The Sonnet The Sonnet

sonnet is sonnet is
a lyric poem a lyric poem
consisting of fourteen lines consisting of fourteen lines
written in iambic pentameter written in iambic pentameter
with a definite rime scheme with a definite rime scheme
and a definite thought structure and a definite thought structure
lyric poem lyric poem
eals with eals with
emotions, emotions,
feelings feelings
,mbic pent,meter consists of ,mbic pent,meter consists of
five measures, units, or meters, of five measures, units, or meters, of
iambs iambs
n n iamb iamb is a metrical foot is a metrical foot
consisting of consisting of
an unaccented syllable an unaccented syllable UU
followed by an accented followed by an accented
syllable syllable / /..
U / U /
a gain a gain
U / U / U / U /
im mor tal ize im mor tal ize
,mbic pent,meter ,mbic pent,meter
U / U / U / U / U / U / U / U / U / U /
ne day I wrote her name u pon the strand, ne day I wrote her name u pon the strand,
U / U / U / U / U / U / U / U / U / U /
But came the waves and wash ed it a way: But came the waves and wash ed it a way:
U / U / U / U / U / U / U / U / U / U /
gain I wrote it with a sec ond hand, gain I wrote it with a sec ond hand,
U / U / U / U / U / U / U / U / U / U /
But came the tide, and made my pains his prey But came the tide, and made my pains his prey
Edmund Spenser, moretti, Sonnet 75 Edmund Spenser, moretti, Sonnet 75
1 2 3 4 5
#ime scheme #ime scheme
!etrarchan (Italian) rime scheme: !etrarchan (Italian) rime scheme:
abba, abba, cd, cd, cd abba, abba, cd, cd, cd
abba, abba, cde, cde abba, abba, cde, cde
Shakespearean (English, or Shakespearean (English, or
Elizabethan) rime scheme: Elizabethan) rime scheme:
abab, cdcd, efef, gg abab, cdcd, efef, gg
Sonnet 18 Sonnet 18
Shall I compare thee to a summer's d Shall I compare thee to a summer's day ay? ?
Thou art more lovely and more temper Thou art more lovely and more temperate ate: :
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of M Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May ay, ,
nd summer's lease hath all too short a d nd summer's lease hath all too short a date ate: :
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven sh Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines ines, ,
nd often is his gold complexion d nd often is his gold complexion dimmed immed,,
nd every fair from fair sometime decl nd every fair from fair sometime declines ines,,
By chance, or nature's changing course untr By chance, or nature's changing course untrimmed immed: :
But thy eternal summer shall not f But thy eternal summer shall not fade ade, ,
Nor lose possession of that fair thou Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st ow'st,,
Nor shall death brag thou Nor shall death brag thou wander'st wander'st in his sh in his shade ade, ,
When in eternal lines to time thou When in eternal lines to time thou gr grow'st ow'st,,
So long as men can breathe, or eyes can s So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see ee, ,
So long lives this, and this gives life to th So long lives this, and this gives life to thee ee..

B

B
C
d
C

E
F
E
F
G
G
Thought structure Thought structure
(Sh,espe,re ,nd Petr,rch) (Sh,espe,re ,nd Petr,rch)
ctave/ sestet ctave/ sestet
The octave, eight lines, presents a The octave, eight lines, presents a
situation or idea. situation or idea.
The sestet (sextet), six lines, responds, The sestet (sextet), six lines, responds,
to the situation or idea in the octave. to the situation or idea in the octave.
Quatrain, quatrain, quatrain, couplet Quatrain, quatrain, quatrain, couplet
Each quatrain, four lines, describes and Each quatrain, four lines, describes and
idea or situation which leads to a idea or situation which leads to a
conclusion or response in the couplet, two conclusion or response in the couplet, two
lines. lines.
ct,;e/Sestet ct,;e/Sestet
I like all types of fruits, mostly apples. I like all types of fruits, mostly apples.
They are juicy and delicious. They are juicy and delicious.
I like gala, Fuji, and red delicious I like gala, Fuji, and red delicious
But my most favorite is granny smith But my most favorite is granny smith
I can eat them in a pie I can eat them in a pie
r candied and on a stick r candied and on a stick
I like them plain and peeled I like them plain and peeled
I can eat them at every meal I can eat them at every meal
If you buy me an apple If you buy me an apple
I will be very happy. I will be very happy.
It will keep the doctor away It will keep the doctor away
If I eat it every day. If I eat it every day.
I like apples for many, many reasons. I like apples for many, many reasons.
I can eat them in every season. I can eat them in every season.
"""/Couplet """/Couplet
I like all types of fruits, mostly apples. I like all types of fruits, mostly apples.
They are juicy and delicious. They are juicy and delicious.
I like gala, Fuji, and red delicious I like gala, Fuji, and red delicious
But my most favorite is granny smith But my most favorite is granny smith
I can eat them in a pie I can eat them in a pie
r candied and on a stick r candied and on a stick
I like them plain and peeled I like them plain and peeled
I can eat them at every meal I can eat them at every meal
If you buy me an apple If you buy me an apple
I will be very happy. I will be very happy.
It will keep the doctor away It will keep the doctor away
If I eat it every day. If I eat it every day.
I like apples for many, many reasons. I like apples for many, many reasons.
I can eat them in every season. I can eat them in every season.
Sonnet 18 Sonnet 18
Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Thou art more lovely and more temperate:
Rough winds Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, do shake the darling buds of May,
nd nd summer's summer's lease hath all too short a date lease hath all too short a date: :
Sometime Sometime too hot too hot the eye of heaven shines, the eye of heaven shines,
nd often is nd often is his gold complexion dimmed his gold complexion dimmed,,
nd nd every fair from fair sometime declines every fair from fair sometime declines,,
By chance, or nature's changing course untrimmed: By chance, or nature's changing course untrimmed:
But But thy thy eternal eternal summer summer shall not fade, shall not fade,
Nor lose possession of that fair thou Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st ow'st,,
Nor shall death brag thou Nor shall death brag thou wander'st wander'st in his shade, in his shade,
When in When in eternal eternal lines to time thou lines to time thou grow'st grow'st,,
So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see, So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see,
So long lives this, and this So long lives this, and this gives life to thee gives life to thee..
The octave
describes the
ways in which
the summer´s
day is inferior
to the
beloved.
The sestet
describes the
ways in which
the beloved is
superior to
the summer´s
day.
Sonnet 29 Sonnet 29
When When in in disgrace disgrace with fortune with fortune and men's eyes and men's eyes
I I all alone all alone beweep beweep my my outcast outcast state, state,
nd nd trouble trouble deaf deaf heaven with my heaven with my bootless bootless cries cries,,
nd look upon myself, and nd look upon myself, and curse curse my fate, my fate,
Wishing me Wishing me like to one more rich in hope, like to one more rich in hope,
Featured like him, like him with friends possessed, Featured like him, like him with friends possessed,
esiring this man's art, and that man's scope, esiring this man's art, and that man's scope,
With what I most enjoy With what I most enjoy contented least contented least; ;
Yet Yet in these thoughts my self almost despising, in these thoughts my self almost despising,
Haply Haply I think on thee I think on thee, and then my state, , and then my state,
Like to the Like to the lark lark at break of day at break of day arising arising
From sullen earth, From sullen earth, sings sings hymns hymns at heaven's gate; at heaven's gate;
For For thy thy sweet love sweet love remembered such remembered such wealth wealth brings brings
That That then I scorn to change my state with kings then I scorn to change my state with kings. .
The diction
of the
octave
implies the
speaker´s
self-pity
and
depression.
The
sestet´s
diction, in
conrast, is
joyful.
Sonnet 73 Sonnet 73
That time of year thou mayst in me behold
When yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hang
Upon those boughs which shake against the cold,
Bare ruined choirs, where late the sweet birds sang.
In me thou see'st the twilight of such day
s after sunset fadeth in the west;
Which by and by black night doth take away,
eath's second self, that seals up all in rest.
In me thou see'st the glowing of such fire,
That on the ashes of his youth doth lie,
s the death-bed, whereon it must expire,
Consum'd with that which it was nourish'd by.
This thou perceiv'st, which makes thy love more strong,
To love that well, which thou must leave ere long.
1
st
Quatrain
Year - Fall
2
nd
Quatrain
ay - Twilight
3
rd
Quatrain
Fire - Coals
"This¨ is ll.1-12
Sonnet 73 Sonnet 73
%e speaker is %e speaker is Part of life lived Part of life lived %e wole of life %e wole of life
in the in the 1, 1, of his life of his life the spring and summer the spring and summer the year the year
in the in the 99 99 of the day of the day the morning and noon the morning and noon the day the day
In the glowing coals In the glowing coals The ashes of youth The ashes of youth hour hour
Q1 Q1
Q2 Q2
Q3 Q3
Year
ay
Hour
Time is
rapidly
shortening.
That time is
running out is
what the
beloved
perceives.

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