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TYPES OF ORAL PRESENTATIONS

TEAM BRIEFING
team briefing brings managers together with their teams on a face-to-face basis so that information can be delivered, questions asked and feedback collected. A team briefing system is an excellent way to enable communication upwards, downwards and sideways throughout an organization.

THE BENEFITS OF TEAMBRIEFING


Team briefing provides a channel for delivering clear messages and encouraging open communication. Timely face-to-face communication prevents rumor and the grapevine from gaining credibility. Its a great form of two-way communication - its not just about informing people, but listening and responding to questions and concerns. It enables questions and suggestions to be fed back from staff to the top. It develops greater awareness and involvement at all levels. Briefing develops a shared sense of mission, vision, collective aims and reasons why were here. Successful team briefing ensures that there is less misunderstanding within your team and other parts of the University It ensures that staff are kept up to date on performance, results, progress and policy changes

GUIDELINES IN CONDUCTING A TEAM BRIEFING


Establish who is responsible for delivering a briefing to your team. Make sure that you know who you will include in your briefing.

Make sure that you know exactly who you are supposed to include in your briefing.

GUIDELINES FOR MANAGERS WHO ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR DELIVERING A TEAM BRIEF
1.Arranging your team briefing.
1. Timing 1. Priority 2. Size 3. Venue 4. Publicizing your briefings 3. Timing

2.The Agenda
2. Sequence

3.Preparing the Local Brief


1. The Core Belief Context 2. The Local Brief 3. Good News 4.

5. Anticipating Questions

GUIDELINES FOR MANAGERS WHO ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR DELIVERING A TEAM BRIEF
4. Presenting the Brief How a typical briefing looks like:

Announce the beginning of the briefing


Note taken of any absentees The briefer goes through the items on the brief both Core and local Questions arising out of the brief are asked and answered

The briefer refers to any significant anticipated questions that have not been asked
Make a note of any questions raised which you havent been able to answer Remind the group of the date of the next meeting

GUIDELINES FOR MANAGERS WHO ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR DELIVERING A TEAM BRIEF

4. Presenting the Brief


Points about your presentation style:
Clear
Brief Interesting

In control
Positive

FEEDBACK AND FOLLOW UP


Records of notes

What to do with feedback


Inform your line manager Make sure you do your follow up quickly

GUIDELINES FOR THOSE RECEIVING A TEAMBRIEFING At the briefing:


Before the briefing:
1. Do you know who will brief you? 2. Do you know when your team briefing will be taking place?

3. How long will the meeting take?


4. Do you know where the team briefing will take place? 5. Are you expected to do any preparation/bring anything with you to the meeting? 6. Look through the records of the last brief you received are there any items still outstanding? 7. Are you having problems with the mechanics of the team briefing which youd like to raise with your manager/colleagues?

1. Concentrate and listen so that you hear the brief and the questions asked by other people 1. A clear picture of the information you have 2. Make concise notes received 3. Ask questions to clarify the information you have 2. An idea of when you been given can expect to receive 4. If youre expected to more information from deliver a team brief to your own team make sure your manager if they you understand which werent able to answer points are of particular your question there and relevance to your area of work then at the briefing

By the end of the briefing you should have:

ORIENT ATION

ORIENTATION
a complimentary 60 90 minute event providing potential audience the opportunity to see what your program offers, take a tour of your facility and to meet the facility staff. HOW TO CONDUCT AN EFFECTIVE ORIENTATION(Jean Barbazette)
1. Take a Long, Hard Look at Your Current Orientation Program. 2. Solicit Feedback from Recent Trainees.

3. Hit the Highlights, Skip the Fine Print.


4. Give New Hires a Cheat Sheet. 5. Dont Be Afraid to Have Some Fun.

TRAINING SESSION

12 PROVEN TECHNIQUES TO CONDUCT A SUCCESSFUL TRAINING SESSION:


1. Tell trainees what you're going to cover. 2. Tell them the information. 3. Tell them what you told them. 4. Always explain what trainees are going to see before you show a multimedia portion. 5. Use as much hands-on training as possible.

7. Involve trainees.
8. Repeat questions before answering them.

9. Analyze the session as you go.


10.Keep your session on track. 11.Put yourself in their shoes or seats. 12.Solicit feedback on the training session.

6. Test frequently.

MAKING TRAINING MEMORABLE


Make learning fun Use humor Use attractive packaging Encourage participation Build self-esteem

TRAINING DAY CHECKLIST


Dress appropriately Arrive early Check seating arrangements Check room temperature Check audiovisual hardware Check electrical outlets Check light switches

Check window-darkening equipment


Check arrangements Lay out classroom supplies. Lay out course materials.

QUALITIES OF EFFECTIVE TRAINERS


Good communicators. Knowledgeable. Experienced. Good with people. Interested in learning. Patient. Open-minded. Creative. Well-prepared. Flexible.

CLASSROOM OR INSTRUCTOR-LED TRAINING


Outline lecture notes; dont read them.
Design each part of the lecture to reinforce a training objective. Always use visual aids, such as overheads, flip charts, or slides.

Encourage trainees to participate by giving them note-taking guides and handouts to follow during the lecture.
Break up the prepared presentation by inviting trainee feedback and telling stories to illustrate points. Whenever possible, combine lectures with other classroom methods such as workshops or role plays to reinforce and illustrate points made in the lecture.

HOW TO USE HANDOUTS


Make your handouts look professional by using quality paper and a good printer or highquality copier. Leave plenty of white space on handouts by keeping information simple, straightforward, and uncluttered. Use large type that is easy to read. Use bullets and borders to organize information and make points easy to follow.

Use headings for important issues and titles.


Use graphics whenever possible to illustrate important points. Use different color papers for handouts on different topics.

Number handouts for easy reference when going over them with participants.
Wait until the end of the session to pass out handouts that you will not discuss in class to prevent distracting participants during the session.

ACCORDING TO A 2001 STRATEGIC PLANNING WORKSHOP ON HUMAN CAPITAL SPONSORED BY THE NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCES' (NIEHS) WORKER EDUCATION AND TRAINING PROGRAM (WETP), THERE ARE SEVERAL POSSIBLE PROBLEMS THAT CAN LEAD TO EITHER TRAINER BURNOUT AND/OR A LESS-THAN-SUCCESSFUL TRAINING PROGRAM.
How Trainers Develop Burnout They get in a rut by always training the same topic. They get in a rut by always using the same training methods.

They are discouraged because of managements lack of support.


Their hands are tied by an inadequate budget. They do not receive ongoing train-the-trainer instruction. They do not receive proper materials or instruction for training across language barriers or cultural differences. They do not get into the field enough to customize their training beyond book learning.

HOW TO KEEP TRAINERS FRESH


Rotate trainers onto different topics.
Encourage using a variety of training methods. Promote your program to management and get their verbal and public support; ask management to personally encourage trainers. Present a realistic and ambitious budget that provides for all your training needs. Encourage and provide for ongoing training and career development for trainers. Assess your training audience ahead of time and provide trainers with languageappropriate materials and cross-cultural information. Arrange for trainers to visit the operations in which they train on a regular basis to keep current on new methods.

WHY TRAINING PROGRAMS FAIL


No training goals are set. Training goals are not in line with company goals.

No accountability measurements are set up for trainers or trainees.


Training is regarded as a one-time event and not as an ongoing need. Little or no support is given from upper management.

HOW TO MAKE YOUR TRAINING PROGRAM SUCCEED


Set specific training goals with a committee that includes top management. Align training goals directly with the companys strategic and financial goals. Set up an accountability system to measure the effectiveness of trainers and trainees; determine whether trainers successfully communicate information and whether trainees successfully apply what theyve learned to improve their job performance. Design a training schedule that includes ongoing training, such as beginner, intermediate, and advanced as well as refresher training.

Always have a representative from upper management on your training committee to ensure that training is an integral part of your companys present and future plans for success.

PRESENTING RESEARCH AND TECHNICAL REPORTS

HOW TO READ A PAPER?


1. First Read Through 2. In Depth Reading 3. Looking at References 4. Evaluate the Paper 5. Start to Prepare your Presentation

HOW TO READ THE TECHNICAL PARTS


How to Read an Experimental Result Identify: 1. The setting of the experiment Look for: 1. A bias in the setting 2. A bias in the method used to analyze results 3. A bias in the interpretation of the results 4. A bias in the reasonning from the interpretation to the conclusions

2. What concrete parameters are measured


3. The method used to analyse the results 4. The interpretation of the results done by the authors 5. The conclusion of the authors

PRESENTING A SCIENTIFIC PAPER


1. Before You Start 2. Organize your Ideas
Introduction Preliminaries Body Technicalities

Conclusion

3. Slides 4. Speaking 5. The Show 6. Last Tips

Before You Start Know your Topic Know Your Audience Know Your Goals Know Your Limits

PRESENTING A SCIENTIFIC PAPER


Introduction Define the Problem

ORGANIZE YOUR IDEA Identify the Key Ideas Do not Go into too Many Details Use A Top-Down Approach Structure Your Talk

Motivate the Audience Discuss Earlier/Posterior Work (briefly) Emphasize the Contribution of the Paper Provide a Road-map Preliminaries

Introduce Terminology and Notations or the Setting of the Experiment (but only the absolutely necessary ones)
If Needed, Redefine the Problem more Technically

PRESENTING A SCIENTIFIC PAPER


Body
List Major Results Explain the Meaning of the Results Give some Examples

Speaking
Speak Slowly, Steadily and Loud Find the Right Words Transitions are the Keys Improvisation is Needed Humor is OK but not Recommended Do not be monotonous Make the Audience Participate Maintain Eye Contact Control Your Position Control Your Timing

Technicalities
Either Sketch the proof of an important result or Present some experimental results

Conclusion
Remind the Main Results Explain Your Opinions on the Paper Indicate that Your Talk is Over

I made a Mitsake... The Show Must Go On