FRIEZE ART FAIR WEEKEND 16-17 OCTOBER 2010

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On view
Does sex really sell?
In the boom, fairs were awash with explicit art. But now the mood is cooler
LONDON. The first thing visitors
see as they enter the Frieze tent is
a fragment of an ancient city
exposed beneath them. Further
“archaeological digs” dotted
around the fair reveal the tanta-
lising remains of “The Frozen
City”—a brothel, the grave of a
female patron, and a Roman art
market. Cartier Award-winning
artist Simon Fujiwara says the
city was “a world of lavish
excess and decadence [where]
every imaginable desire could be
indulged—at a cost”.
A time-travelling resident
from Fujiwara’s city might be a
bit disappointed by the art fair,
2010-style. This edition of Frieze
appears to be one of the most
asexual in recent memory: quite
a switch from the boom, when
titillation, testosterone and temp-
tation-stocked stands helped fuel
sales. “Normally you see a
wiener in the first 15 minutes at
an art fair,” says Los Angeles
dealer Marc Foxx (B6). “There
is a lack of glitzy-type art at the
fair this year, perhaps a cumula-
tive effect of the recession,” says
Matthew Higgs, the director of
New York’s non-profit White
Columns art space. “Along with
the bling, out goes the sex.”
The nude has been a central
art historical subject since the
Greeks carved buff athletes
4,000 years ago, but even our
permissive society is still ruffled
by images of the flesh. Tate
Britain’s exhibition of 19th-cen-
tury photographs by Eadweard
Muybridge has a notice about the
nudity. “In the last couple
decades museums have been
posting warnings,” says art advi-
sor Allan Schwartzman. “This
helps condition audiences.” But
as the late art historian Kenneth
Clark argued, an erotic response
is innate. “No nude, however
abstract, should fail to arouse in
the spectator some vestige of
erotic feeling…and if it does not
do so, it is bad art and false
morals,” he wrote.
This is not to say sex is not
for sale at Frieze. “Sex is in the
eye of the beholder,” says art
advisor Thea Westreich. “It’s
what you bring into the room.”
Westreich observes that the bar-
rage of images in mainstream
life have made sexuality in art
more mundane. “With the inter-
net, and freedom of expression,
there is not much to annotate
about sexuality,” she says. Her
pick of the fair? Tariq Alvi’s
Poster for a Library, depicting a
young man reading a book in a
state of arousal. The screenprint
is available from Cabinet (D16)
for £1,200.
Much of the sex on display—
and the examples finding buy-
ers—tends to be toned-down.
There is nudity, but fewer sexual
acts. There are images appropri-
ated from porn, but applied from
a safe distance. Among the most
popular are photographs by
Ryan McGinley, who has shot
nubile nudes for the past five
years. These images were strong
sellers at New York’s Team
Gallery (E15). An edition of
three of a thin young man in a
tunnel, suffused with golden
light, sold out at $35,000 apiece.
Another speedy seller was
Philip-Lorcia diCorcia’s 2008
Untitled (From the Series East of
Eden) featuring a pair of elegant,
white dogs glued to a grainy
porn video on a television. Five
out of eight, priced $25,000
apiece, sold by Friday afternoon.
Then there is work that is a
harder sell. Three meticulous
ballpoint drawings at London’s
Herald St (A5) by Cary Kwok
are tucked in a small alcove at
the back of the stand. They
depict a priest, a Buddhist monk
and a Hasidic Jew—eyes closed,
aswoon, post-ejaculation. The
work has a loyal following,
according to Herald’s Nicky
Verber, but no sales. At £4,500
each, all three were available.
David Zwirner (G12) has
brought a forceful 1964 portrait
by the late American painter
Alice Neel, priced at $160,000.
The middle-aged blonde, Ruth
Nude, is seated, legs spread. “We
wanted to bring a really strong
portrait,” says Zwirner’s Angela
Choon. “I’ve been told people
love it, but can’t have it at home
because of kids.”
Tracey Emin’s embroidered
Dark Hole, 2009, at Lehmann
Maupin (B13), depicts a disem-
bodied female lower half, recall-
ing the wavering line of Egon
Schiele. The composition is
stark: between a pair of spindly
legs on stilettos, bejeweled
hands frame a black orifice.
Priced £115,000, the work had
attracted interest, but no takers.
Younger dealers said there
was plenty of sex lurking at the
fair, but noted that a new genera-
tion of artists is referencing sex
in new, conceptual ways. “If
there is sex, it’s more about using
the theme of sexuality itself as a
topic,” says Zurich dealer Jean-
Claude Freymond-Guth, who is
showing at Sunday, a fair dedi-
cated to emerging artists.
Freymond-Guth’s stand features
Megan Francis Sullivan, a
straight female artist who appro-
priates 1950s gay porn into her
paintings. (Works are priced
$1,400 to $6,000). “It’s extreme-
ly coded. It’s not about provoca-
tion or subjective desire.”
The Frieze stand of Berlin
dealer Johann König (E7)
doesn’t appear sexy at first, but
an abstract painting by Nathan
Hylden, with a smear of creamy
white drippy paint, suggests bod-
ily fluids. “Sex does sell,” says
Konig’s gallery manager Gregor
Hose. “But it has to be visually
attractive and abstracted—a
well-educated approach to the
erotic.” Like Clark, Hose
believes art is related to sex.
“There’s always libidinous in it,”
says Hose. “Why do people buy
art? It’s an object of desire.”
Lindsay Pollock
Soft focus: Tom (Golden Tunnel), 2010, by Ryan McGinley, at Team Gallery (E15)
Reported sales
Expert eye
at Frieze
Alain Seban, president of
the Pompidou Centre,
Paris, picks a work that
caught his eye at Frieze.
“I chose a piece by Marine
Hugonnier, Art for Modern
Architecture, Die Welt,
Berlin Wall, 2010 (detail
above, Max Wigram
Gallery, A11). I like the
way it brings together the
heroic and the darker side
of modernism, minimalism
and politically engaged
art, architecture and the
structure of media
discourse, Ellsworth Kelly
and the Berlin Wall.”
Wolfgang Tillmans, Your
Dogs, on show with Maureen
Paley (D6), sold, priced at
$78,000
Jennifer Steinkamp, Orbit 8,
2010, on show with Lehmann
Maupin (B13), sold, priced at
$55,000
Johanna Karlsson, Untitled,
2010, sold to a new
European collector for
€7,000 from Magnus
Karlsson (F18)
Maybe, along
with the bling, out
goes the sex

An Eva Rothschild show will
be the inaugural exhibition at
the Hepworth Wakefield
gallery in Yorkshire, the
David Chipperfield-designed
museum due to open in May
2011. Frances Guy, head of
collections and exhibitions at
the gallery, revealed at Frieze
that at least two-thirds of the
work in the show will be new.
Three of the Dublin-born
artist’s latest works can be
seen at The Modern Institute
(B10); 303 Gallery (C13), and
at Stuart Shave/Modern Art
(D13) is her elegant piece
Repetition & Variation, 2010
(pictured right). J.P.
Hepworth to open with Rothschild
MORE OBJECTS OF DESIRE, P10
SEE SALES REPORT ON P4
” Matthew Higgs, White Columns
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2 THE ART NEWSPAPER FRIEZE ART FAIR WEEKEND 16-17 OCTOBER 2010
FRIEZE ART FAIR DAILYEDITION
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What a feeling
At the Cartier Award dinner on
Thursday night the
celebrations took a leg-
warmer-esque turn when a
handful of art world revellers,
including Frieze Projects
supremo Sarah McCrory,
descended on what they
thought was an art soirée—
only to discover that they’d
inadvertently stumbled upon
the launch party for
“Flashdance: the Musical”.
Watch out for a few nifty
dance steps—and the odd
leotard—as part of the next
Frieze Projects programme.
Ai bites the dust
Ai Weiwei and his army of
assistants spent this summer
making the 100 million
ceramic sunflower seeds that
now cover the floor of Tate
Modern’s Turbine Hall. Soon
after it opened, the museum
was forced to turn it into a
“look, don’t touch”
experience, however, after a
hasty risk assessment. Instead
of walking across the seed
bank, you can only appreciate
it from above now. The risk
of potentially dangerous
levels of dust was the cause
rather than the light-fingered
visitors pocketing the seeds.
Those at the private view on
Monday who couldn’t resist
taking home a souvenir or two
may find the value of their
snitched seeds grows in
rarity, forming a tidy windfall
in the future.
Back from the dead
There were some spooky
goings on this week at the fair
around the Frieze Project
devised by the artist and
Fortean Times contributor
Jeffrey Vallance, who asked
five psychics to channel the
spirits of blockbusting artists
Van Gogh, Frida Kahlo,
Jackson Pollock, Leonardo
da Vinci and Marcel
Duchamp. Before the
mediums—and the artist
phantoms—arrived, the
spiritualists predicted:
“There might be some
problems with electricity.”
Before you could say Doris
Stokes, the internet crashed
during the séance, which
meant that a live web
broadcast had to be scuppered.
It was all to do with
“forcefields”, apparently.
Slash relief
Never mind the booths,
veteran pop conceptualist
Billy Apple found aesthetic
nirvana at Frieze while on a
visit to the men’s room.
Apple, in London from his
native New Zealand for his
show at the Mayor
Gallery, singled out the
“impossibly discreet ‘toilet’
sign” for special attention.
“The white lettering on grey is
worthy of Lawrence Weiner—
or the best work of On
Kawara,” he enthused.
Neither was he short of a
snappy title for these limited
edition works: Need /[slash]
Relief.
Taste of leather
At the Hix restaurant at Frieze,
Picpus, the single-sheet mini-
mag named after the French
term for a flea bite, is
celebrating its first anniversary
with a special edition
emblazoned with a portrait of
Squadron Leader Arthur
Lushington Vipan which is
impregnated with a custom-
made—and suitably
masculine—perfume mingling
the smells of leather, tweed
and engine oil. Chocs away!
Creative kindergarten
You're never too young to be an art worldling. At Frieze the
nippers even match some of the works of art. Gagosian was
visited by this junior art fashionista with a T-shirt to match
Damien Hirst’s spot painting. At the same time, a crocodile of
suitably attired children set off for a treasure hunt in and
around the Frieze tent. The tender-aged group of art explorers
formed a roaming advert for the art patrons' group Outset's
latest enterprise, called The Art Room—a venture that funds
specially equipped art therapy classrooms.
Monika Sprüth,
co-director Sprüth Magers,
Berlin and London, B9
I have
always been
interested in
football,
even as a
young girl.
While I was
studying architecture, I
even made excuses to
miss lectures, just so that
I could listen to football
matches on the radio.
A good match can be
almost as gratifying as a
great work of art: it has
an aesthetic appeal,
tension and style.
I live in Cologne so I sup-
port the local team. In
the 1960s, the team was
much stronger and there
were some incredible
matches between
Cologne and Liverpool.
Now, I love Arsenal
because of the coach
[Arsène Wenger]. I also
like Chelsea. In fact, I
don't really have any
favourite players but I
really admire coaches
because they focus on
strategy and tactics.
I was fortunate to attend
two wonderful Champions
League matches at
Stamford Bridge when
Chelsea played Liverpool
and Barcelona. The
Liverpool-Chelsea match
[in 2009] was incredi-
ble—with a 4-4 draw. I
took [the US artist] Cindy
Sherman along to the
Liverpool game; it was
her first football outing
and she really enjoyed it.
Interview by Gareth Harris
Secret Lives
Artoon by Pablo Helguera




















e r a n o t y a l C a k n e L d n a e w o r C l e a h c i M
t n i y e h T . t c e j o r p t r a / g n i t i r w e l a c s - e g r a l a
l n o s e r o t s n o d n o L S O C n i d i l a v s i t n u o c s i d s i h T
b e s a e l P . s d r a c t fft i g S O C r o s m e t i l a n r e t x e o t




, s r e t t e L s u o i r e t s y M d n i h e b s t s i t r a e h t
. d l r o w e h t n i e n o y r ve e o t e t i r w o t d n e t
y l p p a t o n s e o d d n a r e b o t cc O h t 7 1 – h t 4 1 m o r f , y
. t n u o c s i d r u yo ve i e c e r o t r e h c u o v s i h t g n i r b
the kids. “Jelly Baby Family 2010 could easily embody the unity
of family and the multicultural aspect of modern society that is so
prevalent, especially in London,” says Perucchetti. More of his
work can be enjoyed now at the Halcyon Gallery in London.
Frieze-curated sculpture in Regent’s Park isn’t the
only public art that’s the talk of the town. Down the
road in Marble Arch, Italian sculptor Mauro
Perucchetti is due to unveil Mr and Mrs Candy and
Diary
What’s my
favourite? Anything
by the Germans. I
think Frieze is like the
World Cup. Every
year you have to pick
a favourite nation.
This year it’s the
Germans for me
because they’re strong
and good in defence.
Being so dyslexic I
can’t possibly pick out
a single work

” Writer A.A. Gill speaking at
Frieze—for a selection of
other people’s favourite art
at the fair, see p10
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4 THE ART NEWSPAPER FRIEZE ART FAIR WEEKEND 16-17 OCTOBER 2010
6 4 EAST 77TH STREET NEW YORK NY 10075
OCTOBER 6—JANUARY 21
Peter Schinz|er, Photography, Germany, www.schinz|er.com
6 4 EAST 77TH STREET T NEW YORK NY 10075
Sales report: Frieze
Solid sales point to success for most galleries
Exhibitors pleased by the level of business done with new collectors
LONDON. Half-way through the
Frieze art fair on Friday, most
dealers were declaring it a suc-
cess, with some stands rehanging
completely after the visitor surge
of the first day.
Anthony Wilkinson (D2),
who was pleased after selling
Dara Birnbaum’s video installa-
tion Taking to the Streets…,
1990, ($25,000) to a European
museum, said: “I was a bit ner-
vous before the fair opened—
2008 was terrible, 2009 was just
OK, so this year people couldn’t
quite gauge what would happen;
there’s relief all round.”
The gallerist’s words were
echoed across the floor, with
Thaddaeus Ropac (B11) saying:
“I’ve been surprisingly pleased,
people are making decisions
faster again.” Among his sales
were a big Anselm Kiefer, San
Loretto, 2008, for €520,000 and
a Gilbert and George, Money
Sweat, 1998, for £150,000,
which went to a Belgian collec-
tor. “We did most of our selling
on the first day,” he said. Los
Angeles gallerist Richard Telles
(E20) sold more than half the
works by LA artists that he
brought, including Ivan Morley’s
embroidered A True Tale, 2010,
for $32,000. He said: “the first
day—even the first three
hours—were really important.
It’s a hangover of the boom; the
big collectors are there right at
the beginning.”
Nevertheless, some major
collectors were seen on Friday,
including the collector of
Chinese art Uli Sigg, who was
considering buying some of Cao
Fei’s installation at Vitamin
Creative Space (H5). British col-
lector and dealer Charles Saatchi
headed straight for Sprüth
Magers (B9). Canadian musician
Richie Hawtin admired a David
Adamo sculpture at Ibid Projects
(H17), and the Belgian Mimi
Dusselier sought out Bortolami
(F19).
While some major US collec-
tors visited Frieze, they were less
active in the market than their
European peers: Ropac suggest-
ed this was because of the weak
dollar [against the euro] and
lower morale: “New York still
feels the crisis,” he said.
Maureen Paley (D6) said that
most of her sales had been to
Europeans, citing her newly-
signed Romanian twins Gert and
Uwe Tobias, whose Untitled
woodcut image from 2010, ask-
ing €30,000 and Wolfgang
Tillmans’ Your Dogs, 2008, ask-
ing $78,000 both sold.
One feature of this year’s fair
was the number of sales made to
new collectors, which pleased
exhibitors. “New business is
what makes fairs worth it, other-
wise we could just stay in our
galleries and work on our
shows,” said Rachel Lehmann
(B13). The gallerist sold only to
new clients, including Jennifer
Steinkamp’s Orbit 8, 2010 (all
three editions plus the artist’s
proof), for $55,000 each.
Sweden’s Magnus Karlsson
(F18) sold Johanna Karlsson’s
delicate Untitled, 2010, tree
sculpture to a new European col-
lector for €7,000, while
Edinburgh’s Richard Ingleby
(E17) did “amazingly well”, sell-
ing to “lots of new people” at
prices between £1,200 and
£40,000.
Other lower-end sales includ-
ed Carla Black’s cake sculpture
Still Moves, 2010, at Gisela
Capitain (C14) for £7,500.
Eigen+Art (F6) sold half its
booth dedicated to photographer
Ricarda Roggan at prices
between €4,800 and €14,000.
In Frame, Simon Preston (R14)
sold Carlos Bevilacqua sculp-
tures for between $10,000 and
$22,000.
At the market’s mid-level,
Long March Space (E18) had
sold most of its stand of works
by MadeIn, including a plushy
appliquéd fabric I Love You
Passion Fruit Piece (Spread–
BO53), 2010, to collector Guy
Ullens, asking £44,000.
CasaTriângulo (F26) sold
Mariana Palma’s 2010 painting
of silks at $35,000.
At the upper price end, David
Zwirner (G12) reported good
sales, among them Luc
Tuymans’ 2005 Evidence, for
$850,000. “People are not taking
risks but any artist with a strong
museum presence is selling; we
are seeing new clients, particu-
larly Russian and Middle-
Easterners based in London,”
said the gallery’s Ales Ortuzar.
At Gagosian (D8), Stefan
Ratibor said things were slowish
on the first day but picked up
afterwards: “This is supposed to
be a young fair but older artists,
such as Howard Hodgkin, are
finding buyers. The fair has
moved on from the original
Frieze readership,” he said.
Andreas Geiger at Sprüth
Magers (B9) summed up the
overall feeling: “People are
acquiring, but there’s no more
five-minute buying. The market
has found a good pace, it’s not
crazy, but it’s solid.”
Georgina Adam and
Melanie Gerlis
Frieze auction season ends with strong Sotheby’s performance
Evening sales this week have seen nearly £40m of contemporary art sold
MadeIn’s I Love You Passion Fruit Piece (Spread-B053), 2010
China’s art fraud squad
The Chinese Ministry of
Culture has opened the
Huangcheng Art Trading
Center in Beijing in an attempt
to regulate the country’s art
market. The government says
fraud is a growing problem as
the public’s enthusiasm for
buying art increases. The
centre has an appraisal
committee made up of more
than 300 experts who will
advise collectors on whether an
item is genuine or not. Lü
Lixin, head of the art
evaluation committee with the
Ministry of Culture, is the
director of the centre, which
will combine exhibitions,
advice and trading. S.S.
Gulf art talk
The artistic director of the
Sharjah Biennial Jack
Persekian is due to be a speak-
er at the Whitechapel Gallery’s
panel discussion on 16 October
(5pm to 6 pm) about the past
and future of contemporary art
production in the Gulf. Also
due to be on the panel is
Suzanne Cotter, curator of
exhibitions at the Guggenheim
Abu Dhabi. It will be chaired
by writer Shumon Basar. At
the same time, visitors can see
the gallery’s latest exhibition, a
solo show of the Lebanese-
born, US-based artist Walid
Raad (until 2 January 2011).
G.A.
Dubai’s new gallery
Middle-Eastern art specialist
William Lawrie is opening a
new gallery in Dubai, where he
is based. “I’ve been wanting to
do something new for some
time,” said Lawrie, who is
leaving his position as
Christie’s director of Middle
Eastern art at the end of the
year. “I want to work on my
own projects now. I have found
a space in the Al Quoz ware-
house district and will open the
gallery in early 2011.” His
partner in the new venture is
Asmaa Al Shabibi, former
managing director of the Dubai
Art Fair. The gallery will spe-
cialise in Middle Eastern
artists, but will also show some
international names. G.A.
LONDON. Sotheby’s ended the
Frieze evening auction season
last night with a small but strong
sale of £13.3m of contemporary
art (against an estimate of £10m
to £13.6m). In total, the evening
auctions this week have seen
nearly £40m of contemporary
art sold in London. While the
atmosphere has not hit its pre-
recession heights, a little bit of
the sparkle is back.
This was most evident at the
beginning of the auction, which
opened with young, fresh art,
helping to distinguish the Frieze
auction season from the more
heavyweight contemporary
sales coming to its New York
saleroom next month.
Auction newcomer and
Saatchi exhibitor Ahmed
Alsoudani was the second lot on
the block and his Untitled,
2007, which depicts the looting
of the Baghdad Museum, sold
over the phone for £289,250
(est £70,000 to £90,000). Iraqi-
born Alsoudani (who now lives
in the US) is one of five artists
selected to represent Iraq in the
2011 Venice Biennale (the first
time Iraq has had a pavilion
there since 1973). He has
recently been taken on by
Christie’s-owned Haunch of
Venison gallery. “People come
to London in October to find
new artists, and that should be
in the auction rooms as well as
at Frieze,” said Alexander
Branczik, Sotheby’s director of
contemporary art, after the sale.
Another early hit was
Elizabeth Peyton’s Arsenal
(Prince Harry), 1997, which
attracted much telephone bid-
ding and sold for £481,250 (est
£200,000 to £300,000).
Later bidding was less enthu-
siastic, but among the more
established artists was a group
of six works from the collection
of Jerry Hall, the model and for-
mer wife of Rolling Stones
singer Mick Jagger. Hall, who
did not attend the auction, had
previously told the media that
she was selling her art in order
to “move on” after her break-up
from Jagger. The works (whose
total high estimate was £1.8m)
collectively sold for £2.3m and
included a tiny portrait (10.2cm
x 15.2cm) of the pregnant Hall
by Lucian Freud, Eight Months
Gone, 1997, which was
described by auctioneer Oliver
Barker as a “little jewel”, and
sold for £601,250. A distorted
portrait, Jerry Hall, 1997, by
Francesco Clemente was esti-
mated at £100,000 to £150,000,
but attracted little interest and
went unsold. Sotheby’s is selling
another eight works from Hall’s
collection at its day sale today.
Sotheby’s has had success
with Andreas Gursky pho-
tographs in the past and last
night was no exception.
Carrying an irrevocable bid
(meaning the work had a third-
party guarantor who would
either purchase the work or
share in the upside should it be
taken higher), Gursky’s
Pyongyang IV, 2007, sold for
£1.3m (est £500,000 to
£700,000).
Melanie Gerlis
New business
is what makes fairs
worth it, otherwise
we could just stay in
our galleries


Clockwise from left: Andreas
Gursky, Pyongyang IV;
Lucian Freud, Eight Months
Gone; Elizabeth Peyton,
Arsenal (Prince Harry)
Tunis space to open
A North African contemporary
art collector is opening a centre
to display his Middle Eastern
art collection in Tunis.
Financial services entrepreneur
Kamel Lazaar is converting a
former Ottoman palace into a
space for exhibitions, seminars
and workshops in the Tunisian
capital. Artists in his collection
include Mona Hatoum
(Lebanon), Farhad Moshiri
(Iran) and Timo Nasseri
(Iran/Germany). Details of the
foundation will be included in
“Art & Patronage: The Middle
East” published in November
by Thames & Hudson/
TransGlobe Publishing. G.H.
©
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7 THE ART NEWSPAPER FRIEZE ART FAIR WEEKEND 16-17 OCTOBER 2010
SI NCE 1707
Auctions 23 – 25 November 2010
Contemporary Art
Modern Art, Design
Palais Dorotheum, Dorotheergasse 17, 1010 Vienna, Austria
Tel. +43-1-515 60-570, client.services@dorotheum.at
www.dorotheum.com
Anselm Kiefer (b. 1945), “die Ungeborenen” (detail), photograph, collage with lead and fabric,
123 x 60 cm, € 100,000 – 150,000, auction 24 November 2010
B
ryan Ferry came to
prominence in the 1970s
with his band Roxy
Music. He has also had a
successful solo career. He
tours extensively with the
reformed Roxy Music as lead
singer and contributes to both
the artistic direction of the
stage shows and the design of
his album covers. He trained
as an artist at Newcastle
University and has collected
art since the 1970s.
The Art Newspaper: Did you
have any art in your house as
a child?
Bryan Ferry: No, we didn`t
have any at all that I can think
of. It was a very small house. It
was an art-free zone.
TAN: What was the first
work of art that really made
an impression on you?
BF: In sixth form at school I
became interested in becoming
an artist. I wasn`t a natural
draughtsman or anything like
that, but I became consumed by
the whole thing. Discovering
one artist who would lead to
another period, you`d suddenly
find you`d exhausted all the
possibilities of Paris, and then
you`d move to New York and
think 'Oh my God!¨,
discovering Jackson Pollock,
Andy Warhol and all the other
people. There was quite a
strong connection with
Newcastle University, where I
went to art school, and New
York. My friend Mark
Lancaster went to work for
Andy Warhol and my other
friend, Tim Head, went to work
for Claes Oldenburg. Of course,
Richard Hamilton was there.
TAN: What was Hamilton
like as a teacher?
BF: One was in awe of him
because he was such a great
artist. I have works of his but I
acquired them later. I just loved
his art and thought he was so
intellectual, so interesting and
so cool, all the things I wanted
to be. He really led by
example, giving very
interesting talks a few times a
week, when he analysed what
people had done. The rest of
the time you had the
impression he was up in his
studio getting on with his own
work, the Solomon
Guggenheim pieces and also
working on the The Large
Glass [Hamilton`s 1965-66
reconstruction of Marcel
Duchamp`s The Bride Stripped
Bare by her Bachelors, Even
(The Large Glass), 1915-23].
He was a great man doing great
art and we were just trying to
be young apprentices, learning
how to do it. Suddenly I was in
this building with a load of
other interesting artists. It was a
fantastic time for me to grow
up very fast. You sensed you
were learning without it being
forced on you.
TAN: What was the first
work you bought?
BF: It was quite some time
later, around 1976, and was a
Duncan Grant still-life.
TAN: What attracts you to
British art?
BF: At a certain point at art
school I read [Sir John]
Rothenstein`s Modern English
Painters and found Augustus
John, Sickert, and the
Bloomsbury group, Nevinson,
and Wyndham Lewis. You talk
about them all in the same
breath but they are very
different people individually.
Wyndham Lewis couldn`t stand
the Bloomsbury group so it`s
quite fun to have them all
facing each other in my house
in Sussex. When I`d made
some success out of music I
thought: 'I`ve got a house and
need pictures for it¨-British
art was undervalued then.
There are odd bits here in
London that are quite different.
I have a lovely picture by
Cecily Brown, and Jennifer
Bartlett, and there`s a few
Stephen Buckleys, who I love.
I`ve got some beautiful
drawings by Richard Hamilton,
a [James] Rosenquist, a Warhol
Mao, some Man Ray and an
Eve Arnold Marilyn Monroe.
Sometimes it`s the picture that
interests you rather than the
person-for instance, a portrait
by Augustus John of Wyndham
Lewis which is really beautiful,
or Sickert`s painting of Gwen
Ffrangcon-Davies called Gwen
Again [early 1930s]. That`s
probably the biggest picture
I`ve got because they tend not
to be that big. I do like Gursky
and Struth, the scale of them
and the meticulous way they
work. And Glenn Brown. But I
don`t own any.
TAN. Your forthcoming
album has artistic
references.
BF: The album`s called
Olympia because every day I
see the big Olympia sign when
I drive into work. Olympia
obviously made me think of
Manet`s Olympia [1863], one
of the great paintings of the
19th century, which was very
modern and controversial; I
wanted someone who would
pull that off visually for the
album cover. I thought Kate
Moss was the perfect person
and it turned out that she was a
big fan, and said: 'I`ve always
wanted to be a Roxy cover
girl.¨ Kate, of course, as well
as being incredibly glamorous,
is a muse for many artists, as
was Marilyn Monroe.
TAN: What would you say
are the main things that have
changed in the art world
since you were student in
the 1960s?
BF: Well it`s completely
different. It`s so in the public
eye now, there are so many
shows on, there`s just so much
activity. Commercial dealers-
such as Larry Gagosian-are
doing really interesting shows
all the time. People like Damien
(Hirst) and Tracey Emin have
elevated the profile of the art
world so much, so has the
Frieze Art Fair. And who
knows, if it had been like it is
now maybe I wouldn`t have
moved into music. Maybe the
calling was there for me. I`ve
very much enjoyed applying
whatever visual skills I have to
the things we do, like album
covers and stage presentations.
When I go on tour I always try
to go into the local art gallery.
Sometimes you want to absorb
rather than give out all the time.
I don`t spend hours; I`m a bit of
an expert at 'speed viewing¨.
So at Frieze I go around quite
fast and stop when I see
something that really catches
my attention. Last time I went it
was Mat Collishaw.
I can`t imagine life without
art around me. If I`m in a room
I haven`t been in for a while I
can sit and look at a picture. I`d
hate to be constantly changing
my collection. I`m not that sort
of person. Because if I acquire
something it usually finds a
place in my life. So I tend to be
quite conservative in that sense.
Once I get something, I don`t
normally want to part with it. ■
Interview by Jean Wainwright
❏ Bryan Ferry’s new album “Olympia” will
be released on Virgin Records on 25
October. The download single, “Heartache by
Numbers”, will also be available on the same
day. The album features musical contribu-
tions from Nile Rodgers, Scissor
Sisters, Flea and Jonny Greenwood, among
others. It also sees Bryan Ferry reunited on
record with artist, activist and former Roxy
Music bandmate Brian Eno.
Interview: Bryan Ferry
“I can’t imagine life without art around me”
The Roxy Music founder on being taught by Richard Hamilton, his love of British artists and viewing at speed
Art is the drug: Ferry framed by Hirst
D
a
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e
B
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tt/G
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Im
a
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s
I'd hate to be
constantly changing
my collection . Once
I get something, I
don't normally want
to part with it
~
¨
8 THE ART NEWSPAPER FRIEZE ART FAIR WEEKEND 16-17 OCTOBER 2010
CONTEMPORARY ART FAIR
11–15 MAY 2011
BUSINESS DESIGN CENTRE
ISLINGTON
LONDON N1 0QH

WWW.SELECTARTFAIR.CO.UK
SELECT IS A MAJOR NEW
CONTEMPORARY ART FAIR
FOR LONDON.
SELECT WILL BE A HIGH-QUALITY, VETTED FAIR
BRINGING TOGETHER ESTABLISHED AND YOUNG
GALLERIES WITH THE MOST INTERESTING
CONTEMPORARY WORK PRICED UNDER £5,000.
GALLERIES WISHING TO APPLY CAN FIND FURTHER
DETAILS AT WWW.SELECTARTFAIR.CO.UK
C
an 'political¨ art achieve anything? A
Frieze Talk entitled 'Exhibition Making as
Activism: Whose Politics?¨ will focus on
how artists, writers and curators respond to
politics and social issues, debating whether art is
activism in action.
Across the Frieze Art Fair and beyond, artists
are addressing the issues and dilemmas of the
early 21st century. Whitechapel Gallery has a
survey of work from the past 20 years by the
Middle Eastern artist Walid Raad (14 October-2
January 2011), who stresses that his art 'was in
some ways made possible by the wars in
Lebanon¨. A new piece, Sweet Talk: Commissions
(Beirut), 1987-present, examines the changing
face of Beirut over the past 20 years.
Meanwhile, UK artist and Frieze Talk
participant Jeremy Deller`s mangled wreck of a
car blown apart in the bombing of the Al-
Mutanabbi street market in the Iraqi capital
(Baghdad, 5 March, 2007), on show at London`s
Imperial War Museum, is challenging visitors to
take a fresh perspective on the Iraq War. The
charred relic is 'a major new acquisition which
serves as evidence of the impact of modern war
on civilians¨, said a museum spokeswoman.
Another potent military symbol, a
decommissioned Sea Harrier fighter plane,
hangs in the Duveen Galleries of Tate Britain
(Fiona Banner`s Harrier and Jaguar, until 3
January 2011).
And some works by polemical practitioners on
view on the Frieze floor also aim to jolt viewers`
sensibilities, such as Spanish artist Santiago
Sierra, intent on presenting art that moves beyond
purely aesthetic considerations. Greg Hilty of
London`s Lisson Gallery (B7), which represents
Sierra, said: 'From the beginning we`ve been
interested in art that uses the structures, systems
and symbols of the world as material, not just as
content. Not surprisingly, this often has political
resonance, though most artists abhor
dogma. Puerto Rico-based duo Allora &
Calzadilla [who, significantly, will represent the
US at the 2011 Venice Biennale] constantly
question the implications of materials and objects
by examining their history and use.¨ Their
Petrified Petrol Pump, 2010, made of fossilised
stone, addresses the fact that the natural supply of
oil will one day be exhausted, jeopardising global
economies and even humanity.
Sierra, meanwhile, appears to fight for the
disenfranchised. His print of a performance,
Hooded Woman Seated Facing the Wall, 2003,
enacted in the Spanish Pavilion at the 2003
Venice Biennale, shows a woman in a black
hessian hood, seated in isolation, her back to the
camera. 'He obliquely, but powerfully, conveys
the idea of labour as a technology of domination
and punishment,¨ said Hilty.
Sierra`s confrontational work notwithstanding,
numerous commentators, such as the independent
curator Rosa Martinez, argue that 'art is
[nonetheless] always political, even when it
pretends that it is not¨. Martinez co-curated the
2005 Venice Biennale, which proved
controversial when the city authorities, backed by
the Ministry of Culture in Rome, refused to erect
German artist Gregor Schneider`s Cube Venice
2005 installation in St Mark`s Square. The work,
inspired by the Ka`ba in Mecca, was rejected as
'it could [have harmed] the religious feelings of
the Islamic community¨, said Biennale officials,
provoking a fierce debate about the role of art in
the age of global terrorism.
'The illusion that art is an autonomous sphere,
pure and untouched by its surrounding reality, is
totally over. Art must certainly be beautiful and
offer us moments of suspended pleasure, but it
cannot be separated from the social intelligence
that drives our will to change the world,¨ said
Martinez. Not so, said the vocal French-Algerian
artist Kader Attia, whose Kasbah installation of
shanty town roofs, on show at this summer`s
Sydney Biennale, reflected the bleak living
conditions of most of the planet`s population.
For Attia, politics and art can easily be
divorced: 'Political art is not relevant today and
never has been. We believe that in the past, art,
such as the avant-garde movements of the early
20th century, helped change the world politically,
but this was never the case. It`s not the Russian
avant-garde nor constructivism that made the
revolution. On the contrary. People who are part
of the contemporary art process forget that
outside the art domain, political art, which may
well be conceptually rigorous with strong
terminology, has very little impact, if any at all.¨
Often cited as a voice for marginalised
citizens through his film and video installations,
Istanbul-born artist Kutlug Ataman (the stoic
residents of an eastern Turkish village stare out
from his 42-monitor video tower Column, 2009,
on show at Thomas Dane Gallery, A9, at Frieze)
agrees with Martinez that 'all art is inherently
political¨, but says that political art often fails
because 'it preaches obvious messages¨ that can
be accessed, albeit passively, through news
sources such as the BBC. 'Art that promotes
certain political viewpoints by way of existing
slogans is not effective. In this instance, you do
not need art; you should belong to a non-
governmental organisation.¨
Australian cultural commentator Marcus
Westbury also highlights the 'own-goal¨
syndrome: 'The biggest problem with political
art is that it only preaches to the converted.¨ His
comment brings to mind the campaign launched
by some of Britain`s most high-profile artists
during the UK general election in May in a bid
to re-elect the Labour government. Liam Gillick
and Bob and Roberta Smith, among others,
created a series of pro-Labour works for a series
labelled 'Make a Mark¨. Labour lost.
However, such a lack of impact is far from
always being the case. Dada`s anarchists took
issue with the capitalists whose bourgeois
excesses, they held, led to the carnage of World
War I. Meanwhile, art historian Patricia Failing
points out that 'one reason Picasso`s Guernica of
1937 is considered a treasure in terms of art
history is that it seemed to provide a bridge
between what were considered by some to be
antithetical poles: the idea of making an effective
political statement and an effective artistic
statement at the same time.¨
US curator Dan Cameron believes that certain
contemporary practitioners are particularly
relevant. Cameron, who curated a retrospective of
work by veteran performance artist Carolee
Schneemann at New York`s New Museum of
Contemporary Art in 1996, said: 'I don`t actually
consider [Schneemann] to be a political artist,
although I do see her as a pioneering feminist at a
time when that was the only way the work could
be made.¨ Cameron also contends that his
Prospect biennial, launched in New Orleans in
2008, has made a mark as an activist platform,
drawing attention to areas of the city neglected
since the onslaught of Hurricane Katrina in 2005.
'Artists like Robin Rhode, Wangechi Mutu, Nari
Ward and Zwelethu Mthethwa were pretty clear
that they were trying to give artistic form to a
situation of incredible loss,¨ he said.
In some parts of the world, politics is as good
as unavoidable; under totalitarian regimes art
becomes an activist platform almost by default.
The Iranian-born photographer and film-maker
Shirin Neshat, whose work confronts issues such
as gender in post-revolutionary Iran and the
restricted role of women in Islamic society, feels
that cultural background impinges upon an artist`s
sensibility. 'I can hardly imagine that an Iranian
artist living inside or outside of Iran could find the
luxury to distance herself or himself from the
question of politics, whereas a US or an English
artist could easily make that choice,¨ she said.
'If you look at the situation in certain
countries such as Iran, all artists are strictly
monitored by the government; art is censored
and all works must be submitted to review,¨ said
London-based art adviser Arianne Levene, who
closely follows trends in the contemporary art
markets of China, India, Pakistan and Iran.
'Unveiled women, nude figures and political
themes are banned from display. The result is art
which does not conform and is immediately
imbued with a political meaning. It therefore
becomes almost impossible not to make
political` art in those circumstances,¨ she said.
For Stephen Duncombe, associate professor at
New York University and co-founder of the
Center for Artistic Activism: 'Art can be a part
of effective activism. I`d go further: it needs to
be a part of activism if activism is to be
effective. Art, at its best, does what good
activism does: it doesn`t tell people what to do or
to think, it opens up spaces and provides
opportunities and prompts people to do that
for themselves.¨■
Gareth Harris
❏ Exhibition Making as Activism—Whose Politics? Frieze
auditorium, Sunday 17 October, 12 noon. With Jeremy Deller (artist,
UK), Galit Eilat (writer, curator and founding director of The Israeli
Center for Digital Art, Holon, Israel), Emily Roysdon (artist and writer,
USA). Chair: Negar Azimi (senior editor, Bidoun magazine).
Art and activism
Walls: to hang on them or kick them down?
A Frieze Talk this weekend will ask whether political art is just preaching to the converted.
Polemic or pompous? Clockwise, from top: Walid Raad`s Sweet Talk: Commissions (Beirut), detail,
1987-present; Jeremy Deller, Baghdad, 5 March, 2007; ~Make a Mark¨ poster, Jamie Shovlin, 2010
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Impressionist & Modern Art and Contemporary Art
AUCTIONS IN NEW YORK 2 & 9 NOVEMBER 2010 I ENQUIRIES +1 212 606 7000 I SOTHEBYS.COM
HI GHLI GHTS EXHI BI TI ON I N LONDON
ON VI EW UNTI L 1 6 OCTOBER
PROPERTY OF A PRIVATE
EUROPEAN COLLECTION
Amedeo Modigliani Nu assis
sur un divan (La Belle Romaine)
ESTIMATE UPON REQUEST
PROPERTY SOLD TO BENEFIT
YOUNGARTS, THE CORE PROGRAM
OF THE NATIONAL FOUNDATION FOR
ADVANCEMENT IN THE ARTS
Claude Monet
Le Bassin aux nymphéas
ESTIMATE
$20,000,000–30,000,000
Gerhard Richter
Matrosen (Sailors), 1966
ESTIMATE
$12,000,000–18,000,000
PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE
EUROPEAN COLLECTOR
Henri Matisse
Danseuse dans le fauteuil,
sol en damier
ESTIMATE
$12,000,000–18,000,000
Mark Rothko
Untitled, 1955
ESTIMATE
$20,000,000–30,000,000
Andy Warhol Coca-Cola [4]
Large Coca-Cola, 1962
ESTIMATE
$20,000,000–25,000,000
Roy Lichtenstein
Ice Cream Soda, 1962
ESTIMATE
$12,000,000–18,000,000
©
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10 THE ART NEWSPAPER FRIEZE ART FAIR WEEKEND 16-17 OCTOBER 2010
ART DUBAI
16 – 19 March 2011
Objects
It’s hard to see the trees from the wood in an art fair, but if the work of art has a special
quality it will get noticed. At Frieze this year we asked visitors with a discerning eye
to select the piece that made them stop in their tracks and take a second look.
“I love it but I don’t really know why. I guess it’s like the last
days of petrol or something. It’s monumental, like an altar, but it
looks like it’s decaying. I think I might be doing a deal to buy it
later. I’m also really enjoying all the modern British art in the fair.
It is so undervalued these days, so it’s great to see so much of it
this year.”
Frank Cohen, collector, chose
Allora & Calzadilla, Petrified Petrol Pump, 2010,
Barbara Gladstone (D7), priced between $100,000
and $200,000
“I thought the whole
performance was so funky.
It was superb, and really
funny to watch; she is a real
genius. I thought it was
interesting timing too, because
of the “Move: Choreographing
You” exhibition that is
currently on at the Hayward.
I thought her project really
subverted that show, and
undermined it in a really
humorous way.”
“I really loved the gold colour and the way it looked like
cardboard but was actually bronze. I also like that it looked as if it
had bullet-holes in it. It was just beautiful. It seemed like a found
object but was actually made. Unfortunately, it was sold
but I would have liked to have had it because I’ve got a little
collection growing with some Emin drawings and a couple of
Rebecca Warrens.”
“I like this work because it’s a
Gursky that has rarely been
seen. In keeping with his
photographic work in North
Korea, the use of crowds and
concept of the present moment
becomes the focal point in the
work. It’s a contemporary
photograph, yet timeless.”
“Ryan Trecartin is a performance
and a digital artist. He’s
someone who expresses himself
in very new ways. He mixes
a lot of references—consumer
culture, digital culture, race,
globalisation and celebrity
culture. He has a booth to
himself at Elizabeth Dee and is
probably one of the more
exciting, fresh voices that I have
seen here.”
of desire
Bob & Roberta Smith,
artist picked
Spartacus Chetwynd’s
A Tax Haven Run By
Women (In the Style of a
Luna Park Game Show),
Frieze Project (P11)
Jefferson Hack,
magazine editor, on
Ryan Trecartin’s
installation at Elizabeth
Dee (G16), including
four c-prints for £8,500
each and a video for
£28,500
Peter Doroshenko,
director of Dallas
Contemporary, chose
Andreas Gursky’s
Dortmund, 2009,
Sprüth Magers (B9),
€270,000
Russell Tovey, actor, picked
Ricky Swallow’s Plate, 2010,
Stuart Shave/Modern Art (D13), £8,000
A
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“I knew [Conrad] as a film-
maker, but not as an artist.
I felt that it immediately stood
out as speaking another
language—I suppose because
it was from a different time
and so had a different
communicative frequency.
It’s a picture of an empty
screen, a picture of nothing,
where film meets painting, and
yet it had no other subject and
no other agenda.”
“One of my favourite Frieze pieces is a work I’ve seen several
time before. I never tire of its simple elegance and technical wit.
With Frieze fair-induced late nights and early mornings—looking
across darkened hotel rooms—I’d be more than grateful for
Lauschmann’s relentless caressing of time bringing me to
consciousness or happily easing me to sleep.”
Michael Stanley, director of Modern Art Oxford,
on Torsten Lauschmann’s Digital Clock, (Growing
Zeros), 2010, at Mary Mary (F28), £12,000
Fiona Banner, artist, on
Tony Conrad’s Yellow
Movie 2/28/73, 1973,
Greene Naftali (B8),
sold to a US museum
for $150,000
Interviews by Louisa Buck, Rob Curran, Gareth Harris and Anny Shaw
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12 THE ART NEWSPAPER FRIEZE ART FAIR WEEKEND EDITION 16-17 OCTOBER 2010
LONDON. There was less a
stampede and more of a slow
trickle of visitors at the opening
of Multiplied on Friday morning,
the fair hosted by Christie’s
auction house (until 18 October).
Held in its swish West
Kensington showrooms, on sale
are limited edition prints and
multiples at the stands taken by
37 UK galleries.
“It’s a real cross-section of
public institutions, print-shops,
editions galleries and people like
us,” says White Cube’s Yves
Blais, who was showing a range
of works from £200 prints to the
unique Antony Gormley sculpture
MEME, 2010, for £25,000—one
of the most expensive works at
the fair.
Enterprising artists Damien
Hirst and Tracey Emin have
taken their own booths: Other
Criteria, which Hirst part-owns,
and Emin International. “It’s a
chance to show a really important
part of Tracey’s practice, and
expose people to her online
shop,” says Alan Murrin of Emin
International. Everyone, it seems,
could afford an Emin. Art market
virgins could pick up a £10
canvas bag or a £175 print. For
those with deeper pockets, there
is a set of six ceramic plates, You
Know my Heart Is with You,
2010, for £10,000.
But what about the supposed
competition between galleries
and auction houses? For Tobias
Thomas, Other Criteria’s
manager, “in this case, it’s a
friendly rivalry”. Its booth is
YBA-heavy with works
including Sarah Lucas’s sculpture
Love Is a Bird, Love Is a Burden,
2009, for £3,600 and Hirst’s
Happy, 2008—a snapshot of the
artist’s greatest hits with pills,
spots and butterflies covering a
white canvas. The unique, framed
work costs £21,060.
Most galleries hope the niche
fair will attract specialist
collectors: “It allows people to
hone in on something specific,”
says Riflemaker’s Robin Mann.
“It could be fantastic.” Others are
seizing the chance to groom a
new generation of collectors.
“We hope it will bring in the
young people who are interested,
but might not be able to afford a
unique piece by one of our
artists,” says Blais at White Cube.
For some, it’s about
capitalising on the Christie’s
brand and, just as importantly,
their clientele. “It’s a chance to
meet new people, improve our
mailing list and make a bit of
money,” says Mark Hayward
from Pratt Contemporary.
This sentiment was echoed by
The Multiple Store’s Nicholas
Sharp: “Christie’s is providing
a space, its client list, and
showing its flexibility—I think
it’s rather inspiring.”
Some exhibitors are just happy
for the exposure Multiplied could
bring. “If people are in west
London to spend money, then
we’re glad to be here,” says Sam
Arthur, an associate from the East
End’s Nobrow, who described his
typical clientele as students and
design aficionados. Within the
fair’s opening hours Arthur sold
a £300 wall hanging by Ellie
Curtis, Andalucian Wildlife
Throw, 2010.
At the other end of the scale,
Chlöe Faine at CCA Galleries
also made an early sale—Sir
Peter Blake’s I Love You White
Diamond Dust, 2010, for £2,500
to a European collector. “We
don’t have a gallery in London,
so this is a great way to meet
people,” says a cheery Faine.
One of the few visitors spotted
from a museum was Tate
librarian Maria White, who
bought the limited edition book
Hard Wood Lesson, 2010, for
£45, which was, in her words,
“brilliant for the library”.
While the opening morning
was slow, exhibitors are hopeful
that the combination of Christie’s
clout and classy West End
address—as well as the free
entry—will lure the weekend
crowds. If nothing else, they
might be tempted by works on
display at the Henningham
Family Press. The London-based
institution’s irreverent booth,
decked out like a seaside fish-
stall, stood out from Multiplied’s
mass of 2D, white-walled stands.
Hoping to cast a wide net with
potential patrons, owner David
John Henningham sold works for
as little as £1 or, in his words,
“cheaper than chips”.
Marisa Mazria Katz and
Charlotte Burns
Auction-house fair
Will Multiplied find its niche?
Limited edition Hirsts, Blakes and Emins for sale—all with chips
Pop goes the fair: Peter Blake multiples at CCA Galleries
PULSE Mi ami
Dec 2 – 5, 2010
The Ice Pal ace
Mi ami , Fl ori da

PULSE New York
Mar 3 – 6, 2011
New Locati on
The Metropol i tan Pavi l i on
Chel sea, New York

www. pul se-art. com
CONTEMPORARY ART FAI R
We hope it will
bring in the young
people who might not
be able to afford a
unique piece


In the October
main edition
Coming in November
Our current edition
contains 96 pages packed
with art world news,
events, business reports,
interviews—and a smatter-
ing of gossip
News Why artists are
rallying to defend New
York’s controversial
Islamic centre (top)
Art Market Three
arrested over €80m
German “forgeries”
Features The scandal of
Venice’s huge advertising
hoardings (above)
Artist interview Marina
Abramovic on the physical
rigour of her performances
Books Sex and art
during the Renaissance
Art Market Chinese
contemporary is back and
selling fast
Features Can Oscar
Niemeyer’s arts centre in
Aviles, Spain, reproduce
the Bilbao effect?
Artist interview
Painter Ged Quinn put
under the spotlight
Media “Self Made”—
Gillian Wearing’s latest
feature film reviewed
What’s On The Boston
Museum of Fine Arts’ new
53-gallery Americas wing
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13 SEPTEMBER – 31 OCTOBER 2010
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and Karsten Schubert
Frieze talks 2010: Frieze auditorium, Saturday 16 October, 5pm
Bridget Riley in conversation with Michael Bracewell
Bridget Riley Gwangju Biennale 2010, South Korea
Until 7 November 2010
Paintings and Related Work The National Gallery, London
24 November 2010–22 May 2011
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THE ART NEWSPAPER FRIEZE ART FAIR WEEKEND 16-17 OCTOBER 2010 15
F
rom painter to busker in a
bear costume, trainee con-
ductor to circus performer,
Baby Dee has run the career
gamut. For a while she gave up
music altogether and became a
tree surgeon, but dropping a tree
on a woman`s house put paid to
her arboreal duties and the clas-
sically trained harpist and
pianist returned to her musical
destiny. 'Music is what I do,¨
she drawls, in her gloriously
gravelly voice.
Born in Cleveland, Ohio in
1953, Baby Dee underwent a
sex change in the late 1980s,
ending a decade of working as
an organist in a Catholic church
in the Bronx. After encourage-
ment from her friend Antony
Hegarty, the transgender singer
of Antony and the Johnsons, she
emerged on to the contemporary
music scene in 2000 with the
album 'Little Window¨, fol-
lowed by 'Love`s Small Song¨
in 2002. She released 'A Book
of Songs for Anne Marie¨ in
2004, which had an initial, limit-
ed edition run of 150. The album
was given a full release earlier
this year after the string arrange-
ments had been reworked by
Maxim Moston (who has also
collaborated with Antony and
the Johnsons) and it will form
the basis of Baby Dee`s candlelit
performance in Shoreditch
Church for Frieze Music. Baby
Dee and Moston have written a
special version of the album for
her London concert, which
includes string parts for mem-
bers of the Elysian Quartet, who
will be performing on the night.
The Art Newspaper: ~A Book
of Songs for Anne Marie¨ will
form the bulk of your perfor-
mance at Frieze. Why did you
feel compelled to return to
this album?
Baby Dee: I released it the first
time as kind of like a note in a
bottle that you throw into the
ocean and see what happens. I
didn`t really take a lot of care
over it, I was like a bad mother
abandoning my children. I never
saw the first version as a defini-
tive version, I just wanted it to
go out, away from me, so I put it
out. And then Maxim Moston
got to hear the songs and he
eventually wanted to do the
arrangements for them, which I
don`t have the ability to do. He
made it really fine. I arrange
songs, I sing, but one of the
things that I am not good at is
making things neat and perfect.
TAN: You played the organ in
a Catholic church in the Bronx
for ten years. How do you feel
about playing in a church
again for Frieze?
BD: A lot of people do things
they are not proud of. I know a
lot of people who did a lot of
things for a living, like perform-
ing oral sex on 10th Avenue and
14th Street. Nobody says to
them: 'You used to make a liv-
ing sucking dicks on Tenth
Avenue,¨ but with me they say:
'She used to play the organ in a
church.¨ They do it because
they like to hear me howl!
[sticks head out of window and
howls]. The first show I did in a
church, years after working in
one, was in Toronto, and I have
to admit, it really creeped me
out. I didn`t know how to
behave and I felt like I had this
compulsion to be obscene.
TAN: You`ve also been a
painter and a performance
artist. How do you feel about
performing at an art fair?
BD: It`s much more fun because
I`m not a pop musician, but at
the same time I don`t belong in a
classical music kind of venue.
Nowadays, there are all kinds of
wonderful things going on in the
cracks between these genres, but
people are still getting used to
that. The art world is a place
where that can be transcended
completely and I like that.
TAN: How did you start play-
ing the harp?
BD: A couple of guys smashed
up a piano in my neighbourhood
when I was a kid, and to see the
strings inside of it inspired me
for a lifetime. I fell in love with
it. But harps are very expensive
and my family couldn`t afford
one. So I wasn`t able to do it
until I was 18 and I came to
New York and bought a harp
myself and took lessons. I`ve
played the piano all my life, but
the harp came later. I`m just
rediscovering it, I go through
periods. The past couple of
years of my life were complete-
ly into the piano because I have
this great piano at home, but
now I`m back into the harp.
TAN: ~A Book of Songs.¨
has been described as
Germanic lieder. Do you see
what you do as music, poetry
or art, or all three?
BD: I think what I do is music.
I was not able to write music
until I started writing words, so
the words are hugely important
to me. I have written instrumen-
tal things, but really what made
the difference for me between
being able to write music and
not being able to write music
was becoming a songwriter.
TAN: It took you almost 40
years to start singing. Why
did it take so long?
BD: It took a long time. What
can I tell you? Some people get
off to a slow start. I`m a little
slow. A lot of my new songs are
about slugs. I have an encounter
with a slug. I sing about the
slugs, but as one of them. Here`s
a line from one: 'King David
wrote a song for us, and Jesus
sang it on the cross, but no one
heard him when he sang: I am a
worm, and not a man.` ¨
TAN: In terms of visual art
what inspires you?
BD: I have a friend who is real-
ly obsessed, not just by Rubens,
but by one of the people he used
to paint, his first wife, Isabella
Brandt. She is such a striking-
looking individual and his
paintings of her are really great,
not just because he was a good
painter, but because she was
such a great subject. There are
two of them in Cleveland and
I`ve become really obsessed
with them myself. I`ve been all
over the map. When I first came
to New York I wanted to be a
portrait painter like John Singer
Sargent. I wanted to make ordi-
nary American bumpkins look
like Queen Victoria. Then for a
while I was really obsessed with
Sol LeWitt-those complicated
conceptual things he`d make,
like a drawing of a square on a
wall in a certain place. What`s
so nice is that there aren`t as
many rules as there used to be.
It`s a funny combination be -
cause things are a lot more
light-hearted now and a lot
more serious at the same time. I
love that about the art world. ■
Interview by Anny Shaw
❏ Baby Dee, the Elysian Quartet and James
Blackshaw perform at St Leonard’s Church,
Shoreditch on Saturday 16 October at 8pm.
For tickets, go to www2.seetickets.com/frieze/
When Baby gets to stay up late
Genre-defying musician Baby Dee is bringing a reworked version of her latest album to a Frieze Music event
■ Listings start on p16
www.theartnewspaper.com/what- FRIEZE WEEK 13-17 OCTOBER 2010 www.theartnewspaper.com/whatson
What’s On
In the key of Dee: Baby Dee will perform in a candlelit Shoreditch church
BOOKNOW020 7907 7073*
www.vam.ac.uk/shadowcatchers
V&AMembers go free
Victoria and Albert Museum
uSouthKensington
Knightsbridge
SHADOW CATCHERS:
CAMERA-LESS PHOTOGRAPHY
13 OCTOBER 2010–
20 FEBRUARY 2011
SPONSOREDBY
Floris Neusüss, Untitled, (Körperfotogramm),
Berlin, 1962, Collection Christian Diener, Berlin
©Courtesy of Floris Neusüss
*Booking fee applies
HACKEL
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HACKELBURY FINE ART LTD 4 LAUNCESTON PLACE, LONDON
W8 5RL T: 020 7937 8688 F: 020 7937 8868 www.hackelbury.co.uk
GARRY FABIAN MILLER : THE COLOUR OF TIME
1 October 2010 - 29 January 2011

A retrospective selection of work by Garry Fabian Miller is also featured in Shadow
Catchers: Camera-less Photography at the Victoria & Albert Museum, London.





































































































































When I first
came to New York I
wanted to be a
painter like John
Singer Sargent
~
¨
THE ART NEWSPAPER
Fairs
1 Frieze Art Fair
14-16 October, 11am-7pm
17 October, 11am-6pm
Regent’s Park, NW1
www.friezeartfair.com
2 Moniker
14 October, 7pm-9pm
15-17 October, 11am-9pm
54 Holywell Lane, Shoreditch, EC2
www.monikerartfair.com
3 Multiplied
15 October, 9am-5pm
16-17 October, 11am-5pm
18 October, 9am-7.30pm
Christie’s South Kensington,
85 Old Brompton Road, SW7
www.multipliedartfair.com
4 Pavilion of Art & Design London
13-17 October, 11am-7pm
Berkeley Square, W1
www.padlondon.net
5 Sunday
14-15 October, noon-8pm
16 October, noon-6pm
Ambika P3, University of Westminster,
35 Marylebone Rd, NW1
http://sunday-fair.com
Exhibitions
EAST
1 Artangel
Susan Philipsz:
Surround Me
Saturdays and Sundays until 3
January 2011
various locations around London
www.artangel.org.uk
2 Barbican Art Gallery
Damián Ortega
15 October-16 January 2011
Barbican Centre, Level 3, Silk
Street, EC2Y
www.barbican.org.uk/artgallery
3 Bloomberg Space
Comma 28: Adrian Paci
13 October-4 December
Comma 29: Julien Bismuth
13 October-4 December
50 Finsbury Square EC2A
www.bloombergspace.com
4 ▲Calvert 22
Alexander Ponomarev:
Sea Stories
until 21 November
22 Calvert Avenue, E2
www.sophiebenjamin.co.uk/
5 Chisenhale Gallery
Michael Fullerton
until 24 October
64 Chisenhale Road, E3
www.chisenhale.org.uk
6 ▲Flowers East
Nadav Kander
15 October-13 November
Edmund Clark: Guantanamo,
If the Light Goes Out
15 October-13 November
82 Kingsland Road, E2
www.flowerseast.com
7 ▲Fred London Ltd
Godfried Donkor
until 14 November
45 Vyner Street, E2
www.fred-london.com
8 ▲Hales Gallery
Hew Locke
until 17 October
Tea Building,
7 Bethnal Green Road, E1
www.halesgallery.com
9 ▲Herald St
Pablo Bronstein
until 31 October
2 Herald Street, E2
www.heraldst.com
10 ▲Hotel
Steven Claydon
until 30 October
77A Greenfield Road, E2
www.generalhotel.org
11 ▲Kate MacGarry
Tiago Carneiro Da Cunha
14 October-21 November
7a Vyner Street, E2
www.katemacgarry.com
12 ▲Limoncello
James Harrison, Yonatan
Vinitsky and Jessica Warboys
until 20 November
15a Cremer Street, E2
www.limoncellogallery.co.uk
13 ▲Lokal 30
Easyriders
15-30 October
29 Wadeson Street, E2
http://lokal30.pl/london
14 ▲Marsden Woo Gallery
Philip Eglin, Tony Hayward
and Karen Ryan
until 6 November
17-18 Great Sutton Street, EC1V
www.bmgallery.co.uk
15 ▲Matt’s Gallery
Alison Turnbull
until 31 October
42-44 Copperfield Road, E3
www.mattsgallery.org
16 ▲Maureen Paley
Dirk Stewen
until 14 November
21 Herald Street, E2
www.maureenpaley.com
17 ▲Monika Bobinska
Mudflats and Galaxy
until 18 October
242 Cambridge Heath Road, E2
www.monikabobinska.com
18 Old Truman Brewery
Benjamin Cohen
until 17 October
Photolounge
15-17 October
Young Masters Revisited
15-25 October
91 Brick Lane, E1
www.trumanbrewery.com
19 Raven Row
Polytechnic
until 7 November
56-58 Artillery Lane, E1
www.ravenrow.org
20 Rivington Place
Ever Young: James Barnor
until 27 November
The Paris Albums 1900: W.E.B.
Du Bois
until 27 November
Rivington Place, EC2A
www.rivingtonplace.org
21 ▲Rokeby
Bettina Buck: in Shape
in Control
until 13 November
5-9 Hatton Wall, EC1N
www.rokebygallery.com
22 ▲Seventeen
Susan Collis: Works on Paper
until 13 November
AIDS-3D & Paul B. Davis
until 13 November
17 Kingsland Road, E2
www.seventeengallery.com
23 ▲The Approach
Helene Appel: Chopping Board
until 24 October
47 Approach Road, E2
www.theapproach.co.uk
24 ▲Vilma Gold
William Daniels
until 14 November
25 Vyner Street, E2
www.vilmagold.com
25 Whitechapel Gallery
Claire Barclay
until 2 May 2011
The D. Daskalopoulos Collection
until 5 June 2011
The Children’s Art Commission:
the Chapman Brothers
until 31 October
Walid Raad
until 2 January 2011
This Is Tomorrow
until 6 March 2011
77-82 Whitechapel High Street, E1
www.whitechapel.org
26 ▲Wilkinson Gallery
Anna Parkina
13 October-21 November
50-58 Vyner Street, E2
www.wilkinsongallery.com
NORTH
1 2 Cornwall Terrace
House of the Noble Man
until 20 October
2 Cornwall Terrace, NW1
www.cornwallterrrace.co.uk/
boswallhouse/
2 176
Toby Ziegler
until 12 December
176 Prince of Wales Road, NW5
www.projectspace176.com
3 Camden Arts Centre
René Daniëls
until 28 November
Arkwright Road, NW3
www.camdenartscentre.org
4 Estorick Collection
Against Mussolini
until 19 December
39a Canonbury Square, N1
www.estorickcollection.com
5 Freud Museum
The Space of the Unconscious
until 14 November
20 Maresfield Gardens, NW3
www.freud.org.uk
6 Kings Place Gallery
Sefton Samuels: Jazz Legends
15 October-26 November
90 York Way, N1
www.kingsplace.co.uk
7 Museum of Everything
Exhibition #3
13-24 October
Regents Park Road and
Sharpleshall Street, NW1
www.museumofeverything.com
8 ▲Pangolin London
David Bailey: Sculpture +
until 16 October
William Pye: Sculpture
until 24 December
Kings Place, 90 York Way, N1
www.pangolinlondon.com
9 Parasol Unit
Adel Abdessemed
until 21 November
Exposure 10
until 17 October
14 Wharf Road, N1
www.parasol-unit.org
10 ▲Victoria Miro Gallery
Isaac Julien:
Ten Thousand Waves
until 13 November
Yayoi Kusama
until 13 November
16 Wharf Road, N1
www.victoria-miro.com
11 Wellcome Collection
Things
Untitled, 2010, by William
Daniels at Vilma Gold
16
Houses of
Parliament
HYDE PARK
REGENT’S PARK
Serpentine
Gallery
4
44
10
37
6
52
49b
36
30
2
5
24
14
9
54
41
34
15
8
12
58
48
1
16
15
1
60
49a
19
11
51
45
18
27a
23
40
33
1
3
4
5
17
62
61
29
43
16
7
25b
27b
55
42
56
22b
31
50
22a
32
38
39
28
2
11
8
6
3
1
5 7
21
14
13
11
3
14
7
8
17
12
4
10
18
57
25a
35
59
3
53
47
13
49c
26 21
Listings compiled by Rob Curran,
Ben Tomlinson and Emily Sharpe
Map designed by Katherine Pentney

▼ ▼ ▼ ▼
What’s On
20
46
Exhibition listings are
arranged alphabetically by
area
▲ Commercial gallery
until 22 October
183 Euston Road, NW1
www.wellcome.ac.uk
12 ▲White Cube
Mark Bradford: the Pistol
that Whistles
13 October-13 November
48 Hoxton Square, N1
www.whitecube.com
SOUTH
1 Alma Enterprises Gallery
Alex Baggaley: the Perpetual
Set-up
until 17 October
38-40 Glasshill Street, SE1
www.almaenterprises.com
2 ▲Auto-Italia
From LuckyPDF TV: this Is Auto
Italia Live
16 October-13 November
1 Glengall Road, SE15
www.autoitaliasoutheast.org
3 ▲Beaconsfield
Test Bed I
until 17 October
22 Newport Street, SE11
www.beaconsfield.ltd.uk
4 BFI Gallery
Julian Rosefeldt: American Night
until 7 November
BFI Southbank Belvedere Road,
SE1
www.bfi.org.uk/gallery
5 ▲Cafe Gallery Projects
Throwing Shapes
until 7 November
The Gallery, Centre of Southwark
Park, SE16
www.cafegalleryprojects.org
6 ▲Coleman Project Space
Throwing Shapes
until 7 November
94 Webster Road, SE16
www.colemanprojects.org.uk
7 ▲Corvi-Mora
Brian Calvin
until 23 October
1a Kempsford Road, SE11
www.corvi-mora.com
8 ▲Danielle Arnaud Gallery
Karin Kihlberg and Reuben
Henry
until 24 October
123 Kennington Road, SE11
www.daniellearnaud.com
9 Design Museum
Brit Insurance Designs
of the Year
until 17 October
28 Shad Thames, SE1
www.designmuseum.org
10 Dulwich Picture Gallery
Salvator Rosa (1615-73): Bandits,
Wilderness and Magic
until 28 November
Gallery Road, SE21
www.dulwichpicturegallery.org.uk
11 Gasworks
Hydrarchy: Power and Resistance
at Sea
until 7 November
155 Vauxhall Street, The Oval,
SE11
www.gasworks.org.uk
12 ▲Greengrassi
Stefano Arienti
until 23 October
1a Kempsford Road, SE11
www.greengrassi.com
13 Hayward Gallery
Move: Choreographing You
13 October-9 January 2011
Ron Terada, Who I Think I Am
until 7 November
Southbank Centre, Belvedere
Road, SE1
www.hayward.org.uk
14 Imperial War Museum
Baghdad, 5 March 2007:
Jeremy Deller
until 31 March 2011
Lambeth Road, SE1
www.iwm.org.uk
15 ▲Jerwood Space
Jerwood Drawing Prize
until 7 November
171 Union Street, SE1
www.jerwoodfoundation.org
16 ▲Poppy Sebire
Dark Nature
until 17 October
All Hallows Hall, 6 Copperfield
Street, SE1
www.poppysebire.com
17 ▲Purdy Hicks
Neeta Madahar
until 13 November
65 Hopton Street, SE1
www.purdyhicks.com
18 South London Gallery
Tatiana Trouvé
until 28 November
Michal Bundy: Author
until 28 November
65 Peckham Road, SE5
www.southlondongallery.org
19 Studio Voltaire
Keith Farquhar and Dawn Mellor
until 4 December
1a Nelson’s Row, SW4
www.studiovoltaire.org
20 Tate Modern
Gauguin
until 16 January 2011
Martin Karlsson: London
until 31 December
The Unilever Series:
Ai Weiwei
until 2 May 2011
Bankside Power Station, 25
Sumner Street, SE1
www.tate.org.uk/modern
21 ▲The Agency
Ludovica Gioscia
until 23 October
66 Evelyn Street, SE8
www.theagencygallery.co.uk
WEST
1 ▲Agnew’s
John Kelly: Probe
13 October-5 November
35 Albemarle Street, W1S
www.agnewsgallery.co.uk
2 ▲Aicon Gallery
Rasheed Araeen: Before
and after Minimalism
until 23 October
8 Heddon Street, W1B
www.aicongallery.com
3 ▲Alan Cristea Gallery
Eleven
until 13 November
31 & 34 Cork Street, W1S
www.alancristea.com
4 ▲Alexia Goethe Gallery
Alexander de Cadenet: Life-Force
until 19 November
5-7 Dover Street, W1S
www.alexiagoethegallery.com
5 ▲Alison Jacques Gallery
Matt Johnson
13 October-13 November
16-18 Berners Street, W1T
www.alisonjacquesgallery.com
6 All Visual Arts
Vanitas: the Transience
of Earthly Pleasures
until 17 October
33 Portland Place, W1B
www.allvisualarts.org
7 ▲Annely Juda Fine Art
David Nash & Lesley Foxcroft
until 23 October
23 Dering Street, W1S
www.annelyjudafineart.co.uk
8 ▲Anthony Reynolds Gallery
Sturtevant: Elastic Tango
13 October-20 November
60 Great Marlborough Street,
W1F
www.anthonyreynolds.com
9 ▲Atlas Gallery
Floris Neusüss
15 October-27 November
49 Dorset Street, W1U
www.atlasgallery.com
10 Austrian Cultural Forum
Brave New World
until 17 December
Touched
until 28 November
28 Rutland Gate, SW7
www.austria.org.uk/culture
11 ▲Beaux Arts
Marilene Oliver:
Carne Vale
until 6 November
22 Cork Street, W1X
www.beauxartslondon.co.uk
12 ▲Ben Brown Fine Arts
Heinz Mack/Lucio Fontana
until 21 December
12 Brook’s Mews, W1K
www.benbrownfinearts.com
13 ▲Bernard Jacobson Gallery
Helen Frankenthaler: Paper Is
Painting
13 October-13 November
6 Cork Street, W1S
www.jacobsongallery.com
14 ▲Bernheimer Colnaghi
Julian Schnabel Polaroids
until 12 November
15 Old Bond Street, W1X
www.colnaghi.co.uk
15 ▲Bischoff / Weiss
Nathaniel Rackowe
until 30 October
14a Hay Hill, W1J
www.bischoffweiss.com
16 ▲BlainSouthern
Mat Collishaw: Creation
Condemned
13 October-17 December
21 Dering Street, W1S
www.blainsouthern.com
17 British Museum
Impressions of Africa: Money,
Medals, Stamps and Seals
until 6 February 2011
Great Russell Street, WC1B
www.britishmuseum.org
18 ▲Connaught Brown
Geoff Uglow
until 30 October
2 Albemarle Street, W1X
www.connaughtbrown.co.uk
19 David Roberts Art Foundation
More Pricks than Kicks
13 October-18 December
111 Great Titchfield Street, W1W
www.davidrobertsartfoundation.com
20 ▲Fine Art Society
Leonardo Drew
until 29 October
Lavery and the Glasgow Boys
13 October-4 November
148 New Bond Street, W1S
www.faslondon.com
21 ▲Frith Street Gallery
Fiona Tan: Cloud Island and
Other New Works
until 29 October
17-18 Golden Square, W1F
www.frithstreetgallery.com
22a & 22b ▲Gagosian Gallery
a James Turrell
13 October-10 December
6-24 Britannia Street, WC1X
b Damien Hirst
Detail of Gauguin`s 1893 paint-
ing Teha ´amana Has Many
Parents at Tate Modern
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What’s On
Mat Collishaw
Creation Condemned
21 Dering Street, London W1S 1AL
www.blainsouthern.com info@blainsouthern.com
13 October- 17 December
THE ART NEWSPAPER FRIEZE ART FAIR WEEKEND 16-17 OCTOBER 2010 18 What’s On
until 20 November
17-19 Davies Street, W1K
www.gagosian.com
23 ▲Gimpel Fils
Steven Gontarski
until 6 November
30 Davies Street, W1Y
www.gimpelfils.com
24 ▲Hackelbury Fine Art
The Colour of Time
until 27 January 2011
4 Launceston Place, W8
www.hackelbury.co.uk
25a & 25b ▲Halcyon Gallery
a Mauro Perucchetti
until 16 November
24 Bruton Street, W1J
b Figurative Art
until 16 November
29 New Bond Street, W15
www.halcyongallery.com
26 ▲Haunch of Venison
Loud Flash: British Punk
on Paper
until 30 October
6 Burlington Gardens, W1S
www.haunchofvenison.com
27a & 27b ▲Hauser & Wirth
a Jason Rhoades
until 18 December
196A Piccadilly, W1J
b Louise Bourgeois
15 October-18 December
23 Savile Row, W1S
www.hauserwirth.com
28 ▲Helly Nahmad Gallery
Highlights from the Collection
until 3 December
2 Cork Street, W1S
www.hellynahmad.com
29 ▲Imago Art Gallery
Visual Emotions: Bob Krieger
until 18 December
4 Clifford Street, W1S
www.imago-artgallery.com
30 Institute of Contemporary
Arts
Chto Delat? What Is to Be Done?
until 24 October
12 Carlton House Terrace, The
Mall, SW1Y
www.ica.org.uk
31 ▲James Hyman Gallery
Made in Italy: Albrecht Tuebke
until 6 November
5 Savile Row, W1S
www.jameshymangallery.com
32 ▲Laura Bartlett Gallery
Nina Beier
until 23 October
10 Northington Street, WC1N
www.laurabartlettgallery.com
33 ▲Lisson Gallery
Marina Abramovic
13 October-13 November
29 & 52-54 Bell Street
www.lissongallery.com
34 ▲Marlborough Fine Art
John Virtue
13 October-13 November
6 Albemarle Street, W1S
www.marlboroughfineart.com
35 ▲Max Wigram Gallery
Pavel Büchler: Studio Schwitters
13 October-13 November
106 New Bond Street, W1S
www.maxwigram.com
36 ▲Messum’s Fine Art Ltd
Peter Brown
until 23 October
8 Cork Street, W1S
www.messums.com
37 ▲Mummery + Schnelle
The Beholders Share
13 October-18 December
83 Great Titchfield Street, W1W
www.mummeryschnelle.com
38 National Gallery
Venice: Canaletto and His Rivals
13 October-16 January 2011
Frederick Cayley Robinson:
Acts of Mercy
until 17 October
Trafalgar Square, WC2
www.nationalgallery.org.uk
39 National Portrait Gallery
Chasing Mirrors: Portraits of the
Unseen
15 October-9 January 2011
Camille Silvy
until 24 October
St Martin’s Place, WC2H
www.npg.org.uk
40 ▲Offer Waterman & Co, Fine
Arts
Sheila Fell
until 29 October
11 Langton Street, SW10
www.waterman.co.uk
41 ▲Osborne Samuel
Modern and Contemporary
British Art
until 6 November
23A Bruton Street, W1J
www.osbornesamuel.com
42 ▲Paul Stolper Gallery
Damien Hirst: the Souls
until 13 November
31 Museum Street, WC1A
www.paulstolper.com
43 ▲Pilar Corrias Ltd
Rirkrit Tiravanija
13 October-1 December
54 Eastcastle Street, W1W
www.pilarcorrias.com
44 ▲Riflemaker
Josephine King: Life So Far
until 30 October
79 Beak Street, W1F
www.riflemaker.org
45 ▲Robilant + Voena
The Gallant Apparel: Italian Art
and the Modern
until 27 October
38 Dover Street, W1S
www.robilantvoena.com
46 ▲Rossi & Rossi Ltd
Jaishri Abichandani: Dirty Jewels
14 October-25 November
16 Clifford Street, W1S
www.rossirossi.com
47 Royal Academy of Arts
The Brandhorst Museum by
Sauerbruch Hutton
until 7 November
Treasures From Budapest:
European Masterpieces from
Leonardo to Schiele
until 12 December
The Language of Line: John
Flaxman’s Illustrations to the
Works of Homer and Aeschylus
until 29 October
Burlington House, Piccadilly, W1J
www.royalacademy.org.uk
48 Saatchi Gallery
Newspeak: British Art Now, Part I
until 17 October
Duke of York, King's Road, SW3
www.saatchi-gallery.co.uk
49a, 49b & 49c ▲Sadie Coles
a Angus Fairhurst
until 27 November
69 South Audley Street, W1K
b Dirk Bell: Made in Germany
until 28 October
9 Balfour Mews, W1
c Urs Fischer: Douglas Sirk
until 11 December
4 New Burlington Place, W1
www.sadiecoles.com
50 Serpentine Gallery
Klara Lidén
until 7 November
Serpentine Gallery Pavilion
until 31 October
Kensington Gardens, W2
www.serpentinegallery.org
51 ▲Simon Lee Gallery
Angela Bulloch: Discrete
Manifold Whatsoever
13 October-27 November
12 Berkeley Street, W1
www.simonleegallery.com
52 ▲Sprüth Magers
Thomas Scheibitz
until 30 October
7A Grafton Street, W1S
www.spruethmagers.com
53 ▲Stephen Friedman
Beatriz Milhazes
until 20 November
25-28 Old Burlington Street, W1S
www.stephenfriedman.com
54 ▲Stuart Shave / Modern Art
Bojan Sarcevic: Comme des
Chiens et des Vagues
13 October-13 November
Nasreen Mohamedi
13 October-13 November
23/25 Eastcastle Street, W1W
www.modernart.net
55 Tate Britain
Eadweard Muybridge
until 16 January 2011
Tate Britain Duveens
Commission: Fiona Banner
until 3 January 2011
Rachel Whiteread: Drawings
until 16 January 2011
Turner Prize
until 3 January 2011
Millbank, SW1P
www.tate.org.uk/britain
56 ▲Thomas Dane
Kelley Walker
until 13 November
11 Duke Street, SW1
www.thomasdane.com
57 ▲Timothy Taylor Gallery
Jessica Jackson Hutchins:
Champions
13 October-6 November
Ryan McLaughlin: Farley
13 October-6 November
15 Carlos Place, W1K
www.timothytaylorgallery.com
58 Victoria and Albert Museum
Serge Diaghilev and the Golden
Age of the Ballet Russes 1909-29
until 9 January 2011
Raphael: Cartoons and
Tapestries for the Sistine Chapel
until 17 October
Shadow Catchers: Camera-less
Photography
13 October-20 February 2011
Cromwell Road, SW7
www.vam.ac.uk
59 ▲Waddington Galleries
Sculpture
until 30 October
11 Cork Street, W1S
www.waddington-galleries.com
60 Wallace Collection
The Wallace Collection
and the Art Treasures of Spain
until 30 November
From Drawing-board to Display:
the Work of the Wallace
Collection Conservation
Technician
until 24 October
Poussin to Seurat:
French Drawings from the
National Galleries of Scotland
until 19 December
Hertford House,
Manchester Square, W1M
www.wallacecollection.org
61¶ ▲White Cube
Christian Marclay:
the Clock
15 October-13 November
25-26 Mason’s Yard, SW1Y
www.whitecube.com
62 ▲Whitford Fine Art
Kudditji Kngwarreye:
My Country
15 October-5 November
6 Duke Street, SW1Y
www.whitfordfineart.com
■For more listings, please see our website:
www.theartnewspaper.com/whatson
Klara Lidén`s 2010 mixed-
media piece, Always to Be
Elsewhere, at the Serpentine
Serge Lifar and Alexandra
Danilova in Appolon Musa -
gete, 1928, at the V&A
©
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Frieze Talks
Saturday 2.30pm Artist
Susan Hiller in conversa-
tion with John Welchman
from the University of
California, San Diego;
5pm UK writer Michael
Bracewell talks to artist
Bridget Riley
Sunday 12noon Exhibition
Making as Activism:
Whose Politics? A panel
including artists Jeremy
Deller and Emily Roysdon
discuss art as activism
Frieze Film Programme
Saturday and Sunday
11.30am, 2.30pm,
5.30pm Screening of the
Frieze Film Commissions
2pm and 5pm Screening
of Shahryar Nashat’s
new video
Saturday 12.30pm Indian
curator Shanay Jhaveri
selects three films includ-
ing Lucy Raven’s China
Town, 2009; 3.30pm
London-based Lux pre-
sents Monument (2010)
by Redmond Entwistle
and Robert Longo’s 1987
film Arena Brains;
6.30pm Screening of
Spartacus Chetwynd’s
Hermitos Children, 2009
Sunday 3.30pm Jhaveri’s
selection includes Subdoh
Gupta’s Pure, 2009
Ryan’s Bar at Sunday
Ambika P3, University of
Westminster, 35
Marylebone Rd
Australian artist Ryan
Gander invites artists to
mix cocktails. A mere
£50 buys a cocktail and
an artist-signed beer mat
Saturday 3pm-4pm Bob
& Roberta Smith
Live Painting at Moniker
54 Holywell Lane,
Shoreditch, EC2
Saturday from 12 noon
German graffiti artist duo
Herakut paints a wall;
Sunday from 12 noon
Brazilian street artist Titi-
Freak paints a wall; 1pm
World premiere of graffiti
documentary Bomb It 2
Serpentine Gallery’s
Map Marathon
Royal Geographical
Society, 1 Kensington
Gore, SW7
Saturday and Sunday
8pm Fifty non-stop pre-
sentations by leading
artists, writers, philoso-
phers, musicians, archi-
tects, designers and sci-
entists including Marina
Abramovic, David Adjaye,
Gilbert & George, Pancho
Guedes, Mona Hatoum
and Ai Weiwei. Tickets
from £10/£15-£20/£25
available at:
www.ticketweb.co.uk
Weekend highlights
16-17/10/10
Jason Rhoades: 1:12 Perfect World
Hauser & Wirth 196A Piccadilly
until 18 December
For the first solo European show of Jason Rhoades’ work since
his untimely death at the age of 41 in 2006, Hauser & Wirth
presents a sterling silver 1:12 scale model (above) of the
American installation artist’s famed 1999 exhibition “Perfect
World” at the Deichtorhallen, Hamburg. The original two-storey
installation, made from wooden triangles and aluminium bars,
took up the Deichtorhallen’s entire gallery space—all 15,000 sq.
ft of it. Visitors to the Hamburg gallery used a hydraulic lift to
reach the second level and watch Rhoades work in his “perfect
world” or “Eden”, which was a photographic reproduction of his
father’s vegetable patch. In addition to the model, visitors to the
Piccadilly gallery can see the 400 drawings Rhoades created
during the 1999 project and hear a soundtrack capturing the
cacophony recorded during the Hamburg presentation.
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Edgware Road
Project:
Marwan Rechmaoui
in Residence
Until 18 October
Centre for Possible Studies,
64 Seymour Street, London W1
+44 (0)20 7298 1535
Serpentine Gallery
Kensington Gardens
London W2 3XA
T +44 (0)20 7402 6075
www.serpentinegallery.org
Open daily 10am–6pm,
Fridays 10am–10pm until
17 October
Anish Kapoor:
Turning the World
Upside Down
Kensington Gardens
28 September–
13 March
An exhibition organised by The Royal
Parks and the Serpentine Gallery

Klara Lidén
7 October–
7 November
Serpentine Gallery
Pavilion 2010
by Jean Nouvel
10 July–17 October
Map Marathon
16–17 October
Pavilion funded by
Advisors
Klara Lidén exhibition
co-produced with
Act 3 Act 4 Act 1 Act 2
Keeping It Real
Whitechapel Gallery
The D. Daskalopoulos
Collection
Supported by:
An Exhibition in Four Acts
10 June 2010–22 May 2011
Act 2: Subversive Abstraction
17 September–5 December 2010
whitechapelgallery.org
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November 6
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March 13
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Savethedate
B I E N N A L E
socledumonde.dk heartmus.dk agitp
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ARTISTS:
Christian Danielewitz
Danh Vo
Hesselholdt and Mejlvang
Ismar Cirkinagic
Jannis Kounellis
Jens Haaning
Jette Hye Jin Mortensen
Joachim Hamou
Lilibeth Cuenca Rasmussen
Nedko Solakov
Thierry Geoffroy
Marcelo Viguez
SPECIAL PROJECT:
Kim Sooja
COMPANIES:
Aarhus Universitet,
Handels- og IngeniørHøjskolen
A Hereford Beefstouw
Dagbladet Børsen/Cand.Selv
C.C. CONTRACTOR A/S Herning
egetæpper a/s
IB Gruppen – IB&Co, Co3, NewsRoom
IT Relation A/S
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TEKO

2

THE ART NEWSPAPER FRIEZE ART FAIR WEEKEND 16-17 OCTOBER 2010

Diary
Frieze-curated sculpture in Regent’s Park isn’t the only public art that’s the talk of the town. Down the road in Marble Arch, Italian sculptor Mauro Perucchetti is due to unveil Mr and Mrs Candy and

FRIEZE ART FAIR DAILY EDITION

Editorial and production:
Editor: Jane Morris Deputy editor: Javier Pes Assistant editor: Emily Sharpe Website editor: Helen Stoilas Contributors: Georgina Adam, Robert Bound, Louisa Buck, Charlotte Burns, Melanie Gerlis, Gareth Harris, Marisa Mazria Katz, Lindsay Pollock, Cristina Ruiz, Anny Shaw, Jean Wainwright Photography: Sara Ekholm Copy editors: James Hobbs, Simon Stephens Designer: Emma Goodman Editorial researcher/picture editor: William Oliver Editorial assistance: Rob Curran Group editorial director: Anna Somers Cocks Managing director: James Knox Associate publisher: Patrick Kelly Office administrator: Belinda Seppings Advertising sales UK: Ben Tomlinson, Louise Hamlin Advertising sales US: Caitlin Miller Advertising executives: Julia Michalska (UK), Justin Kouri (US) Published by Umberto Allemandi & Co. Publishing Ltd

the kids. “Jelly Baby Family 2010 could easily embody the unity of family and the multicultural aspect of modern society that is so prevalent, especially in London,” says Perucchetti. More of his work can be enjoyed now at the Halcyon Gallery in London.

Secret Lives
Monika Sprüth,
co-director Sprüth Magers, Berlin and London, B9 I have always been interested in football, even as a young girl. While I was studying architecture, I even made excuses to miss lectures, just so that I could listen to football matches on the radio. A good match can be almost as gratifying as a great work of art: it has an aesthetic appeal, tension and style. I live in Cologne so I support the local team. In the 1960s, the team was much stronger and there were some incredible matches between Cologne and Liverpool. Now, I love Arsenal because of the coach [Arsène Wenger]. I also like Chelsea. In fact, I don't really have any favourite players but I really admire coaches because they focus on strategy and tactics. I was fortunate to attend two wonderful Champions League matches at Stamford Bridge when Chelsea played Liverpool and Barcelona. The Liverpool-Chelsea match [in 2009] was incredible—with a 4-4 draw. I took [the US artist] Cindy Sherman along to the Liverpool game; it was her first football outing and she really enjoyed it. Interview by Gareth Harris

What a feeling

At the Cartier Award dinner on Thursday night the celebrations took a legwarmer-esque turn when a handful of art world revellers, including Frieze Projects supremo Sarah McCrory, descended on what they thought was an art soirée— only to discover that they’d inadvertently stumbled upon the launch party for “Flashdance: the Musical”. Watch out for a few nifty dance steps—and the odd leotard—as part of the next Frieze Projects programme.

after it opened, the museum was forced to turn it into a “look, don’t touch” experience, however, after a hasty risk assessment. Instead of walking across the seed bank, you can only appreciate it from above now. The risk of potentially dangerous levels of dust was the cause rather than the light-fingered visitors pocketing the seeds. Those at the private view on Monday who couldn’t resist taking home a souvenir or two may find the value of their snitched seeds grows in rarity, forming a tidy windfall in the future.

Back from the dead
There were some spooky goings on this week at the fair around the Frieze Project devised by the artist and Fortean Times contributor Jeffrey Vallance, who asked five psychics to channel the spirits of blockbusting artists Van Gogh, Frida Kahlo, Jackson Pollock, Leonardo da Vinci and Marcel Duchamp. Before the mediums—and the artist phantoms—arrived, the spiritualists predicted: “There might be some problems with electricity.” Before you could say Doris Stokes, the internet crashed during the séance, which meant that a live web broadcast had to be scuppered. It was all to do with “forcefields”, apparently.

Creative kindergarten
You're never too young to be an art worldling. At Frieze the nippers even match some of the works of art. Gagosian was visited by this junior art fashionista with a T-shirt to match Damien Hirst’s spot painting. At the same time, a crocodile of suitably attired children set off for a treasure hunt in and around the Frieze tent. The tender-aged group of art explorers formed a roaming advert for the art patrons' group Outset's latest enterprise, called The Art Room—a venture that funds specially equipped art therapy classrooms.

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Ai bites the dust

Ai Weiwei and his army of assistants spent this summer making the 100 million ceramic sunflower seeds that now cover the floor of Tate Modern’s Turbine Hall. Soon
Artoon by Pablo Helguera

Slash relief
Never mind the booths, veteran pop conceptualist Billy Apple found aesthetic nirvana at Frieze while on a visit to the men’s room. Apple, in London from his native New Zealand for his show at the Mayor Gallery, singled out the “impossibly discreet ‘toilet’ sign” for special attention. “The white lettering on grey is worthy of Lawrence Weiner— or the best work of On Kawara,” he enthused. Neither was he short of a snappy title for these limited edition works: Need /[slash] Relief.

Taste of leather What’s my favourite? Anything At the Hix restaurant at Frieze, by the Germans. I Picpus, the single-sheet minithink Frieze is like the mag named after the French term for a flea bite, is World Cup. Every celebrating its first anniversary year you have to pick with a special edition emblazoned with a portrait of a favourite nation. Squadron Leader Arthur This year it’s the Germans for me because they’re strong and good in defence. Being so dyslexic I can’t possibly pick out a single work
Writer A.A. Gill speaking at Frieze—for a selection of other people’s favourite art at the fair, see p10

Lushington Vipan which is impregnated with a custommade—and suitably masculine—perfume mingling the smells of leather, tweed and engine oil. Chocs away!

Michael Crowe and Lenka Clay ton are the ar tists behind Mysterious Letters, a large -scale writing /ar t project . They intend to write to ever yone in the world. This discount is valid in COS London stores only, from 14th –17th October and does not apply to external items or COS gif t cards. Please bring this voucher to receive your discount .

COMPLIMENTARY SHIPPING From London, New York and Hong Kong to any CFASS facility for 2010 —— —— Contact CFASS London today to learn more about this exclusive offer and arrange a private tour. +44 207 622 0609, london@cfass.com. —— ——
CFASS is an independent subsidiary and our clients enjoy complete confidentiality. We work with the world's leading private collectors, galleries, and auction houses.

SEPTEMBER 16 – OCTOBER 30 2010 .

Also due to be on the panel is Suzanne Cotter.” Among his sales were a big Anselm Kiefer.000. Arsenal (Prince Harry) Another early hit was Elizabeth Peyton’s Arsenal (Prince Harry).500.000 and Wolfgang Tillmans’ Your Dogs. particularly Russian and MiddleEasterners based in London. citing her newlysigned Romanian twins Gert and Uwe Tobias.3m of contemporary art (against an estimate of £10m to £13.” Georgina Adam and Melanie Gerlis Gulf art talk The artistic director of the Sharjah Biennial Jack Persekian is due to be a speaker at the Whitechapel Gallery’s panel discussion on 16 October (5pm to 6 pm) about the past and future of contemporary art production in the Gulf. He said: “the first day—even the first three hours—were really important. This was most evident at the beginning of the auction. but among the more established artists was a group of six works from the collection of Jerry Hall. David Zwirner (G12) reported good sales. at Gisela Capitain (C14) for £7. It’s a hangover of the boom. © Sara Ekholm Dubai’s new gallery Middle-Eastern art specialist William Lawrie is opening a new gallery in Dubai. visitors can see the gallery’s latest exhibition. Eigen+Art (F6) sold half its booth dedicated to photographer Ricarda Roggan at prices between €4.250 Clockwise from left: Andreas Gursky. Los Angeles gallerist Richard Telles (E20) sold more than half the works by LA artists that he brought.” Nevertheless. Farhad Moshiri (Iran) and Timo Nasseri (Iran/Germany). While some major US collectors visited Frieze.000 to £300. including Jennifer “ ” MadeIn’s I Love You Passion Fruit Piece (Spread-B053). and sold for £601. otherwise we could just stay in our galleries dollar [against the euro] and lower morale: “New York still feels the crisis. Sotheby’s has had success with Andreas Gursky photographs in the past and last night was no exception. The market has found a good pace. 1998. In total.200 and £40. “People come to London in October to find new artists. 1997.000 each. people are making decisions faster again. but will also show some international names. The fair has moved on from the original Frieze readership. for $850. He has recently been taken on by Christie’s-owned Haunch of Venison gallery. At Gagosian (D8).800 and €14. who is leaving his position as Christie’s director of Middle Eastern art at the end of the year. I have found a space in the Al Quoz warehouse district and will open the gallery in early 2011. asking £44.” said Alexander Branczik. asking $78. “We did most of our selling on the first day. Stefan Ratibor said things were slowish on the first day but picked up afterwards: “This is supposed to be a young fair but older artists. helping to distinguish the Frieze auction season from the more heavyweight contemporary sales coming to its New York saleroom next month. The gallerist sold only to new clients. such as Howard Hodgkin. Sweden’s Magnus Karlsson (F18) sold Johanna Karlsson’s delicate Untitled. 2010. Eight Months Gone. Simon Preston (R14) sold Carlos Bevilacqua sculptures for between $10. for €520.000 to £700. for £150. who did not attend the auction. 2008.000 and a Gilbert and George.000. “I want to work on my own projects now. a solo show of the Lebaneseborn.” said the gallery’s Ales Ortuzar. head of the art evaluation committee with the Ministry of Culture. G. Hall.250 (est £200.” he said. they were less active in the market than their European peers: Ropac suggested this was because of the weak New business is what makes fairs worth it. Lü Lixin. Pyongyang IV. asking €30. sold for £1. sold over the phone for £289. which was described by auctioneer Oliver Barker as a “little jewel”. a little bit of the sparkle is back. In Frame.2cm) of the pregnant Hall by Lucian Freud. with some stands rehanging completely after the visitor surge of the first day.000. One feature of this year’s fair was the number of sales made to new collectors. A distorted portrait. The government says fraud is a growing problem as the public’s enthusiasm for buying art increases. US-based artist Walid Raad (until 2 January 2011).2cm (est £70. Sotheby’s ended the Frieze evening auction season last night with a small but strong sale of £13. the evening auctions this week have seen nearly £40m of contemporary art sold in London.” The gallerist’s words were echoed across the floor. curator of exhibitions at the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi. among them Luc Tuymans’ 2005 Evidence. tree sculpture to a new European collector for €7.000). Financial services entrepreneur Kamel Lazaar is converting a former Ottoman palace into a space for exhibitions. Half-way through the Frieze art fair on Friday. Canadian musician Richie Hawtin admired a David Adamo sculpture at Ibid Projects (H17). Anthony Wilkinson (D2). while Edinburgh’s Richard Ingleby (E17) did “amazingly well”.H.000 both sold. G.250. 2010 (all three editions plus the artist’s proof). we are seeing new clients.4 THE ART NEWSPAPER FRIEZE ART FAIR WEEKEND 16-17 OCTOBER 2010 Sales report: Frieze Tunis space to open A North African contemporary art collector is opening a centre to display his Middle Eastern art collection in Tunis. Carrying an irrevocable bid (meaning the work had a thirdparty guarantor who would either purchase the work or share in the upside should it be taken higher). are finding buyers. the big collectors are there right at the beginning. Andreas Geiger at Sprüth Magers (B9) summed up the overall feeling: “People are acquiring. 2008. most dealers were declaring it a success.000) to a European museum. there’s relief all round. x 15.” said Lawrie. including Ivan Morley’s embroidered A True Tale. 2010. to collector Guy Ullens. Sotheby’s director of contemporary art. Eight Months Gone.000. the model and former wife of Rolling Stones singer Mick Jagger.000.8m) collectively sold for £2. selling to “lots of new people” at prices between £1. 2010 Steinkamp’s Orbit 8. Artists in his collection include Mona Hatoum (Lebanon). The gallery will specialise in Middle Eastern artists. 2009 was just OK. The works (whose total high estimate was £1. including a plushy appliquéd fabric I Love You Passion Fruit Piece (Spread– BO53). At the same time.000. some major collectors were seen on Friday. 2007. At the market’s mid-level. after the sale. Auction newcomer and Saatchi exhibitor Ahmed Alsoudani was the second lot on the block and his Untitled.000. and that should be in the auction rooms as well as at Frieze.S. At the upper price end.A. with Thaddaeus Ropac (B11) saying: “I’ve been surprisingly pleased. “People are not taking risks but any artist with a strong museum presence is selling. Melanie Gerlis China’s art fraud squad The Chinese Ministry of Culture has opened the Huangcheng Art Trading Center in Beijing in an attempt to regulate the country’s art market. CasaTriângulo (F26) sold Mariana Palma’s 2010 painting of silks at $35. who was pleased after selling Dara Birnbaum’s video installation Taking to the Streets…. Iraqiborn Alsoudani (who now lives in the US) is one of five artists selected to represent Iraq in the 2011 Venice Biennale (the first time Iraq has had a pavilion there since 1973). whose Untitled woodcut image from 2010. fresh art.A.000. San Loretto. Frieze auction season ends with strong Sotheby’s performance Evening sales this week have seen nearly £40m of contemporary art sold LONDON. “I’ve been wanting to do something new for some time. former managing director of the Dubai Art Fair. While the atmosphere has not hit its prerecession heights. Elizabeth Peyton. by Francesco Clemente was estimated at £100.000).000 and $22. but there’s no more five-minute buying. 1997. said: “I was a bit nervous before the fair opened— 2008 was terrible. Other lower-end sales included Carla Black’s cake sculpture Still Moves. is the director of the centre. which will combine exhibitions. The centre has an appraisal committee made up of more than 300 experts who will advise collectors on whether an item is genuine or not.000 to £90. 2010. G. but attracted little interest and went unsold. 1990. Later bidding was less enthusiastic. British collector and dealer Charles Saatchi headed straight for Sprüth Magers (B9).000. S. which went to a Belgian collector. Maureen Paley (D6) said that most of her sales had been to Europeans. which depicts the looting of the Baghdad Museum. “New business is what makes fairs worth it.6m). who was considering buying some of Cao Fei’s installation at Vitamin Creative Space (H5). so this year people couldn’t quite gauge what would happen.3m and included a tiny portrait (10. Money Sweat.” he said.000 to £150.” said Rachel Lehmann (B13). which pleased exhibitors. Details of the foundation will be included in “Art & Patronage: The Middle East” published in November by Thames & Hudson/ TransGlobe Publishing. Long March Space (E18) had sold most of its stand of works by MadeIn. and the Belgian Mimi Dusselier sought out Bortolami (F19).” His partner in the new venture is Asmaa Al Shabibi. seminars and workshops in the Tunisian capital. Lucian Freud. 1997. which opened with young. otherwise we could just stay in our galleries and work on our shows. 2010. Gursky’s Pyongyang IV. 6 4 E A S T 77 T H S T R E E T N E W Y O R K N Y 1 0 0 7 5 O C TOB E R 6 — J A N U A RY 21 . where he is based. which attracted much telephone bidding and sold for £481. Sotheby’s is selling another eight works from Hall’s collection at its day sale today. ($25.000).” he said.000. advice and trading. for $55. Solid sales point to success for most galleries Exhibitors pleased by the level of business done with new collectors LONDON. it’s not crazy.3m (est £500. including the collector of Chinese art Uli Sigg. Jerry Hall. had previously told the media that she was selling her art in order to “move on” after her break-up from Jagger. It will be chaired by writer Shumon Basar. but it’s solid. 2007. for $32.

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000.000.000. sol en damier ESTIMATE $12.000 – 18. NEW YORK © ESTATE OF ROY LICHTENSTEIN H I G H L I G H TS E X H I B I T I O N I N LO N D O N O N V I E W U N T I L 1 6 O C TO B E R PROPERTY OF A PRIVATE EUROPEAN COLLECTION Amedeo Modigliani Nu assis sur un divan (La Belle Romaine) ESTIMATE UPON REQUEST PROPERTY SOLD TO BENEFIT YOUNGARTS. THE CORE PROGRAM OF THE NATIONAL FOUNDATION FOR ADVANCEMENT IN THE ARTS Claude Monet Le Bassin aux nymphéas ESTIMATE $20. 1955 ESTIMATE $20.000 Mark Rothko Untitled. 1962 ESTIMATE $20.000 – 30.000 – 30.000. NEW YORK© 1998 KATE ROTHKO PRIZEL & CHRISTOPHER ROTHKO / ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS). INC. NEW YORK © 2010 ANDY WARHOL FOUNDATION FOR THE VISUAL ARTS/ ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS).000.000 – 25. PRINCIPAL AUCTIONEER.000. #9588677 © 2010 GERHARD RICHTER © 2010 SUCCESSION H.MATISSE/ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS). 1962 ESTIMATE $12.000 Roy Lichtenstein Ice Cream Soda. 1966 ESTIMATE $12.COM .000 PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE EUROPEAN COLLECTOR Henri Matisse Danseuse dans le fauteuil.000 Andy Warhol Coca-Cola [4] Large Coca-Cola.000.000.000.000 – 18.000 Impressionist & Modern Art and Contemporary Art AUCTIONS IN NEW YORK 2 & 9 NOVEMBER 2010 I ENQUIRIES +1 212 606 7000 I SOTHEBYS.000 – 18.© SOTHEBY’S.000 Gerhard Richter Matrosen (Sailors). 2010 TOBIAS MEYER.000.000.000.

director of Modern Art Oxford. priced between $100.000 “I really loved the gold colour and the way it looked like cardboard but was actually bronze. Frieze Project (P11) “I thought the whole performance was so funky.000 “I love it but I don’t really know why. like an altar. I think I might be doing a deal to buy it later. and really funny to watch. director of Dallas Contemporary. actor.” AP Photo/Jennifer Graylock Bob & Roberta Smith. £8. It seemed like a found object but was actually made. so it’s great to see so much of it this year.” A RT DUBA I 16 – 19 March 2011 . It is so undervalued these days. Petrified Petrol Pump.” Russell Tovey. sold to a US museum for $150. 2010. With Frieze fair-induced late nights and early mornings—looking across darkened hotel rooms—I’d be more than grateful for Lauschmann’s relentless caressing of time bringing me to consciousness or happily easing me to sleep. I never tire of its simple elegance and technical wit. where film meets painting. because of the “Move: Choreographing You” exhibition that is currently on at the Hayward. fresh voices that I have seen here. it was sold but I would have liked to have had it because I’ve got a little collection growing with some Emin drawings and a couple of Rebecca Warrens. 2009. (Growing Zeros). He’s someone who expresses himself in very new ways. globalisation and celebrity culture. It was superb. magazine editor. It was just beautiful.500 each and a video for £28.500 “Ryan Trecartin is a performance and a digital artist. 2010. but it looks like it’s decaying. I felt that it immediately stood out as speaking another language—I suppose because it was from a different time and so had a different communicative frequency. at Mary Mary (F28). Barbara Gladstone (D7). collector. It’s monumental. 1973. Greene Naftali (B8). I thought it was interesting timing too. the use of crowds and concept of the present moment becomes the focal point in the work.000 and $200. chose Andreas Gursky’s Dortmund.” Michael Stanley. Sprüth Magers (B9). artist picked Spartacus Chetwynd’s A Tax Haven Run By Women (In the Style of a Luna Park Game Show). yet timeless. Interviews by Louisa Buck.000 “One of my favourite Frieze pieces is a work I’ve seen several time before.000 “I knew [Conrad] as a filmmaker. on Ryan Trecartin’s installation at Elizabeth Dee (G16). chose Allora & Calzadilla. and undermined it in a really humorous way. I thought her project really subverted that show. In keeping with his photographic work in North Korea. on Tony Conrad’s Yellow Movie 2/28/73.000 “I like this work because it’s a Gursky that has rarely been seen. He has a booth to himself at Elizabeth Dee and is probably one of the more exciting.” Fiona Banner. but if the work of art has a special quality it will get noticed. Gareth Harris and Anny Shaw Jefferson Hack. 2010.” All photos © Sara Ekholm unless credited otherwise Sprüth Magers Photo by Linda Nylind Peter Doroshenko. artist. It’s a picture of an empty screen. she is a real genius.10 THE ART NEWSPAPER FRIEZE ART FAIR WEEKEND 16-17 OCTOBER 2010 Objects of desire It’s hard to see the trees from the wood in an art fair.” Frank Cohen. a picture of nothing. Stuart Shave/Modern Art (D13). €270. on Torsten Lauschmann’s Digital Clock. picked Ricky Swallow’s Plate. At Frieze this year we asked visitors with a discerning eye to select the piece that made them stop in their tracks and take a second look. I also like that it looked as if it had bullet-holes in it. but not as an artist. £12. including four c-prints for £8. digital culture. I’m also really enjoying all the modern British art in the fair. He mixes a lot of references—consumer culture. I guess it’s like the last days of petrol or something. and yet it had no other subject and no other agenda. Unfortunately. Rob Curran. It’s a contemporary photograph. race.

IMAGE: DOORWAY TO HEAVEN BY MAURO PERUCCHETTI .

Love Is a Burden. Enterprising artists Damien Hirst and Tracey Emin have taken their own booths: Other Criteria.com . For some. While the opening morning was slow. The London-based institution’s irreverent booth. 2011 New Location The Metropolitan Pavilion Chelsea. 2010. market analysis and opinion. for £45.” says Sam Arthur. for £3.com There was less a stampede and more of a slow trickle of visitors at the opening of Multiplied on Friday morning. just as importantly. exhibitors are hopeful that the combination of Christie’s clout and classy West End address—as well as the free entry—will lure the weekend crowds. Online content includes breaking news. The Art Newspaper TV has interviews with artists. it seems. could afford an Emin. Subscribers can access our complete archives. Its booth is YBA-heavy with works including Sarah Lucas’s sculpture Love Is a Bird. Hoping to cast a wide net with potential patrons. an associate from the East End’s Nobrow.500 to a European collector.12 THE ART NEWSPAPER FRIEZE ART FAIR WEEKEND EDITION 16-17 OCTOBER 2010 Auction-house fair Will Multiplied find its niche? Limited edition Hirsts.000. decked out like a seaside fishstall. 2010.pulse-art. Marisa Mazria Katz and Charlotte Burns © Marisa Mazria Katz Our current edition contains 96 pages packed with art world news. the fair hosted by Christie’s auction house (until 18 October).” says Blais at White Cube.” says Alan Murrin of Emin International. This sentiment was echoed by The Multiple Store’s Nicholas Sharp: “Christie’s is providing a space. One of the few visitors spotted from a museum was Tate librarian Maria White.600 and Hirst’s Happy. who bought the limited edition book Hard Wood Lesson. while our daily fair reports are available to everyone. then we’re glad to be here. they might be tempted by works on display at the Henningham Family Press. there is a set of six ceramic plates. Blakes and Emins for sale—all with chips LONDON. 2010. and Emin International. 2010. who described his typical clientele as students and design aficionados. Other Criteria’s manager.” says a cheery Faine. 2009. stood out from Multiplied’s mass of 2D. for £25. Spain. “We hope it will bring in the young people who are interested. who was showing a range of works from £200 prints to the unique Antony Gormley sculpture MEME. but might not be able to afford a unique piece by one of our artists. which Hirst part-owns. For those with deeper pockets. “If people are in west London to spend money. interviews—and a smattering of gossip On Twitter The Art Newspaper team is tweeting from the fair.” says Mark Hayward from Pratt Contemporary. 2010. If nothing else. You Know my Heart Is with You. Sign up and follow us @TheArtNewspaper News Why artists are rallying to defend New York’s controversial Islamic centre (top) Art Market Three arrested over €80m German “forgeries” Features The scandal of Venice’s huge advertising hoardings (above) Coming in November Art Market Chinese contemporary is back and selling fast Features Can Oscar Niemeyer’s arts centre in Aviles. Chlöe Faine at CCA Galleries also made an early sale—Sir Peter Blake’s I Love You White Diamond Dust.theartnewspaper. its client list. and expose people to her online shop. Andalucian Wildlife Throw. “cheaper than chips”.” says Riflemaker’s Robin Mann. Everyone. New York www. editions galleries and people like us. their clientele. “It’s a real cross-section of public institutions. and showing its flexibility—I think it’s rather inspiring. on sale are limited edition prints and multiples at the stands taken by 37 UK galleries. so this is a great way to meet people. In the October main edition On our website Get all the stories delivered to your desktop. which was. Most galleries hope the niche fair will attract specialist collectors: “It allows people to hone in on something specific. in her words. in his words.060. events. 2010 The Ice Palace Miami. improve our mailing list and make a bit of money. At the other end of the scale. for £10. The unique. “It could be fantastic.” says White Cube’s Yves Blais. Held in its swish West Kensington showrooms. 2008—a snapshot of the artist’s greatest hits with pills. including some live from Frieze www. business reports. “brilliant for the library”. “in this case. owner David John Henningham sold works for as little as £1 or. Art market virgins could pick up a £10 canvas bag or a £175 print. reproduce the Bilbao effect? Artist interview Painter Ged Quinn put under the spotlight Artist interview Marina Abramovic on the physical rigour of her performances Books Sex and art during the Renaissance Media “Self Made”— Gillian Wearing’s latest feature film reviewed Get your free copy from Stand M5 What’s On The Boston Museum of Fine Arts’ new 53-gallery Americas wing CONTEMPORARY ART FAIR PULSE Miami Dec 2 – 5. “It’s a chance to show a really important part of Tracey’s practice. “We don’t have a gallery in London. Within the fair’s opening hours Arthur sold a £300 wall hanging by Ellie Curtis. Pop goes the fair: Peter Blake multiples at CCA Galleries We hope it will bring in the young people who might not be able to afford a unique piece spots and butterflies covering a white canvas.” Some exhibitors are just happy for the exposure Multiplied could bring. interviews. But what about the supposed competition between galleries and auction houses? For Tobias Thomas. for £2.000—one of the most expensive works at the fair. collectors and museum figures. it’s about capitalising on the Christie’s brand and. “It’s a chance to meet new people. framed work costs £21.” Others are seizing the chance to groom a “ ” new generation of collectors. Florida PULSE New York Mar 3 – 6. it’s a friendly rivalry”. print-shops. white-walled stands.

com .timothytaylorgallery.PLATON@SOTHEBYS.COM/BEYONDLIMITS Chatsworth House Trust is a registered charity No 511149 dedicated to the long term preservation of Chatsworth. 5pm Bridget Riley in conversation with Michael Bracewell Bridget Riley Gwangju Biennale 2010. Saturday 16 October.STOCK@SOTHEBYS. London W1K 2EX T: +44 (0)20 7409 3344 www.COM.COM SOTHEBYS. Frieze Art Fair C17 and Karsten Schubert Frieze talks 2010: Frieze auditorium. London 24 November 2010–22 May 2011 15 Carlos Place. Bridget Riley is represented by Timothy Taylor Gallery.SOTHEBY’S AT CHATSWORTH: A SELLING EXHIBITION 13 SEPTEMBER – 31 OCTOBER 2010 Yue Minjun Contemporary Terracotta Warriors – 9 Price upon request ENQUIRIES +44 (0)20 7293 6095 ALEXANDER. SIMON. South Korea Until 7 November 2010 Paintings and Related Work The National Gallery.

it SHOW OFFICE T +39 051 282111 / F +39 051 6374019 artefiera@bolognafiere.28/31 GEN JAN 2011 BOLOGNA ITAL Y www.it PREVIEW AD INVITI giovedì 27 gennaio PREVIEW BY INVITATION ONLY Thursday 27 January Main Sponsor .bolognafiere.artefiera.

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com 3 Multiplied 15 October.B.com 7 ▲Fred London Ltd Godfried Donkor until 14 November 45 Vyner Street.com 8 ▲Hales Gallery Hew Locke until 17 October Tea Building.cornwallterrrace. SW7 www.30pm Christie’s South Kensington. 85 Old Brompton Road.uk 24 ▲Vilma Gold William Daniels until 14 November 25 Vyner Street. E2 www.com 18 Old Truman Brewery Benjamin Cohen until 17 October Photolounge 15-17 October Young Masters Revisited 15-25 October 91 Brick Lane. 11am-5pm 18 October.barbican.fred-london.padlondon. noon-8pm 16 October.com 20 Maresfield Gardens. E2 www.limoncellogallery.com HYDE PARK Serpentine Gallery 24 58 16 46 44 35 7 29 23 12 2 49c 25b28 41 1327b 22b 25a 20 36 26 21 52 57 34 59 53 4 31 15 11 27a 3 1 14 47 56 45 18 49a 4 61 62 51 49b 30 50 4 Pavilion of Art & Design London 13-17 October.org.rokebygallery.com .com 4 ▲Calvert 22 Alexander Ponomarev: Sea Stories until 21 November 22 Calvert Avenue.com 10 ▲Hotel Steven Claydon until 30 October 77A Greenfield Road.vilmagold.co.museumofeverything.com 23 ▲The Approach Helene Appel: Chopping Board until 24 October 47 Approach Road.katemacgarry.freud. 35 Marylebone Rd. EC2 www.parasol-unit. Du Bois until 27 November Rivington Place.maureenpaley. Daskalopoulos Collection until 5 June 2011 The Children’s Art Commission: the Chapman Brothers until 31 October Walid Raad until 2 January 2011 This Is Tomorrow until 6 March 2011 77-82 Whitechapel High Street. 11am-9pm 54 Holywell Lane.org 4 Estorick Collection Against Mussolini until 19 December 39a Canonbury Square. 11am-7pm Berkeley Square. Davis until 13 November 17 Kingsland Road.victoria-miro. N1 www. E1 www. 90 York Way.org 11 ▲Kate MacGarry Tiago Carneiro Da Cunha 14 October-21 November 7a Vyner Street.uk 6 Kings Place Gallery Sefton Samuels: Jazz Legends 15 October-26 November 90 York Way.com 19 Raven Row Polytechnic until 7 November 56-58 Artillery Lane. University of Westminster.estorickcollection. E2 www.projectspace176. E3 www.wilkinsongallery. Shoreditch.com 33 1 1 32 5 9 60 6 37 19 54 43 5 17 42 2 Moniker 14 October. E1 www. EC1N www.pangolinlondon. N1 www. EC1V www. noon-6pm Ambika P3. 7 Bethnal Green Road. NW1 www. N1 www.trumanbrewery. E1 www.camdenartscentre.co. 11am-7pm 17 October.halesgallery.com 8 ▲Pangolin London David Bailey: Sculpture + until 16 October William Pye: Sculpture until 24 December Kings Place.chisenhale. W1 www.seventeengallery.co. 7pm-9pm 15-17 October. NW5 www. E2 http://lokal30.uk/artgallery 3 Bloomberg Space Comma 28: Adrian Paci 13 October-4 December Comma 29: Julien Bismuth 13 October-4 December 50 Finsbury Square EC2A www.com 12 ▲Limoncello James Harrison.bloombergspace.com 3 Camden Arts Centre René Daniëls until 28 November Arkwright Road.org 21 ▲Rokeby Bettina Buck: in Shape in Control until 13 November 5-9 Hatton Wall.co. NW1 www.rivingtonplace. NW3 www. NW1 http://sunday-fair. N1 www.com 11 Wellcome Collection Things NORTH 1 2 Cornwall Terrace House of the Noble Man until 20 October 2 Cornwall Terrace.sophiebenjamin.org 16 ▲Maureen Paley Dirk Stewen until 14 November 21 Herald Street. Tony Hayward and Karen Ryan until 6 November 17-18 Great Sutton Street. E2 www.com 3 48 Exhibitions EAST 1 Artangel Susan Philipsz: Surround Me Saturdays and Sundays until 3 January 2011 various locations around London www.artangel.E.kingsplace. E2 www. If the Light Goes Out 15 October-13 November 82 Kingsland Road.uk/ boswallhouse/ 2 176 Toby Ziegler until 12 December 176 Prince of Wales Road.ravenrow. EC2Y www. E2 www.org 10 ▲Victoria Miro Gallery Isaac Julien: Ten Thousand Waves until 13 November Yayoi Kusama until 13 November 16 Wharf Road. Ben Tomlinson and Emily Sharpe Map designed by Katherine Pentney 9 ▲Herald St Pablo Bronstein until 31 October 2 Herald Street.com 25 Whitechapel Gallery Claire Barclay until 2 May 2011 The D.whitechapel. E2 www.org 20 Rivington Place Ever Young: James Barnor until 27 November The Paris Albums 1900: W.mattsgallery.com 40 11 Listings compiled by Rob Curran. E1 www. NW3 www.com 17 ▲Monika Bobinska Mudflats and Galaxy until 18 October 242 Cambridge Heath Road. E2 www.uk 13 ▲Lokal 30 Easyriders 15-30 October 29 Wadeson Street. EC2A www. E3 www.uk/ 5 Chisenhale Gallery Michael Fullerton until 24 October 64 Chisenhale Road. NW1 www. E2 www.uk 2 Barbican Art Gallery Damián Ortega 15 October-16 January 2011 Barbican Centre.org.uk 15 ▲Matt’s Gallery Alison Turnbull until 31 October 42-44 Copperfield Road.com 9 Parasol Unit Adel Abdessemed until 21 November Exposure 10 until 17 October 14 Wharf Road.net 10 5 Sunday 14-15 October. N1 www.uk 7 Museum of Everything Exhibition #3 13-24 October Regents Park Road and Sharpleshall Street.uk 6 ▲Flowers East Nadav Kander 15 October-13 November Edmund Clark: Guantanamo.What’s On Exhibition listings are arranged alphabetically by area ▲ Commercial gallery 3 5 7 REGENT’S PARK Fairs 1 Frieze Art Fair 14-16 October.org.bmgallery. E2 www.monikerartfair.co.flowerseast.heraldst. Level 3. Silk Street.friezeartfair.co. 9am-5pm 16-17 October. E2 www.monikabobinska.org.org 26 ▲Wilkinson Gallery Anna Parkina 13 October-21 November 50-58 Vyner Street. E2 www.com 10 ▼ 22 ▲Seventeen Susan Collis: Works on Paper until 13 November AIDS-3D & Paul B.pl/london 14 ▲Marsden Woo Gallery Philip Eglin. 11am-6pm Regent’s Park. E2 www. 9am-7.theapproach. Yonatan Vinitsky and Jessica Warboys until 20 November 15a Cremer Street.multipliedartfair.generalhotel.

/ #$$#% &#$* + #$% '$ 5 Freud Museum The Space of the Unconscious until 14 November ▼ 2 ▼ ▼ ▼ 8 6 22a 11 14 21 8 38 39 13 4 18 17 15 16 1 Houses of Parliament 8 14 7 3 12 55 .

!.iwm.uk 7 ▲Corvi-Mora Brian Calvin until 23 October 1a Kempsford Road.bischoffweiss.org 19 Studio Voltaire Keith Farquhar and Dawn Mellor until 4 December 1a Nelson’s Row.dulwichpicturegallery.uk 12 ▲Ben Brown Fine Arts Heinz Mack/Lucio Fontana until 21 December 12 Brook’s Mews.com 13 Hayward Gallery Move: Choreographing You 13 October-9 January 2011 Ron Terada. W1F www. SE1 www. SE8 www. SE16 www.org 10 Dulwich Picture Gallery Salvator Rosa (1615-73): Bandits.uk 19 David Roberts Art Foundation More Pricks than Kicks 13 October-18 December 111 Great Titchfield Street. SE1 www.org 3 ▲Beaconsfield Test Bed I until 17 October 22 Newport Street.org.davidrobertsartfoundation.wellcome. SW4 www.uk 15 ▲Jerwood Space Jerwood Drawing Prize until 7 November 171 Union Street. W1K www.benbrownfinearts. W1S www.org 18 ▲Connaught Brown Geoff Uglow until 30 October 2 Albemarle Street.blainsouthern.whitecube. N1 www. W1X www.hayward.annelyjudafineart. SE1 www.org 20 Tate Modern Gauguin until 16 January 2011 Martin Karlsson: London until 31 December The Unilever Series: Ai Weiwei until 2 May 2011 Bankside Power Station.ltd. W1X www.uk 12 ▲White Cube Mark Bradford: the Pistol that Whistles 13 October-13 November 48 Hoxton Square. Stamps and Seals until 6 February 2011 Great Russell Street. Medals. W1J www.cafegalleryprojects.org 6 ▲Coleman Project Space Throwing Shapes until 7 November 94 Webster Road. SE5 www.org.com 18 South London Gallery Tatiana Trouvé © The Art Institute of Chicago Mat Collishaw Creation Condemned 13 October.britishmuseum.org. London W1S 1AL www.almaenterprises.com 2 ▲Auto-Italia From LuckyPDF TV: this Is Auto Italia Live 16 October-13 November 1 Glengall Road.blainsouthern.beauxartslondon.connaughtbrown.austria. NW1 www.ac.com 17 ▲Purdy Hicks Neeta Madahar until 13 November 65 Hopton Street. SE11 www.com 9 8 16 18 Whitechapel Gallery 25 10 15 10 Austrian Cultural Forum Brave New World until 17 December Touched until 28 November 28 Rutland Gate.org.com 13 ▲Bernard Jacobson Gallery Helen Frankenthaler: Paper Is Painting 13 October-13 November 6 Cork Street.com 9 6 5 21 2 Park.10 9 12 6 22 20 4 2 1 2 3 19 1 1 1 1 1 Modern South London Gallery 19 ▼ 18 until 22 October 183 Euston Road.uk 15 ▲Bischoff / Weiss Nathaniel Rackowe until 30 October 14a Hay Hill. 5 March 2007: Jeremy Deller until 31 March 2011 Lambeth Road.uk until 28 November Michal Bundy: Author until 28 November 65 Peckham Road. SE1 www.17 December 21 Dering Street.org.uk/modern 21 ▲The Agency Ludovica Gioscia until 23 October 66 Evelyn Street.daniellearnaud.com 9 Design Museum Brit Insurance Designs of the Year until 17 October 28 Shad Thames.gasworks.co. SE1 www.uk 4 BFI Gallery Julian Rosefeldt: American Night until 7 November BFI Southbank Belvedere Road. SW7 www.#&1* (#&+ #&! .purdyhicks. SE11 www.autoitaliasoutheast. The Oval. SE1 www.bfi. SE16 www.studiovoltaire.com info@blainsouthern.com 17 British Museum Impressions of Africa: Money.uk 3 ▲Alan Cristea Gallery Eleven until 13 November 31 & 34 Cork Street.anthonyreynolds. SE1 www.uk/culture 11 ▲Beaux Arts Marilene Oliver: Carne Vale until 6 November 22 Cork Street.greengrassi.com ▼ 4 What’s On 17 7 24 13 11 26 23 5 12 until 23 October 23 Dering Street.atlasgallery. Centre of Southwark 8 ▲Danielle Arnaud Gallery Karin Kihlberg and Reuben Henry until 24 October 123 Kennington Road.org.uk 14 Imperial War Museum Baghdad.org. W1S www.tate. Belvedere Road.co.alancristea.colnaghi. WC1B www. SE11 www.jerwoodfoundation.uk/gallery 5 ▲Cafe Gallery Projects Throwing Shapes until 7 November The Gallery.com +#$ ' .co. SE15 www.colemanprojects. W1W www.designmuseum.org 16 ▲Poppy Sebire Dark Nature until 17 October All Hallows Hall. W1S www. 25 Sumner Street.jacobsongallery.uk 11 Gasworks Hydrarchy: Power and Resistance at Sea until 7 November 155 Vauxhall Street.com 12 ▲Greengrassi Stefano Arienti until 23 October 1a Kempsford Road.co. SE11 www.corvi-mora. SE21 www. SE1 www.poppysebire.com 14 ▲Bernheimer Colnaghi Julian Schnabel Polaroids until 12 November 15 Old Bond Street. SE1 www.southlondongallery.org. Wilderness and Magic until 28 November Gallery Road.co. W1S www.com SOUTH 1 Alma Enterprises Gallery Alex Baggaley: the Perpetual Set-up until 17 October 38-40 Glasshill Street.com 16 ▲BlainSouthern Mat Collishaw: Creation Condemned 13 October-17 December 21 Dering Street. W1U www.uk 8 ▲Anthony Reynolds Gallery Sturtevant: Elastic Tango 13 October-20 November 60 Great Marlborough Street. Who I Think I Am until 7 November Southbank Centre.theagencygallery.com 9 ▲Atlas Gallery Floris Neusüss 15 October-27 November 49 Dorset Street. 6 Copperfield Street.beaconsfield. W1X www. SE11 www.

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 + + ')& 4 ▲Alexia Goethe Gallery Alexander de Cadenet: Life-Force until 19 November 5-7 Dover Street.allvisualarts. W1S www.faslondon. WC1X b Damien Hirst WEST 1 ▲Agnew’s John Kelly: Probe 13 October-5 November 35 Albemarle Street.com 6 All Visual Arts Vanitas: the Transience of Earthly Pleasures until 17 October 33 Portland Place.frithstreetgallery. W1B www.agnewsgallery.alexiagoethegallery. W1T www.aicongallery.com . W1S www.com 21 ▲Frith Street Gallery Fiona Tan: Cloud Island and Other New Works until 29 October 17-18 Golden Square.com 5 ▲Alison Jacques Gallery Matt Johnson 13 October-13 November 16-18 Berners Street.org 7 ▲Annely Juda Fine Art David Nash & Lesley Foxcroft 20 ▲Fine Art Society Leonardo Drew until 29 October Lavery and the Glasgow Boys 13 October-4 November 148 New Bond Street.uk 2 ▲Aicon Gallery Rasheed Araeen: Before and after Minimalism until 23 October 8 Heddon Street.co.com 22a & 22b ▲Gagosian Gallery a James Turrell 13 October-10 December 6-24 Britannia Street. W1B www.alisonjacquesgallery. W1S www. W1F www.

W1S www.com 34 ▲Marlborough Fine Art John Virtue 13 October-13 November 6 Albemarle Street.com 35 ▲Max Wigram Gallery Pavel Büchler: Studio Schwitters 13 October-13 November 106 New Bond Street.com 38 National Gallery Venice: Canaletto and His Rivals 13 October-16 January 2011 Frederick Cayley Robinson: Acts of Mercy until 17 October Trafalgar Square. WC2H www. W1J b Figurative Art until 16 November 29 New Bond Street. W1S www.gagosian. W1W www.imago-artgallery.com 30 Institute of Contemporary Arts Chto Delat? What Is to Be Done? until 24 October 12 Carlton House Terrace.uk 40 ▲Offer Waterman & Co.What’s On until 20 November 17-19 Davies Street. W1S www.com 37 ▲Mummery + Schnelle The Beholders Share 13 October-18 December 83 Great Titchfield Street. W1J b Louise Bourgeois 15 October-18 December 23 Savile Row.uk 25a & 25b ▲Halcyon Gallery a Mauro Perucchetti until 16 November 24 Bruton Street. W1W www.uk 39 National Portrait Gallery Chasing Mirrors: Portraits of the Unseen 15 October-9 January 2011 Camille Silvy until 24 October St Martin’s Place.messums. W8 www.halcyongallery. Fine Arts Sheila Fell until 29 October 11 Langton Street.co. W1S www.mummeryschnelle.marlboroughfineart.com 23 ▲Gimpel Fils Steven Gontarski until 6 November 30 Davies Street.com 43 ▲Pilar Corrias Ltd Rirkrit Tiravanija 13 October-1 December 54 Eastcastle Street.maxwigram.pilarcorrias.co.com .osbornesamuel. SW10 www.org.haunchofvenison.uk 29 & 52-54 Bell Street www.hellynahmad.hackelbury.org.uk 41 ▲Osborne Samuel Modern and Contemporary British Art until 6 November 23A Bruton Street.hauserwirth. WC2 www.ica. WC1A www.org. SW1Y www.gimpelfils. W1J www.lissongallery. W1Y www. W1S www.paulstolper.waterman. W1S www.com 24 ▲Hackelbury Fine Art The Colour of Time until 27 January 2011 4 Launceston Place.com 36 ▲Messum’s Fine Art Ltd Peter Brown until 23 October 8 Cork Street.com 29 ▲Imago Art Gallery Visual Emotions: Bob Krieger until 18 December 4 Clifford Street. W1S www.com 26 ▲Haunch of Venison Loud Flash: British Punk on Paper until 30 October 6 Burlington Gardens.nationalgallery.com 28 ▲Helly Nahmad Gallery Highlights from the Collection until 3 December 2 Cork Street. The Mall.com 42 ▲Paul Stolper Gallery Damien Hirst: the Souls until 13 November 31 Museum Street. W15 www. W1K www.npg.com 27a & 27b ▲Hauser & Wirth a Jason Rhoades until 18 December 196A Piccadilly.

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modernart. took up the Deichtorhallen’s entire gallery space—all 15.vam.saatchi-gallery. The original two-storey installation. SW1Y www. W1W www. SW7 www. 35 Marylebone Rd Australian artist Ryan Gander invites artists to mix cocktails.org 61¶ ▲White Cube Christian Marclay: the Clock 15 October-13 November 25-26 Mason’s Yard.stephenfriedman. King's Road. writers.whitecube. 6. made from wooden triangles and aluminium bars. 2009 Ryan’s Bar at Sunday Ambika P3.30pm London-based Lux presents Monument (2010) by Redmond Entwistle and Robert Longo’s 1987 film Arena Brains. 2009. W1 c Urs Fischer: Douglas Sirk until 11 December 4 New Burlington Place.30pm Jhaveri’s selection includes Subdoh Gupta’s Pure.uk/britain 59 ▲Waddington Galleries Sculpture until 30 October 11 Cork Street. Visitors to the Hamburg gallery used a hydraulic lift to reach the second level and watch Rhoades work in his “perfect world” or “Eden”.net 55 Tate Britain Eadweard Muybridge until 16 January 2011 Tate Britain Duveens Commission: Fiona Banner until 3 January 2011 Rachel Whiteread: Drawings until 16 January 2011 Turner Prize until 3 January 2011 Millbank. 5pm UK writer Michael Bracewell talks to artist Bridget Riley Sunday 12noon Exhibition Making as Activism: Whose Politics? A panel including artists Jeremy Deller and Emily Roysdon discuss art as activism Frieze Film Programme Saturday and Sunday 11. SW3 www. ft of it. 5. visitors to the Piccadilly gallery can see the 400 drawings Rhoades created during the 1999 project and hear a soundtrack capturing the cacophony recorded during the Hamburg presentation.ac. SW1Y www. architects. A mere £50 buys a cocktail and an artist-signed beer mat Saturday 3pm-4pm Bob & Roberta Smith Live Painting at Moniker 54 Holywell Lane. Hamburg. W1S www. Hauser & Wirth presents a sterling silver 1:12 scale model (above) of the American installation artist’s famed 1999 exhibition “Perfect World” at the Deichtorhallen.sadiecoles. Mona Hatoum and Ai Weiwei. W1 www. In addition to the model.uk © The Estate of Jason RhoadesCourtesy Hauser & Wirth and David Zwirner.thomasdane.simonleegallery.com 58 Victoria and Albert Museum Serge Diaghilev and the Golden Age of the Ballet Russes 1909-29 until 9 January 2011 Raphael: Cartoons and Tapestries for the Sistine Chapel until 17 October Shadow Catchers: Camera-less Photography 13 October-20 February 2011 Cromwell Road.com 62 ▲Whitford Fine Art Kudditji Kngwarreye: My Country 15 October-5 November 6 Duke Street. Part I until 17 October Duke of York.uk 49a. SW1P www. 3.waddington-galleries. San Diego.com 52 ▲Sprüth Magers Thomas Scheibitz until 30 October 7A Grafton Street. Pancho Guedes. W1S www. musicians. SW7 Saturday and Sunday 8pm Fifty non-stop presentations by leading artists.timothytaylorgallery. which was a photographic reproduction of his father’s vegetable patch.tate.30am.com ■ For more listings.wallacecollection.org 51 ▲Simon Lee Gallery Angela Bulloch: Discrete Manifold Whatsoever 13 October-27 November 12 Berkeley Street. Gilbert & George.theartnewspaper.com 57 ▲Timothy Taylor Gallery Jessica Jackson Hutchins: Champions 13 October-6 November Ryan McLaughlin: Farley 13 October-6 November 15 Carlos Place.     56 ▲Thomas Dane Kelley Walker until 13 November 11 Duke Street. Sunday from 12 noon Brazilian street artist TitiFreak paints a wall.000 sq. 49b & 49c ▲Sadie Coles a Angus Fairhurst until 27 November 69 South Audley Street. W1S www. David Adjaye.com 54 ▲Stuart Shave / Modern Art Bojan Sarcevic: Comme des Chiens et des Vagues 13 October-13 November Nasreen Mohamedi 13 October-13 November 23/25 Eastcastle Street. 47 Royal Academy of Arts The Brandhorst Museum by Sauerbruch Hutton until 7 November Treasures From Budapest: European Masterpieces from Leonardo to Schiele until 12 December The Language of Line: John Flaxman’s Illustrations to the Works of Homer and Aeschylus until 29 October Burlington House. philosophers.co. Tickets from £10/£15-£20/£25 available at: www.spruethmagers. W1J www.whitfordfineart. W1K www.30pm Artist Susan Hiller in conversation with John Welchman from the University of California.org.serpentinegallery. W1M www.com/whatson © V&A Images # #   ' #  !&  . designers and scientists including Marina Abramovic.com 53 ▲Stephen Friedman Beatriz Milhazes until 20 November 25-28 Old Burlington Street. Piccadilly. 2. SW1 www. 1pm World premiere of graffiti documentary Bomb It 2 Serpentine Gallery’s Map Marathon Royal Geographical Society.ticketweb. W1K b Dirk Bell: Made in Germany until 28 October 9 Balfour Mews. Shoreditch.co. New YorkPhoto: Mike Bruce Jason Rhoades: 1:12 Perfect World Hauser & Wirth 196A Piccadilly until 18 December For the first solo European show of Jason Rhoades’ work since his untimely death at the age of 41 in 2006.uk    Weekend highlights 16-17/10/10 Frieze Talks Saturday 2.royalacademy.30pm Screening of the Frieze Film Commissions 2pm and 5pm Screening of Shahryar Nashat’s new video Saturday 12. W2 www.30pm Indian curator Shanay Jhaveri selects three films including Lucy Raven’s China Town. W1 www. 2009 Sunday 3.uk 48 Saatchi Gallery Newspeak: British Art Now.org. please see our website: www. Manchester Square. EC2 Saturday from 12 noon German graffiti artist duo Herakut paints a wall. 1 Kensington Gore.com 50 Serpentine Gallery Klara Lidén until 7 November Serpentine Gallery Pavilion until 31 October Kensington Gardens.30pm Screening of Spartacus Chetwynd’s Hermitos Children.com 60 Wallace Collection The Wallace Collection and the Art Treasures of Spain until 30 November From Drawing-board to Display: the Work of the Wallace Collection Conservation Technician until 24 October Poussin to Seurat: French Drawings from the National Galleries of Scotland until 19 December Hertford House. University of Westminster.30pm.

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W1S www.org 45 ▲Robilant + Voena The Gallant Apparel: Italian Art and the Modern until 27 October 38 Dover Street. WC1N www.com 32 ▲Laura Bartlett Gallery Nina Beier until 23 October 10 Northington Street.riflemaker. W1S www.robilantvoena.rossirossi.laurabartlettgallery.   % %  31 ▲James Hyman Gallery Made in Italy: Albrecht Tuebke until 6 November 5 Savile Row. W1S www.jameshymangallery.com © 2010 Klara Lidén # ( )$ '  "   . W1F www.com 33 ▲Lisson Gallery Marina Abramovic 13 October-13 November 44 ▲Riflemaker Josephine King: Life So Far until 30 October 79 Beak Street.com 46 ▲Rossi & Rossi Ltd Jaishri Abichandani: Dirty Jewels 14 October-25 November 16 Clifford Street.

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C. 64 Seymour Street.Selv C. An Exhibition in Four Acts 10 June 2010–22 May 2011 Act 2: Subversive Abstraction 17 September–5 December 2010 November 6 2010 March 13 2011 Savethedate whitechapelgallery. 1961. Photo: Nikos Markou.org ARTISTS: Christian Danielewitz Danh Vo Hesselholdt and Mejlvang Ismar Cirkinagic Jannis Kounellis Jens Haaning Jette Hye Jin Mortensen Joachim Hamou Lilibeth Cuenca Rasmussen Nedko Solakov Thierry Geoffroy Marcelo Viguez SPECIAL PROJECT: Kim Sooja agitprop design COMPANIES: Aarhus Universitet. CONTRACTOR A/S Herning egetæpper a/s IB Gruppen – IB&Co. tissue. NewsRoom IT Relation A/S Jæger Holding A/S Montana Møbler A/S Nordea Nykredit TEKO Act 1 Act 2 Act 3 Act 4 socledumonde. © Nikos Kessanlis.dk .og IngeniørHøjskolen A Hereford Beefstouw Dagbladet Børsen/Cand. Daskalopoulos Collection Supported by: Nikos Kessanlis Untitled (Gesture). ready-made object. London W1 +44 (0)20 7298 1535 Pavilion funded by Klara Lidén 7 October – 7 November Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2010 by Jean Nouvel 10 July–17 October Map Marathon 16–17 October Klara Lidén exhibition co-produced with Serpentine Gallery Kensington Gardens London W2 3XA T +44 (0)20 7402 6075 www. wire. 200 x 21 cm. Courtesy Alpha Delta Gallery. Athens.serpentinegallery.Edgware Road Project: Marwan Rechmaoui in Residence Anish Kapoor: Turning the World Upside Down Kensington Gardens 28 September– 13 March An exhibition organised by The Royal Parks and the Serpentine Gallery Advisors Until 18 October Centre for Possible Studies. Co3. Handels.org Open daily 10am–6pm. Fridays 10am–10pm until 17 October Socle du Monde B I E N N A L E Between Cultures Socle du Monde Keeping It Real Whitechapel Gallery The D.dk heartmus.

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