
communication.

Cooper, R., & Press, M. (1995). The design agenda: a guide to successful
design management. John Wiley and Sons.
This book considers the management of design is about fostering that passion and linking
it to the fulfillment of corporate goals and profitability. Design itself is the world, which
connect the culture and commerce. Design is indeed a passion for things, offering methods
that enable them to come into being. For the better development of the design, it is also
important to find the method to manage the source and ideas, which bring the sustainable
development for design. In the book, authors provided the resources in balancing the
creativity and development for guidance on effective management.

Cooper, R., Junginger, S., & Lockwood, T. (Eds.). (2013). The handbook
of design management. A&C Black.
The book provided an overview of the subject of design management. In the aspect of its
methodologies, current debate, history and future. By introducing design management
principle, methods and practices that shows the management of design has emerged as
central to the operational and strategic options of any successful organization. After reading
the book, a general concept about design management will generate in the mind.

Crittenden, V. L., Crittenden, W. F., & Hawes, J. M. (1999). The facilitation


and use of student teams in the case analysis process. Marketing
education review, 9(3), 15-24.
This paper records a complete process of how student team starts to learn analysis
business cases. The case method is appropriate to the project is that it evolved as an
important means of teaching and learning process, also the case method is an excellent
mechanism for developing the critical thinking skills essential for effective decision-making.
In the paper, the experiment examined both professor-led approach and student-lead
approach analysis process, which provides the data to compare and contrast the meeting in
the situation of facilitated by experienced leader and the situation in peer education.

Egri, C. P. (2014). Introduction: Design Thinking for Learning. Academy


of Management Learning & Education, 13(4), 640-640.
Design thinking as one of the Design Management method captures the essence of
dialogue as inquiry to facilitate learning. This article features an imaginary dialogue in the
Socratic tradition of artful questioning to help a new manager develop a design perspective
about the learning of being a manager, as well as to gain insights for solving organizational
problem. In the educational aspect, design thinking method are integrated to the business
education.

110

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: References


Ertel, C., & Solomon, L. K. (2014). Moments of Impact: How to Design
Strategic Conversations that Accelerate Change. Simon and
Schuster.
In this book, the authors talked about the cross over collaboration, which great strategic
conversations are always generate breakthrough insight by combining the best ideas
of people with different background and perspectives. The book describe the current
background of fast-changing world, leader are increasingly confronted by messy,
multifaceted challenges that require collaboration to resolve. The principle in the book
shows the necessary to generate the conversation with different fields. So do the methods,
which can be used crossing the boundary of industry.

Friberger, M. G., & Falkman, G. (2013). Collaboration processes,


outcomes, challenges and enablers of distributed clinical
communities of practice. Behaviour & Information Technology ,
32(6), 519-531.
This article is a research article, which talks about the one way of promoting learning and
knowledge sharing. The Community of practice as a new method focuses on problem
solving and decision-making challenges the traditional knowledge sharing and connecting
system. The advantage of bring the problem to a community of practice is the fast feedback
which break the limitation of learning environment, get feedback and solution from all
channel of the industry. Community of practice can be seen as a new method of efficiency
meeting, which break the geographical limitation. The method of organizing member,
knowledge and all resources can be an inspiration for improving the organization of meeting
resources.

Glen, R., Suciu, C., & Baughn, C. (2014). THE NEED FOR DESIGN
THINKING IN BUSINESS SCHOOLS. Academy of Management
Learning & Education, amle-2012.
The article talked about how design-thinking method is introduced to the business school
education. Design thinking is described as cognitive processes designers have in common,
cress a wide range of design field. It is a method for design background student to break the
boundary of the subject, think comprehensively. Also from a business school perspective,
a fascinating aspect of the design-thinking method applied is their demonstration that
in everyday problem-solving practice designers have diverged quite dramatically and
significantly from the traditional problem-solving paradigm. Design thinking as an essential

design management method is widely applied in different fields, which provided the function
of a comprehensive thinking guide. Design management provides the method to other fields
and at the same time absorb great methods in order to build a more all-scale framework.

Hands, D. (2009). Vision and values in design management . AVA


Publishing.
This book brought me a general overview about the application of design management
in cross-fields. In the book, the author talked about the design management change and
evolves in different geographic and socio-cultural setting. Some design management
principle and methodologies are provided for better understand of the subject. The
diagrams and illustrations, contributions from key players, make this book an essential
guide to the development, issues and future of design management.

Laflamme, E. (2003, September 1). GE taught us how to meet: Meetings


are a time to resolve problems and make decisions. The actions
decided on from these meetings move the company forward.
(business ideas). Landscape Management.

The article is written by one of the manager in GE company, which has rich industrial design
cases. The article using the aspect of creative company talked about how to improve
meeting efficiency. Twelve details are pointed out for meeting facilitator, which go through
the whole meeting process. The author also pointed out, one of the reasons some meeting
is kind of wasting time because members always talk, talk and talk. This directly showed
the purpose of meeting is making decision. The meeting facilitator may not the person make
the decision but personal push member to enter into decision phase.

Landale, A. (2004). Go faster, Meet less. British Journal of Administrative


Management, 26-27.
In this article, the author defined a new approach to free up time for group member from
business meeting. End the complacent practice and instead working with action-oriented
objectives. Time as a valuable resource, this approach focus on the business priorities
that the team needs to resolve and requires that every participant come to the meeting
with thought through ideas on how this can be achieved. The agreements reached are
only outputs required. This new action-oriented meeting approach makes every member
get every idea ready to be achieved before the meeting in order to speed up the meeting
agenda.

111

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: References


Levasseur, R. E. (1992). People skills: What every professional should
know about designing and managing meetings. Interfaces, 22(2),
11-14.

Pelletier, S. (2004). Meeting by Design. Small Meeting Guide,


Vol.10(Issue 3), 23-25.

Northridge, R. (1994, October 1). Facilitating the facilitators.


Management Accounting.

Pickett, R. (n.d.). Effective Management Is Key to Successful Meetings.


International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management,
212-220.

The author provided a general method for everyone to design an efficiency meeting in the
article. He concerned about meeting is a process of sharing information, solving problems
and planning, but a group focuses exclusively on content can never become a team. So
the facilitator provides participative processes and insists that group learn to use them. For
design a meeting, the most important thing is know about what result the participants want
from the meeting, then catch the agenda.

In this article, several section are talked from build a group, create the relationship inside
and outside team and points for the meeting facilitator to raise meeting efficiency. One
important thing mentioned by author is that the more the group leader can foster open
communication with many different resources, the better your team will be. That means
the leader play a role that creates relationships among team members and link between
the team and outside groups. In the general working group, the meeting facilitator always
ignores external sources as way to make team innovative and effective.

Paulsen, D. (2004, October). Leadership essentials: facilitation skills for


improving group effectiveness. In Proceedings of the 32nd annual
ACM SIGUCCS conference on User services (pp. 153-160). ACM.
This article talked about the importance of facilitation skills in a teamwork environment.
Teams are being utilized and given the decision-making responsibility previously reserved
for middle management. A good meeting facilitator can help groups collaborate and
effectively meet the challenges of todays work environment. The increasing in a facilitators
competence can result in higher levels of group productivity and organizational efficiency.
The author mentioned that it is important for the facilitator to know about the current
facilitation knowledge. It will be able to assess and evaluate the facilitation skill and training
needs required of themselves and the team.

By using a case of how meeting facilitator helped plan an interactive meeting that turned
perfect stranger into strategic teammate with mission. The relationship between meeting
process and meeting outcome pointed out by author is that, the facilitator should be
involved in the design from the start. The key parts of the design was try to capture as many
of the participants hidden agendas as possible. The case showed the meeting facilitators
role in the meeting and also in a group, which the participation of the facilitator self has a
great impact on the meeting efficiency.

In the management aspect talked about the efficiency meeting details which helps
improving the meeting process. The author using the sub-title pointed out the factor, which
impact the meeting outcome and meeting process. In a meeting facilitator aspect, control
the meeting speed, clear meeting path, and keep outside issue outside, catch the brief. This
article provided some simple details easy to be overlooked by leader.

Rees, F. (1992). Facilitation Skills; Success rests on the assumption that


people care. San Diego, CA: Pfeiffer & Company,| c1991, 1.
In this article, the author examine the structural change must take place in order to support
effective leadership. He brought a new concept of choice-creating meeting to reframe
a meeting, which challenged the traditional agenda supported meeting. The new meeting
process is facilitated by someone trained to evoke and sustain a creative space. The
meeting facilitator helps the group to reach creative break-through. This method would get
an emotional and even audible response. In the creative space, teams members are surely
want to react with their own opinion and listen to what is being said around them.

112

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: References


Sibbet, D. (2010). Visual meetings: How graphics, sticky notes and idea
mapping can transform group productivity. John Wiley & Sons.
The author explored the new methods for facilitating the teamwork meeting. By using the
graphic recording, visual planning, story boarding, graphic templates and idea mapping
methods, open the mind of the participants. The creative recording and presentation
way getting beyond the paper and whiteboard engaging the new media platform helped
increasing the participation of a meeting. The visual meeting is not just a simple method
using pattern, symbols and sketch to record the meeting process, it also combine
the general brain storming methods in the process in order to enlarge the creativity of
participants.

Sibbet, D. (2011). Visual Teams: Graphic Tools for Commitment,


Innovation, and High Performance. John Wiley & Sons.
Different from the book of visual meetings, this book set the situation in a long-term
teamwork. Through the visual method help to build the group working system and
processes the understanding of relationship, interconnections, and big picture context. The
toolkit provided in the books help the group work facilitator to start step by step. Also the
special visual recording explored the limitation of communication by talking, showed the
variety way of the communication and presentation.

Staren, E., & Eckes, C. (2009). Optimizing Organizational Meeting


Management. American College of Physician Executives,
Vol.8(Issue 1), 80-83.
The author considers the efficiency meeting started with the correct definition of a
group. The meeting usually is planned as a one-time event and if so, is it intended to
be informational, working, and decision-making. The author also pointed out that it is
important to specify an agenda foe each meeting so that participants can plan and prepare
appropriately prior to getting together. The meeting facilitator should request input from
all members regarding agenda topics and should do so with adequate time prior to the
meeting. And as a meeting facilitator, the main task is to clarify hoe its purpose relates to
organizations mission, vision and value.

Tyran, C. K., Dennis, A. R., Vogel, D. R., & Nunamaker Jr, J. F. (1992).
The application of electronic meeting technology to support
strategic management. MIS Quarterly, 313-334.
New method is applied in the process of strategic management for the meeting facilitator.
Strategic management refers to the process of formulating the goals and policies of
strategy and overseeing its implementation. This paper examines the application of EMS
technology to support each step of face-to-face meeting for strategic management through
goal formulation, environment analysis, strategy formulation, strategy evaluation, strategy
implementation and strategic control steps. This technology method can be a good
reference for the method for general meeting method.

Vasilash, G. (2002). Manage Design, Design Management. AD&P, 34-35.


The author discussed the new trends in the design process management, which can be
fundamental to success of any organization. In the article, a case of Nissan is used to
point out the design process management. The high technology helps the development
of production also provide the possibility of making ideas develop to sustainable design
field. The design management methods are used to organize the design resources in this
process. Also consider the field that out of design; break the boundary of creative industry.

Westcott, M., Sato, S., Mrazek, D., Wallace, R., Vanka, S., Bilson, C.,
& Hardin, D. (2013). The DMI Design Value Scorecard: A New
Design Measurement and Management Model. Design
Management Review, 24(4), 10-16.
In this paper, the author presents a design value project to evaluate how design works for
business or the later step of development of design idea. Started with measuring the impact
of design in business, it becomes the first stepping-stone for the Design Value Project.
Here, I got inspired from the methods of how DMI organize the project rather than the
project content itself. Started with design value measurement and assessment, design roles
and the design value scorecard and ended with design value investment and growth. The
clarify level divided to know deeper from the participants experience and their opinion.

113

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: References

Additional Sources
Zimmerman, J. (2008). Powerful New Communication Tools for Your
Meetings. Nonprofit World, Vol.23(No.3), 12-14.
In this article, the author brought a new way of visual recording to facilitate the meeting.
It is a kind of graphic facilitation. This is a process of taking notes on a topic by using
combination of pictures, words, and symbols. It is a mural like visual image that captures a
dialogues topic. And the graphic facilitation is the process used by meeting leader, which
create the process use visual recording. The advantage of graphic facilitating is that it helps
generate creative new ideas in the process. Also it contains the potential function of team
building and strategic planning, which can fit any type of community meetings.

Zhang, S., Gao, Q., & Yang, C. (n.d.). A New Method For Design Process
Knowledge Management. Journal of Advanced Manufacturing
Systems, 102-107.
In this paper, the authors discussed the new model of managing the knowledge in the
design process. In the background of regarding resources as most important factor that
determines the success of project. The authors examine the design process into three
layers: harmony layer, purpose layer and action layer, each layer presents different phase
of design that can be clearly recognized the participator and the design documents. The
model is used to help to reuse the knowledge resources efficiently in sustainable design
process context. This article explored my understanding of design process management.
The description of layer category principle provides me a new method to organize the
design knowledge, which is also helpful to meeting facilitation process.

Allen and Morton, Generating Self-Organizing Capacity; Patrick Lencioni,


Overcoming the Five Dysfunctions of a Team: A Field Guide for Leaders,
Managers, and Facilitators (San Francisco: Jossey- Bass, 2005).
Sibbet, D. (2010). Visual meetings: How graphics, sticky notes and idea mapping
can transform group productivity. John Wiley & Sons.
Doyle, M. E., & Smith, M. K. (2007). What is leadership?. Leading Work with
Young People, 7.
Sibbet, D. (2002). Best practices for facilitation. Grove Consultants International.
Sibbet, D. (2006). Graphic facilitation: Transforming group process with the
power of visual listening. San Francisco: Grove Consultants International.
Sibbet, D. (1999). Team Performance: Creating and Sustaining Results.
Lambert, L. (2002). A framework for shared leadership. Educational leadership,
59(8), 37-40.
Carson, J. B., Tesluk, P. E., & Marrone, J. A. (2007). Shared leadership in teams:
An investigation of antecedent conditions and performance. Academy of
management Journal, 50(5) , 1217-1234.
Pastor, J. C., & Mayo, M. (2002). Shared leadership in work teams: A social
network approach (No. wp02-10). Instituto de Empresa, Area of Economic
Environment.
Drexler, A. B., Sibbet, D., & Forrester, R. H. (1988). The team performance
model. Team building: Blueprints for productivity and satisfaction, 45-61.

114

APPENDICES

115

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Appendices A: Project Gantt Chart


Week 1

PROJECT TASK

0105-0111

Week 2

0112-0118

Week 3

0119-0125

Week 4

0126-0201

Week 5

0202-0208

Week 6

0209-0215

Week 7

0216-0222

Week 8

0223-0301

Week 9

0302-0308

Week 10

0309-0312

1. Project Planning
Confirming the Final Project Proposal
Preparing for Primary Research process
(research protocols, interview questions, survey questions)

2. Conducting Research
Primary Research
Observation
Online Servey
Interview & Shinterview
Working Wall

3. Market Analysis
Positioning Your Project
Finding your ZAG
Value Proposition

4. Research Synthesis
Filling in the Research Gaps
Recapping Personas
Opportunities and Design Criteria
Midterm Preparation

5. Midterm & Initial Exploration


Midterm Process Book
Initial Concept Exploration
6. Refined Exploration & Prototyping
Explore, Rethink, Reframe, Align
Prototyping Concepts for Testing

7. Assessment & Validation


Assessing Concept
Filling in the Gaps

8. Final Prototype
Finalizing Prototype

9. Business/Implementation Plan
Business Model Canvas to
Business/Implementation Plan
Final Project Process Book Generation

10. Process Book & Poster


Final Process Book per specs
Graduation Poster per specs

Figure 73. Project Gantt chart map, Authors image, 2015

116

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Appendices B: Research Questions Matrix


RESEARCH
QUESTIONS

WHAT DO I NEED TO
KNOW?

WHY DO I NEED TO
KNOW THIS?

What are Design


Management
Methods?

How might we apply


Design Management
Methods to meeting
facilitation?

How might we
increase participation
in meetings?

What determines
success in
meetings?

What is the definition


of positive
experience in
meetings?

How are people using


Design Management
Methods?
What is the benefit of
using Design Management
Methods?

What is meeting facilitation?


What is the purpose of
meeting facilitation?
What kinds of methods have
already been applied in
meeting facilitation?
What is the main task for a
meeting facilitator?

What does participation mean in a


meeting environment?
What emotional expressions
or behaviors demonstrate that
participants are fully engaged in
meetings?
What will influence group members
participation in meetings?
What methods will be used to
increase participation in meetings?
Who or what might encourage more
participation besides the facilitator?

What is the definition of


success in meetings (for
instance, desired outcome is
achieved)?
What methods are used to
evaluate success?
Who determines whether
meetings were successful?
How do participants evaluate
success (versus facilitator)?

What variables impact the


experience?
What kind of experience do
participants expect?
What is the relationship
between positive experience
and desired outcome?
What methods can be used
to improve the meeting
experience?

Know about the definition


of Design Management
Methods
Discover the advantage
of Design Management
Method used in fields out
of design
The process/experience of
using Design Management
Method in teamwork
Know about meeting
facilitation
Discover the pros and
cons of current facilitation
methods
Identify the possible
opportunities for exploring
existing methods used in
facilitation
Know the definition of
participation in the
context of meeting
Discover the expectation
and emotion needs from
participation process
How might the
participation be increased
by different group role

Define successful
outcome in meeting
Discover the methods to
evaluate meeting outcome
Lean from expectation
from member, discover
possible opportunities to
improve outcome

Learn from the personal


experience aspect,
discover emotional needs
Define the impact of
meeting outcome on
meeting experience
Identify the possible
methods to improve the
meeting experience

WHAT TYPE OF DATA


IS NEEDED?

Definition
Design Management
Method cases
Quotes from resource
about Design
Management Method
Conversational pieces

The experience from a


meeting facilitator
Meeting facilitation cases
Quotes from resources
about facilitation
List of facilitation
organizations

Quotes from resource


about facilitation
Suggestion from facilitate
professional
Photos and notes from
meeting
Compare and contrast
different meeting process

Quotes from resources


about meeting outcome
Attitude from group
members
Photo and notes from
meeting in different
outcome

Attitude from group


members
Relationship between
experience and outcome,
also positive and negative
Photos and notes from
meeting

WHERE CAN I FIND


THIS DATA?

WHAT TYPE OF DATA


COLLECTION
METHODS?

WHO
DO I CONTACT?

SCAD library
Online resource

SCAD Library
SCAD
Classroom
Gulfstream/
CLC
Online resource

SCAD Library
SCAD
Classroom
Gulfstream/
CLC
Online resource

SCAD Library
SCAD
Classroom
Gulfstream/
CLC
Online resource

SCAD Library
SCAD
Classroom
Gulfstream/
CLC
Online resource

Design Management
professionals
SCAD Design
Management Major
student/faculty
David Sobin
Sandy Wu

Secondary
research
Online survey
Interview
Observation
Shinterview

David Sobin
Yajing Hou
Miao Yu
Ashile Thomas
Nicle Wood

Secondary
research
Online survey
Interview
Observation
Shintweview

Miao Yu
Fei Xu
Huii Chuang
Nicole Andrews
David Sobin

Kiki Li
TJ Sun
Angel Chang
Jane Jiang
Neil Shastri

Kiki Li
TJ Sun
Angel Chang
Jane Jiang
Neil Shastri

Secondary
research
Interview
Survey

Secondary
research
Online survey
Interview
Observation

Secondary
research
Online survey
Interview
Observation

WHAT WILL I TAKE


AWAY?
WHAT WILL I
LEARN?

WHEN DO I NEED
TO KNOW?

Week 2-3
(by 01/25/2015)


Week 2-3
(by 01/25/2015)

Week 2-3
(by 01/25/2015)


Week 2-3
(by 01/25/2015)

Week 2-3
(by 01/25/2015)

How people think about


the Design Management
method
The methods which
already be used in other
fields
The preference of methods
by meeting in different
fields

How to connect the


meeting facilitation with
Design Management
method
The current problem in
facilitation

What members
expectation on meeting
Experience
Opportunities

Relationship between
outcome and experience
Experience
Attitude

Relationship between
outcome and experience
Experience
Attitude

WHAT MIGHT I BE
MISSING?

Missing Design
Management Methods
Need secondary research

Missing knowledge from


facilitation professionals
Meeting facilitation
process

Need observe meeting


in different fields, get
comprehensive meeting
data

Meeting outcome evaluate


methods research
Secondary research

Take out personal attitude


limitation
Relate the experience with
industry of the meeting

Table C1. Sub questions matrix. Authors image, 2015

117

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Appendices C: Signed Consent Forms

Figure 74. Interview consent form and photos of signing by interviewees, Authors image, 2015

118

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Appendices D: Observation Notes

Figure 75. Observation Notes, Authors image, 2015

119

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Appendices E: Interview Transcriptions


David S.

Figure 76. Interview transcription 1, Authors image, 2015.

120

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Appendices E: Interview Transcriptions


Syafiq A.

Maria D.

Bingjie Q.

Yi H.

Figure 77. Interview transcription 2, Authors image, 2015.

121

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Appendix F: MBU! Toolkit Visual Maps

Shared Leadership Spectrum


MBU! Phase I | Create Environment

ONE LEADER

ADAPTIBILITY

MANY LEADERS

MAP INSTRUCTIONS

Read the definition of sharedleadership collaboration concept

Share your thinking with


participants about the sharedleadership

Rotate the ADAPTIBILITY


indicator to adjust leadership
level of your group between ONE
LEADER and MANY LEADERS

Write down what the selected


leadership level mean to you on
the post-it notes and then stick in
that spectrum area

Discuss with participants to


reach an agreement about the
leadership level for the later
collaboration

NOTES

SHARED LEADERSHIP NORM

Figure 78. Visual map, Shared leadership spectrum, Authors image, 2015.

122

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Appendix F: MBU! Toolkit Visual Maps

Participants Stories

MAP INSTRUCTIONS

MBU! Phase I | Create Environment

GROUP MEMBER SELFIE

Describe a story that can


present you most, such
as background, interest,
character and etc.

Divide the space equally base on


the amount of the group members

Take one of the dotted line circles


and draw a self-portrait in it

Use visual way to describe a story


that can present you most, such
as background, interest, character
and etc.

Share the visualized stories


about yourself with other group
members

NOTES

Figure 79. Visual map, Participants story, Authors image, 2015.

123

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Appendix F: MBU! Toolkit Visual Maps

Meeting Agenda

MAP INSTRUCTIONS

MBU! Phase I | Create Environment


ng
eti se
e
M rpo
Pu

Date:
Host:

Fill the map within the lead of the


selected daily leader

Daily leader fill in the basic


information DATE and HOSTERof the meeting

Members write down / draw their


thinking on the post-it notes and
post them in the appropriate
blocks

The sequence is: MEETING


PURPOSE VISION AGENDA
OUTCOME CHALLENGES
DECISION IN THE MEETING

Share your thinking with other


members and daily leader
summarize all the ideas into
meeting criteria

Project
Vision

:
Agenda

enges

Chanll

e
Outcom

NOTES
Decisions in
the Meeting:

Figure 80. Visual map, Meeting agenda, Authors image, 2015.

124

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Appendix F: MBU! Toolkit Visual Maps

Cross Section
MBU! Phase II | Build Relationship

A Week
In My Life

MAP INSTRUCTIONS

Divide the group into 2-3 peoples


subgroups base on the amount
of the group members, and the
subgroup members need to
facilitate each other to complete
the map

List your one-week activities


and color appropriate areas by
different colors in the sector base
on the time you assigned for each
activity

Use visual way to describe your


PAIN-POINT, HAPPY POINT, and
PASSION of your life

Share the visualized stories with


other group members

NOTES

Happy-Point

Pain-Point

Figure 81. Visual map, Cross section, Authors image, 2015.

125

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Appendix F: MBU! Toolkit Visual Maps

Personal Vision

MAP INSTRUCTIONS

MBU! Phase II | Build Relationship


Accomplishment

Joys

Divide the group into 2-3 peoples


subgroups base on the amount
of the group members, and the
subgroup members need to
facilitate each other to complete
the map

Use visual way to describe


your ideal RELATIONSHIPS,
EXPERIENCES,
ACCOMPLISHMENTS,
JOYS, CONTRIBUTIONS,
ENVIRONMENT and INNER
QUALITIES for your future life

Share the visualized stories with


other group members

Experiences
Contributions

Relationships

NOTES
Environments

Inner
Qualities

Figure 82. Visual map, Personal vision, Authors image, 2015.

126

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Appendix F: MBU! Toolkit Visual Maps

Energy Sustaining Map


MBU! Phase III | Meet Expectation

MAP INSTRUCTIONS

Members write down / draw their


thinking on the post-it notes and
post them in the appropriate
blocks

The sequence is: TARGET GROUP SWOT STAGE/TASK


CHALLENGES SUCCESS
FACTORS

Share the visualized information


with other group members

Discuss the SWOT as a group


in the project context and
distribution group energy
reasonably to each project phase

t
Targe

GROUP

S W
O T

ar
Prim

NOTES

Stage

/ Tas

Challeng

es

s
ces s
c
u
S ctor
Fa

Figure 83. Visual map, Energy sustaining map, Authors image, 2015

127

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Appendix F: MBU! Toolkit Visual Maps

E&O Map
MBU! Phase III | Meet Expectation
OUTCOME

MAP INSTRUCTIONS

Members write down / draw their


personal expectations they want
to achieve in the meeting process
in both experiences and outcome
side

Share the expectations with other


group members

Use visual way to list the


expectations to achieve as a
group in the meeting process
base on the conclusions of group
discussion

Participant 1

Participant 2

NOTES
GROUP
E&0
EXPECTATION

Stage /
Task

Participant 3

Participant 4

EXPERIENCES

Figure 84. Visual map, E&O map, Authors image, 2015.

128

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Appendix F: MBU! Toolkit Visual Maps

TPI Assessment Tool

MAP INSTRUCTIONS

MBU! Phase IV | Bump Up


Drexler | Sibbet

Read the introduction of The


Team Performance Indicator (TPI)

Members look back their


collaboration process base
on the phases showed in the
indicator, write down / draw their
collaboration experiences on the
post-it notes, and post them in
the appropriate blocks

Share the experiences with other


group members

7.
Renewal

1.
Orientation
WHY
am I here?

WHY
continue?

6.
High
Performance

2.
Trust
Building
WHO
are you?

NOTES

WOW!

3.
Goal
Clarification

5.

Implementation

WHAT

WHO, does WHAT,


WHEN, WHERE

are you doing?

4.
Commitment
HOW
will we do?

CREATING

SUSTAINING

TPModel 1991-2004 Allen Drexler & David Sibbet

Figure 85. Visual map, TPI assessment tool, Authors image, 2015

129

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Appendix F: MBU! Toolkit Visual Maps

Bump Up Map

MAP INSTRUCTIONS

MBU! Phase IV | Bump Up

Use the TPI map finished before


as a part of criteria to evaluate the
collaboration experiences

Move the posit-it notes of their


collaboration experiences on
TPI Map to Bump Up Map and
posit them based on the level of
satisfaction

Based on the past collaboration


experiences, members write down
/ draw their ideal collaboration
experience and outcome on the
post-it notes and post them in the
appropriate phases

Share the thinking with other


group members and generate
the Bump Up space for the
collaboration as a group

NOTES

1.
Orientation
WHY
am I here?

2.
Trust
Building
WHO
are you?

3.
Goal
Clarification
WHAT

are you doing?

4.
Commitment
HOW
will we do?

5.

Implementation
WHO, does WHAT,
WHEN, WHERE

6.
High
Performance
WOW!

7.
Renewal
WHY
continue?

Figure 86. Visual map, Bump up map, Authors image, 2015.

130

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Appendix G: Business Model Canvas SWOT

SWOT Analysis

Strengths

Weakness

The methods help expanding facilitation skills


for experienced facilitators

Starters will be introduced new methods with


facilitations

The methods help establishing facilitation


skills for inexperienced facilitators in creative
ways

Aligning the background knowledge for


experienced and inexperienced participants

The methods are fit any levels in facilitation


community and professionals

SWOT

Opportunities
Customer Segments:

More collaboration will be created in the


process of learning creative methods

The facilitation professionals and starters will


be well connected in the collaborations

New facilitation will be co-created in the


collaboration processes

Students (work in the collaborative environment)


Student-led meeting participants
Meeting facilitators
Educational institutions (schools, facilitation
learning organizations)
Meeting facilitation consultancies

Threats
Many other facilitation methods are
combined optionally will made facilitation
process chaos

Figure 87. Business model canvas, Customer segments SWOT analysis, Authors image, 2015.

131

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Appendix G: Business Model Canvas SWOT

SWOT Analysis

Strengths

Weakness

Many assistant methods are available for


starters to learning new methods

The collaboration within the facilitation


communities encouraging the innovation of
new facilitation methods

Personal assistant (learning workshops, facilitation


consulting)
Facilitation communities (facilitation connections,
shared-leadership groups)
Co-creation

More human resources (experiences


facilitators) need to be ready for the personal
assistant

Opportunities need to be created to


gather participants for co-creation the new
facilitation methods

SWOT

Opportunities
Customer Relationships:

Customers may generate personal


understanding of the facilitation methods
in the assistant process, which helps
performing the better collaboration in future
New facilitation methods may generate in the
collaboration of facilitation communities

Threats

Starters need to find the way to blend in


facilitation communities

Customers need take more time to


participate in learning process in order to be
familiar with new methods

Figure 88. Business model canvas, Customer relationships SWOT analysis, Authors image, 2015.

132

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Appendix G: Business Model Canvas SWOT

SWOT Analysis

Strengths

Multiple methods are available for


dissemination

The connections between different


dissemination methods need to be managed

The facilitation experiences provided in the


learning workshops bring customers deeper
understanding of new methods

The information post on different channels


needs to be aligned

Opportunities
Channels:



Meeting facilitation learning workshops


Virtual platforms (website & social media)
Physical booklet (printed toolkit)
Partner organizations

Weakness

SWOT

More dissemination opportunities will be


created in the collaboration with partner
organizations
The creative facilitation toolkit will be spread
broader on virtual platforms

Threats

Extra cost to host the learning workshops

The creative methods may be challenged


by other newer facilitation methods, which
may reduce the collaboration with partner
organizations

Figure 89. Business model canvas, Channels SWOT analysis, Authors image, 2015.

133

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Appendix G: Business Model Canvas SWOT

SWOT Analysis

Strengths

Weakness

New creative approaches guiding meeting


participants to conduct team building

Improving the collaboration quality

The strategic facilitation toolkit generated


based on the development of existing
facilitation methods is easy to be adopted

Providing both personal development and


leadership training

SWOT

Opportunities
Value Proposition:

The strategic facilitation toolkit can be


developed to fit any kinds of group working

The concept of balancing meeting experience


and outcome may drive the innovation of
meeting facilitation methods

Increasing meeting participation


Achieving positive experiences
Achieving desired outcomes
Improving meeting facilitation skills

The facilitation skills will be improved


after several practices in the collaboration
environments, the result may not be instantly

Threats
The customers need to be willing to use
visual communication methods in the
facilitation process; otherwise the effect of
the toolkit may be reduced

Figure 90. Business model canvas, Value proposition SWOT analysis, Authors image, 2015.

134

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Appendix G: Business Model Canvas SWOT

SWOT Analysis

Strengths

Weakness

Creative approaches for team building can


provide fresh and positive collaboration
experiences for participants

Some of the facilitation activities are


limited to work in the shared-leadership
collaboration environment

The visual communication activities break


the limitation of language, create open
environment for participants

The meeting facilitation education may cost


lots of human resources

Both personal leadership and facilitation


skills are improved in the training process

Opportunities

SWOT

Key Activities:

Customers in different fields are interested in


visual communication

Facilitating meetings
(by creative engagement methods)
Education
(facilitation methods learning workshops, step-bystep facilitation guide)
Visual mapping
Creating collaborative environment
(shared-leadership collaboration experiences)

Shared-leadership collaboration concept


maybe spread widely

The facilitation training will begin earlier in


collaboration educations

Threats
The experienced facilitator may not willing to
try new methods

Figure 91. Business model canvas, Key activities SWOT analysis, Authors image, 2015.

135

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Appendix G: Business Model Canvas SWOT

SWOT Analysis

Strengths

Most of the key resources are easy to get


in the educational institutes, which the
workshops are accessible for students

The collaborations between intellectual


resources are easy to create

Opportunities
Key Resources:




Meeting facilitation maps (Bump Up maps)


Office supplies (paper, markers, post-its, pins, etc.)
Workshop space
Creative meeting facilitation mentors
Visual communication facilitators

Weakness

The workshop schedule may be decided


upon facilitation mentors

The cost of hiring intellectual resources

SWOT

Creating the facilitation mentor volunteer


groups to reduce the intellectual resources
cost

Creating the meeting facilitation packages to


connect office suppliers

Threats
The workshop space is limited for
participants to conduct big visual maps

Figure 92. Business model canvas, Key resources SWOT analysis, Authors image, 2015.

136

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Appendix G: Business Model Canvas SWOT

SWOT Analysis

Strengths

Weakness

Most of the key partners have connection


with each other, which the collaboration is
easy to create

Most of the key partners help to attract


potential customers in their general working
activities

Multiple industries are covered as partners

Opportunities

SWOT

Businesses need to be developed with the


help of some partners, which may cause the
conflict in one industry

Threats

Key Partners:

Creating collaborations among partners may


lead win-win businesses

The conflicts among partners caused by


business benefit

The collaborations among partners may drive


the innovation in facilitation industry

Hard to create the collaborations among


partners with different business focuses

Facilitation corporations
Meeting facilitation communities
Creative facilitation organizations
Human resources department
(in educational institutions and corporations)
Publishers
Social media platform

Figure 93. Business model canvas, Key partners SWOT analysis, Authors image, 2015.

137

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Appendix G: Business Model Canvas SWOT

SWOT Analysis

Strengths

Weakness

Most of marketing fees can be coved by the


collaboration with key partners

The dissemination of the workshops are


mostly conducted by the collaboration
organizations

Opportunities

SWOT

Cost Structure:

Developing volunteer workshop facilitators to


reduce the intellectual resources cost

Creating the meeting facilitation packages to


connect office suppliers

Creating long time collaboration with


suppliers

Office supplies (paper, markers, post-its, pins, etc.)


Workshops venue rental
Publishing Fees
Workshop facilitators salaries
Marketing fees

The main cost are separated in different


industries, it is a challenge to create the
collaboration among them in order to reduce
the cost

Threats
Extra cost may be added due to the
adjustment of material fees / rentals for
specific time

Figure 94. Business model canvas, Cost structure SWOT analysis, Authors image, 2015.

138

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Appendix G: Business Model Canvas SWOT

SWOT Analysis

Strengths

Weakness

Many collaboration partners provide


sponsorship

Copyright of the Bump up toolkit becomes


the main part of the revenue

The workshop can be host in multiple


platforms, which will bring revenue streams
through variety of channels

SWOT

Opportunities
Revenue Streams:





Bump Up creative facilitation toolkit copyright


Facilitation learning workshops fees
Facilitation e-learning membership fees
Creative facilitation consulting fees
Meeting facilitation related sponsorship
Educational institutions sponsorship

The existing channel and resources can be


used by new developed toolkits, which the
revenue streams can continually evolve

Invisible assets will generated in the existing


business/ dissemination activities

The revenue streams brought by the Bump


up toolkit is limited, the toolkit need to be
developed continually

Threats

The challenge form the existing facilitation


toolkits/ workshops in the market

The instable relationship with collaboration


suppliers

Figure 95. Business model canvas, Revenue streams SWOT analysis, Authors image, 2015.

139

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Appendices H: Working Wall

Working Wall
For this research study, the working wall is organized base on
primary research and secondary research methods. The secondary
research data is gathered mainly from academic articles, books and
online database, which provide an overview of current study on the
meeting facilitator. The primary research is designed on the basis of
research questions, which expect to collect data directly to the subquestions, which are looking forwarded by researcher. The primary
research actions are including observation, interview and online
survey, which can cover the data in depth and dimension.

Figure 96. Working Wall 1, Authors image, 2015.

140

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Appendices H: Working Wall

Secondary + Primary Research

Observation + Notes

Interview + Transcription

2 x 2 Axis Charts

Secondary Research
Figure 97. Working Wall 2, Authors image, 2015.

141

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Appendices H: Working Wall

Interview Quotations

Affinity

Affinity
Figure 98. Working Wall 3, Authors image, 2015.

142

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Appendices H: Working Wall

Concept Sketches

Facilitation Toolkit Prototype


Figure 98. Working Wall 3, Authors image, 2015.

143

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: Appendices H: Working Wall

MBU! Toolkit Sketch

Business Model Canvas

Visual Facilitation Map Sketch


Figure 99. Working Wall 4, Authors image, 2015.

144

LIST OF FIGURES AND TABLES

145

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: List of Figures and Tables


List of Figures
Figure 1. Meeting Bump Up! Process book cover, Authors image, 2015......................................................................................................................................................1
Figure 2. ZAG steps 1-6. Authors image, 2015............................................................................................................................................................................................11
Figure 3. ZAG steps 7-12. Authors image, 2015..........................................................................................................................................................................................12
Figure 4. ZAG steps 13-17. Authors image, 2015........................................................................................................................................................................................13
Figure 5. Competitor and collaborator analysis, IDEO, Authors image, 2015.............................................................................................................................................15
Figure 6. Competitor and collaborator analysis, Frog, Authors image, 2015...............................................................................................................................................16
Figure 7. Competitor and collaborator analysis, Continuum, Authors image, 2015....................................................................................................................................17
Figure 8. Competitor and collaborator analysis, XPLANE, Authors image, 2015........................................................................................................................................18
Figure 9. Competitor and collaborator analysis, MFI, Authors image, 2015................................................................................................................................................19
Figure 10. Competitor and collaborator analysis, The Hayes Group, Authors image, 2015.......................................................................................................................20
Figure 11. Competitor and collaborator analysis, IAF, Authors image, 2015...............................................................................................................................................22
Figure 12. Competitor and collaborator analysis, INIFAC, Authors image, 2015........................................................................................................................................23
Figure 13. Competitor and collaborator analysis, IIFAC, Authors image, 2015...........................................................................................................................................24
Figure 14. 2X2 axis chart for market positioning, Meeting Expectations vs. Facilitation Methods, Authors image, 2015..........................................................................25
Figure 15. 2X2 axis chart for market positioning, Facilitation Guidance vs. Facilitation Purpose, Authors image, 2015............................................................................26
Figure 16. Ecosystem map of research space, Authors image, 2015..........................................................................................................................................................30
Figure 17. Interview consent form, Authors image, 2015.............................................................................................................................................................................33
Figure 18 . Research protocols, Authors image, 2015..................................................................................................................................................................................34
Figure 19. Interviews' quotations, Authors image, 2015..............................................................................................................................................................................39
Figure 20. Journey map of meeting observation, Authors image, 2015......................................................................................................................................................40
Figure 21. Word cloud of students' perception of meeting, Authors image, 2015......................................................................................................................................43
Figure 22. Journey map of students' actions in a meeting, Authors image, 2015......................................................................................................................................44
Figure 23. SWOT analysis of current situation in student meeting, Authors image, 2015..........................................................................................................................45

146

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: List of Figures and Tables


List of Figures
Figure 24. Affinity map, Authors image, 2015..............................................................................................................................................................................................46
Figure 25. Persona photo, David Sobin, Authors image, 2015....................................................................................................................................................................49
Figure 26. Persona photo, Kelli Peterson, Authors image, 2015.................................................................................................................................................................50
Figure 27. Persona photo, Yan Lee, Authors image, 2015...........................................................................................................................................................................51
Figure 28. Persona photo, Syafiq Azmy, Authors image, 2015....................................................................................................................................................................52
Figure 29. Research-Findings-at-a-Glance Map, Authors image, 2015......................................................................................................................................................54
Figure 30. Opportunities for design Map, Create Environment, Authors image, 2015................................................................................................................................56
Figure 31. Opportunities for design Map, Build Relationship, Authors image, 2015...................................................................................................................................57
Figure 32. Opportunities for design Map, Meet Expectation, Authors image, 2015...................................................................................................................................58
Figure 33. Opportunities for design Map, Bump Up, Authors image, 2015................................................................................................................................................59
Figure 34. Opportunities for design Map, Authors image, 2015..................................................................................................................................................................60
Figure 35. Prototype concept 1 sketch, Authors image, 2015.....................................................................................................................................................................63
Figure 36. Prototype concept 2-3 sketch, Authors image, 2015..................................................................................................................................................................64
Figure 37. Prototype concept 4 sketch, Authors image, 2015.....................................................................................................................................................................65
Figure 38. Visual maps for CREATE ENVIRONMENT phase, Authors image, 2015....................................................................................................................................67
Figure 39. Visual maps for BUILD RELATIONSHIP phase, Authors image, 2015........................................................................................................................................68
Figure 40. Visual maps for MEET EXPECTATION phase, Authors image, 2015..........................................................................................................................................69
Figure 41. Visual maps for BUMP UP phase, Authors image, 2015............................................................................................................................................................70
Figure 42 . Flow of the chosen prototype concept testing, Authors image, 2015........................................................................................................................................71
Figure 43. Photo in prototype concept testing process with David. S, Authors image, 2015.....................................................................................................................72
Figure 44 . Photo in prototype concept testing process with Miao. Y, Authors image, 2015.......................................................................................................................73
Figure 45. Photo in prototype concept testing process with Xiaochun. S, Authors image, 2015...............................................................................................................74
Figure 46. Photo in prototype concept testing process with Olive&Luie, Authors image, 2015.................................................................................................................75

147

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: List of Figures and Tables


List of Figures
Figure 47. Summary photo in prototype concept testing process, Authors image, 2015...........................................................................................................................76
Figure 48. Visual presentation of Meeting Bump Up! Suite , Authors image, 2015......................................................................................................................................79
Figure 49. Meeting Bump Up! Suite logo, Authors image, 2015..................................................................................................................................................................80
Figure 50. Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Toolkit , Authors image, 2015............................................................................................................................................................81
Figure 51. Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Toolkit, Content, Authors image, 2015............................................................................................................................................82
Figure 52. Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Toolkit, Introduction, Authors image, 2015......................................................................................................................................83
Figure 53. Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Toolkit, MBU! Model , Authors image, 2015.....................................................................................................................................84
Figure 54. Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Toolkit, Shared-leadership, Authors image, 2015............................................................................................................................85
Figure 55. Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Toolkit, TPM & TPI, Authors image, 2015........................................................................................................................................86
Figure 56. Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Toolkit, MBU! Process , Authors image, 2015..................................................................................................................................87
Figure 57. Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Toolkit, Visual map overview, Authors image, 2015........................................................................................................................88
Figure 58. Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Toolkit, Phase1, Authors image, 2015.............................................................................................................................................89
Figure 59. Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Toolkit , Phase1 visual maps, Authors image, 2015.........................................................................................................................90
Figure 60. Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Toolkit, Phase2, Authors image, 2015.............................................................................................................................................91
Figure 61. Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Toolkit, Phase2 visual maps, Authors image, 2015.........................................................................................................................92
Figure 62. Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Toolkit, Phase3, Authors image, 2015.............................................................................................................................................93
Figure 63. Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Toolkit, Phase3 visual maps, Authors image, 2015.........................................................................................................................94
Figure 64. Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Toolkit, Phase4, Authors image, 2015.............................................................................................................................................95
Figure 65. Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Toolkit, Phase4 visual maps, Authors image, 2015.........................................................................................................................96
Figure 66. Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Toolkit, Reference, Authors image, 2015.........................................................................................................................................97
Figure 67. Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Workshop Poster, Authors image, 2015..........................................................................................................................................98
Figure 68. Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Workshop process photos, Authors image, 2015...........................................................................................................................98
Figure 69. Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Virtual Collaboration Space , Authors image, 2015..........................................................................................................................99

148

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: List of Figures and Tables


List of Figures
Figure 70. Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Business model canvas, Authors image, 2015.............................................................................................................................100
Figure 71. Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Marketing mix, Authors image, 2015.............................................................................................................................................102
Figure 72. Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Business SWOT analysis, Authors image, 2015............................................................................................................................103
Figure 73. Project Gantt chart map, Authors image, 2015.........................................................................................................................................................................115
Figure 74. Interview consent form and photos of signing by interviewees, Authors image, 2015............................................................................................................117
Figure 75. Observation Notes, Authors image, 2015.................................................................................................................................................................................118
Figure 76. Interview transcription 1, Authors image, 2015.........................................................................................................................................................................119
Figure 77. Interview transcription 2, Authors image, 2015.........................................................................................................................................................................120
Figure 78. Visual map, Shared leadership spectrum, Authors image, 2015...............................................................................................................................................121
Figure 79. Visual map, Participants story, Authors image, 2015...............................................................................................................................................................122
Figure 80. Visual map, Meeting agenda, Authors image, 2015..................................................................................................................................................................123
Figure 81. Visual map, Cross section, Authors image, 2015......................................................................................................................................................................124
Figure 82. Visual map, Personal vision, Authors image, 2015...................................................................................................................................................................125
Figure 83. Visual map, Energy sustaining map, Authors image, 2015.......................................................................................................................................................126
Figure 84. Visual map, E&O map, Authors image, 2015............................................................................................................................................................................127
Figure 85. Visual map, TPI assessment tool, Authors image, 2015...........................................................................................................................................................128
Figure 86. Visual map, Bump up map, Authors image, 2015.....................................................................................................................................................................129
Figure 87. Business model canvas, Customer segments SWOT analysis, Authors image, 2015.............................................................................................................130
Figure 88. Business model canvas, Customer relationships SWOT analysis, Authors image, 2015........................................................................................................131
Figure 89. Business model canvas, Channels SWOT analysis, Authors image, 2015..............................................................................................................................132
Figure 90. Business model canvas, Value proposition SWOT analysis, Authors image, 2015..................................................................................................................133
Figure 91. Business model canvas, Key activities SWOT analysis, Authors image, 2015........................................................................................................................134
Figure 92. Business model canvas, Key resources SWOT analysis, Authors image, 2015.......................................................................................................................135

149

M.A. FINAL PROJECT: List of Figures and Tables


List of Figures
Figure 93.
Figure 94.
Figure 95.
Figure 96.
Figure 97.
Figure 98.
Figure 99.

Business model canvas, Key partners SWOT analysis, Authors image, 2015.........................................................................................................................136
Business model canvas, Cost structure SWOT analysis, Authors image, 2015.......................................................................................................................137
Business model canvas, Revenue streams SWOT analysis, Authors image, 2015..................................................................................................................138
Working Wall 1, Authors image, 2015........................................................................................................................................................................................139
Working Wall 2, Authors image, 2015........................................................................................................................................................................................140
Working Wall 3, Authors image, 2015........................................................................................................................................................................................141
Working Wall 4, Authors image, 2015........................................................................................................................................................................................142

List of Tables
Table C1. Sub questions matrix. Authors image, 2015...............................................................................................................................................................................116
Table C2. Meeting Bump Up! (MBU!) Implementation roadmap, Authors image, 2015............................................................................................................................104

150