techno god

Linda M
Charming and witty Toronto singer/ songwriter plays melodic pop rock. 9pm, Espresso Royale Caffe, 214 S. Main St., free.

Soot
Heavy funk rock from Ann Arbor. 10pm, T.C.’s Speakeasy, Ypsilanti, $3.

“Youth-Owned Records Presents”
Ann Arbor band The Misters plays alternative rock, plus The Ninjas and Smokestack. 7pm, The Neutral Zone, $5.
FOLK/COUNTRY

“First Saturday Contra Dance”
Ann Arbor Council for Traditional Music & Dance presents. John Freeman calls to live music by Sharon Hollow Stringband. No partner needed; all dances taught. Wear cool, casual clothes and bring flat, smoothsoled shoes for dancing. 8pm, Pittsfield Union Grange, $8 ($5 stu).
MARK ZIEMBA

W

hile most people argue about whether techno was born in Detroit, Carl Craig, himself from Detroit, looks to the future. “The past makes no difference any more, this is the 21st century. It only matters who will develop the next future sound.” Craig has been doing exactly that, and he demonstrates this at The Necto on Thursday, February 13 at 9pm. “Any track that had synthesizers in it, I liked the most,” he says of his attraction to techno. Under the tutelage of Detroit’s legendary Derrick May, Craig developed his own style, drawing on jazz, rock and African music. “I am not afraid to experiment,” he says. His sound is as varied as the monikers he has assumed through the years. From smooth down-tempo tracks to throbbing dance floor hits to enthusiastic club-favored remixes, Craig defines his style as “environmental funk.” Craig’s apotheosis began when he launched the Detroit Electronic Music Festival in 2000. Created to bring the social community closer to the music, it succeeded in bringing divergent political factions together, while hugely popular with fans. Craig runs the Detroit record label Planet E with his father, wife and a close circle of friends. Planet E’s success is evident from the parties that they throw. Recalling one event in Florida he says, “people were insane for Kevin Saunderson … and others at a restaurant called Tantra. That’s where supermodels go to eat. I got to walk around greeting people in my robe and slippers! I felt like Hugh Hefner!” This isn’t Craig’s first appearance at The Necto, either. “I had a good night there last year,” he says, “the crowd in Ann Arbor are definitely great. It seems like the smartest students make the best party.” Without an opening act, Lust Thursday will see a monster five-hour set. —Prashant Rajkhowa Carl Craig plays at The Necto on Thursday, February 13 at 9pm. Cover is $10 ($15 under 21) before 11pm and $15 ($20 under 21) at 11pm and after. For more information call (734) 994-5436 or visit www.thenecto.com.

The Gigantics
Honky-tonk country rock. 9:30pm, The Wooden Nickel, Ypsilanti, $5.

“North Country Opera”
The Ark hosts a special 20th anniversary performance of area folk songwriter Jay Stielstra’s beloved musical celebrating romance and Mother Nature in northern Michigan, which toured Michigan to critical acclaim after its Performance Network debut. The original starred two-thirds of popular song trio The Chenille Sisters, folk balladeer David Menefee, Michael Smith (of the Cadillac Cowboys), vocalist Tracy Komarmy (of the Imperial Swing Orchestra) and Charlie Weaver. Several original cast members reprise their roles, but celebrated young folk songwriter Chris Buhalis and Tamar Schoenberg play the lead roles this time. 8pm, The Ark, $20 ($12.50 with stu ID, union card or fishing license).

Evalyn Parry, Eve Goldberg, Trevor Mills
Three Canadian singer/songwriters present their “Three-ring, Rootsy Road Show.” Canadian folk and spoken-word performer Parry weaves together the personal, the political, the poetic and the hilarious in haunting acoustic ballads and thought-provoking commentary. Guitarist Goldberg employs a lovely voice in folk, country, bluegrass, swing, blues and gospel music. Singer/songwriter Mills performs intelligent, compassionate tunes ranging from the serious to the whimsical. 8:30pm, Crazy Wisdom Bookstore & Tearoom, free.

Saline Fiddlers Philharmonic
Saline high school students perform American folk fiddle music with an emphasis on bluegrass and old-time music, led by

February 2003 CURRENT

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