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By HEATHER FIORE

The Hopewell Sun


The Hopewell Valley Septem-
ber 11th and Emergency Services
Memorial Committee recently
began the construction of the
Hopewell Valley September 11th
and Emergency Services Memori-
al in Alliger Park on Route 546 in
Hopewell.
Although the initial construc-
tion is complete the ground-
breaking, grading and lawn clear-
ing a 10-ton steel beam that was
recovered from the World Trade
Center following the Sept. 11,
2001, attacks was mounted and
welded on to the supports and
will serve as the centerpiece of
the memorial.
The 10-ton steel artifact that is
being used was obtained from
Hanger 17 at JFK International
Airport located in Queens, where
all artifacts from the World Trade
Center are stored.
There are all types of artifacts
from the World Trade Center at
Hanger 17, chairman of the
Hopewell Valley September 11th
and Emergency Services Memori-
al Committee and former
Hopewell Chief of Police Mike
Chipowsky said. They have
crushed fire engines and police
cars, subway cars that were re-
covered and steel beams.
The process of obtaining the
artifact started when the commit-
tee approached the Port Authori-
ty of New York and New Jersey in
early 2011.
The committee had to fill out a
form requesting an artifact, and
then had to go and pick up the
piece of steel and transport it to
Hopewell after they received the
award to secure it, according to
Chipowsky.
The committee held a ceremo-
ny on Sept. 10, 2011, to unveil the
piece of steel to the community,
with about 300 people in atten-
dance.
After the unveiling, the com-
mittee began to receive a consid-
erable number of private dona-
tions from individuals as well as
businesses. These donations
alone paid for the majority of the
work that has been completed
thus far.
No public funds will be used for
the project.
The actual cost of the memo-
rial has been very low to this
point due to donations,
Chipowsky said. We have had
great support from the communi-
ty.
Hopewell Township Manager
Paul Pogorzelski helped the com-
mittee find and coordinate the
contractors.
I helped with a lot of the de-
sign engineering and construc-
tion element, as far as the grad-
ing, drainage and such, he said.
Someone put the graphic togeth-
er for me as to what they wanted
it to look like and I designed it
further.
Twenty members of the com-
mittee, as well as the fire depart-
ment, police department and
EMS squad are also currently aid-
ing at the construction of the me-
morial.
When finished, the memorial
will consist of the steel center-
piece surrounded by a 4-foot wall
with a brick walkway wrapping
around the wall to symbolize a
ribbon.
The opening ceremony for the
completed memorial is scheduled
for Sept. 8, which is the Saturday
before the 11th anniversary of the
attacks.
At the ceremony, some of the
bricks from the walkway will be
engraved with the names of fall-
en policemen, firemen, and EMS
www.hopewellsun.com
MAY 16-22, 2012
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INSIDE THIS ISSUE
Kids Fun Run
Kids invited to participate in
1-mile race on May 19. PAGE 5
P r e - s o r t e d
S t a n d a r d
U S P o s t a g e
P A I D
B e l l m a w r N J
P e r m i t 1 5 0 1
R e s i d e n t i a l C u s t o m e r
Borough
adopts
budget
By HEATHER FIORE
The Hopewell Sun
At Hopewell Boroughs com-
mittee meeting on May 7, the
council adopted the 2012 mu-
nicipal budget of $3,015,883.
The 2012 budget carries a
2.5-cent increase per every
$100 of assessed value, which
means a tax increase of $108
per year for the average home
valued at $400,000.
It seems that were doing
as best we can, in terms of de-
clining property values, not
adding additional services,
and holding the tax increases
to as little as we can,
Hopewell Borough Mayor Paul
Anzana said. We seem to be
doing pretty well. Im hoping
that next year, in addition to
our vigilance in watching ex-
penses during the budget year,
well be better.
While the available surplus
in the budget has been steadily
increasing over the years
jumping from $344,242 in 2010
to $427,463 at then end of 2011
the borough used more than
half of its available surplus
this year $258,000 out of
$427,463, leaving the borough
with $169,463.
The borough is also paying
off a considerable amount of
debt this year $621,600
which is almost double the
amount of debt that was paid
off in 2011, which amounted to
Special to The Sun
Volunteers from AM. QUIP Crane Company help place the 10-ton steel artifact from the World Trade Cen-
ter buildings from the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks onto the supports of the Hopewell Valley September 11th
and Emergency Services Memorial in Alliger Park in Hopewell.
Construction begins on 9/11 memorial
please see PUBLIC, page 4 please see BOROUGH, page 3
MAY 16-22, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 3
4436 Route 27, Su|te One
gps: 4436 ||nco|n H|ghway
K|ngston, N.J. 08528
609-454-5065
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908-672-3320 cell 888-519-7677 ext 5850
reakins@1stconstitution.com
86 East Broad Street Hopewell, NJ 08525
(609) 466-2100 www.1stconstitution.com
Branch Hours:
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Sat 9am-1pm
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$310,910.
We very much have a stable
budget this year, Hopewell Bor-
ough Administrator and Munici-
pal Clerk Michele Hovan said.
We have no new expenditures
and we dont have any additional
elimination in services. Were
holding our own this year and
maintaining the status quo.
Aside from the unanimously
adopted budget, the council also
adopted a variety of ordinances.
One of the ordinances included
the authorization for the sale of 4
Columbia Ave., which is the for-
mer location of the Hopewell Bor-
ough offices that just recently re-
located to 88 E. Broad St. on April
30.
The council said the former of-
fice building is going to be sold to
the Hopewell Fire Department
which is attached to the existing
building for $50,000. The sale of
the building is in accordance
with state law under, which al-
lows the borough to sell it to the
department for the use of fire
purposes.
The closing hasnt been sched-
uled yet, Hovan said. Its esti-
mated to be before June 1, but it
still hasnt been decided.
Other than the adopted budget
and ordinances, Hovan said the
most invigorating part of the
meeting was for the council mem-
bers.
The big news for us was hav-
ing the first meeting in the new
building, she said. It was the
biggest change. Its not signifi-
cantly larger; its maybe 20 per-
cent larger than the old space, but
its more appropriate for
council meetings and court pur-
poses.
Its nice being in a new build-
ing, Anzana said. I truly appre-
ciate that the new building has
good community space, is mod-
ern, clean, and accessible.
BOROUGH
Continued from page 1
Borough paying off
over $621,600 of debt
4 THE HOPEWELL SUN MAY 16-22, 2012
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personnel.
We have probably all come in
touch with what happened on
Sept. 11, Pogorzelski said. So, I
get great personal satisfaction in
building something thats so
meaningful.
For the unveiling ceremony
last year, the Former Deputy Di-
rector of Port Authority of New
York and New Jersey attended.
For the opening ceremony this
year, the committee plans to have
a guest speaker, but is unsure
who it will be.
Aside from the September 11th
Memorial being developed, Al-
liger Park is also home to the
Hopewell Valley Veteran Associa-
tion Memorial.
The park is an amazing
place, Pogorzelski said. Its got
great solitude and trails, and is
close to 200 acres of open space.
PUBLIC
Continued from page 1
Public funds will not
be used for memorial
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Visit us online at www.hopewellsun.com
MAY 16-22, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 5
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Students in grades kinder-
garten through eighth grade are
invited to participate in the 1-mile
Kids Fun Run on Saturday, May
19, beginning at 8:30 a.m. This
race begins just prior to the Pen-
nington 5K. Proceeds for both
races will benefit the Hopewell
Valley YMCA and Hopewell Val-
ley Municipal Alliance. These or-
ganizations provide programs to
help create strong and healthy
kids. The run begins and ends at
the Hopewell Valley Regional
School District administration
building at 425 S. Main St. in Pen-
nington.
The Kids Fun Run organiz-
ers have again planned for school
mascots from Hopewell Valley Re-
gional Schools to be on the race-
course. The mascots, as well as
the Pennington police and many
volunteers, will be available for
safety and support.
All runners will cross the
same finish line as the 5K run-
ners where they will receive a
participation medal with a red,
white and blue ribbon.
Miriam Khan, a graduate of
Hopewell Valley Central High
School, who will be running the
4x100 relay in the 2012 Summer
Olympic Games for Italy, will
hand out the ribbons. T-shirts and
drawstring bags will also be given
to each student while supplies
last.
Registration forms for both the
Kids Fun Run and the 5K race
are available on line at
www.hvymca.org. Forms will be
accepted by mail or in person at
62 S. Main St. in Pennington, or a
printable form can be faxed to
(609) 737-8081.
Registration is also available at
raceforum.com.
Questions can be directed to
HVYMCA program director Tina
Morak at (609) 737-3048.
Kids Fun Run on May 19
Send us your Hopewell news
Have a news tip? Want to send us a press release or photos? Shoot
an interesting video? Drop us an email at news@hopewellsun.com.
Fax us at (856) 427-0934. Call the editor at (609) 751-0245.
6 THE HOPEWELL SUN MAY 16-22, 2012
20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A
Princeton, NJ 08542
609-751-0245
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A,
Princeton, NJ 08542. It is mailed weekly to
select addresses in the 08560, 08525 and
08534 ZIP codes. If you are not on the mail-
ing list, six-month subscriptions are avail-
able for $39.99. PDFs of the publication are
online, free of charge. For information,
please call 609-751-0245.
To submit a news release, please email
news@hopewellsun.com. For advertising
information, call 609-751-0245 or email
advertising@hopewellsun.com. The Sun
welcomes suggestions and comments from
readers including any information about
errors that may call for a correction to be
printed.
SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers.
Brief and to the point is best, so we look for
letters that are 300 words or fewer. Include
your name, address and phone number. We
do not print anonymous letters. Send letters
to news@hopewellsun.com, via fax at 609-
751-0245, or via the mail. Of course, you can
drop them off at our office, too. The
Hopewell Sun reserves the right to reprint
your letter in any medium including elec-
tronically.
PUBLISHER Steve Miller
GENERAL MANAGER & EDITOR Alan Bauer
VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES joe eisele
NEWS
MANAGING EDITOR, NEWS Kevin Canessa Jr.
MANAGING EDITOR, PRODUCTION Mary L. Serkalow
HOPEWELL EDITOR Heather Fiore
OPERATIONS
DIGITAL MEDIA DIRECTOR Tim Ronaldson
ART DIRECTOR Tom Engle
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Russell Cann
CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Barry Rubens
VICE CHAIRMAN Michael LaCount, Ph.D.
ELAUWIT MEDIA GROUP
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Dan McDonough, Jr.
VICE CHAIRMAN Alan Bauer
in our opinion
D
espite all of the political hy-
perbole were going to have to
put up with until Election Day,
theres at least one positive aspect to a
presidential campaign: Neither party
wants to offend voters. Theyll wait to
do that after the votes are counted.
Thats good news if you are trying
to pay back your federally funded stu-
dent loans. Come July, the interest rate
on those loans is set to double.
But thats not going to happen. In-
deed, the Democrats and Republicans
are arguing about how best to pay for
keeping the interest rate at 3.4 percent.
The Democrats say they want to close
a tax loophole. The Republicans want
to go after the presidents health-care
plan. Theres even speculation that the
rate will be extended with no idea of
how to pay for it.
But, and you can bet on it, the rate
isnt going to rise.
Thats because there are a lot of peo-
ple with these loans. A lot of people
who likely will be voting this Novem-
ber. And neither party wants to anger
them. Letting the rate rise and bank-
ing on political spin to blame the
other guy is too risky. After all, isnt
getting elected the most important
thing a politician can do?
Were all for promoting higher edu-
cation and wouldnt mind seeing the
rate stay where it is. What we dont
like is the talk about just doing it and
worrying about paying for it later.
Reuters estimates keeping the rate
steady would cost about $6 billion.
One reason the public is so disen-
chanted with the government is that
the government doesnt have to play
by the same rules. Regular folks, or at
least responsible regular folks, live on
a budget. They spend what they can af-
ford. If they want to buy something,
they find a way to pay for it.
But, this being an election year and
all, the politicians no doubt will go all-
out to make as many people happy as
possible. Unfortunately, in the case of
student loans, that might mean simply
ignoring a bill that is due.
Friendly politicians
One good thing about election years: Politicians want to be your friend
Student loans
Those with federally funded student
loans shouldnt worry too much about
a possible interest rate hike in July.
Its an election year. The politicians
will do all they can to keep you happy.
letters to the editor
The Bridge Academy thanks
Princeton community
On behalf of the students, faculty, staff
and parents of The Bridge Academy, I
would like to thank the Princeton,
Lawrenceville and Hopewell community
businesses that supported our recent
fundraiser, Reach for the Stars. I would
also like to thank Willis Greenhouse for
the beautiful centerpieces they provided.
The evening was a fabulous success. As
a school for language-based learning dis-
abilities (like dyslexia) and the only school
in New Jersey that is Orton-Gillingham ac-
credited, it is extremely important for us to
provide a multi-sensory approach to learn-
ing. Our annual fundraiser helps support
the hands-on learning opportunities for
our students that enrich their educational
experience.
While fundraising was an important
part of the evening, the highlight was the
remarkable testimonials from our students
about how important Bridge has been to
their success in school and in life. As one of
our students said: Opportunities are
found every day at The Bridge: to go to col-
lege, to have a job, to grow a family, to
bridge forward. Who said a dyslexic was
not normal?
Thank you to all the local businesses
that help our students bridge the gap be-
tween potential and performance.
Kim Bruno
Development Coordinator
The Bridge Academy
Lawrenceville
Barbara Bristow and Janice McCurdy of
Senior Care Management will participate
in National Geriatric Care Manager
Month by offering a free seminar on Car-
ing for Dementia at Home on May 31 from
3 p.m. to 5 p.m. If you are interested in at-
tending this presentation, call (609) 882-
0322.
The presentation will cover various
themes to include activities for engage-
ment, role of home care and help from
caregivers. The seminar will be presented
by McCurdy, LCSW, co-owner of Senior
Care Management and Lisa Rozycki, RN.
McCurdy and Bristow founded Senior
Care Management in 1990 and have been
providing geriatric care management and
home care services to seniors and their
families in the Mercer County area. Care
Management helps elders stay in their
home environment by assisting in medical
appointments, household management
and the supervision of care and help in the
home. Senior Care Managements services
offer peace of mind to families who are
long distance caregivers.
Both McCurdy and Bristow have been
members of the National Association of
Professional Geriatric Care Managers
(NAPGCM) since 1990.
For more information on Senior Care
Management, visit
www.seniorcaremgt.com.
Caring for Dementia at Home free seminar on May 31
Visit us online at www.hopewellsun.com
Hopewell Township resident
Molly Van Nostrand Rice was in-
ducted into the Eastern Tennis
Association Hall of Fame on
April 27 at the Grand Hyatt in
New York City. At the black-tie af-
fair, Van Nostrand Rice was intro-
duced by her father, coach and fel-
low Eastern Tennis Hall of Fame
inductee and tennis legend King
Van Nostrand.
Van Nostrand Rice grew up on
Long Island and played competi-
tively on the local, national and
international level throughout
her career. At age 16, Rice held
the No. 1 national USTA ranking
in the 16 and under.
She played her first profession-
al tournament at age 16 and re-
ceived her first WTA ranking that
same year. She went on to receive
a full scholarship to SMU in Dal-
las. In 1984, after playing college
tennis for one year, she turned
professional and played profes-
sionally for 10 years, having wins
over third- and fourth-ranked
players in the world.
She was consistently world
ranked in the top 50 in singles,
her best being ranked number 38,
and number 42 in doubles. High-
lights include: quarterfinalist at
Wimbledon three years in a row,
1986 (singles), 1987 (doubles) and
1988 (mixed doubles); finalist at
the Mahwah Open; and quarterfi-
nalist at the Canadian Open.
Van Nostrand Rices career
was plagued by a number of seri-
ous foot injuries, requiring long
lay-offs.
She retired from competitive
play in 1990 due to a back injury.
She resides in Pennington with
her husband and three children.
Township resident inducted into
Eastern Tennis Association Hall of Fame
MAY 16-22, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 7
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The following items were taken
from reports on file with the
Hopewell Police Department:
On May 5 at 1:08 p.m., Hopewell
Township police responded to
Baldpate Mountain for the report
of a man trapped in a hole. It was
reported the man became trapped
after a boulder shifted and fell on
to his leg. Officer Mandy Grey
and Sgt. Christopher Kascik ar-
rived on scene and found a 56-
year-old man in a 4-foot deep hole
with a boulder on his right leg.
Attempts to move the boulder off
of his leg were unsuccessful. The
Union Fire Department and first
aid squad arrived on the scene
moments later and began the res-
cue operation under the direction
of Union Fire Department Acting
Chief Andrew C. Kintzel. Addi-
tional specialty resources units
from Mercer, Bucks, Camden and
Hunterdon counties also respond-
ed and assisted with the rescue
operation.
The man was extricated from
the hole at approximately 4:45
p.m. and was then flown by
Northstar to Capital Health Re-
gional Medical Center.
Police say they learned the
man and his friend, a 63-year-old
man, dug the hole with hand
shovels in an area behind a va-
cant home on the property in
search of artifacts. After trying to
free the man from the hole him-
self, the 63-year-old called 9-1-1.
Personnel from the Mercer
County Park Rangers were on
scene and charges for park ordi-
nance violations for prohibited
digging are pending.
Additional responders: Pen-
nington Fire Department,
Hopewell Valley Emergency Serv-
ices, Lawrenceville Fire Depart-
ment, Hopewell Fire Department,
Plainsboro Fire Department,
West Amwell Fire Department,
Lambertville Fire Department,
Pennington Road Fire Depart-
ment, Trenton Fire Department,
Clinton Township Fire Depart-
ment, Whitehouse Fire Depart-
ment, Flemington Raritan Rescue
Squad, Upper Makefield Fire De-
partment, Princeton First Aid
Squad, Capital Health para-
medics and Pennington First Aid
Squad.
On April 25 at 9:34 p.m., Officer
Louis Vastola responded to Poor
Farm Road for the report of a
one-car motor vehicle crash. A
2002 Porsche Boxster, driven by a
53-year-old man, had left the road-
way and crashed through two
mailboxes. Police say the man
had the odor of alcohol on his
breath and was unable to perform
field-sobriety tests. He was then
transported to a local hospital by
the Pennington First Aid Squad,
where he was treated for minor
injuries and later released.
He was charged with DWI,
reckless driving and failure to
keep right and was later re-
leased to a relative.
This case will be heard in mu-
nicipal court.
On May 1 at 10:52 p.m., Officer
Sara Erwin responded to a
Shrewsbury Court address for the
report of a burglary. Sometime
between 7:15 a.m. on April 30 and
10:50 p.m. on May 1, someone en-
tered the unlocked townhouse
and removed cash and jewelry
from the home. The loss was esti-
mated at $1,630.
On May 3 at 6:45 a.m., Officer
Gerard Infantino responded to a
Manley Road address for the re-
port of a car burglary. Sometime
overnight, someone entered an
unlocked car parked in front of
the home and removed cash, pre-
scription medicines and work
files. The loss was estimated at
$1,765.
On May 2 at 3:44 p.m., Officer
Christopher Vaccarino says he
observed a car traveling at 43 mph
in a 25 mph zone along Maddock
Road. Vaccarino says he stopped
the car and spoke with the driver,
a 25-year-old man, who originally
provided a false name. Further in-
vestigations found the man had a
suspended drivers license and 10
active arrest warrants out of
Trenton. The man was placed
under arrest and transported to
police headquarters for process-
ing where he was charged with
hindering apprehension.
This case will be heard in mu-
nicipal court. The man was later
turned over to the Trenton Police
Department on the active war-
rants.
Send us your Hopewell news
Have a news tip? Want to send us a press release or photos? Shoot
an interesting video? Drop us an email at news@hopewellsun.com.
Fax us at (856) 427-0934. Call the editor at (609) 751-0245.
POLICE REPORT
WEDNESDAY MAY 16
Business & Bagels: 8:30 to 9:45
a.m. at Capital Health, 1 Capital
Health Way. Join the YPC along
with doctors from Capital Health,
as they discuss the importance of
maintaining health and well being
at every age! All are welcomed.
Free for Mercer Regional Cham-
ber of Commerce members and
$15 for future members. For more
information, call (609) 689-
9960, ext. 24.
Feeling Emotionally Healthy in the
Golden Years: 10:30 to 11:30 a.m.
at Hopewell Valley Senior Center,
395 Reading St., Pennington. The
aging process creates many
changes and challenges. Marsha
Maloney, MSW, Senior Support
Specialist at GTBC will discuss
various choices seniors have to
maintain a significant level of
psychological and emotional sta-
bility. No registration needed. For
more information call 737-0605,
ext. 692 or email awaugh@
hopewelltwp.org.
Story Time: Ages 2 to 5; siblings
welcome. 11 to 11:45 a.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Action
rhymes, songs and felt board
activities. Age-appropriate craft
follows story time. Parental
supervision required.
THURSDAY MAY 17
Story Time: Ages 2 to 5; siblings
welcome. 11 to 11:45 a.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Action
rhymes, songs and felt board
activities. Age-appropriate craft
follows story time. Parental
supervision required.
Toddler Rock: Ages 18 months to 3.
10 to 10:30 a.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Singing, dancing
ad rhymes. Play with musical
instruments, puppets, parachutes
and more.
FRIDAY MAY 18
Neurobics: 3 to 4 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. The brain is the
most important organ in the
body. While you may have heard
the word aerobic, which relates to
physical fitness, Neurobics are
exercises to keep the brain fit and
increase memory function. These
mental stimulation exercises help
seniors as they transition
through the process of aging but
can benefit younger adults as
well. Included are brain-teasing
puzzles and mind-challenging
games.
Pat McKinleys Toddler Tunes:
Ages newborn to 5. 10:30 to 11
a.m. at Hopewell Branch of the
Mercer County Library System.
Sing and dance to classic chil-
drens songs played on live guitar.
SATURDAY MAY 19
Pennington Day: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in
downtown Pennington Boro
along Main Street and intersect-
ing roads.
36th annual Pennington 5K:
Check-in at 8 a.m. at administra-
tion gym, 425 S. Main St., Pen-
nington. One-mile fun run begins
at 8:30 a.m. 5k race/walk begins
at 9:15 a.m. Awards immediately
following race. Bring own water
battle. Flat course, walker-friend-
ly. Music, post-race refreshments,
race shirt and goody bags to par-
ticipants while supplies last. Ben-
efits Hopewell Valley YMCA. Reg-
ister online at hvymca.org/spe-
cial-events/pennington-5k.
Family Story Time: All ages. 10:30
to 11 a.m. at Hopewell Branch of
the Mercer County Library Sys-
tem. Theme is Make a Kite!
Enjoy stories, songs, rhymes and
a craft for children and their fam-
ilies. Each program runs about 30
minutes. Online registration
required.
SATURDAY MAY 20
Hopewell Presbyterian Church:
Worship service at 10:30 a.m.
Intergenerational Sunday School
from 9 to 10:15 a.m. Coffee fellow-
ship from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
80 West Broad St., Hopewell.
Hopewell United Methodist
Church: Worship service at 10
a.m. Teen/adult education from 9
to 9:45 a.m. Sunday school at 10
a.m. Youth group at 6:30 p.m. 20
Blackwell Ave., Hopewell.
St. Alphonsus Roman Catholic
Church: Mass at 7:30, 9 and 11:15
a.m. 54 East Prospect St.,
Hopewell.
Word Christian Fellowship Interna-
tional: Worship service at 10 a.m.
Sunday school at 10:30 a.m. 44
Van Dyke Road, Hopewell.
MONDAY MAY 21
Trivia Night at Hopewell Valley
Central High: 7 p.m. in high
school cafeteria, 259 Pennington-
Titusville Road. Teams are com-
prised of one to three adults and
up to seven high schools students
with a maximum of eight people
per team. The registration fee is
$3 for senior citizens. Top teams
earn prize money which goes
towards a school club, sports
team or organization of the
teams choice. If you would like to
join a team, please contact
Hopewell Valley Senior Services
at 737-0605, ext. 692 or email
awaugh@hopewelltwp.org.
Yoga: 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Bring yoga mat
CALENDAR PAGE 8 MAY 16-22, 2012
WANT TO BE LISTED?
To have your Hopewell meeting or affair listed in the Calendar or
Meetings, information must be received, in writing, two weeks prior
to the date of the event.
Send information by mail to: Calendar, The Hopewell Sun, 20
Nassau Street, Suite 26A, Princeton, N.J. 08542. Or by email:
news@hopewellsun.com. Or you can submit a calendar listing
through our website (www.hopewellsun.com).
We will run photos if space is available and the quality of the photo
is sufficient. Every attempt is made to provide coverage to all
organizations.
Browns Upholstery Co. L.L.C.
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Browns Carpet Cleaning
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Water and Floor Damge / Pet Stains
1613 Reed Road Pennington, NJ
(609) 737-3773 www.brownsupholsteryco.com
10%
OFF
With this ad.
Expires 5/31/12.
800 B. Denow Road Penn|ngton, NJ 08654
609-737-6900
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FREE KANI SALAD
or SEAWEED SALAD
W|th any purchase
of $30.00 of more
Dine in only. Must present coupon at
time of purchase. Expires 5/31/12.
please see CALENDAR, page 9
or large towel. Registration
required; call (609) 737-2610.
Tai Chi: 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Learn
this ancient art to promote good
health and relaxation. No regis-
tration required.
Kids Open Craft: Ages 3 to 8. 4 to
5:30 p.m. at Hopewell Branch of
the Mercer County Library Sys-
tem. Children can stop in to con-
struct the craft of the week. Staff
member will be present to help.
Hopewell Township Recreation
Advisory Committee meeting: 7
p.m. at the Hopewell Municipal
Building, 201 Washington Cross-
ing-Pennington Road. Open to
the public. Visit www.hopewell
twp.org to confirm time or for
more information.
Story time: 10:30 a.m. at Hopewell
Public Library. For toddlers and
pre-schoolers. Stories, songs and
fingerplays. Registration is not
required.
TUESDAY MAY 22
Yoga: 5 to 6 p.m. at Hopewell Branch
of the Mercer County Library Sys-
tem. Bring yoga mat or large tow-
el. Registration required; call
(609) 737-2610.
New Jersey Writers Society Sup-
port Group: 6 to 8:30 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. All are
welcome to attend and enjoy
challenges of becoming better
writers, defeating writers block
and perfecting the craft. No reg-
istration required.
Baby Time: Ages birth to 2. 11 to
11:30 a.m. at Hopewell Branch of
the Mercer County Library Sys-
tem. A great way to introduce
your child to library story times
and reading. Age-appropriate
books shared. Songs, nursery
rhymes, puppets and felt board
figures create a rich audio-visual
and social experience. Adult
supervision required.
Story Time: Ages 2 to 5; siblings
welcome. 2 to 2:45 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Action
rhymes, songs and felt board
activities. Age-appropriate craft
follows story time. Parental
supervision required.
MAY 16-22, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 9
MULCH LAWN SERVICE TOPSOIL PRUNING
SPRING CLEAN UP EDGE TRIMMING NEW GARDEN BEDS
Located in Ewing N.J. 609-516-0259
www.bluegardenlandscape.webs.com
Blue Garden Landscaping
15% OFF ANY SERVICE
With a year contract. Exp. 6/30/12.
20% OFF ANY SERVICE
Exp. 6/30/12.
609-924-9700
www.fearawaydrivingschooI.com
Same rates as Lawrence HS for HS students!
FEAR AWAY
Driving SchooI
Route Test Special $70.00
$110 with 1 Hour Practice
Teen Special $280.00
+$10 Permit Purchase
20% OFF
Household Specials
Excludes Tablecloths & Sheets
Exp. 6/16/12.
25% OFF
Alterations & Repairs
Not valid with other offers.
Exp. 6/16/12.
24% OFF
Any Dry Cleaning Order
6 pieces or more
Excludes Shirts. Exp. 6/16/12.
Theyre back!
SPRING SPECIALS!
CALL 609-737-3373
Or email us at service@craftpennington.com
Pennington Market Shopping Center 25 Route 31 South, Pennington
Tailor On Premises Suedes and Leathers Wedding Gown Specialists (Cleaning and Preservations)
Fast and Friendly Service Same-Day Dry Cleaning Senior Citizen Discount: 15% Off Any Dry Cleaning
Shoe Repair
SmaII Rug CIeaning
Up to 6' x 9'
CALENDAR
CALENDAR
Continued from page 8
Send us your Hopewell news
Have a news tip? Want to send us a press release or photos? Shoot
an interesting video? Drop us an email at news@hopewellsun.com.
Fax us at (856) 427-0934. Call the editor at (609) 751-0245.
Klose to perform at
epilepsy awareness event
Jann Klose, heard on the
Grammy-nominated Healthy
Food for Thought compilation
and MTV Cribs, and currently in
the studio with David Bendeth
(Papa Roach, Paramore, Bruce
Hornsby), will be performing at
the Candlelight Concerts For
Epilepsy Awareness in Penning-
ton on May 19, at 8 p.m.
The concert is a unique and
fundraising house concert series
to raise awareness and spread the
facts about epilepsy. Currently,
the house concert series is in Pen-
nington and open to a very limit-
ed number of guests (40 per
show).
The shows are also streamed
online using StageIt.com, with
proceeds going to various epilep-
sy charities.
Other artists performing in-
clude John Wesley Harding (June
9), Francis Dunnery (June 23) and
Dan Reed (July 15).
For more information and to
purchase tickets, visit the web site
candlelightconcert.org or e-mail
contact@candlelightconcert.org.
Camden Joy plays free
shows in coming weeks
Singer/songwriter Camden
Joy (also known as Pennington
resident Tom Adelman) plays
three free shows in the coming
weeks. The first show will be held
on Saturday, May 19, at 11 a.m. at
Howe Commons in downtown
Pennington. The second show
will be held on Sunday, May 27 at
3:30 p.m. at the Old Woosamonsa
Schoolhouse in the woods of
Hopewell Township. And, the
third show will be held on Satur-
day, June 9 at 9 a.m. at the Pen-
nington Farmers Market on
Route 31.
Joy will play alone, unampli-
fied and bewhiskered in all three
settings. His repertoire includes
stirring patriotic classics (Revolu-
tionary ballads, Union Army
marching songs, The National
Anthem) alongside original mate-
rial from his ongoing series of
songs inspired by the 2005 Presi-
dential Coins Act.
Guided hike at Eames
Preserve on May 20
Join Friends of Hopewell Val-
ley Open Space for a guided hike
at the Eames Preserve in the Har-
bourton area of Hopewell Town-
ship located on Harbourton-
Woodsville Road, approximately
2.8 miles east of Route 579 and
about one mile west of Marshalls
Corner-Woodsville Road, on May
20 at 1 p.m. The trail follows an
old driveway past the former
homestead, and then leads into
open woods and around a field.
The varied habitat is rich with
native trees such as red maple,
sassafras and beech. The woods
will be full of bird song. Some
spring wildflowers will still be in
bloom and summer wildflowers
are getting ready to open.
Boots are recommended, as the
trail will likely be wet in places.
This free hike is about 1.6 miles on
easy terrain, with just a slight ele-
vation change. All ages welcome.
No reservations are required. For
more information, call (609) 730-
1560 or email Beth@fohvos.org.
Minds and Manners
preschool set to open
Minds and Manners, a pre-
school that educates the heart as
well as the mind, opens at the
beautiful Rambling Pines Day
Camp. Minds and Manners is a
new name in the area, but the
staff has been teaching in the
area since 1993. Bonnie Martin,
formerly of Hopewell Country
Day School, will be heading
Minds and Manners, which is lo-
cated at the Country Day Schools
former location in the one level,
bright and airy classrooms of
Rambling Pines on Route 518, just
off Route 31 at the Hopewell/East
Amwell border. Minds and Man-
ners offers developmentally ap-
propriate programs for full or
half day, with flexible schedules.
Call to schedule a tour at (609)
649-4214, or stop by our table at
Pennington Day, on May 19. The
open house will be held on Sun-
day, May 20 from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at
174 Lambertville-Hopewell Road
in Hopewell.
For more information, email
mindsandmanners@comcast.net
or check out our page on
www.mindsandmanners.com.
Plan to celebrate spring
Under the Stars
Gather your friends and plan to
celebrate spring Under the
Stars at the fifth annual
Hopewell Borough Block Party,
on Friday, May 18 from 7 p.m. to 10
p.m. on the Dana Communica-
tions property at 2 E. Broad St. in
Hopewell.
Under the Stars will feature
The Lifters, a dance band, as well
as light hors doeuvres from the
Brothers Moon Restaurant, Anti-
mos, Peasant Grill, Da Thai
restaurant and other local busi-
nesses. Tickets are $20 per person.
The price includes local fare, a se-
lection of specialty and premium
beverages, a commemorative an-
niversary glass and the chance to
reconnect with good friends and
neighbors under the stars.
On hand that evening will be
our local celebrities serving up
beverages and good conversation.
All event supporters will be
featured on the fifth Hopewell
Block Party Commemorative
glass, which each ticket holder re-
ceives as they arrive for the event.
This glass entitles the holder to
beverages throughout the
evening, as well a being a great
take-away from a fun-filled com-
munity gathering. Profits will be
donated to a local charity benefit-
ting children. Attendees must be
21 or older..
Tickets are available for sale at
PNC Bank, or by calling Sandy
Brown at (609) 468-8545 or Deb
Stuhler at (609) 865-9818. For more
information, email Hopewell_
Blockparty@comcast.net.
10 THE HOPEWELL SUN MAY 16-22, 2012
Special to The Sun
Ed Dormer, 91, of Pennington Pointe, talks about his service in
the US Army during World War II at the Hopewell Valley Veter-
ans Association meeting held recently at the Pennington Pointe
Club House. Mr. Dormer served as a Sergeant in the 101st Air-
borne and took part in the Battle of the Bulge.
Dormer shares World War II stories
BRIEFS
Visit us online at www.hopewellsun.com
Send us your Hopewell news
Have a news tip? Want to send us a press release or photos? Shoot an interesting video? Drop us an email
at news@hopewellsun.com. Fax us at (856) 427-0934. Call the editor at (609) 751-0245.
classified
T HE HO P E WE L L S U N
MAY 16-22, 2012 PAGE 11
BOX A DS
W H A T Y O U N E E D T O K N O W
All ads are based on a 5 line ad, 15-18 characters per line. Additional lines: $9, Bold/Reverse Type: $9 Add color to any box ad for $20. Deadline: Wednesday - 5pm for the following week.
All classified ads must be prepaid. Your Classified ad will run in all 10 of The Sun newspapers each week! Be sure to check your ad the first day it appears.
We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, so call us immediately with any errors in your ad. No refunds are given, only advertising credit.
L I NE ADS
List a text-only ad for your yard sale,
job posting or merchandise.
Only
$
20per week
B US I NE S S
S E RV I C E S
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80per month Only
$
25per week
H O W T O C O N T A C T U S
Call us: 609-751-0245 or email us: classifieds@elauwitmedia.com
Hopewell Sun Lawrence Sun
Montgomery Sun Princeton Sun
Robbinsville Sun West Windsor Sun
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