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Table of Contents

GROUP Report......................................................................................................................................... 5
a) Project Methodology ...................................................................................................................... 5
b) Project Charter ................................................................................................................................ 6
A. Background ................................................................................................................................. 6
B. Measurable Objective ................................................................................................................. 6
C. High Leve Scope Description ....................................................................................................... 6
Product Scope ................................................................................................................................. 6
Project Scope .................................................................................................................................. 7
D. Constraints .................................................................................................................................. 7
E. Assumptions ................................................................................................................................ 7
F. High Level Risks ........................................................................................................................... 8
G. Summary Milestones .................................................................................................................. 8
H. Summary Budget......................................................................................................................... 8
I. Stakeholder list ........................................................................................................................... 9
J. Criteria for Project Approval ....................................................................................................... 9
K. Team Operating Principles .......................................................................................................... 9
L. Project manager authority ........................................................................................................ 10
M. Signature ............................................................................................................................... 10
c) Work Breakdown Structure / Scope Statement ........................................................................... 11
d) Gantt Chart and Network Diagram ............................................................................................... 13
e) Cost Estimation and Budgeting ..................................................................................................... 13
f) Quality Management Plan ............................................................................................................ 16
A. Introduction .............................................................................................................................. 16
B. Quality Plan ............................................................................................................................... 16
Techniques for QP ......................................................................................................................... 16
i. Cost-Benefit Analysis(CBA) ................................................................................................... 16
ii. Benchmarking ....................................................................................................................... 17
C. Quality Assurance ..................................................................................................................... 18
Techniques for QA......................................................................................................................... 18
i. Quality Audit ......................................................................................................................... 18
ii. Process Checklist ................................................................................................................... 19
D. Quality Control .......................................................................................................................... 20
Techniques for QC ......................................................................................................................... 20
i. Cause and Effect Diagrams ................................................................................................... 20

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ii. Flowcharts ............................................................................................................................. 21
g) Cutover strategy and transition plan ............................................................................................ 22
h) Lesson Learned Report.................................................................................................................. 23
Lesson Learnt- Wang Tianci TP039202 ............................................................................................. 23
Lesson Learnt- Jonathan Thomas Musiitwa TP040117 ..................................................................... 23
Lesson Learnt- ITERITEKA Daisy Gladys TP040486 ........................................................................... 23
Lesson Learnt- Nura Sahardid TP0404 .............................................................................................. 24
INDIVIDUAL Reports.............................................................................................................................. 25
a) Project Human Resource Management – Wang Tianci (TP039202) ......................................... 25
Issue management ............................................................................................................................ 25
1. Introduction .............................................................................................................................. 25
1.1 Processes involved in project HR management:............................................................... 25
2. Plan HR Management ............................................................................................................... 26
2.1 Project Organization Structure (MATRIX) ......................................................................... 26
2.2 RACI Chart ......................................................................................................................... 28
2.3 Team Role/Responsibility ................................................................................................. 28
2.4 Staff Management Plan .................................................................................................... 29
3. Acquire Project Team ................................................................................................................ 29
4. Develop Project Team ............................................................................................................... 30
4.1 Techniques for developing project team .......................................................................... 30
4.2 Training ............................................................................................................................. 31
4.3 Team Building Activities .................................................................................................... 32
4.4 Tuckman Model ................................................................................................................ 32
4.5 Ground Rules..................................................................................................................... 33
4.6 Co-location ........................................................................................................................ 34
1.1 Recognition and rewards .................................................................................................. 34
1.2 Assessment Tool ............................................................................................................... 34
2. Manage Project Team ............................................................................................................... 35
1.1. Performance appraisals .................................................................................................... 35
1.2. Conflict management ........................................................................................................ 36
1.3. Soft skills ........................................................................................................................... 37
3. Conclusion ................................................................................................................................. 37
b) Project Communication Management – Jonathan Thomas Musiitwa (TP040117) ...................... 38
Introduction ....................................................................................................................................... 38
Communications Risks ...................................................................................................................... 39
Stakeholder Analysis ......................................................................................................................... 39

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Plan Communications Management ................................................................................................. 41
Tools & Techniques ....................................................................................................................... 41
Team Directory ................................................................................................................................. 42
Outputs ......................................................................................................................................... 43
Manage Communications ................................................................................................................. 45
Inputs ............................................................................................................................................ 45
Tools and Techniques.................................................................................................................... 46
Outputs ......................................................................................................................................... 50
Control Communications .................................................................................................................. 51
Inputs ............................................................................................................................................ 51
Tools & Techniques ....................................................................................................................... 53
Outputs ......................................................................................................................................... 53
Conclusion ......................................................................................................................................... 54
c) Project Risk Management – ITERITEKA Daisy Gladys(TP040486) ................................................. 54
1. Introduction .............................................................................................................................. 54
2. Risk Management Plan ............................................................................................................. 55
3. Risk Identification...................................................................................................................... 57
3.1. Writeup ............................................................................................................................. 57
3.2. Risk Identification techniques (brainstorming, Delphi, interview, etc) ............................ 57
3.3. Risk Register ...................................................................................................................... 59
4. Qualitative Risk Analysis ........................................................................................................... 59
4.1. Probability Scale .................................................................................................................... 59
4.2. Impact Scale ...................................................................................................................... 60
4.3. Risk Urgency Assessment (Priority) ................................................................................. 60
4.4. Risk Heat Map ....................................................................................................................... 60
4.4.1 Risk Ranking Summary ....................................................................................................... 61
5. Quantitative Risk Analysis ......................................................................................................... 61
6. Plan Risk Response .................................................................................................................... 61
7. Control Risks.............................................................................................................................. 62
8. Risk Register .............................................................................................................................. 62
Risk Register 1 ............................................................................................................................... 62
Risk Register 2 ............................................................................................................................... 65
9. Conclusion ................................................................................................................................. 67
d) Project Procurement Management. Nura Sahardid muse TP040460 .......................................... 68
Introduction ...................................................................................................................................... 68
1. Planning Procurement .............................................................................................................. 68

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Types of contract .......................................................................................................................... 68
Proposed contract for the project. ............................................................................................... 69
Make-or-Buy Analysis ................................................................................................................... 69
Procurement Team - Roles & Responsibility................................................................................. 70
Bidding Deadline ........................................................................................................................... 71
Contents procurement management plan ................................................................................... 72
Contents of procurement Statement of Work(SOW) ................................................................... 73
The types of Procurement Documents (RFI, RFQ, IFB and RFP) ................................................... 73
RFP is chosen................................................................................................................................. 74
Source Selection............................................................................................................................ 76
2. Conducting Procurements ........................................................................................................ 78
Bidder conference ......................................................................................................................... 78
Proposal evaluation techniques (e.g. tender evaluation committees)......................................... 78
Advertising technique ................................................................................................................... 79
How to evaluate bidders attach sample (tender evaluation sheet) and explain.......................... 79
Procurements Negotiations .......................................................................................................... 80
Sellers selection ............................................................................................................................ 80
Agreements ................................................................................................................................... 81
3. Control Procurements............................................................................................................... 81
Contract change control system ................................................................................................... 81
Procurement performance review ............................................................................................... 81
Inspection and audits .................................................................................................................... 82
Payment systems .......................................................................................................................... 82
Claims administration ................................................................................................................... 83
Record management system ........................................................................................................ 83
4. Closing Procurement. ................................................................................................................ 83
A procurement audits ................................................................................................................... 83
Procurement Negotiations............................................................................................................ 84
Closed procurement notice, deliverable acceptance ................................................................... 84
Lessons learned........................................................................................ Error! Bookmark not defined.
Appendices............................................................................................................................................ 86
Gantt Chart ....................................................................................................................................... 86
Network Diagram .............................................................................................................................. 86
References ............................................................................................................................................ 87

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GROUP Report

a) Project Methodology
In this assignment, we are going to use is the PMBOK methodology for the Integrated
Supply Chain Management System (ISCMS) project, it covers 10-knowledge area,
which are: Time management, Cost management, Quality management, Scope
management, Integration management, HR management, Procurement management,
Risk management, Communication management and Stakeholder management.

Figure 1 PMBOK 10 Knowledge Areas

Moreover, we will follow the project life cycle, which including 5 phases, initiation,
planning, executing, monitor/control and closing.

Figure 2 PMBOK Project Life Cycle

There are two reasons to choose PMPBOK as our methodology, first one is that
PMBOK discusses what is feasible. The way the project manages the community

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records helps those who are not sure how to manage the risk. PMBOK also discussed
what did not work. This prevents the project from failing. The second reason is that
PMBOK offers tested methodologies and evidence-based practicesInvalid source
specified. to ensure we can make the project success.

b) Project Charter
A. Background
The Integrated Supply Chain Management System (ISCMS) is a supply chain management
project for Actavis HealthCare Pte. Ltd (AH), a leading nutrition health and wellness
multinational company.

There currently exists a defragmentation of operations amongst the various South East Asian
branches where each country branch opts for L1 support rendered by local IT and L2 support
from the local application vendor. Hence, with independent costs attributed to these support
employments, meant high capital and operating costs.

Therefore, this project is aimed at providing the features of a supply chain whilst integrating
the support for a data warehouse. The hope is that it will reduce CAPEX/OPEX, provide
centralized support and create a platform for unified administration amongst the various
international branches of the company.

B. Measurable Objective
 The project is looking to implement a centralized support system for ITSS.
 A significant reduction in capital and operational costs with an effective and
efficient integrated supply chain management system.
 Ensuring global governance and administration amongst all the company’s
international branches.

C. High Leve Scope Description


Product Scope
1. Warehouse Management
2. Yard Management
3. Logistics Management
4. Stock/Inventory Management
5. Transportation Management
6. Sourcing and Procurement Management
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7. Supplier Relationship Management
8. Labour Management
9. Order Management
10. Customer Relationship Management

Project Scope
1. Project Time Management.
2. Project Risk Management.
3. Project Cost Management.

D. Constraints
 Localization of the system to fit within the lingual requirements of the various
branches will call for significant translation input.
 General outsourcing for the development of the product scope to vendors will be
restricted to only the most crucial modules and the rest shall be developed in-house.
 The project is now limited to just 4 months duration compared to the initial 6
months.
 There is likely to be a sacrifice in terms of product scope quality to meet project
deadlines.
 The new project manager and team are going to be surmounted by the pressure and
requirements from the steering committee to succeed in the project.

E. Assumptions
 This project will assume that the project team has already been developed and
undergone several team building exercises to ascertain themselves.
 Assumptions are made that the development vendors have already made bids and
have been approved.
 It is assumed that the high-level milestones accomplished by the previous Project
Manager were well executed but will only require minor alterations.
 The system will build upon the current infrastructure available and will not require
a complete start over.
 The project has the full support of the project sponsor with the hiring of a more
professional project manager.
 The ITSS-ADC team will not be taken up in other projects and as such will devote
their full attention to this project.
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F. High Level Risks
 Due to the previous expenses by the former project manager, the project risks being
under funded to acquire certain external resources.
 Several team members have already been signed for new projects at the forecasted
end of the project. Hence, any project delay is likely to turn a negative response for
both them and their clients.
 The shorter project duration means that certain phases will be rushed to meet the
project deadlines which could lead to potential errors along the way.
 The procurement of new development and test servers could lead to delayed testing
as they’re being supplied by an international supplier.

G. Summary Milestones
Milestone Duration(days)
Initiation Phase 5
Planning Phase 9
Execution Phase 70
Monitoring & Control Phase 20
Closing Phase 10

H. Summary Budget
Name Amount
Resources $30,000
Hardware $40,000
Vendor Costs $100,000
Manpower $50,000
Project Execution $150,000
Miscellaneous $10,000
Total $380,000

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I. Stakeholder list
Name Role Description
Mr. Nehru Project Sponsor He has overall accountability for the project
Nagappan as well as plays the vital role of project’s
leader,
Ms. Daisy Gladys Project Manager Oversee the planning, budgeting, and
documenting of all aspects of the project.
Ms. Kerry Wang Finance Manager Monitor the daily financial operations within
the scope of the project.
Mr. John Ng Operations Manager Manage the day-to-day operations and
activities of the personnel and resources
attached to the project.
Mr. Yousef Ali Head of IT Superintend the development of the project’s
Development (ADC) modules and provision of development
resources.

J. Criteria for Project Approval


The project sponsor & project manager shall deem the project a success provided it has been able to
accomplish the following;

 The new system does not have a steep learning curve making it possible for the
current employees to comfortably transition to the new system.
 The project has implemented the product scope and has passed integration testing
of the modules of the system.
 The project scope has been met well within the measurable objectives.
 The system should be able to offer a minimum of 90% uptime.
 The system should have followed a successful parallel cutover strategy with no
errors.

K. Team Operating Principles


 The team will be expected to respect the communication channels and follow along
with the frequency of communication updates as expected by the various superiors.

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 The team members shall be expected to maintain confidentiality on the activities in
the project both during the on-going of the project & shortly after the project has
ended.
 Ensure we fulfil the project commitments we have diligently and in a timely manner
to avoid project delays.
 Prior preparation before any high-level meetings is paramount to ensure time is
properly accounted for.
 Team members should provide prior notice if they are unable to make it to a
scheduled meeting.
 Maintain a professional code of conduct with fellow team members as well as
following the standard operating procedures with each project task.
 Final call on the status of project’s development is left to the project manager only.

L. Project manager authority


In due presence to ensure the successful completion of the project, the project manager is
requesting, along with the already known authority the position ensures, to be availed the
following authority;

 The project manager has the authority to adjust the timeline for a project activity to
ensure it meets the project deadline.
 The PM should be able to assemble or dismiss new team members where need be
to either expand the team or punish a team member accordingly.
 The PM has the free will to re-adjust the requirements to ensure the project remains
in-line with the sponsor’s system goal.
 The PM has the free will to readjust resources and man power in the work break
down structure to ensure the project’s timely completion.
 The PM has the right to refuse or accept any new requirements provided from users
to the ITSS-ADC team.

M. Signature
This project charter has been submitted, reviewed and accepted by the following parties:

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MR. NEHRU NAGAPPAN MS. GLADYS DAISY

PROJECT SPONSOR PROJECT MANAGER

c) Work Breakdown Structure / Scope Statement


WBS Task Name
1 Integrated Supply Chain Management System
1.1 Initiation Phase
1.1.2 Develop Project Charter
1.1.3 Conduct Kick Off Meeting
1.1.4 Project Charter Signed
1.2 Planning Phase
1.2.2 Scope Management
1.2.2.1 Conduct Interview
1.2.2.2 Document Requirement
1.2.2.3 Planning scope
1.2.2.4 Collecting requirements
1.2.2.5 Define Scope
1.2.2.6 Creating the WBS
1.2.2.7 Validating scope
1.2.2.8 Controlling scope
1.2.3 Time Management
1.2.3.1 Planning schedule management
1.2.3.2 Defining activities
1.2.3.3 Sequencing activities
1.2.3.4 Estimating activity durations
1.2.3.5 Developing the schedule
1.2.3.6 Controlling the schedule
1.2.4 Risk Management
1.2.4.1 Plan Risk
1.2.4.2 Identify Risk
1.2.4.3 Perform Qualitative Risk Analysis
1.2.4.4 Perform Quantitave Risk Analysis
1.2.4.5 Plan Risk Responses
1.2.4.6 Monitor and Control Risk
1.2.5 Cost Management
1.2.5.1 Planning cost management
1.2.5.2 Estimating costs
1.2.5.3 Determining the budget
1.2.6 HR Management
1.2.6.1 Planning HR management
1.2.6.2 Acquiring the project team
1.2.6.3 Developing the project team
1.2.6.4 Hire Network Engineer
1.2.6.5 Hire Security Engineer
1.2.6.6 Hire Database Engineer
1.2.7 Procurement Management

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1.2.7.1 Procurement Planning
1.2.7.1.1 Decide item to procure
1.2.7.1.2 Decide when to procure
1.2.7.1.3 Decide procurement document to be used
1.2.7.1.4 Establish procurement team
1.2.7.2 Contract Planning
1.2.7.2.1 Prepare procurement document and Statement
1.2.7.2.2 Determining contract
1.2.7.2.3 Prepare tender evaluation sheet & statement
1.2.7.3 Request Seller Response
1.2.7.3.1 Identify potential source of vendor
1.2.7.3.2 Send RFP to vendor
1.2.7.3.3 Send Bidder Conference invitation to vendor
1.2.7.3.4 Conduct Field Visit
1.2.7.3.5 Held Bidder Conference
1.2.7.4 Select Sellers
1.2.7.4.1 Collecting & evaluate Proposal of vendor
1.2.7.4.2 Contract Negotitation
1.2.7.4.3 Contract Awarding
1.2.7.4.4 Vendor Contract Signed
1.2.7.5 Administering the Contract
1.2.7.5.1 Evaluate seller’s performance
1.2.7.5.2 Writing & administering contracts
1.2.7.5.3 Manage contractual issues
1.3 Execution Phase
1.3.1 Coding
1.3.1.1 Yard Management
1.3.1.1.1 Yard layout Management
1.3.1.1.2 Generate schedule plan
1.3.1.1.3 Develop container tracking
1.3.1.1.4 Yard control system
1.3.1.2 Warehouse Management
1.3.1.2.1 Warehouse inventory inbound
1.3.1.2.2 Warehouse inventory management
1.3.1.2.3 Order packing and preparation
1.3.1.2.4 Warehouse inventory outbound
1.3.1.3 Order Management
1.3.1.3.1 Develop stock checking function
1.3.1.3.2 Develop stock ordering function
1.3.1.4 Demand Management
1.3.1.4.1 Gather Business Date
1.3.1.4.2 Analyse purchase order and business plan
1.3.1.4.3 Develop demand forecast
1.3.1.4.4 Develop business decision according forecast report
1.3.1.5 Finance Management
1.3.1.5.1 Plan investment
1.3.1.5.2 Track total cost of system
1.3.1.5.3 Revenue profit reporting

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1.3.1.6 CRM Management
1.3.1.6.1 Customer data analysis
1.3.1.6.2 Customer feedback service
1.3.1.6.3 E-Marketing
1.3.1.6.4 Reporting
1.3.1.7 Supplier Relationship Management
1.3.1.7.2 Contract Management
1.3.1.7.4 Operational Procurement
1.3.1.7.6 Application Developed
1.3.1.8 Labour Management
1.3.1.8.2 Develop access privilege level
1.3.1.9 Procurement Management
1.3.1.9.3 Develop past procurement browsing
1.3.1.10 Transport Managment Module
1.3.1.10.4 Develop transport monitoring system
1.3.2 Testing
1.3.2.1 User Acceptance Testing
1.3.2.1.1 Cycle 1
1.3.2.1.1.3 Fix Defects
1.3.2.2 Integration Test
1.3.2.2.1 Cycle 1
1.3.2.2.1.2 Collect Defects
1.3.3 Implementation/ Cut Over
1.3.3.4 Training Staff
1.4 Monitor / Control Phase
1.4.1 Weekly Progress Meeting with Project Teams
1.4.1.8 Weekly Progress Meeting with Project Team 8
1.5 Closing Phase
1.5.3 Gather Stakeholders Satisfaction Survey
1.5.4 Release Staffs from project

d) Gantt Chart and Network Diagram


Find attached in the Appendices

e) Cost Estimation and Budgeting


WBS Cost Task Name
1 $375,190.00 Integrated Supply Chain Management System
1.1 $39,800.00 Initiation Phase
1.1.2 $4,700.00 Develop Project Charter
1.1.3 $34,000.00 Conduct Kick Off Meeting
1.1.4 $100.00 Project Charter Signed
1.2 $64,190.00 Planning Phase
1.2.2 $14,703.00 Scope Management
1.2.2.1 $100.00 Conduct Interview
1.2.2.2 $2,650.00 Document Requirement
1.2.2.3 $2,580.00 Planning scope

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1.2.2.4 $2,550.00 Collecting requirements
1.2.2.5 $2,600.00 Define Scope
1.2.2.6 $56.00 Creating the WBS
1.2.2.7 $67.00 Validating scope
1.2.2.8 $100.00 Controlling scope
1.2.3 $2,977.00 Time Management
1.2.3.1 $200.00 Planning schedule management
1.2.3.2 $50.00 Defining activities
1.2.3.3 $67.00 Sequencing activities
1.2.3.4 $80.00 Estimating activity durations
1.2.3.5 $45.00 Developing the schedule
1.2.3.6 $35.00 Controlling the schedule
1.2.4 $12,906.00 Risk Management
1.2.4.1 $76.00 Plan Risk
1.2.4.2 $3,100.00 Identify Risk
1.2.4.3 $3,550.00 Perform Qualitative Risk Analysis
1.2.4.4 $34.00 Perform Quantative Risk Analysis
1.2.4.5 $3,056.00 Plan Risk Responses
1.2.4.6 $90.00 Monitor and Control Risk
1.2.5 $3,168.00 Cost Management
1.2.5.1 $45.00 Planning cost management
1.2.5.2 $56.00 Estimating costs
1.2.5.3 $67.00 Determining the budget
1.2.6 $8,436.00 HR Management
1.2.6.1 $2,055.00 Planning HR management
1.2.6.2 $89.00 Acquiring the project team
1.2.6.3 $2,065.00 Developing the project team
1.2.6.4 $72.00 Hire Network Engineer
1.2.6.5 $91.00 Hire Security Engineer
1.2.6.6 $64.00 Hire Database Engineer
1.2.7 $22,000.00 Procurement Management
1.2.7.1 $4,500.00 Procurement Planning
1.2.7.1.1 $.00 Decide item to procure
1.2.7.1.2 $0.00 Decide when to procure
1.2.7.1.3 $0.00 Decide procurement document to be used
1.2.7.1.4 $0.00 Establish procurement team
1.2.7.2 $4,000.00 Contract Planning
1.2.7.2.1 $4,000.00 Prepare procurement document and
Statement
1.2.7.2.2 $0.00 Determining contract
1.2.7.2.3 $0.00 Prepare tender evaluation sheet & statement
1.2.7.3 $4,500.00 Request Seller Response
1.2.7.3.1 $0.00 Identify potential source of vendor
1.2.7.3.2 $0.00 Send RFP to vendor
1.2.7.3.3 $0.00 Send Bidder Conference invitation to vendor
1.2.7.3.4 $0.00 Conduct Field Visit
1.2.7.3.5 $0.00 Held Bidder Conference
1.2.7.4 $4,500.00 Select Sellers

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1.2.7.4.1 $0.00 Collecting & evaluate Proposal of vendor
1.2.7.4.2 $0.00 Contract Negotiation
1.2.7.4.3 $0.00 Contract Awarding
1.2.7.4.4 $0.00 Vendor Contract Signed
1.2.7.5 $4,500.00 Administering the Contract
1.2.7.5.1 $2500.00 Evaluate seller’s performance
1.2.7.5.2 $0.00 Writing & administering contracts
1.2.7.5.3 $2000.00 Manage contractual issues
1.3 $204,100.00 Execution Phase
1.3.1 $119,400.00 Coding
1.3.1.1 $14,800.00 Yard Management
1.3.1.1.1 $3,000.00 Yard layout Management
1.3.1.1.2 $3,000.00 Generate schedule plan
1.3.1.1.3 $3,000.00 Develop container tracking
1.3.1.1.4 $3,000.00 Yard control system
1.3.1.2 $12,600.00 Warehouse Management
1.3.1.2.1 $2,400.00 Warehouse inventory inbound
1.3.1.2.2 $2,400.00 Warehouse inventory management
1.3.1.2.3 $2,400.00 Order packing and preparation
1.3.1.2.4 $2,400.00 Warehouse inventory outbound
1.3.1.3 $10,000.00 Order Management
1.3.1.3.1 $2,500.00 Develop stock checking function
1.3.1.3.2 $2,500.00 Develop stock ordering function
1.3.1.4 $12,600.00 Demand Management
1.3.1.4.1 $2,400.00 Gather Business Date
1.3.1.4.2 $2,400.00 Analyze purchase order and business plan
1.3.1.4.3 $2,400.00 Develop demand forecast
1.3.1.4.4 $2,400.00 Develop business decision according forecast
report
1.3.1.5 $11,400.00 Finance Management
1.3.1.5.1 $2,800.00 Plan investment
1.3.1.5.2 $2,800.00 Track total cost of system
1.3.1.5.3 $2,800.00 Revenue profit reporting
1.3.1.6 $12,600.00 CRM Management
1.3.1.6.1 $2,400.00 Customer data analysis
1.3.1.6.2 $2,400.00 Customer feedback service
1.3.1.6.3 $2,400.00 E-Marketing
1.3.1.6.4 $2,400.00 Reporting
1.3.1.7 $10,500.00 Supplier Relationship Management
1.3.1.7.2 $2,500.00 Contract Management
1.3.1.7.4 $2,500.00 Operational Procurement
1.3.1.7.6 $2,500.00 Application Developed
1.3.1.8 $7,000.00 Labour Management
1.3.1.8.2 $3,000.00 Develop access privilege level
1.3.1.9 $5,800.00 Procurement Management
1.3.1.9.3 $0.00 Develop past procurement browsing
1.3.1.10 $16,100.00 Transport Management Module
1.3.1.10.4 $2,800.00 Develop transport monitoring system

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1.3.2 $42,600.00 Testing
1.3.2.1 $16,600.00 User Acceptance Testing
1.3.2.1.1 $10,200.00 Cycle 1
1.3.2.1.1.3 $7,000.00 Fix Defects
1.3.2.2 $20,500.00 Integration Test
1.3.2.2.1 $12,500.00 Cycle 1
1.3.2.2.1.2 $7,500.00 Collect Defects
1.3.3 $29,600.00 Implementation/ Cut Over
1.3.3.4 $0.00 Training Staff
1.4 $51,600.00 Monitor / Control Phase
1.4.1 $47,100.00 Weekly Progress Meeting with Project Teams
1.4.1.8 $17,800.00 Weekly Progress Meeting with Project Team 8
1.5 $15,500.00 Closing Phase
1.5.3 $3,500.00 Gather Stakeholders Satisfaction Survey
1.5.4 $4,500.00 Release Staffs from project

f) Quality Management Plan


A. Introduction
The quality management of the project is all the processes and activities needed to determine
and realize the quality of the project. (michael, 2012) The following section will discuss about
the 3 core phases of quality management.

B. Quality Plan
The quality management planning process determines the quality standards applicable to the
project and designs the methods to meet these requirements.

Techniques for QP
i. Cost-Benefit Analysis(CBA)
The cost-benefit analysis is similar to a cost-benefit ratio. The costs and benefits are measured
to analyze the trade-offs of providing quality. The CBA is also defined as a systematic process
for calculating and comparing benefits and costs of a decision. Here is a CBA example:

16
Figure 3 Cost-Benefit Analysis Example

(Dr.Eugene, 2010)

ii. Benchmarking
Benchmarking is a process that compares the performance of a company with the performance
of other companies. Management can do this by comparing corporate groups within a company,
by comparing companies in the industry, or by comparing companies in different industries.
Conduct benchmarks:

1. Product quality or characteristics

2. Quality of service provided

3. Efficiency of operation process

4. Financial and business performance measurement (W, 2013)

17
Figure 4 A figure showing the popularity between several top food businesses

(benchmark, 2016)

C. Quality Assurance
PMBOK Guide defines the quality assurance process as "quality requirements audit and quality
control measurement result audit, to ensure proper quality standards and operation definitions."

Techniques for QA
i. Quality Audit
It is a structured and independent process to determine whether project activities conform to
the policies, procedures, and processes of the organization or project. (J, 2012) Here is the
sample:

18
Figure 5 An example of a quality audit document

(ProcessAudit, 2011)

ii. Process Checklist


Process Checklist is a more common quality assurance management technique based on Tom
Mochal in TechRepublic. This involves the development of a list of all the key steps involved
in the development process. When each step is completed, the straight-line manager or the shift
manager should check the steps on the list. This diligent technique can prevent the neglect or
avoidance of important procedures. (Kokemuller, 2016)

19
Figure 6 An example of a process checklist document

(template, 2016)

D. Quality Control
According to PMBOK Guide, the process of controlling quality is defined as the "process" of
monitoring and recording performance evaluation of executing quality activities and
recommending the necessary changes of results. (Institute, 2005)

Techniques for QC
i. Cause and Effect Diagrams
Cause-and-effect diagrams are also called fishbone diagrams because they resemble the
skeleton of a fish. The head of the fish is the effect and each bone of the fish is a cause that

20
leads to that effect. The bones can branch off into smaller bones as you determine the lower-
level cause-effect relationships. (McClintock, 2016)

Figure 7 A cause and effect diagram

(McClintock, 2016)

ii. Flowcharts
Flowcharts show the logical steps in a process and how various elements within a system are
related. They can be used to determine and analyse potential problems in quality planning and
quality control. (McClintock, 2016)

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Figure 8 A flowchart diagram showing how a change request form is processed

(McClintock, 2016)

g) Cutover strategy and transition plan


The cutover process involves a series of steps that require planning, execution, and monitoring
to enable the project to go live. It includes the cutover strategy, the transition plan, the
conversion date, the agile monitoring and control of the transformation activities and the
changes that are not needed. This is a crucial process and focuses the project on the important
activities necessary for the end user to actually use the project results.

Here are the steps of transition plan about IT:

1. Copy all the data to temporary location

2. Data massaging

3. Copy new data into new server database

4. Conduct regression test

5. Train all staffs to use the new system

6. Train users

7. Ask user about user acceptance test

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8. Ask management staff about launch new system

9. Communicate to all users

10. Shutdown the old system

h) Lesson Learned Report


Lesson Learnt- Wang Tianci TP039202
From what has been discussed above, I know about the processes involved in a project life
cycle and how the PMPBOK 10 knowledge areas implemented and how to follow the project
life cycle to manage a project. In addition, using appropriate techniques in the quality
management will help a lot.

I am so appreciating the help from Mr. Nehru, thanks for his valuable instructions and impatient
teaching so that we overcome all the problems and challenges during this project due to his
help.

Lesson Learnt- Jonathan Thomas Musiitwa TP040117


The process of managing a project from initiation to conclusion is task that is very demanding.
Therefore, the need by project managers to ensure that all the resources in play are effectively
configured to complete their respective tasks, must be completed dutifully to ensure no delays
in the project.

Understanding the general terminologies, techniques and tools that go about in most of the
projects has given an insight into identifying where the strengths and weaknesses of a project
lie. In so doing, projects moving forward can be achieved properly to a high standard that is
demanded in the real-world. All in all, a project manager is measured not only by the success
of their project but also how the resources put into that project are integrated into a well-oiled
machine.

Lesson Learnt- ITERITEKA Daisy Gladys TP040486


Working on the assignment early gave me an idea of how tough the assignment was. Starting
early or at least analysis of the assignment early can be very fruitful. That was a first lesson
learned. A crucial lesson, the writer learned, was how projects work in reality; the structure,
the procedures, and demands of the upper levels, I learned that you cannot wake up and come
up with a project, it must follow a proper plan in order to succeed and avoid risks of failure as

23
I was the Project risk manager. Experiencing this first time in work environment would have
been quite a though task but now I feel more prepared for this eventuality.

Communication was another vital lesson, as the commencement of the assignment required to
sit and discuss about the project since I was a project manager to communicate to each group
member what to do and feedback of the process wasn’t easy, agreeing, disagreeing and
compromising, how, and when, these were learned from the practical experience while working
on the assignment. This communication was not only limited to students but extended to the
lecturer as well. Overall, communication plays a key role in accomplishing a project
successfully.

Lesson Learnt- Nura Sahardid TP0404

Lastly, in the project procurement management, I have learned planning procurement and
discovering different types of contracts to use Fixed-price contracts, Cost-reimbursable
contracts and Time and Material Contracts (T&M) and their benefits and disadvantages. The
differences of using of the source inside the organization or outsourcing from outside. the use
of (SWOT) the process of the project scope baseline such as activities, time and deliverables
that will be part of the contract when vendors providing services to the clients. The type of
documents used in the process of offering vendors briefing about the products and services
needed. using advertising techniques to and inviting bidding conference in order to provide
them the same treatment and distribute the RFP. After that selecting the sellers by using
tender evaluation and negotiating to award the contract. Contract change control system to
control describing how the changes the manage, Procurement performance review and
Inspection and audits. Finally closing the procurement by signing off the contract and
officially closing the project after the results and the deliverables of the project has been
accepted.

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INDIVIDUAL Reports
a) Project Human Resource Management – Wang Tianci (TP039202)
Issue management
Issue Solution

1. The Project Manager’s authority was Communicate with department manager, try to
constantly overridden by the distribute the task clearly to avoid conflicts.
department head /managers.

2. Most of the team members have been First try to confirm if the task is clear, let the
focusing more on their daily operation team members repeat the task, if they still don't
support rather than tasks being assigned cooperate, then try to know about the reason
by the Project Manager or their why they ignore the project task, or
respective Team Lead. communicate with their direct boss.

1. Introduction
Project Human Resource Management includes the processes that organize, manage, and lead
the project team. The project team is comprised of the people with assigned roles and
responsibilities for completing the project. Project team members may have varied skill sets,
may be assigned full or part-time, and may be added or removed from the team as the project
progresses. Project team members may also be referred to as the project's staff. Although
specific roles and responsibilities for the project team members are assigned, the involvement
of all team members in project planning and decision making is beneficial. Participation of
team members during planning adds their expertise to the process and strengthens their
commitment to the project. (from PMBOK® Guide, Fifth Edition) (institute, 2011)

1.1 Processes involved in project HR management:


-Plan HR Management—The process of identifying and documenting project roles,
responsibilities, required skills, reporting relationships, and creating a staffing management
plan.

-Acquire Project Team—The process of confirming human resource availability and


obtaining the team necessary to complete project activities.

25
-Develop Project Team—The process of improving competencies, team member interaction,
and overall team environment to enhance project performance.

-Manage Project Team—The process of tracking team member performance, providing


feedback, resolving issues, and managing changes to optimize project performance. (from
PMBOK® Guide, Fifth Edition)

2. Plan HR Management
HR planning is the process of analysing the current organization’s requirements for human,
making forecast in terms of the requirements, and then developing the HR management plan.

2.1 Project Organization Structure (MATRIX)


The following is the organizational structure matrix of ISCMS:

26
27
2.2 RACI Chart
A responsibility assignment matrix (RAM) is a matrix that maps the work of the project, as
described in the WBS, to the people responsible for performing the work. One representative
example of RAM is the RACI chart, RACI separately stands for Responsibility, Accountable,
Consulted and Informed, here is a RACI chart of ISCMS:

Task Sponsor Project Programmer Business Testing


manager analyst team

Requirement gathering C A -- R I/A

Functional&Technical -- C/A I R I/A

Specification
development

Coding I A R C --

Testing I A A/C -- R

User acceptance test I I A/C -- R

2.3 Team Role/Responsibility


Here is a brief team role /responsibility table of HR department:

Role Name Responsibility

HR manager Cassie Recruiting and staffing; organizational departmental planning; employee


onboarding, development, needs assessment, and training; employee
relations and community communicationInvalid source specified.

HR executive 1 Carol Designing compensation and benefits packages; Implementing


performance review procedures (e.g. quarterly/annual and 360°
evaluations) Developing fair HR policies and ensuring employees
understand and comply with them

HR executive 2 Mary Implement effective sourcing, screening and interviewing techniques

Assess training needs and coordinate learning and development initiatives


for all employees; Monitor HR department’s budget; Act as the point of

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contact regarding labor legislation issues; Manage employees’
grievances; Create and run referral bonus programs

2.4 Staff Management Plan


According to the analysis of current project team, we need IT security engineer and network
engineer for this ISCMS project. Here is a template of ISCMS:

Role Team Responsibility Skills Start End date Part


date time
(estimated)
/full
time

Security CNN Provide governance for IT Strong understanding 1st, 6th, April, Part
engineer security for application of endpoint security Feb, time
2018
development, software and solutions to include
2018
hardware File Integrity
monitoring and Data
Loss Prevention

CCRI Certification is
needed

Network ITSEC Provides network services CISCO certification is 1st, 6th, April, Full
engineer for Local IT/Market required, Feb, time
2018
familiar with Internet 2018
addresses, Proxy,
Routing, Network
traffic

3. Acquire Project Team


Getting the needed personnel assigned to and working on the project is the point of acquiring
project team. These are the techniques used in acquiring project team:

Pre-assignment Pre-assignment is a potential technique used in the PMI process to acquire project
teams. There may be some reasons for the pre- allocation of project team members.

29
Sometimes specific people are identified in the agreement with the customers or
partners. Another reason for pre- allocation is to plan human resource management
for future or multiple projects or activities. This is likely to be when someone has
a skill or knowledge that is rare or high. Some organizations need to use pre-
assigned to determine whether to hire or contract extra staff, or to delay the project
until the appropriate staffs are available.

Negotiation Negotiation is a technique that gathers staff from other departments. Negotiations
are usually carried out between the project manager and the functional manager.

Acquisition Team acquisition methods can be used individually and can also be combined to
obtain project teams. When all the team members have the appropriate task, the
project is staffed. Then the process of getting the project team is finished and the
following process is generated to get the output of the project team:

Project staff assignment documentation, work schedule, updates to the project


management plan

Virtual Team Virtual teams are often geographically separate, working together using electronic
equipment to communicate.

For this ISCMS project, we decide to combine acquisition, pre-assignment and negotiation
techniques to handle this project. The details are as following:

Negotiation will be used to temporarily grab staffs from HR, Finance department and
procurement to work on this project with their specialization. Using acquisition to hire staff
who has skills and knowledge that organization lacks, such as a network engineer and IT
security engineer.

4. Develop Project Team


After acquiring the project team, the next step is to build the individual and group skills to
enhance project performance, which is called developing project team.

4.1 Techniques for developing project team


Psychologists and management theorists have contributed much research and thoughts to the
field of managing people at work. There are many famous motivational theories, such as

30
Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs, Herzberg’s Motivational and Hygiene Factors, McClelland’s
Acquired-Needs Theory, McGregor’s Theory X and Y, Thamhain and Wilemon Ways and so
on.

Each of these theories has their own advantage, however in this ISCMS project, we suppose to
use Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs as our motivational theory. The reason to choose Maslow’s
Hierarchy of Needs is that Maslow realized that all human beings start fulfilling their needs at
the bottom levels of the pyramid, (chand, 2016) and classified all human needs into a
hierarchical manner from the lower to the higher order, which provided the most direct way for
project managers to meet member’s needs. Using this theory, the leader can easily motivate
staff according to their needs.

-Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs

Maslow developed a hierarchy of needs, which states that people’s behaviors are guided or
motivated by a sequence of needs. Here is the model of Maslow’s:

Figure 9: Maslow's Hierarchy

(Mr.Nehru, 2018)

4.2 Training
Training can help people understand themselves and each other and understand how to work
better in teams. During this project, training is provided for the security team and network team,
details are as following:

Team Type of training


Network team CCNA / CCIE training by CISCO certified instructors in a crash course
style approach.

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Security team Black hat and Linux Red Hat training. Since these two certifications are
not localized, the staff will be sent abroad for the course.

4.3 Team Building Activities


To build the project team, some activities between team members are required, social activities
will help project team members and other stakeholders get to know each other better.

Activity name Description

Lunch Conducting lunch is a great approach to bringing together the team


members and making them socialize. There is no pressure of work
and staff members are free to discuss topics outside work.

Short-distance Trip Short trip can be hiking, climbing mountain or a near beach, a trip
can strength inter-team relations and leadership roles.

Office party Conducting an office party can make members more motivated to
work, the party can include different activities that related to time
management, lead ship, emotional games and so on.

4.4 Tuckman Model


The Tuckman model describes the maturity and ability of team development, the establishment
of interpersonal relationships, and leadership to change the style of leadership. (Enciso, 2012)

The following are the 4 stages of Tuckman Model:

Figure 10: Tuckman Model

(sarabethberk, 2013)
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-Forming:Establish basic expectations, determine the similarities on the common goals, the
members begin to contact and connect, and begin to develop trust members who rely on the
leadership. (Narciss, 2011) In this stage, most team members are positive and polite. Some are
anxious, as they haven't fully understood what work the team will do. Others are simply excited
about the task ahead. Leader play a dominant role at this stage, because team members' roles
and responsibilities aren't clear.

-Storming: Storming often starts where there is a conflict between team members' natural
working styles. People may work in different ways for all sorts of reasons but, if different
working styles cause unpredictable problems, they may become frustrated, they learned to
work together, to solve problems, to work independently, and to cooperate with the team.

-Norming: In the norming stage, members begin to work together as a team, leaving personal
goals aside. They respect each other's opinions and actively seek advice and help each other.

-Performing: In this stage, the team leader has less involvement in decision making, problem
tackling or other activities involving day-to-day work.

- Adjourning: The adjourning stage is where the project is coming to an end and the different
members are starting to move into different directions. The team leader should make sure that
there is enough time for the team to commemorate the success of the project and capture best
practices and lessons learned for future use.

4.5 Ground Rules


After a project team is acquired, making ground-rules can certainly eliminate unnecessary
confusion, in addition, business customers and team members may appreciate it if defined
beforehand. The following rules are related to this ISCMS project:

1. All team members maintain contact information in the team contact list and provide
contact preferences.
2. All members participate in the necessary meetings and conference calls; if they are not
present, the organizers of the conference will be informed. If the key contributor is
unable to attend, please rearrange the meeting time.
3. The weekends or holidays of any plan must be communicated to the project manager
in advance so that the project plan can be renewed. If there is any affects, it can be
analyzed.

33
4. All project team members can access project plans and project logs (in standard
document format) and know the assigned tasks and deadlines.
5. Before the management is approved, all team members have to negotiate on the
feasibility of the plan.
6. All team members need to verify their task and time allocation to the existing baseline
plan.
7. All project team members have the responsibility to report to the project manager the
tasks they lack, duration or dependence, or change any other requirements of the plan,
and directly and quickly face problems. (A, 2010)

4.6 Co-location
Colocation is a concept of placing all resources of a project within a single location. The project
management terms, also known as "tight matrix", have important strategic significance in the
implementation of the project, making all the resources in the same position. Examples of
collocation strategies include conference rooms, bulletin boards nearby, and other things to
enhance the communication of each stakeholder in the project. (Manager, 2018)

1.1 Recognition and rewards

Team-based reward and recognition systems can promote teamwork. Allow time for team
members to mentor and help each other to meet project goals and develop human resources.

There are different ways of measuring staff performance. It can be observations, checklists or
appraisal forms.

Each of these techniques helps project managers to gauge the level of performance and
competency of the staff. Furthermore, this data can later be used to make decisions on training
requirements, bonuses and overall on how to deal with strengths and weakness of individual
staff members. We will use the performance appraisal to give staff reward or punishment.
Performance Appraisal will be discussed in the later section.
1.2 Assessment Tool
The technique we choose for assessment is Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), which is a
popular tool for determining personality preferences and helping teammates understand each
other. There are 4 dimensions included:

-Extrovert/Introvert (E/I)

-Sensation/Intuition (S/N)

34
-Thinking/Feeling (T/F)

-Judgment/Perception (J/P)

Figure 11: Keirsey Temperament Sorter

(Stephanie, 2015)

2. Manage Project Team


Managing project team is an essential part in a project, which is tracking team member
performance, motivating team members, providing timely feedback, resolving issues and
conflicts, and coordinating changes to help enhance project performance.

To manage the project team, techniques are needed, such as Observation and conversation,
Project performance appraisals and Conflict management. When the project manager need to
get closer with team members, the observation and conversation should be used to get closer
with staff

1.1. Performance appraisals


Performance assessment is a systematic evaluation of employee performance, and it is the
ability to understand the staff's further growth and development. The performance assessment
is generally carried out in a systematic way, which is as follows:

1. Managers measure employees' wages and compare them with goals and plans.
2. The supervisor analyses the factors behind the employees' work performance.
3. Employers can guide employees to achieve better performance. (Team, 2018)

35
Figure 12: Example of an Employee Appraisal form

(Appraisal, 2011)

1.2. Conflict management


Conflict management is a critical part of managing a team. When a lot of different people are
working on a project, it is very likely that difference of opinion and approach to tasks can arise.
Thus, it is essential to turn the negative aspects of conflict into a positive one.

36
Conflict Brief description
Management
Techniques

Forcing Also known as competing. An individual firmly pursues his or her own
concerns despite the resistance of the other person. This may involve
pushing one viewpoint at the expense of another or maintaining firm
resistance to another person’s actions.

Collaborating Collaboration involves an attempt to work with the other person to find a
win-win solution to the problem in hand - the one that most satisfies the
concerns of both parties. It includes identifying the underlying concerns of
the opponents and finding an alternative which meets each party's concerns.

Compromising Compromising looks for an expedient and mutually acceptable solution


which partially satisfies both parties.

Withdrawing Also known as avoiding. This is when a person does not pursue her/his own
concerns or those of the opponent. He/she does not address the conflict,
sidesteps, postpones or simply withdraws.

Smoothing Smoothing is accommodating the concerns of other people first of all,


rather than one's own concerns.

(conflict, 2018)
1.3. Soft skills
Soft skills or interpersonal skills are an employee’s ability to relate and get along with others,
social norms and communication abilities. This is very important for successful collaboration
in the workplace. The main soft skills are leadership, influencing, decision making and so on.

3. Conclusion
To conclude this project, the most essential thing is that it deepens my understanding of project
human resource through this assignment, I become to know deeply about the processes
involved in the HR management in a project, for example how to plan HR management, how
to acquire project team, develop team and manage project team and so on. For HR management,
the point is making the human relations well, to fix the problem instead to blame people is what
I learned in HRM.

37
I appreciate the help of Mr. Nehru, our PM lecturer, thanks for his valuable instructions and
impatient teaching so that I can complete this project smoothly. Moreover, I would like to thank
my group members, it is their help and tolerant that gives me encouragement to overcome
difficulties.

b) Project Communication Management – Jonathan Thomas


Musiitwa (TP040117)
Introduction
This knowledge area is crucial in the success of any project as it plays the key role of ensuring
all the team members are always on the same page with a unified goal in mind.

Project communications management is defined as the processes required to ensure timely and
appropriate planning, collection, creation, distribution, storage, retrieval, management, control,
monitoring, and the ultimate disposition of project information. In allowing the building of
effective communication bridges, the various team departments and project stakeholders can
interconnect on a unified understanding platform that will have an impact on the outcome or
execution of the project. (Lewis, 2016)

In order to successfully implement project communications management, a couple of major


processes will have to be adhered to in order to avoid cases of miscommunication or
misinterpretation of communicated information. These include;

 Planning Communications Management – The process of developing an appropriate


an appropriate approach and plan for project communications based on stakeholder’s
information needs & requirements and available organizational assets. (Lewis, 2016)
 Managing Communications – The process of creating, collecting, distributing,
storing, retrieving and the ultimate disposition of project information in accordance
with the communications management plan. (Lewis, 2016)
 Controlling Communications – The process of monitoring and controlling
communications throughout the entire project life cycle to ensure the information needs
of the project stakeholders are met. (Lewis, 2016)

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Figure 13: Example of communication management Overview

(Ogunsina, 2018)

Communications Risks
i. The steering committee’s lack of proof or receipt of the feasibility study invokes the
idea of ineffective communication amongst the several communication channels.
ii. The constantly changing requirements received by the ITSS-ADC Team Lead in effect
imply that communication rules aren’t being followed.
iii. The project lacked an effective organisational structure and thus no idea of who was to
be reported on what.

Stakeholder Analysis
Stakeholder Role in project Involvement Influence Reaction to
Change
Communication & Provides network services for Medium High Neutral
Network Local IT/Market
IT Security Provide governance for IT Medium High Neutral
security for application
development, software and
hardware

39
Application Provide develop application and High High Against
Development provide application Governance
Center and Intellectual Property.
Project Provide Project Managers to Medium High Neutral
Management manages projects
Centre
Data Center Infrastructure support including High High Against
Operations Servers, Operating Systems for
centralized datacentre and local
servers
IT Operations Provide governance for IT Medium Medium Against
operations, which includes
supporting local markets and its
business operations.
Center of Provide L2 Support for Center Medium Medium Against
Excellence – of Excellence-ERP
Enterprise
Resources
Planning
Center of Provide L2 Support for Center Low Low Neutral
Excellence – of Excellence -CRM
Customer
Relationship
Management
Center of Provide L2 Support for Center Medium High Supportive
Excellence – of Excellence -SCS
Supply Chain
Services
Global Service Helpdesk perform level-one Low Low Neutral
Desk (L1) support
IT Dept IT Manager, Executive #1, Medium Medium Supportive
Executive #1
Marketing Dept MKTG Manager, Executive #1, Low Low Supportive
Executive #2, Executive #3,
Sales Rep x 30,
Finance Dept FIN Manager, Executive #1, High High Against
Executive #2, Clerk#1, Cashier
#1
Human Resources HR Manager, Executive #1, High Medium Neutral
Dept Executive #2
Communication COMM Manager High Low Neutral
Affairs
Procurement OUTSOURCING Manager, High Medium Supportive
Officer x2

40
Plan Communications Management
In summary, this process is meant to plan what information needs to be delivered to the
stakeholders. Most projects will undergo this phase as one of the earliest project phases but
often, the results of this phase are regularly reviewed over the course of the project & revised
where necessary ensuring continued applicability.

The preparation of the communication plan will involve having answered a set of 6 key points;

i. Defining the audience – Identifying and listing the key stakeholders who need
information over the course of the project.
ii. Defining the requirements – What do these stakeholders need to know
iii. Building a communications schedule – When to communicate to the stakeholders
iv. Finding the responsible team member
v. Defining the communication medium – Selecting the appropriate communication
medium to ensure successful information delivery.
vi. Preparing the content – The assigned team member(s) prepare the communication
content and report it to the project manager who checks it before presenting to the
stakeholders. Content will usually include roles and responsibilities of team members,
steps involved in undertaking the process etc.

(Project Management Institute, 2013)

Tools & Techniques


a. Communications Requirements
These are the sum of information requirements of the project stakeholders. These
requirements are made up of the type & format of information required with an analysis
of the information value. It will include information such as logistics of the number of
people involved with the project as well as their locations, project organisation structure
and stakeholder responsibility, external information needs etc.
b. Communications Technology

41
This informs of the methods that will be used to transfer information back and forth
among the project elements and stakeholders. Among the factors considered when
choosing the appropriate technology include urgency of the need, project length,
sensitivity and confidentiality of the information being transmitted etc.
c. Communication Models
They display how the information is transmitted & received between the sender & the
receiver. The most basic communication model is comprised of 5 stages;
 Encode: A sender encodes thoughts into a message that’ll be understood by
others.
 Transmit message: the output of the encoding is to send the message using an
appropriate medium.
 Decode: A receiver translates the information into an understandable message.
 Acknowledge: The receiver should admit to the receiving of the message.
 Feedback/Response: Once the message has been decoded & understood, the
receiver sends a response to the original sender. (Farr, 2013)

d. Communication Methods
These are classified as the methods of sharing information among stakeholders;
1. Interactive communication: This involves having two or more parties in a multi-
directional communication channel.
2. Push Communication: This information is sent to specific people or groups and
doesn’t necessarily ensure that the information was received and/or understood.
3. Pull Communication: Allows recipients in large audiences to access large volumes
of information when needed.
e. Meetings
They provide a logical forum from which the team can discuss the best ways to
communicate project information and respond to stakeholders.

Team Directory
Name Position Email Contact Information
Frequency Shared
Mr. Nehru Project nehru@mail.com Bi-weekly Progress Report,
Naggapan Sponsor Quality Audit
Report
Ms. Daisy Project daisy@pmac.com Weekly Project Status
Gladys Manager Report,

42
Forecasting Report,
Quality Audit
Report
Mr. IT Manager jonathan@ito.com Weekly Issue Logs
Jonathan Work Performance
Thomas Reports
Ms. Marketing sahardid@mktg.com Weekly
Sahardid Manager
Ms. Becky Financial beckyfin.com Daily Work Performance
Manager Reports,
Forecasting Reports,
Financial Reports
Ms. Wang Communicatio wang@comm.com Daily Work Performance
ns Manager Reports,
Project
Communication
Plan
Mr. Paul Outsourcing paul@outsourcing.com Bi-weekly Vendor Reports,
Manager Progress Reports

Mr. Robert HR Manager robert@hr.com Monthly Employee


Performance
Reports

Outputs
After what is needed to get information for the phase in terms of the inputs and implementing
the various tools & techniques to accumulate the required communication information, it is
necessary for the project manager to communicate findings to the stakeholders via two
documents; the communications management plan and the project documents updates.

Communications Management Plan: The primary output of communication planning that


formally presents the findings to give a clear understanding of project’s communication and
information will be handled and is inclusive of the following;

4. A collection & filing structure detailing the methods that’ll be used to gather and
store various types of information.
5. A distribution structure detailing to whom information will flow and what
distribution methods will be applied e.g. written reports, meetings etc.
6. A description of what information is being distributed inclusive of the format,
content, level of detail and naming conventions used.
7. Production schedules when each type of communication will be produced e.g. start
and end dates for the communication.

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8. Methods for updating and refining the communications management plan as the
project progresses and develops.

Figure 14: Example of a Project Communication plan

(infovia, 2018)

Project document updates: These are output updates that are associated with the project
documentation and will be inclusive of the stakeholder registry and management strategy.

44
Manage Communications
Throughout the project’s duration, information is shared with the stakeholders are planned.
Managing communications lies under the Executing process group and implies that it is an
action phase where the tasks for information acquisition defined in the communication plan,
timely stakeholder distribution and storage of the information is carried out.

This is the phase that also allows for follow-on requests for additional information as well as
clarification and discussion. It can further be mentioned that this phase is critical for a smooth
& successful running of a project.

Figure 15: Process of communication management

(Project Management Institute, 2013)

Inputs
a. Communications Management Plan:
This is an input that comes as an output of the previous stage that was planning
communication. The components that make up the communication management plan
serve the purpose of providing essential details as to what communication will be
managed.
b. Work Performance Reports:
They’re used to collect and distribute performance and status information used to
facilitate discussions and create communications. It is vital that these reports are highly
accurate and always current at any time during the project’s duration.
c. Enterprise environmental factors:
They refer to the mechanism supposed to identify factors that can’t be controlled by the
project team but have a significant impact on how the project has to be managed (as an
input) or on the outcome of the project (as an output). (Alby, 2010) These’re the
organisational dynamics that are factored in based on the project’s environment; not

45
necessarily factors defined by the enterprise but also those that the enterprise has to deal
with e.g. organisation’s structure, government/industry standards, existing human
resources etc.
d. Organizational process assets:
This is a listing of organisational process-oriented assets involved in any and all
elements of the project particularly, and of significance elements that can influence the
success of the project. These assets may be categorised as policies, procedures and
documents inherent to the organisation e.g. historical information recording etc. (Alby,
2010)
It is further on important to include an outline and delineation of the organizations
knowledge base as they provide an insight into previous decision points to leverage the
best practice approach. (Long Island Chapter of the Project Management Institute,
2011)

Tools and Techniques


1. Communication technology
This informs of the methods that will be used to transfer information back and forth
among the project elements and stakeholders. Among the factors considered when
choosing the appropriate technology include urgency of the need, project length,
sensitivity and confidentiality of the information being transmitted etc.
2. Communication models
They display how the information is transmitted & received between the sender & the
receiver. The most basic communication model is comprised of 5 stages;

Figure 16: Example of Communication models

(Project Management Institute, 2013)

46
 Encode: A sender encodes thoughts into a message that’ll be understood by
others.
 Transmit message: the output of the encoding is to send the message using an
appropriate medium.
 Decode: A receiver translates the information into an understandable message.
 Acknowledge: The receiver should admit to the receiving of the message.
 Feedback/Response: Once the message has been decoded & understood, the
receiver sends a response to the original sender. (Farr, 2013)
3. Communication methods
These are classified as the methods of sharing information among stakeholders;
1. Interactive communication: This involves having two or more parties in a multi-
directional communication channel.
2. Push Communication: This information is sent to specific people or groups and
doesn’t necessarily ensure that the information was received and/or understood.
3. Pull Communication: Allows recipients in large audiences to access large
volumes of information when needed.
4. Information management systems:
This is a technique facilitating the processes and procedures used to collect,
store and distribute information between producers and consumers of the
information in either physical or electronic format. (Long Island Chapter of the
Project Management Institute, 2011) Tools used may include project meetings,
email, hard copy document distribution etc. (Project Mangement Institute,
1996)
5. Performance reporting:
This is a technique of collecting and disseminating performance information to
project stakeholders such that they understand how resources are being used to
achieve the project’s objectives. (Project Mangement Institute, 1996)
This technique is usually inclusive of three major categories:
o Status Reports; describing where the project now stands.

47
Figure 17: Project Status report

(ideastocker, 2018)

o Progress Reports; describing what the project team has thus far
accomplished.

48
Figure 18: Project Progress Report

(M.Y., 2015)

o Forecasting Report; predicting future status of the project and progress.


The performance reports generally provide information on scope, schedule, cost
quality, risk and procurement.

49
Figure 19: Sample of forecasting Report

(Excel Templates, 2018)

Outputs
The importation of inputs and running the tools and techniques against the inputs leads to a
generation of outputs that the project manager is makes key usage of in terms of ensuring the
successful outcome along the project’s lifecycle.

1. Project Communications
Involves activities that’re required for information to be received,
acknowledged and understood. The communications may include and aren’t
limited to performance reports, status of deliverables, schedule progress etc and
are influenced by urgency, appropriate delivery method and the level of
confidentiality.
2. Project management plan updates
Includes areas of the project management plan that may need updating such as
the project baselines (scope, schedule, and cost), communications management
and stakeholder management.

50
3. Project document updates
The project documents are also subject to being updated after this phase of
project communication management. They include the issue log, project
schedule & funding requirements.
4. Organizational Process Assets updates
The organizational process assets should also be update in order to reflect the
results from the performance reporting and information management systems.
The updates are made up of lessons learned documentation, feedback from
stakeholders, stakeholder notifications, project records and project reports and
presentations.

Control Communications

Figure 20: Process of Control communication.

(Project Management Institute, 2013)

The control communications process falls under the monitoring and control process group and
serves the purpose of monitoring and controlling communications throughout the entire project
life cycle ensuring the information requirements of the project stakeholders are satisfied. (Alby,
2018) The key benefit the project stands to gain from this process is the effective
communication flow amongst all communication participants at any moment as well as in time.
(GlobalSkillup, 2016) Thus, achieving the ultimate goal that the project continues to deliver
the right message to the right audience at the right time and understood in the desired manner.
(Farr, 2013)

Inputs
1. Project management plan
This document describes how the project will be executed, monitored,
controlled & closed. This plan provides information for controlling
51
communications that the project manager will find beneficial such as
stakeholder communication requirements, reason, timeframe & frequency for
information distribution, reason etc. (Bryant, 2016)
2. Project Communications
The project communications will address the level of detail and formality of
information that needs to be distributed depending on the individual needs of
the project and its stakeholders. It’ll involve information such as status of
deliverables, schedule process and costs incurred. (Farr, 2013)
3. Issue Log
This document catalogues & monitors issues within the project and their
resolutions and continues to document the person responsible for issue
resolution by a target date. (Long Island Chapter of the Project Management
Institute, 2011)

Issue Log
Project: Date:
Issue Description Priority Category Reported Assigned Status Date Resolution
(H, M, By To Resol /
L) ved Comments
This Detailed High, Assign to Who Who is the What is What What was
should description of Medium a reported issue the date the
be a the issue. or Low category. the issue? assigned status was resolution
standar priority. to? of the the or what is
d issue? issue being done
number resolv to resolve
ing ed? the issue?
system.
(Piscopo, 2018)

4. Work performance data


This is information regarding the project’s process, in terms if raw observations
& measurements identified during activities performed, measured against the
project’s performance baseline. Data collected may include work completed,
technical performance measures & number of change requests. (Bryant, 2016)
5. Organizational process assets
Similarly, to managing communications, these assets constitute information that
the project can draw on to understand the influences of controlling
communications such as allowed communication media, report templates &
available communication technologies, record retention policies & security

52
requirements and policies, standards and procedures for communicating. (Farr,
2013)

Tools & Techniques


1. Information Management Systems
This technique provides a set of standard tools i.e. processes, procedures and facilities,
to capture, store and assimilate information about costs, schedule and performance
between the information’s producers and consumers in either physical e.g. memos,
letters, reports or electronic format e.g. telephone, voicemail, email etc. (Long Island
Chapter of the Project Management Institute, 2011)
2. Expert Judgement
This is a technique that applies the tools of specialized technical & management
knowledge to assess the impact of communications and identify the need for
intervention, action plans, assigning responsibility and determining the appropriate
timeframes. (Farr, 2013)
3. Meetings
Meetings are techniques that provide a forum to discuss the most appropriate way to
update and communicate project performance and responding to requests from
stakeholders. Meetings should be effectively managed using appropriate locations,
timeframes and agendas to get productivity and fulfilment out of them. (Farr, 2013)

Outputs
1. Work Performance Information
This summarises and communicates performance data to the level required by various
stakeholders. (Farr, 2013) It’ll include information such as technical performance
measures, project deliverables status, required corrective actions, and performance
reports.
This information contributes to the efficient use of resources, helps identify potential
problems & continues to serve as a capable project management tool. (Alby, 2010)

2. Change Requests
Control Communications often results in need for adjustment, action and interventions.
The requests are reviewed using the Perform Integrated Change Control process and
may result in;
 New/Revised cost estimates, schedules, activity sequences etc

53
 Updates/adjustments to the project management plan and related documents.
 Recommendations for corrective or preventive actions.
(Farr, 2013)
3. Project Management Plan Updates
The management plan may need to be updated as a result of controlling
communications such that is in par with the current status of the project e.g. stakeholder
and human resource management plan. (Farr, 2013)

4. Project Documents Updates


The project’s own documents are also updated in reflection of the controlling
communications process such that communication within the project isn’t interfered
e.g. performance reports and issue logs. (Farr, 2013)

5. Organizational Process Assets Updates


The organisational assets will also need to be updated resulting from the controlling
communications process as it may also affect managing stakeholders e.g. causes of
issues, reasoning for corrective actions etc. (Farr, 2013)

Conclusion
The communication management knowledge area among other knowledge areas is crucial to
the success of the project. The criticality of communication amongst the various stakeholders
and resources involved goes a long way to ensuring tasks are completed in time ensuring the
project doesn’t exceed its assigned time. The project manager’s responsibility of managing
the communication channels and all contents of the channels will ensure that the

c) Project Risk Management – ITERITEKA Daisy Gladys(TP040486)


1. Introduction
Risk management is the practice of finding, assessing and controlling threats to a company's
capital. These threats or risks could come from a large variety of sources, including financial
uncertainty, legal liabilities, strategic management errors, accidents and natural
disasters, IT security threats and data-related risks.

Therefore, risk Management is an important part of the project to increase the chances of the
project’s success. The previous PM had failed to initiate any part of Risk Management and
therefore, this management part will begin from scratch. Throughout this section, risks will be

54
identified, a team will be formed to handle the risks led by the Project Manager, various
analyses will be made and upon the analysis results, actions, solutions, and contingency plans
will be made. (Rouse, 2017)

2. Risk Management Plan


As risk management deals with all the areas of Administration including Integration, Scope,
Time, Cost, Quality, Human Resource, Communication, Stakeholder, Risk, and Procurement.
A person from each of those areas will be taken and the person selected will be an expert in
that field preferably, the leader of their own management field. If for any reason, that is not
possible, the second highest rated person will be chosen based on experience on projects and
previous recommendations. The Risk Management Team will be led by no other than the
Project Manager. (Watt, n.d.)

Therefore, being the leader in the Risk Management team, the authority to update the Risk
Registry falls to the Project Manager as well. The template of the risk registry will be made
during this stage. But the information will be updated as the risk management process is
completed providing the team with information. As risk is a dynamic environment, there is
“controlling and monitoring” the risks, this outputs to a reviewing the project and updating the
risk registry. This will be done every ten working days or 4 days before a meeting with the
Actavis HealthCare Pte.Ltd (AH) Superiors, whichever is more recent will be chosen. For
extreme risks, Back-up plans will be made or for other “regular” risks contingency plans will
be made.

The Probability and Impact Matrix Range will be carried on from previous projects for ease of
superiors and subordinates. The Matrix will be described in the Qualitative Risk Analysis
Section. Risk categories will be the same as the Management areas of the problem domain.
The Risk Response will also be further explained in the Risk Response Section.

 Risk categories
Risk Breakdown Structure (RBS)

Risk category is the combination of Operational, Financial, People, Regulatory, Governance,


and Technical. Operational deals with the activities or services that the performed in the
projects. Financial is a type that directly with the risks which result in primary loss in budget.
Regulatory deals with the upper management rules and regulations. Governance deals with the

55
management side of the organization. Technical is the type of risk category that that deals with
techniques that need to be performed in the project such as documentation.

No Category Risk

R1 OPERATIONAL The Project Feasibility study was not presented to


the steering Committee.

R2 TECHNICAL There is no formal documentation of the project


approval

R3 TECHNICAL Complete lack of evidence that the process of


proper project management was adhered to.

R4 FINANCIAL Hardware technical specifications are dynamic and


being changed because of improper req. analysis
and elicitation.

R5 OPERATIONAL Actavis HealthCare (AH) is requesting more and


more requirements almost daily and the Team Led
is accepting them all.

R6 OPERATIONAL WBS is not structure properly as there is a


redundancy of work. The Manager was ineffective
at his job and did not review the WBS to make it
holistic.

R7 OPERATIONAL Lack of focus on tasks given by the Project


Manager and more focus on individual daily tasks.

R8 OPERATIONAL Lack of logical following on dependent tasks


related to each other when performing tasks.

R9 FINANCIAL IT assets acquisition and spending were through


Procurement Manager with suppliers without going
through a proper tendering process. There was no
proper tendering process from the Procurement
manager’s side for obtaining IT assets

R10 FINANCIAL budget has overflown because of R9

R11 OPERATIONAL There is no testing plan.

R12 REGULATORY Lack of Clarity on Designated Sponsor for Project.

56
R13 GOVERNANCE No project organizational structure was developed
to manage the project.

R14. PEOPLE Department Head or Managers were overruling the


actions given by the Project Manager.

R15 PEOPLE The people hired for the network and security areas
were technically unskilled at their jobs.

R16 TECHNICAL Because none were prepared there is no monitoring


report to review and make changes if needed.

R17 OPERATIONAL Though risk was identified it did not go through the
full PMBOK process of risk management.

R18 OPERATIONAL With only four months left, the negotiations for the
hardware and software acquisition were still in
talks.

(VISWANATHAN, 2016)

3. Risk Identification
3.1. Writeup
Risk identification is among the main procedures of the risk management plan. The Risk
Management team will meet every ten working days to review changes and state of the ISCMS
project to identify new risks. The first risk identification meeting will be held before the project
starts. The initial meeting after the change of PM has resulted in eighteen risks. (Power, 2014)

Risk can be known through certain methods including brainstorming, the Delphi Technique,
Interviewing, SWOT analysis. The first risk identification meeting after the initial meeting will
utilize both brainstorming and SWOT analysis. SWOT analysis will not be utilized again
throughout the project. It is used initially to identify the broad negative and positives risk that
apply to the project. The second meeting will perform Delphi Technique as contrast to
brainstorming. Brainstorming is a group activity and might inhibit individual thoughts as such
to balance it Delphi Technique will be in the second meeting. The risk identification meetings
rotate between using brainstorming and the Delphi Technique. (Power, 2014)

3.2. Risk Identification techniques (brainstorming, Delphi, interview, etc)


No Risk Description
R1 Steering The Project Feasibility study was not presented to the steering Committee.
Committee out-
of-loop

57
R2 Documentation There is no formal documentation of the project approval
Error
R3 Project Complete lack of evidence that the process of proper project management was adhered to.
Management
Process Error
R4 Dynamic Tech Hardware technical specifications are dynamic and being changed because of improper req.
Spec analysis and elicitation.
R5 Improper Actavis HealthCare (AH) is requesting more and more requirements almost daily and the
Requirement Team Led is accepting them all.
Elicitation
R6 WBS Procedure WBS is not structure properly as there is a redundancy of work. The Manager was ineffective
error at his job and did not review the WBS to make it holistic.

R7 Singular Lack of focus on tasks given by the Project Manager and more focus on individual daily
Operation Error tasks.
R8 Task priority Lack of logical following on dependent tasks related to each other when performing tasks.
Error
R9 IT acquisition IT assets acquisition and spending were through PROC Manager with suppliers without
Error going through a proper tendering process. There was no proper tendering process from the
PROC manager’s side for obtaining IT assets
R10 Budget-Limit Because of Risk R9, budget has overflown
Error
R11 Quality-Testing There is no testing plan.
Error

R12 Sponsor Protocol Lack of Clarity on Designated Sponsor for Project.


Error

R13 Improper Project No project organizational structure was developed to manage the project.
Organizational
Structure

R14 illegal DM Department Head or Managers were overruling the actions given by the Project Manager.
protocol
R15 Ineffective The people hired for the network and security areas were technically unskilled at their jobs.
Hiring
R16 Improper Because none were prepared there is no monitoring report to review and make changes if
Monitoring needed.
Protocol

58
R17 Ineffective Risk Though risk was identified it did not go through the full PMBOK process of risk
Management management.
R18 Ineffective With only four months left, the negotiations for the hardware and software acquisition were
Equipment still in talks.
Acquisition

3.3. Risk Register


The risk register as stated before, get updated after every meeting of the risk management team
which is every ten days. After the whole process is done, the risk register is updated. It contains
the risk ID, risk Event, probability, impact, priority, cost, EMV, Risk Response, Contingency
which includes: trigger, plan and Risk Owner. The risk register is a summary of all the risks
and the information related to them. (McDonough, 2014)

4. Qualitative Risk Analysis


There are many methods to use for Qualitative risk analysis (is to analyze risks involved in the
project). The technique used in this project will be the Probability and Impact Matrix. The
matrix gives an output of the probability of the risk occurring and potential damage impact of
the risk to the project. This provides helpful information to the team for risk monitoring, control
and response. The tables below explain the Probability and Impact Range and what that range
the means for each of them. (Collins, 2014)

The Impact Matrix rates the risk from one to five; with five being project failure. Each of the
high-ranking number displays the amount of damage the risk can concur on the project if it is
not avoided or solved. The Impact times Probability results in the Total Risk Factor, which
expresses the total risk value of the specific risks. (Gray, 2013)

4.1. Probability Scale


Rating Chance Description

1 0%-20% Chances to occur are quite Low. Occurrences are rare and may
require external input to occur.
Unlikely

2 21%-40% Probability of occurrence still low but not low as rare. May have
occurred in past projects but infrequently.
Possible

3 41%-60% Occurrences are neither rare nor common.


Likely

4 61%-80% Has occurred in past projects. Probably will occur in this project
Almost

59
5 81%-100% Has occurred in past projects and has a high probability of
occurring again in current project. Conditions might even be prime
Certain
for it to occur.

4.2.Impact Scale
Rating Impact Description

1 Very low Minimal Impact. Might not affect the project at all or affect might be
minimal enough to be ignored
2 Low Minor Impact. Will affect Project but still effect is small enough to be
ignored.

3 Medium Impact will be noticed. Though not significant, should be monitored.

4 High High Impact. Quality of project can be compromised. Features and


Functionalities can be affected negatively and can be compromised as
well.

5 Extreme Highest Impact. Project Failure is a realistic possibility.

4.3.Risk Urgency Assessment (Priority)


Priority groups the probability and impact to create the overall risk value of the risk to the
project. The higher the number, the riskier the project is.

5 5 10 15 20 25

4 4 8 12 16 20

3 3 6 9 12 15

2 2 4 6 8 10

1 1 2 3 4 5

1 2 3 4 5

4.4. Risk Heat Map


PROBABILITY

5 5 10 15 20 25
R1,R5,R14 R17,R12,R10
4 4 8 12 16 20
R8 R7,R11,R15,R18
3 3 6 9 12 15
R3,R4,R9 R16
2 2 4 6 8 10
R2,R13
1 1 2 3 4 5
R6

60
1 2 3 4 5

IMPACT

4.4.1 Risk Ranking Summary


Extreme Risk R10,R12,R17

High Risk R1,R5,R7,R11,R14,R15,R18

Moderate Risk R3,R4,R8,R9,R16

Low Risk R2,R13

Low or Missing Risk R6

5. Quantitative Risk Analysis


EMV = PO (Probability of Occurrence) * RV (Risk Value)

As the title indicates, Quantitative risk analysis varies from Qualitative in the perspective that
it deals with specific numeric value that contain real meaning. This is an analysis based on the
results from Qualitative pertaining the highest prioritized risk. One of the most important task
of this analysis is the calculation of EMV. EMV assists in pertaining risk cost in terms of
money. (Shuttleworth, 2017)

Therefore, Quantitative Risk Analysis is performed utilizing the EMV or Expected Monetary
Value. EMV is calculated using two factors – probability of occurrence (PO) times the full
amount of money (RV) lost (or gained, depending on positive or negative risk) when said risk
occurs. (Shuttleworth, 2017)

6. Plan Risk Response


In the Plan Risk, there are 4 types of responses: Mitigate, Avoid, Accept and Transfer.

Mitigation (Mitigate): This response requires mitigating the probability or/and subsequent
negative results to an acceptable standard. Responding to reduce the probability of the risk
occurring is a better action than trying to mitigate the damage after the risk has occurred. In the
scenario where the reduction of the probability is not possible, certain specific variable that
cause the most severe damage to the project should be targeted to minimize the damage.

Avoid: This response means to take out the risk or the factors that cause the risk by altering the
project plan. This does not mean that all risk scenarios can be avoided but some are possible.
Proper requirement elicitation, communication and information can aide in this.

61
Accept: Acceptance is the decision of the team to accept the risk as it is and not to alter any
project plan to avoid or mitigate it. This can be due to the less severity of the risk overall.
Contingency plans can be developed to be called into action in the event of the risk occurring.

Transfer: This type requires shifting the consequence of the risk to a third party to handle.
This basically moves the responsibility of the risk from the team to another party to handle
though the presence of the risk might still be present. (VISWANATHAN, 2016)

7. Control Risks
Risk monitor and control deals with the risks and all the alteration of any kinds. These
alterations are adding, updating or deleting the risks. As mentioned before, the risk register
would be updated every ten working days or four days before meeting with the company
supervisors. (Imagine Education, 2012)

Risk meeting will be attended by the heads of all the individual department heads. The
meeting to identify the risks to last maximum one day, after which the risks Identification
table shall be updated and from which, the risk qualitative and quantitative analysis will start
again. (Imagine Education, 2012)

Risk audit: Here, the integrity of the risk responses and planning are audited for affectivity
and efficiency. This will go on until the end of the project. (Imagine Education, 2012)

Contingency reserve analysis: In terms of the project management scope of work and work
flow, the concept of reserve analysis refers to a specific technique that is often implemented by
the project management team and/or the project management team. The purpose of
the execution and implementation of a reserve analysis is the establishment of an estimated
reserve that can be used for the purposes of establishing a schedule duration, any and all
estimated costs, the budget, as well as the complete funds assigned or allocated to the project.
(Project Management Knowledge, 2018)

8. Risk Register
Risk Register 1
Risk Risk Description Probability Impact Priority Cost EMV
ID
R1 the steering committee do 0.40 1 0.40 $150,000 $60,000
not recall of being
presented the project
feasibility study by the

62
Project Sponsor or the
Project Manager to them.
R2 the project approval was 0.10 2 0.20 $35,000 $7,000
not formally
documented.

R3 there is no evidence that a 0.60 1 0.60 $40,000 $24,000


proper project
management process was
followed.
R4 the PC and server 0.70 3 2.10 $80,000 $168,000
hardware technical
specifications were
constantly being changed
to suit new or added
requirements
R5 requirements keep 0.64 2 1.28 $97,000 $124,160
coming in from users
almost daily where the
ITSS-ADC Team Lead
keeps on accepting them
without hesitation.

R6 there was redundancy of 0.7 3 2.10 $34,000 $71,400


work performed as the
Work Breakdown
Structure (WBS) was
done separately by each
respective department and
the Project Manager did
not review and then
consolidate those WBSs
into one wholistic WBS.

R7 most of the team members 0.90 3 2.70 $120,000 $324,000


have been focusing more
on their daily operation
support rather thantasks
being assigned by the
Project Manager or their
respective Team Lead.

R8 tasks are performed 0.40 2 0.80 $75,000 $60,000


without prioritizing other
dependent tasks.

63
R9 IT assets acquisition and 0.60 3 1.80 $86,000 $154,000
spending went through
outsourcing manager
with suppliers without
going through a proper
tendering process.
R10 purchasing of IT assets 0.70 2 1.40 $200,000 $280,000
without a proper
tendering process has led
to overrun by budget.

R11 the testing plan was not 0.32 1 0.32 $55,000 $17,600
developed yet.
R12 there was not even a clear 0.24 3 0.72 $225,000 $162,000
designated sponsor (or
sponsors) for the project.
R13 there was no clear project 0.70 2 1.40 $21,000 $29,400
organizational structure
to manage the project.
R14 the Project Manager’s 0.10 2 0.20 $35,000 $7,000
authority was constantly
overridden by the
department head
/managers.

R15 technical skills were 0.60 2 1.20 $33,000 $39,600


especially lacking in the
network and security
areas.
R16 there were no monitoring 0.10 1 0.10 $40,000 $40,000
reports to review as none
were prepared and
formally documented.
R17 the risks associated with 0.50 3 1.5 $250,000 $375,000
the project, although
documented, had no
detailed action plans and
were not categorized in
terms of impact or
severity.

64
R18 the hardware and software 0.10 1 0.10 $135,000 $135,000
delivery was still being
negotiated with some
potential vendors while
there were only four (4)
months to complete the
project.

Risk Register 2

Risk ID Risk Description Risk Category Triggers Plan Owner


R1 the steering committee Communication Steering Invite the Communication
committee is committee by manager
do not recall of being
not well sending them
presented the project informed about a formal
the invitation
feasibility study by the
presentation of
Project Sponsor or the feasibility
study.
Project Manager to
them.
R2 the project approval was Project Process Project Accentuate on Project manager
not formally approval is not the Project
documented. properly documentation
highlighted.
R3 there is no evidence that Project Process Previous Explain to the Project manager
project team team about
a proper project
didn’t attend to which
management process any proper methodology
project is being used.
was followed.
methodology
R4 the PC and server Technology Hardware Go through all IT Manager
specifications the
hardware technical
changes are requirements
specifications were affected by with the
requirements stakeholders
constantly being
changes. to ensure
changed to suit new or minimal
changes.
added requirements tion
R5 requirements keep Human Factor Development Set a deadline IT Manager
coming in from users team is and finish all
almost daily where the accepting the
ITSS-ADC Team Lead changes to the requirements
keeps on accepting them system. by that
without hesitation. deadline.

65
R6 there was redundancy of Human Project team is Design a WBS Project Manager
work performed as the Resources not getting the and give it to
Work Breakdown concept of all resources
Structure (WBS) was what they have
done separately by each to do
respective department
and the Project Manager
did not review and then
consolidate those WBSs
into one wholistic WBS.

R7 most of the team Organization Unclear Instructions Communication


members have been instructions and tasks are manager
focusing more on their from the given to the
daily operation support project resources
rather thantasks being manager
assigned by the Project
Manager or their
respective Team Lead.

R8 tasks are performed Human Previous Separate tasks Project Manager


without prioritizing Resources project team and assign
other dependent tasks. assigns task tasks
randomly w/o accordingly to
any system. employees.
R9 IT assets acquisition and Financial Previous Make sure all Procurement manager
project team procurements
spending went through
doesn’t have a are recorded
outsourcing manager proper
procurement
with suppliers without
process to
going through a proper follow.
tendering process.
R10 purchasing of IT assets Financial Poor and Review the Financial Manager
without a proper Inaccurate cost price from
tendering process has led estimation and different
to overrun by budget. also no cost sources to
management. avoid
unjustified
price.
R11 the testing plan was not Project Lack of expert Hire software IT Manager
Processes to execute the developers to
developed yet.
test plan. design the test
plan.
R12 there was not even a Project The previous To find who is Project Manager
Processes project the project
clear designated sponsor
manager didn’t sponsor from
(or sponsors) for the identify the the beginning
project sponsor of the project.
project.
from the
stakeholders.

66
R13 there was no clear Human Employees To implement Project Manager
Resources were not a proper
project organizational
assigned structured
structure to manage the accordingly to organizational
their teams. system within
project.
the project
team.
R14 the Project Manager’s Organizations The Previous Ask Project Manager
authority was constantly project didn’t employees to
overridden by the properly state prioritize
department head his authority to work assigned
/managers. employees. by the project
manager.
R15 technical skills were Human - - Human resource
Resources manager
especially lacking in the
network and security
areas.
R16 there were no Project Lack of Motivate team Project Manager
Processes guidance from regarding the
monitoring reports to
the high level importance of
review as none were to document reports
the reports
prepared and formally
formally.
documented.
R17 the risks associated with Project The previous Make sure that Risk Manager
the project, although Processes Project the risk
documented, had no manager didn’t manager is
detailed action plans and finish his/her leading well
were not categorized in tasks the project till
terms of impact or the end.
severity.

R18 the hardware and Human Factor Poor Confirm the Procurement Manager
software delivery was communication vendor.
still being negotiated between the
with some potential vendor and the
vendors while there were procurement
only four (4) months to team.
complete the project.

9. Conclusion
Risk Management is an essential part of the PMBOK’s project management. It assists in
keeping the integrity of the project excellence; it involves all the other areas of the project
management. Risk management ends with the results in the Risk Register. Though, the risk
register is typically a simple compilation of the previous segments: risk identification,
qualitative analysis with probability, impact and priority, quantitative analysis with EMV. The

67
addition of the contingency plan and Fall-back plan is exceptional to the risk register. Improper,
inefficient or ineffective performance of risk management has the potential to be quite deadly
to the project, on the other hand proper performance of risk management can mean the project
can survive several problematic issues.

d) Project Procurement Management. Nura Sahardid muse


TP040460
Introduction
Procurement is involved with securing items, facilities and works. From identifying the needs
till the end of delivering the products, procurement is the whole cycle of the services as it's far
involved with securing item facilities that fits the quality that customers desire and the local
community on the way to assist obtain the key priorities. As well it helps ordering services and
to develop markets in which is appropriate. There are four main processes in project
procurement management such as planning, conducting, control and close procurement.
(management strategy, 2015)

1. Planning Procurement

Planning procurements is verifying the project needs in order to outsource the products from
outside the organization and making sure the appropriate services are procured. It is fulfilling
numerous questions and deciding whether or not to obtain, the way to procure, what to
acquire, what quantity to obtain, and when to procure. (Kathy Schwalbe, 2012)

Types of contract

Fixed-price contracts
Is a type of contract that is intended to set a fixed total price for specific services, product or
other outcomes need to be provided. Fixed-price helps to merge financial motives in order to
accomplish or exceed proposed objectives, such as schedule delivery dates, cost and technical
performance, or things that can be counted and consequently measured. Suppliers who apply
fixed-price contract are obliged to complete this contract and accept with expected financial
damages if they do not fulfill it.

68
Cost-reimbursable contracts
This type of contract contains the process of repaying to the sellers the money that is been
offered to complete the services and plus the expected profit. In cost-reimbursable
contracts there may be conditions like financial incentive clauses that is affected whenever if
the seller exceeds, or fall below, outlined objectives such as costs, schedule, and technical
performance targets. Cost-reimbursable contracts consists the most used types of contracts such
as Cost Plus Fixed Fee (CPFF), Cost Plus Incentive Fee (CPIF), and Cost Plus Award Fee
(CPAF).

Time and Material Contracts (T&M).


Time and material contract, it has mixed features of contracts and it contains both fixed-price
and cost-reimbursable. If the statement of work cannot be described faster, staff augmentation
and acquisition of experts only then time and material contracts are used. This contract is
similar to cost reimbursable contract as it is flexible and it may cause cost to increase for the
buyer. At the time of contract, the buyer may not be able to define the details of the exact
amount of resources and full value of the agreements.

Proposed contract for the project.

Time and material contract proposed for this project as the seller and buyers share the risk in
evenly distributed also the project needs to outsource experts outside. This contract benefits to
estimate the cost of the experts in hourly rate and the contractor need to list down the desired
experience and experts with hourly rate as bid, the team will make sure to set a limit in order
to avoid running over budget. The initial phase of the project resources and scope are not
detailed or defined well this contract will be best suited and also it grants us the flexibility to
design, to change scope and materials at any time. Moreover, as we have limited time and need
to be finish within four months this contract is the best as the other contracts take some time.

Make-or-Buy Analysis

Make-or-buy analysis is used in order to analyse and determine whether specific types of
products can be accomplished by the project team or it is needed to be purchased from outside
the organizations. It happens the organization has the ability to produce but the time is limited

69
in this case the company needs to outsource in order to meet the specified time to complete the
project. Some factors may influence the make-or-buy decisions such as budget constraints.
(PMI, 2015)

Resources Buy Option Make Option


Transportation management $ 16,100 $ 18,100
Order management $ 10,000 $ 12,000
Yard management $ 14,800 $ 13,400
Labour management $ 7,000 $ 11,600
Warehouse management $ 12,600 $ 14,300
Demand Management $ 12,600 $ 12,900
Finance Management $ 11,400 $ 13,200
Procurement Management $ 5,800 $ 7,000
Customer Relationship $ 12,600 $ 13,000
Management
Supplier Relationship $ 10,500 $ 12,000
Management

Therefore, the project team decided to outsource all the ten resources as shown in the table
above the make option seems the price is higher and it consume more time for the team to
complete, in contrast outsourcing all the products will endure high product quality and will be
delivered successfully.
Procurement Team - Roles & Responsibility
Team Roles Responsibilities

Buyer To selects a suitable vendor and issues purchasing orders.


Prepares a list of potential vendors.
Procurement Officer To communicate and negotiate with vendors.
To send the request for proposals (RFPs) to the Chosen Vendors.
Manager Takes supervisory and managerial responsibilities.
Manages leads the work of the purchasing division.
Authorized to make decisions concerning operational activity.
closely works with the project manager.

70
Director Defines the long-term direction of strategic procurement processes and services for
the procurement department.
Also involved in high-value contract negotiations.
Concludes of international procurement contracts and agreements.
Analyst Prepare and submits procurement reports to the upper management.
Tracks spending activity against contracts and non-contracted spending.
Ensures procurement best practices and policy compliance
Lawyer In-house legal department that are responsible for reviewing legal implications of
contracts, for avoiding potential conflicts and for legal advising on complex
legislation for procuring products and services from external organizations as well
as for drafting terms and conditions of contracts.
Evaluation Committee Evaluates the proposal and prepare the evaluation reports. Also performs
submission of evaluation report with the approval of the tender broad.
Tender Broad Tender broad are responsible for inspection in the terms and conditions of the
contract agreement that are being awarded to a certain vendor. They also have the
authority to approve and reject a proposal or cancel the award contracts.
(Lewinson, 2010)

Bidding Deadline

Task Deadline

Identify need for goods, services need to Procure 2/12/2018

Release of RFQ/RFP/ITB/RFT 2/20/2018

Evaluation of bids/proposals 3/1/2018

Selection of supplier and Contract establishment 3/18/2018

Awarding the contract 3/28/2018

71
Contract Supervision 4/10/2018

Payment 4/30/2018

. (PMI, 2012)

Contents procurement management plan


Every project management consists some planning. The project management plan is a
document that defines how the outsourcing process will be managed, beginning from producing
the documentation to purchase from outside or acquisitions to contract closure. Project
management plan depends the type of project needs such as that there will different project
plan, contents according to different project needs. (Schwalbe, 2011)

Guidelines on types of contracts to be used in different situations


Standard procurement documents or templates to be used, if applicable
Risks associated with procurement management
Guidelines for creating contract work breakdown structures, statements of work, and other
procurement documents
Roles and responsibilities of the project team and related departments, such as the purchasing or
legal department
Guidelines on using independent estimates for evaluating sellers
Suggestions on managing multiple providers
Processes for coordinating procurement decisions, such as make-or-buy decisions, with other
project areas, such as scheduling and performance reporting
Constraints and assumptions related to purchases and acquisitions
Lead times for purchases and acquisitions
Risk mitigation strategies for purchases and acquisitions, such as insurance
contracts and bonds
Guidelines for identifying prequalified sellers and organizational lists of
preferred sellers
Procurement metrics to assist in evaluating sellers and managing
contracts
(Schwalbe, 2011)

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Contents of procurement Statement of Work(SOW)

The statement of work (SOW) it defines the process of the project scope baseline such as
activities, time and deliverables that will be part of the contract when vendors providing
services to the clients and that can pre-define whether or not the seller can fulfill the project
criteria that clients desire like services and products. Detailed statement can be different
depending on the type of item, the type of contract form that is expected and the buyer
requirements. SOW consists quantity that is needed, specification, quality levels, period of
performance, performance data, work location and other needs. (KERZNER, 2009)

Figure 21: Statement of Work template

(Kathy Schwalbe, 2016)

The types of Procurement Documents (RFI, RFQ, IFB and RFP)


RFI

73
Request for Information (RFI) is written form that is used to collect information from various
vendors to define the capability of the vendor when providing products and services to the
buyer. Specifically, its applied when the information about the vendors is limited and the
number vendors are many, to differentiate the best suppliers according to the provided products
and services as the organizations that are able and willing to fulfill these needs will be
shortlisted. (Purchasing & procurement Center, 2017)

RFQ

A Request for Quotation (RFQ) is document that is organization provides to different suppliers
into bidding and submit a bid a specific product or services. An RFQ suits for obtaining
products that are manufactured in repetitive quantities. Sometimes, when shortlisted vendors
are invited to offer a more detailed price quotes and that causes to led an RFQ into an RFP.
(Purchasing & procurement Center, 2017)

IFB

An Invitation for Bids (IFB) is way that the bid is sealed and invitation to the vendors with
lowest price only. An IFB describes the organizational process, defines specifications,
determines essential delivery terms, bidder qualifications, method of award and rules and
regulations, and guidelines for responding. (New York State Procurement Guidelines, 2014)

RFP

RFP is a document that is issued when the organization needs to purchase product or service
and make it available to the vendor although this is most costly attempt for the seller. Large
bids may contain separate volumes for cost, technical performance, management history,
quality, facilities, subcontractor management, and others. Vendors may become uncertain the
amount of money to spend on bidding on a contract except if the vendor has high expectations
to win the contract or will be returning all the bidding cost to the buyer. (KERZNER, 2009)

RFP is chosen

Structure of request for proposal (RFP) document

74
1.Key section of an RFP The buyer first introduces organization and the purpose of the RFP.
what the organization wants from the vendors to do but also why.
1) what
What is the central “pain point” the organization has?
2) Describe
the organization, what it does, about the company values. What makes
unique?
3) Why
The reason why the organization need to purchase a new product and
services?
Plan
what the organization plan to accomplish or what outcome they have in
mind
4) How
Contract. Information needed from suppliers. Proposal evaluation
criteria.
Contract award criteria
5) When
Selection process timeframe and deadlines. Persons to contact.
1.2 Statement of Purpose Describe the extent of products and services your organization is
looking for, as
well as, the overall objectives of the contract.
1.3 Background Information Present a brief overview of your organization and its operations, using
statistics, customer demographics, and psychographics. State your
strengths and weaknesses honestly. Don’t forget to include
comprehensive information on the people who will handle future
correspondence
1.4 Scope of Work Enumerate the specific duties to be performed by the provider and the
expected outcomes. Include a detailed listing of responsibilities,
particularly when subcontractors are involved.
1.5. Outcome and Specify the outcome targets, minimal performance standards expected
Performance Standards from the contractor, and methods for monitoring performance and
process for implementing corrective actions.

75
1.6 Deliverables Provide a list of all products, reports, and plans that will be delivered to
your organization and propose a delivery schedule.
1.7 Term of Contract Specify length, start date and end date of the contract, and the options
for renewal.
1.8 Payments, Incentives, and List all the terms of payment for adequate performance. Highlight the
Penalties basis for incentives for superior performance and penalties for
inadequate performance or lack of compliance
1.9 Contractual Terms and Attach standard contracting forms, certifications, and assurances. You
Conditions may include requirements specific to this particular contract.
1.10 Requirements for A consistent structure in terms of content, information, and documents
Proposal Preparation types simplifies things for the people evaluating the proposals.
Therefore, you should request a particular structure for the proposal and
provide an exhaustive list of documents you want to receive.
1.11 Evaluation and Award Lay down the procedures and criteria used for evaluating proposals and
Process for making the final contract award.
1.12. Process Schedule Clearly and concisely present the timeline for the steps leading to the
final decision, such as the dates for submitting the letter of intent,
sending questions, attending the pre-proposal conference, submitting
the proposal, etc
1.13 Points of contact for Include a complete list of people to contact for information on the RFP,
future correspondence or with any other questions. Incorporate their name, title,
responsibilities, and the various ways of contacting them into this list.

Source Selection
Source selection criteria is frequently added in the procurement document as part of it. These
criteria can be subjective or objective and is created to be use in a process to rate or score
vendor proposals. If the procurement item is provided by acceptable vendors, selection criteria
will be limited to only the purchase price. (PMI, 2015)

Criteria

76
Understanding of need How well does the seller’s proposal address the procurement statement of
work?
Overall or life-cycle Will the selected seller produce the lowest total cost of ownership (purchase
cost. cost plus operating cost)?
Technical capability Does the seller have, or can the seller be reasonably expected to acquire, the
technical skills and knowledge needed?
Risk How much risk is embedded in the statement of work, how much risk will be
assigned to the selected seller and how does the seller mitigate risk?
Management approach Does the seller have, or can the seller be reasonably expected to develop,
management processes and procedures to ensure a successful project?
Technical approach Do the seller’s proposed technical methodologies, techniques, solutions, and
services meet the procurement documents requirements or are they likely to
provide more or less than the expected results?
Warranty What does the seller propose to warrant for the final product, and through what
time period?
Financial capacity. Does the seller have, or can the seller reasonably be expected to obtain, the
necessary financial resources?
Production capacity Does the seller have the capacity and interest to meet potential future
and interest requirements?
Business size and type Does the seller’s enterprise meet a specific category of business such as small
business (disadvantaged, specific programs, etc.) as defined by the organization
or established by governmental agency and set forth as a condition of the
agreement award?
Past performance of What has been the past experience with selected sellers?
sellers
References Can the seller provide references from prior customers verifying the seller’s
work experience and compliance with contractual requirements?
Intellectual property Does the seller assert intellectual property rights in the work processes or
rights services they will use or in the products they will produce for the project?
Proprietary rights Does the seller assert proprietary rights in the work processes or services they
will use or in the products they will produce for the project?
(2012)

77
2. Conducting Procurements
After planning process is done, next will be conducting procurement. Conducting procurement
is the process of deciding what work will be assigned to whom, distributing appropriate
documentation to proper vendors, acquiring proposals or bids, selecting a seller, and awarding
a contract. The buying organization is required to advertise the material needed and for large
procurement, as well to offer bidder conference to specify about the job. The main results from
this a selected seller and awarding the contract. (Ayers, 2010)

Bidder conference

Bidder conference is a meeting that’s help by the buyer to invite all perspective sellers to allow
them to submit the proposal. The purpose of this meeting is to ensure all the vendors have clear
understanding about the procurement, the requirements whether it is technical and conceptual
and all the bidders receive the same treatment. The responses can be combined into the
procurement documents as amendments. Buyers should endure all the sellers hear the questions
and answer about the procurement.

Proposal evaluation techniques (e.g. tender evaluation committees)

Based on the responses received from vendors there will be source selection and proper
evaluation process will be applied by the buyer’s procurement policies. Regarding the selection
is going to be approved by the evaluation committee and approve it by management. In this
project the team will be using Expert judgement and evaluation criteria to rate and score the
sellers.

Figure 22: Proposal Evaluation Template

78
(Maley, 2012)

Advertising technique

The number of sellers can be increase by providing different kinds of advertisements such as
advertising with newspapers and or special publications trade. Online resource is used to reach
out as many sellers as possible, in the case of government project may need public
advertisements of the procurement items, where most government projects being use either
public advertising or online posting. (Kathy Schwalbe, 2016)

How to evaluate bidders attach sample (tender evaluation sheet) and explain.

Vendor proposals are evaluated and as favored suppliers are chosen, referring to RFP
requirements.to evaluate vendors is used pre-defined evaluation criteria. There are three types
of vendor evaluation. A technical evaluation review, cost or financial evaluation review and
recommendation report of both evaluations. (Maley, 2012)

Figure 23: Tender Evaluation Sheet

(EXCELTEMPLATES, 2013)

79
Vendors Project Components Vendor(s) Descriptions
Vendor A Transportation management Vendor A will be providing three projects
Order management as the vendor has the ability to provide
Yard management these projects.
Vendor B Labor management Vendor B has large number of
Warehouse management development team, they have bidden
Logistic Management multiple GSCMP project components
Finance Management and that increases the performance that is
expected and they have agreed to deliver
the materials after negotiation with 1
month and half.
Vendor C Procurement Management Vendor C will be providing three as well
Customer Relationship as the development team is less compare
Management to Vendor B but is most likely same as
Supplier Relationship vendor A.
Management

Procurements Negotiations

Procurement negotiation is done in order to sign the contract between the vendor and the buyer
during purchasing while clarifying and coming to the mutual understand about the structure,
terms and requirements. All the agreements that is reached is been reflected the final contract
language. The subject that has been accomplished should include authority to make changes,
authority to make changes, responsibilities, contract financing, technical and business
management approached, proprietary rights, technical solutions, contract financing, technical
solutions, payments and price, overall schedule, and both vendor and buyer executes after
coming to the conclusion of the documents. (Project Management Institute, 2013)

Sellers selection
Based on the results of the vendor evaluation, the vendors that are considered to be competitive
to provide are those who have been judged and participated the procurement negotiation are
called the selected sellers and the contract will be awarded. Before proceeding to award, the

80
last approval will be needed to make by the organizational senior management and any other
high value, complex and high-risk procurement. (Project Management Institute, 2013).

Agreements

Agreements is the terms and condition that the vendor incorporates to meet the items the buyer
specified according the seller’s performance. The project management is responsible to specify
the requirements of the project and ensure the agreements has been met while following
organizational procurement policy. In some areas agreement is called an understanding, a sub
contract, contract or a purchase order. Agreements are unbreakable and equally shared among
the sellers and buyers regardless of it is complexity to fulfill the specified product, service or
results. And the buyer is responsible to pay the sellers. (Kathy Schwalbe, 2016)

3. Control Procurements

Control procurement is a process to manage the relationship between the two parties, to observe
the performance of the seller on the contract and the improvements that is required to be
performed by the seller. moreover, seller’s performance is observed to ensure the sellers meets
procurement requirements. The benefit is that both parties fulfills legal agreements according
to the procurement requirements. (Safari OREILY, 2013)

Contract change control system

Contract change control system is system that is planned to use during control procurements
and it establish a formal system for submitting a contract change requests. A brief description
about the project process should be covered and how changes are managed and solving
problems also defining authority levels.

Procurement performance review

is process that is focused on the sellers to conform the scope has been met by the seller
while focusing the triple constraint (time, cost and quality) and it is prepared as a structure
review. This gives the project team the chance to measure the seller’s work and the success
and failure rate, while provides to make decisions according the collected informations.

81
Inspection and audits

Inspection and audits is conducted to verify the contract deliverables have been met while the
project is executing. The buyer needs inspections and audits while the seller supports. In the
execution of the project the performance of the seller’s work procedures or deliverables are
identified. (Kathy Schwalbe, 2016)

Figure 24: Vendor performance Template

(tidyform, 2018)

Payment systems
Payment system is the process to ensure all the payments are made to the seller when the
work is done and confirm to be satisfied. After the work has been satisfied and certified
by the person on the project team, all the payments are proceeded by using account payable
and should be documented regarding the terms of the contract. (Kathy Schwalbe, 2016)

Payments Deadlines
Payment 1 2/20/2018
Payment 2 3/9/2018
Payment 3 3/18/2018

82
Payment 4 4/12/2018

Claims administration

Claims administration Is where sellers and buyers can’t agree on the changes that happened
or on the cost changes. Claims administration allocates and solves the terms that is agreed
upon both parties in the contract. Throughout the contract, these claims need to be stored,
processed, monitored and managed often the terms that are in the contract.

Record management system

Record management system is a system utilized by procurement as well as project manager.


This system operated to manage agreement and records also the documentation of the
procurement. It contains a particular arrangement of procedures, linked to the control the
operations, and automation instruments that are combined and collective as a component
of the project management information framework. The framework consists a recover of
the agreement files and correspondence. (Ogunsina, 2013)

4. Closing Procurement.

Closing procurement is the final process in procurement management and it called as contract
closure. Contract closure is including the completion and agreement of contracts and resolving
any open items. The project team need to verify if the requirement of contracts fulfilled and
completed correct. The requirements for formal acceptance and closure should be included in
the contract. the tools that is used in the contract closure are such as procurement audits,
negotiated settlements,
and a records management system. (Kathy Schwalbe, 2015) contract closure involves
completing the very procurement and identifying the planned work in the contract has been
fulfilled. (REALYST, 2015)

A procurement audits

A procurement audit is a designed analysis of the procurement procedure initiating through the
strategy of the procurement. The aim of the procurement review is to detect or recognize the

83
failure and the success that deserve the identification in the planning or organization of other
procurement agreements on the project, or different venture in the preparing association.

Procurement Negotiations

The dealings of the procurement conclude reasonable of unsettled problems, claims and
argument by arrangement of the main objectives. At the cases that resolution can't be
accomplished through direct debate, some type of alternative dispute resolution (ADR)
involving mediation or arbitration might be investigated. At the point when all else fails,
process in the courts is the minimum choice. (Project Management Institute, 2013)

Closed procurement notice, deliverable acceptance

The sellers receive a written notice from the buyer which authorized procurement administrator
sends and it mentions the contract has been completed. Requirements for formal procurement
closure are usually defined in the terms and conditions of the contract and are included in the
procurement management plan. the contract requires to be signed off and official closing the
project after the results and the deliverables of the project has been accepted. (Ogunsina, 2013),

84
Figure 25:Deliverable Acceptance Template

(Oracle, 2017)

85
Appendices
Gantt Chart
Network Diagram
Work Matrix

Name Type of the work


Jonathan Thomas  Project Charter
Musiitwa  Communication Management
 Lesson learnt

ITERITEKA Daisy  Project Leader


Gladys  Gantt Chart and Network Diagram
 Cost and Budgeting
 WBS
 Risk Management
 Lesson Learnt

Nura Sahardid Muse  Gantt Chart and Network Diagram


 Cost and Budgeting
 WBS
 Procurement Management
 Lesson Learnt
Tianci Wang  Project Methodology
 Quality Management Plan
 Cutover strategy and transition plan
 Human Resource Management
 Lesson Learnt

86
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