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Edward William Lane's lexicon - Volume 4 - page 401 to 481

Edward William Lane's lexicon - Volume 4 - page 401 to 481

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Published by Silky Beaver
Important Note: You shall not use any meanings without reading the complete information available in the lexicon by self.

Edward William Lane was a British Orientalist, translator and lexicographer (September 17, 1801, Hereford - August 10, 1876, Worthing).

From 1842 onwards, Lane devoted himself to the monumental Arabic-English Lexicon, although he found time to contribute several articles to the journal of Deutsche Morgenländische Gesellschaft.[1]

Lane's Selections from the Quran appeared in 1843. It was neither a critical nor a commercial success. Moreover, it was misprint-ridden, as Lane was for the third time in Egypt, along with his wife, sister and two nephews, to collect materials for the planned dictionary, the Arabic-English Lexicon, when it was being printed.[2]

Lane was unable to complete the dictionary. He had arrived at the letter Qāf, the 21st letter of the Arabic alphabet, when he died in 1876. Lane's great-nephew Stanley Lane-Poole finished the work based on his incomplete notes and published it in the twenty years following his death.[3]

In 1854, an anonymous work entitled The Genesis of the Earth and of Man was published, edited by Lane's nephew Reginald Stuart Poole. The work is attributed by some to Lane.[4]

The part concerning Cairo's early history and topography in Description of Egypt, based on Al-Maqrizi's work and Lane's own observations, was revised by Reginald Stuart Poole in 1847 and published in 1896 as Cairo Fifty Years Ago.[5] The whole Description of Egypt was published by the American University in Cairo Press in 2000.[6]

Lane died on 10 August 1876 and was buried at West Norwood Cemetery. To read more about the author, visit :

http://www.saudiaramcoworld.com/issue/200802/the.indefatigable.mr.lane.htm

[1] Roper, Geoffrey (1998). "Texts from Nineteenth-Century Egypt: The Role of E. W. Lane", in Travellers in Egypt by Paul Starkey (Editor), Janet Starkey , Page 249
[2] Oriental Essays by A.J. Arberry, Pages 106-7
[3] Oriental Essays by A.J. Arberry, Page 115
[4] Roper, Geoffrey (1998). "Texts from Nineteenth-Century Egypt: The Role of E. W. Lane", in Travellers in Egypt by Paul Starkey (Editor), Janet Starkey , Page 249
[5] Roper, Geoffrey (1998). "Texts from Nineteenth-Century Egypt: The Role of E. W. Lane", in Travellers in Egypt by Paul Starkey (Editor), Janet Starkey , Page 245
[6] Thompson, Jason. "An Account of the Journeys and Writings of the Indefatigable Mr. Lane". Saudi Aramco World. Retrieved 2008-06-22

Preface part Lane's Lexicon: "In the year 1842, a most generous offer made to me by the present Duke of Northumberland (then Lord Prudhoe*) enabled me to undertake the composition of this work; His Grace's princely aid I have ever since been mainly indebted for the means of accomplashing the project thus originated."

*Admiral Algernon Percy, 4th Duke of Northumberland KG PC FRS (15 December 1792 – 12 February 1865), styled Lord Algernon Percy until 1816 and known as The Lord Prudhoe between 1816 and 1847, was a British naval commander, explorer and Conservative Party (UK) politician.
Important Note: You shall not use any meanings without reading the complete information available in the lexicon by self.

Edward William Lane was a British Orientalist, translator and lexicographer (September 17, 1801, Hereford - August 10, 1876, Worthing).

From 1842 onwards, Lane devoted himself to the monumental Arabic-English Lexicon, although he found time to contribute several articles to the journal of Deutsche Morgenländische Gesellschaft.[1]

Lane's Selections from the Quran appeared in 1843. It was neither a critical nor a commercial success. Moreover, it was misprint-ridden, as Lane was for the third time in Egypt, along with his wife, sister and two nephews, to collect materials for the planned dictionary, the Arabic-English Lexicon, when it was being printed.[2]

Lane was unable to complete the dictionary. He had arrived at the letter Qāf, the 21st letter of the Arabic alphabet, when he died in 1876. Lane's great-nephew Stanley Lane-Poole finished the work based on his incomplete notes and published it in the twenty years following his death.[3]

In 1854, an anonymous work entitled The Genesis of the Earth and of Man was published, edited by Lane's nephew Reginald Stuart Poole. The work is attributed by some to Lane.[4]

The part concerning Cairo's early history and topography in Description of Egypt, based on Al-Maqrizi's work and Lane's own observations, was revised by Reginald Stuart Poole in 1847 and published in 1896 as Cairo Fifty Years Ago.[5] The whole Description of Egypt was published by the American University in Cairo Press in 2000.[6]

Lane died on 10 August 1876 and was buried at West Norwood Cemetery. To read more about the author, visit :

http://www.saudiaramcoworld.com/issue/200802/the.indefatigable.mr.lane.htm

[1] Roper, Geoffrey (1998). "Texts from Nineteenth-Century Egypt: The Role of E. W. Lane", in Travellers in Egypt by Paul Starkey (Editor), Janet Starkey , Page 249
[2] Oriental Essays by A.J. Arberry, Pages 106-7
[3] Oriental Essays by A.J. Arberry, Page 115
[4] Roper, Geoffrey (1998). "Texts from Nineteenth-Century Egypt: The Role of E. W. Lane", in Travellers in Egypt by Paul Starkey (Editor), Janet Starkey , Page 249
[5] Roper, Geoffrey (1998). "Texts from Nineteenth-Century Egypt: The Role of E. W. Lane", in Travellers in Egypt by Paul Starkey (Editor), Janet Starkey , Page 245
[6] Thompson, Jason. "An Account of the Journeys and Writings of the Indefatigable Mr. Lane". Saudi Aramco World. Retrieved 2008-06-22

Preface part Lane's Lexicon: "In the year 1842, a most generous offer made to me by the present Duke of Northumberland (then Lord Prudhoe*) enabled me to undertake the composition of this work; His Grace's princely aid I have ever since been mainly indebted for the means of accomplashing the project thus originated."

*Admiral Algernon Percy, 4th Duke of Northumberland KG PC FRS (15 December 1792 – 12 February 1865), styled Lord Algernon Percy until 1816 and known as The Lord Prudhoe between 1816 and 1847, was a British naval commander, explorer and Conservative Party (UK) politician.

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Published by: Silky Beaver on Jun 07, 2013
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inf.n.
as
above,means
t
He
abstained,
refrained,
-
And
Theact
of
scattering,
or
dispersing.
(El-
leaving,relinquishing,
or
forsaking,
it.
(M.)
or
~sited,from
the
thing;
[asthough
he
became
I1ilee,
TA.)
WAnd
A.:.
said
of
barley and
of
See
1. ~
Seealso
-4nd
see
~jol.l-
4
cold
with
respectto
it;]
he
lkft,
relinquished,
or
wheat,
It
put
forth
its
awn,but
not
its
ears,
applied
to
a
horse,
1
Galledin
this
place
of
the
for,sook,
it:
(M
:) and, t
:
A-;
t.y
tho~halmot
doing
the
latter.
(El-Hejeree,
M.)
.i,d&
(15,
TA:)
or,(L,)
asalso
*
;;.a,
(A,
eart
refrainedfrom
he
thing;
k.fi,
relinquished,
TA,)
aving
a
white place,
or
white
places,
on
his
L.'..JI
(?.
M,
L,
.K,)
nd
.aj
r
forsook,
it:
(.,A,O,1g:)
likeas one says,
I;(;
,ck,
p
oluced
by
galls,
(L,
TA,)
or
iaving
u,
,:
(TA:)
the[lizard
called]
2
and
;
(M,
L,
.;)
tIe
made
the
a,row,
h,is
back
wiiteilaccs
ermded
1.,
[p1.
of---
and
the
spear,
or
a
part
thereof,
to
pass
throuh
-
is
spoken
ofea
saying,
(~,M)
the
animal
at
which
it
wasshot
[or
woduced
by
hair
growing
in
the
place
of
galb.
LA.1
*
thrown]:
(~:)
or
to
so
that
its
[or,
(A.)
[Auid
app. appliedin
a
similar
senseto
a
"
I,~
Jl
~~
'
bj.s,!5
'
thrown]:
(.8
)
or
to
enetrate
--
ca
l:
ace.
e.O.]
tremity
passed
throynqh.
(M,
L,
K..)
[See
cam
[t
My
heart
has
become
cold,
'or
indjferent,
and
tMn
nd
.
.]
~
See
also
1,
latterpart.
>P-
A
certain
bird,
(q,
M,
1,,)
above
the
si:e
(meaning
dislosed
to
abstinence,)
not
desirous
of
of
the
sparrow,
(M)
having
a
large
head,
(15,)
coming
to
drink].
(O.)
~,.s
,
(M,L,
]5,)
or
7.
*"
is
saidto meanThe
expcriecwing
of
whiich
pr'eysupon
sparronis:
(T,]
:)
a certain
!0A
L;a
~,
()
or
h
1
~
(A,)
said
of
an
cowd.
(Meyd.[Mentioned
by
him,
withthe
ex-
bird,
black
and
white,
or
parycloured,
;r;,
~ ~
C
prnon
of
aA
doub
astahnremenn,ada
arrow,
(.,
M,
A,
1K,)
and
of
a
spear, (M,
L,)
aor.
pression
ofa
doubt
asto
the truemeaning,andas
with
a
whilebelly:
(A:)
a certainbird
of
the
as
above,
(L,)
and
so
the
inf.
n.,(M,A,
L,)
It
only
occurring,tohisknowledge,
in
a prov.,
which
-
passedthrough,
or
tranpiereed,
or
a
part
of
it
se
in
Freytag's"Arab.Prov."
i.
3a7:
but,,,abl
used
to
regardits
cry,
(L,
M.Sh,
and
thie
birdl
passed
throuhi,.
(.,
M,)
the
animal
at
which
it
there, should
beAbi.])
i t
sed
to
regar
it
cry,
(L,
M~b,)
and
thedbir
was
sho
[or
t~trown],
by
reawn
of
0J.
itself,
(L,)
as
of
evil
omen,
(L,
Mqb,)and
used
to
was
shot
or
thrown],
by
reason
of
its
sharpness;
**
-..
.
-kill
it;
and
theyare forbidden
to
kill
it,
in
order
expl. by
3..~,.
J,: (.:)
or
it
penetrated
o
that
A..
(~,
M,L,
1.)
and
I/;j..,
(M,
L,)
the
todispel
the
idea
ofa
thing's
being
of
evilomen:
istrt p
former
a
simvlesubst.
and
the
latter
an
inf.
n.,
(M.b:)
there
are
too
species
thereof;
one
slpeies
it ia
.through;
xpl.
by?u.i..
j
;
(Lth,)
and
t
.
,
(TA,)
Cobl,
or
coldness:
(Sp
is
called
by
the
people
of
E!-'Irdk1
4:?-.
[a
liame
(L,
1
;)
or
.1
.
j,.;
and
o
,aor.'.
M,
L,:)
or
i
cold:
(M,L:),coru
pica];
the
(A.
[See
;L,:
and
see
an
ex.
in
a
versecited
Pers.
word,
[originally
,
arabicized:
(S,
K:)
othlr
species,
called
.A"I.4H
./all,
[so
in
the
L,
voce
tX.1)_.-And
,
(.,)
inf.
.
and,,
or,
a'cord-
toa number
of
authors,it
is
an
Arabicbut
in
mycopy
of
the
M.lb
.W%J1,]
is
the
w.il,l
(M,
L,)
[the
latter
inkn. suggesting
that
onesays
word
a, opted
by the
Persians.
(MF.)
One
says
sort,
w/tich
isfound
in
Nejd,
upon
tith
trees
called
also
.;,,
said
of
an
arrow,
(M,]5,)
and
of
a
?
"'&
and
*
[A
day
of
col:
or
of.
intese
*.
;
it
is
never
seen
butt
upon
the
ground,
[sn
spear
and
thelike,
(M,)
It
aissed
the
object
of
co,d].
(A.).
For
the
former,
:
also
,
in in
the L,
but
in mycopy
of
the
M.b,
it
is
wrve,'
aim:
thus
hIaving
twocontr.
significations:
(M,two
plaes.
-
Also,
the
former,
A
high
place
in
seen
upml
the
grmnd,]
prin~gng
from
tree
to
L,
1]
)
and
V.,.jl
also
hasthe
latter
of these
tw
mountains;
(AA,
L,
15;)
being
the
coldest
part.
tree:
(SukeynEn-Numeyrec,
L, M.sb:)
whe,,
significatioiis.(L.)
j,.
said
of
a
hiors,
aor.
9,
(AA,
L.)in,.
signifiesalso
Pure,
unmi'ed,
chased,
and
hard
pr~me,
it
is
overtaken,
andi
I-
-~~~~~~~~~~~~~31
[inf.n.
iy.i,]
t
lie
became
galledin
the
place
of
unadulterated,
r
genuine;
(.,
M,L,
K;)
applied
utters
a
crj
lilethat
of
the
hawk: it
preys
upon
the
sad,ile:
(.K,
TA:)
[or
he
had
a
white
llare,
tobeverage,
(L,)
such
as
is
termed
,.",
(. ,
L,)
sparrows:
(Msb:)
it
is
describedby
AlUtt
as
a
or
white
!la'e.,
on
hisback,
prodced,
by
gaUl,
and
to
wine,
(L,)
and
to
anything.
(M,
15.)
bird
black
and
white,
or
party-coloured,
(
tl,)
or
by
hai,ryrowing
in
theplaces
of
galls:
(see
Onesays
>.c..
,.s'.k%
tAn
unmied
lie.
(.,
L.)
with
a
white
belly,
and
a
back
of
a dark,
or
an
;
and
nd
:)]
and,
said
of
a
camel,
he
had
.,
-
-·Andre,
..aith,
dust-colour
,
[or,
is
said
in
theL,
white
fuirgron'i,g
in
the
plface
of
a
gall
#moduced
eni
half
hite
and
half
black,
found
in
tree,]
large
Igemuin,
or
m/~.re,
1^
(AZ,
S,
L.)
-
[Hence,]
bythesadtile,
after
itshealing.
(AO.)
~See
.
o,
in
the
head
and
betrl,
htaing
a
talon
with
which
also
4.
)Q
t
An army
composd
only
of
the
w
it
preys
upon
sparrows
and
other smallbirds,
a
of
one
father
or
ancestor:
(L:)
or
anarmy
lair
2.
oe.~a,
(.,
M,
15,)in
the
giving
to
drink,
l
altogether
consisting
of
sons
qf
one's
paterl
uncle
large
asthe
point
of a
spear:
(Mgh,
Mlb:)
some
(.8,
.5,)
is
The
giring
to
dri~nk
less
than
satixfies
I
[meaning
of
one's
relations]:
(AO:)
or,
(M,
A,
add
to
this
that
it
is
called
tJyh.J,
because
of
th,e
thirst.
(.8?
M,
}$.·)
Onesays,
6.e.
lie
gave
L,
15,)
and
V .~
(M,A,
L)
and
.,
whiteness
of
its
belly;
and
,,.a.',J
because
of
him
to
drink
less
than
sat;~Jied
his
thirst.
(M.)
(11,)
t
A
gret
army;
(15;)
!
an
army that
the
dark,
or
ashy,
dust-colour
of
its
back;
amd
it
,.a-
appears,
romn
the
lownes
of
its
motion,
by
reason
Jse.'19
[a
nanie
now
applied
to
the
rceen
'roud-
Arid
#"tJ
~
~.t~ZJt
'~.0I
stopped
sthort
the
of
its
great
nmber,
tobe
inanimate.
(M,
A,
L.)
lpecher,
picus
viridila],
because
of
itsdiversity
of
drinker
from
drinking
the
water.
(A.)
And
~
See
also
.,
near
colour;
that
it
is
neersen
d.t
upon
a
brauck
-%0
~L
"'[
regare,
to
drink
a
uat*.,nrthed.
"'0
'.3jg
J04
J9..l[egaetria
..
nit
*,
.
**
(Lac.
and
soin
the
L,)
or
a
tree,
(Mghi,
,sot
lme
than
satisfied
thiist].
(A.)
And
.l.i
j.o:
see
.y.,
in
three places:and
see
>j.
'
~
,
and
an
rel
e,)
or
ee,
btkh,
10
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Myth,)
nui
can
.~"l'~ly
erer,or
t/&*l'r,
be
ta~elet,
~
Jl
.lie
tol,ppd
shortthe
giving
to
drink
before
near
the
end.
(Mib,)
or
cannerer
be
taken:
(Mgh,
L:)
it
;x
siatisfying
..
.
l-
.
*,
-
c,
,egardedas
of
evil
omen:
(Mgh:)
.gh
says
that
short,or
put
a
sto.p
to,
his
drinking.
(TA.)
AndA
nd
it
iscalled
1
,
[perhapsa
mistranseriptio,n
for
4tl~
4;.&
lie
,aide
isbeverageto
be
little
in an
intensely-cold
night:
(M,
L:)
[or]
*.
L.,,
because
black
and
white,]in
the
dim.form:
quantity.
(A.).
And
accord.
to
the
T,
.
a
cold
day:
(.:)
and
j
.[pl.
oft'
(Mb:)
[it
is said
that]
it
was
thefirstbird
that
signifies
The
drinking
les
than
satif.ies
thirst.
V
b13
]
cold
winds..
(.Ham
p.
WO9G.)
And
w.j!
1listed
for
the
sake
of
God:
(15:)
the
pi.
is
(TA.)
-Also,
(.,
15,)
in
giving,
(.,)
1The
V..
A
coil
anI:
pl.::)
thg
latter
Cj.Ly.:
(. ,
M,
Myb,
15:)
and
the
female
is
caUlled
making
to
be
little,
or
small,
in
quantity
or
,.(
--p
number.
(.8,1,TA.)
Onesays,
;L[allI
.1
I,le
(i. C.
he
pI.)
contr.
'.
.)
3
)-.o.
(M.b.)_-Also
:.A
white
place,
(',
M,
nL,
g,)
pro,dced
ly
ga.lls,
(.,.,L5,)
or
by
thc
made
tie
grl
to
be
little,
or
small,
(M,
A,
TA,)
A
cold,
or
an
intensely-cold,
mnan:
and
.
tlie;
(M;)
or
b.
signifies
a
hited,
cC
A
to
him.
(A,
TA.)
Andit
is
said
in
a
trad.,
*l.D
a
cold,
or
an
intensel.-cold,
cotm,pany
'f
l,nsluced.
by
hairowing
n
tellar
f
a
all;
[app.
relating
toa
particular
class
of
persons,]
men.
(M, L.)
8o
also
apple.
lprik
ed
by
hi
gr
oi
the
place
of
a
alled:
t.If-
~*5
'il4,1
R.M
l.#'
'*,
meaning
[i.
e.
to
milk,
in
a state
ofddecomposition,
(0,
]K,
TA,)
(A:)
Ibl.
IJt;.0.
(M,
A.)
And
t
A
,whiteplace
T
They
will
tot
eater
Paradise
sate
in
small
by
reason
of
cold.
(TA.)
-
,.
onthe
hump
of
a
camel:
(M:)
or
white
fit,
number].
(TA.)
[Also,
app.,
An
arrow's
t Abstaining,
refrainin
hitting
the
object
of
aim:
see
its
part.
n..
.
A
.thaing,[s
hoghcg,
or
desisting,
froto
a
;
ro]idd
in
the tas
e
of
pall
prlo
dced
sb
ehe
hit~~~~~~~~~~~tingf
h beto
:BOiBpr.n
lIjt'
[as
thouagh
cold
with
respectto
it;]
readale
s
after
its
/twaling:
(AO
:)
pi.
us
abov'e.
BooK
I.]
1677
 
y
m-t.
(AO,M.)
-
And
t
A
certain
rein
(Ag,
M)
be-
e
ath
tho
tongue,
(AQ,)
or
in
thelower
part
of
the
tongue,
(M,)of
the
horse.
(AR,
M.)And
c-t
wo
win,
(Lth,
Ks,
$,M,
L,
l,)
of
a
dark,
or
as
ahy,
dust-colour,
(
i,
Lth,
Ks,
M,L,)
in
thelower
part
of
the
tongue,
bymeans
of
which
tits
tongue
moves
about,
(Lth,
Ks,
L,)
or
penetrating
within
(Q
:.)
the
tongue:
(S.,
M,
g
:)
or
two
veins,
on
the
rightand
left
of
the
tongue:
(L:)
or,
as
some
say,
two
bones,
which
erect
(
1
A.. )
the
tongue.
(M.)
Yczeed
Ibn-E4-
a,'i1
inhis
saying
meanc
1
A
[i.
e.l+,
for
QL
though
he
said
,L
J
lie
has
a
long,
or
an
unbridled,
tongue;
thephrase
that
he
uses
beingpleonastic],
($.).
Also,
(M,L,)
or
t',
(so
in
the
1],)
and
t
;,
which
isthe
more
known,
(TA,)
A
nail
in
a
spear-head,
(M,
L,
]1,)
by
means
of
hich
tie
shaft
is
fastened
to
it.
(L,
].*)--
Accord.
to
8h,
Oj*
e
means
He
wpened
his
mind,
so
as
to
reeal
his
screts.
(TA.
[But
this
isperhaps
a
mistranscription,
for
,Jte:
see
.])
iS
'
[pl.
of
sp;
and,agreeablywithana-
logy,
of
'
e
,
and
;l·
sese
..
-
Also
lHoar-frost,
or
rime;
syn.
e...
(TA.)
-
See
also
>,.
3.'
[app.
a
subst.;
for
if
it
were
anepithet,
having
the meaning
of
a
pass.
part.
n.
of
the
fern.
gender,
it
should
by
rule
be
without
J;]
Afemaleanimal,
(M,)
or
a
ew,
(g,)
injured,(M,
g,)
and
enmaciated,
(M,)
by
cold:
pl.
j
3
ty:
(M,
:)
on
the
authority
of
IAr.
(15.)
Z1.
Cold
and
humid
clouds
in
which
is
no
rater:
(AV:)
or
cold
and
humid
cloudswhich
the
nind
carries
away;
as
also
't ^
and
' .:
(M:)
or
thin
clou
in
whichis no
water;
(8,
;)
as
also
*
i
()
and
*
-.
(L,
TA.)
.N"s
:
see
whatnext
precedes,
intwo
places.
G:
seeits
fern.,
with
3,
voce
~Also,
(.,
A,
L,
VJ,)
and
t l,(., L,
1,)
and
'P,
(A,)
Anarrow
that
has
passed,
or
of
which
apart
lus
passed,
through
the
animal
at
which
it
has
ben
shot;
syn.
.1
:
(S,
L,
:)
or
of
wohich
the
extremity
only
ha;
passed
through:
when
part
of
the
arrow
haspassed
through,
it
is
termed
1i;
and
whenthe
whole
haspassed
through,
jjL.
(A.)
And
`
1
.
j34
Arrows
of
which
theex-
tremities
havepassedthrough
the
animals
at
whichthey
have
been
shot.
(A.)
,jl
Afore
[and
most]
cold;
or
more
[and
most]
affected
by
cold:
and
Alore
[and
most]
tranpiercing.
(Meyd,
in
explanations
of
provs.
commencing
with
this
word.
[See
Freytag's
"Arab.
Provey."
pp.743-4.])
~j.~~:
see
what
next
follows.
.
,,
(8tr,
L,)
or
;'P,
(so
accord.
tothe
1],
[theformeragreeable
with
its
verb,the
latter
app.
a
mistake,])Anarrow
missing
thoobject
of
aim.
(1.tr,
L,
1.)
[See
also
.a.]
.a.
Beverage,
(S,)
ordrink,
(A,)
madelittlein
quantity.
(S,
A.)
-And
Given
little
to
drink:
or
tgiven
a
small
giSt.
(S.)
-
See
also
;Y.
.;¥,
,An
arrow
hitting
the
object
of
aim.
(gtr,
L.)
[Seealso
;.r.]
;~.
A
wind
(h)
cold;
or
intensdycold:
or
accompanied
by
coldandl
humid
clouds.
(IAsr,
M.)
-
Also,
and
t
T,
,
T
,,
,
,)
A
man
quickly
snsible
of
cold;
(S;)
weah
in
enduring
cold;
(1;)
impatient
of
cold.
(T,
M.)
-
Andthe
fonner,
Strong
in
enduring
cokl.
(g.)
-
And
A
land
writlout
trees,
and
without
any-
thing
(1,
TA)
of
herbage.
(TA.)
See
also
;J..
A
man
vehemently
angered
or
enraged:
(
:)
and
sojia,
without
.
(TA.)
A
A
oag
snord:
adial.var.
of
;-
[q.
v.].
(.)
1!,
:A
road,
or
way;
as
also
;.,
(.
,
g,)
which
is
the
original;
(TA;)
and
W1,j:
S:)
[see
the
second
of
these
three
words:]
Akh
says
that
the
people
of
El-jlijaz
make
it
fern.,
andTemeemmake
it
masc.
(S
and
Mgbvoce
1Bj,
q.
v.)_
LI.I,
also
written
with
,o,
islikewise
[The
ntame
of]a
bridge
extended
overthe
midst
of
1Iell,
(.,
TA,)
sharlper
than
a
sword,
and
thiner
than
ahair,
otver
whichthe
creatures
will
pass,
the
people
of
Paradie
as~sing
over
it
with
their
orks,
some
likethe
blinding
lightning,
and
some
likethe
wind
sent
forth,
and
some
likecoursers,
and
some
running,
and
some
walking,
and
some
dragging
hemselves
along;
and
a
crier
,vill
cryJ,
om
the
loner
parts
of
the
empyrean,
"
Lower
your
eyes
until
Fdtimeh,
the
daujhter
of
[ouhammad,
(may
God
blass
alnd
amve
him,
and
mnay
God
be
nwell
pleased
with
her
and
her
two
tons,)
passm
over;"and
the
fire
will
say
to
the
believer,
"Pass
thou
over,
0
believer,
for
thylight
hath
extinguished
my
flame;"
and
there-upon,the
feet
of
thepeople
of
the
fire
will
slip.
(TA.)
;;;
and
:
see
.
1.
-0,
aor.
,
inf.n.
(.(
,
O,'
sb,
]V)
and
5
.,
S,
0,'
1,)
theformer
inf.
n.
of
thedial.
of
Temeem
and
the
latter
of
I~cys,
($,
0,)
and
.~,
whichisalso
a
n.
of
place,
[and,accord.
to
rule,
of
timealso,]
($,
0,
g1,)
said
of
a
man,
(S,
Mqb,)
He
threw
him
down,
or
pros-
trated
him,
on
the
ground;
(0, L,],
TA;)
namely,
a
man.
(T,
TA.)
And
°y.
is
also
said
of
a
beast,[the
pronounreferringtotherider,]meaning
It
threrhim
don.
(TA
in
art.
a.3.)
Hence
the
saying,
C's)%-,
A
3
;j
t
[Death
prostrate
the
animal].
(TA.)
And
-.
-,.-.,
ef
S^l
lJ e
,>i
i. e.
[7ie
simiitude
of
the
believer
is
as
the
fresh,
or
juicyJ,
plant
of
sd-
produce,]
which
the
wind
bends
at
one
time,throwing
it
from
side
to
side,
[and
straigten
at
another.]
(TA,
from
atrad.)
And
jq..l,1
i
The
trees
wre
cut
and
thrown
down.
(TA.)-
Seealso3.
-
[Hence
also,].
.
He
was
affected
I-t-
with
thedisease
termed
j.o
[expl.
below].
(Msb.)
And
lie
(a
man)
was
affected
wit
Oe
.
diabolical
possession,
or
madness;
inf.
u
s.
(TA.)
See also
2,
ix
twoplaces.
2.
',
[inf.
n.
'j3,]
HIe
threr
hikn
down
or
prostrated
hnim,
on
the
ground,
vwhemently;
namely,
a
man.
(K.)
_
4u
.e,
(K,)
inf.
n.
asabove,
(TA,)
He
made
the
door-way
to
ham
whiat
are
termed
el~
[i.
e.
a
pair
of
fod~ig
doors];
as
also
t
4.
,.
(K,TA.)...And
[hence,]
~.J?
,
U
He
made
the
poetry
to
have
at
are
termed
jt&l~;
as also
,
:
(4,
TA:)
or
or
HJI
^
,
(. o
:-JI,
(TA,)
is
the
making
the
first
'e
[meaning
hemistich]
to rhyme
[like
the
send]
(
;)
[i.
e.]
the
making
the
last
foot
of
the
Jirt
kemistichlike
the
last
of
the
sconul
[inrhyme]:
(TA:)
derived
fiom
the
.
of
the
door-way.
(S,
TA.)
3.
'
V
i
L.
;,
(S,
Msb,
TA,)
inf.
n.
of
4;AJ
-3I
-&
the
former"[4a.and
bl,
(Msb,
TA,)
I
re~ledwith
him,
each
of
us
endmavourig
to
throw
down
tthe
other,
[and
I
overcate
him
in
doing
so,
or
and
I
threm
him
down.]
(TA.)
5.
d
,je
Hte
becamelowly,humble,
or
abased,
and
abasd,
to
him;
as
also
CZ:
(Az,
TS,
TA:)
or
t
he
lowered,
humbled,
or
abased,
himself
to
him:
one
says,
3
l
.Jj
and
t
[I
ceaed
not to
lower,humble,
or
abas,
myelf
to
him]
tli
L
.
[until
he
answered
wme,
or
gave
me
his
assnt].
(Z,
TA.)
6.
1j1s
J
7th
wrestled,
o0w
with
another,
endeavouringtothrow
down
one
atother;
and
[t
1
92
J
1
.tsignifies
the
same;
or]
t Ij.l
they
twro
wrestled,
each
endeavouring
to
throro
dow
the
otwher.
(TA.)
7.
7
la
[He,
or
it,
became
thrown
down,
or
prostrated,
on
the
ground].
(Occurring
in
the
g
in
art.
t.4.)
8:
see
6,
in
two
places.
..
an
in£
n.
of
L
($,
Msh,
1..)
-
Also,
[as
a
subst.,
Epilepnsy,
orfaUing
sichne.:
and
some-
times,
app.,
ecstaticcatalelmy;
asort
of
tranceinto
which
a
person
fals:]
a
certain
disease,
(?,
0,
Msb,
g,)
well
known,
(S,
0,)
re
madness,
or
diabolical
possesion,
(Msb,)
accord.
I
11
[Boox
I.
1678
 
1679
BooK
I.]
to
the
Raees
[Ibn-Seen,
whomwecall
"
Avi-
cenna"],
(TA,)
preventing,
butnot
completely,
the
,ital
organs
from
performingtheir
actions
[orfrnction];
the
caum
of
wrhich
is
an
obstru,-
tion
that
occurs
in
one
or
more
of
the
venters
(')
of
the
brainand
in
theducts
of
the
,.,La.
[here
meaning
nerves]
by
which
the
metbers
are
moved,
[arising]
rom
an
abundant
thick
or
vicow
JL
[or
humour],
whereby
the
[by
whichishere
meant,
as
inmanyother
instances,the
vital
spirit,
or
nervous
fluid,]
isprevented
from
pervading
them
in
the
natural
manner,
and
consequently
the
members
become
[smodically]
contracted.
(15,
TA.)
m
Also
A
sort,
or
speciaes:
and
a
state,
condition,
or
manner
of
being:
syn.
&.
and
C
:
(g,V,:)
of
a
thing:
(1
:)
and
so
and
likewise
"h
nd
,~:
(TA:)
[see
also
i:]
pl.
[of
mulLti.]
,
1)
and
[of
pauc.]
1.
(15.)
One
says,
j3
t,p,',
meaning
.1.
[i.
e..
Ie,
or
it,
has
two
sorts,
or
species:
or
two
distinctivequalities
or
ropertaes].
(Ibn-'Abbad,
Z,
O,
K.)
And
*gy
b;w3
I
lcft
them
changing
from
state
0
*8'
elm
to
state.
(Ibn-'Abbid,
O,
1.)
And
;.~..,..l,
meaning
1lji
[i.
e.
There
are
two
ways
of
per-forming
the
affair,
either
of
hvAich
may
be
chow~].
(TA.)-
See
also
pt,
n
three
places.
._;,
Two
camels
of
which
one
comes
to
the
water
when
the
otherreturns
f.om
it,
by
reason
of
their
[the
camels']
multitude.(S,
O,
g(.)
-
And
[hence,
perhaps,]
i
ttJ1
signifies
TIe
niglt
and
the
day;
(J
;)
[and]
so
tt) l$,with
kesr,
like
LU*
l:
(TA
in
art.
J~
:)
oi
the
forenoon
a;d
the
afternoon;
from
the
firsi
part
of
day
to
midday
and
from
midday
to
sun
set;
each
of
these
beingtermed
i
:
(S,
O,V
:,
or
the
morning,
between
daybreak
and
snrise,and
the
vemning,
between
sunset
andnightfall;
m
also
J1;=li-;
(~and
15
in
explanation
of
~lj8l;
and
some
assert
that
it
is
formedby
transpositiofrom
Qlj_-ld:
(TA:)
or
the
two
extremities
o
the
day.
(A,
TA.)
And
one
says,
.y0.o
_-
4l;JI
ame
to
himin
the
morning
and
evening
or
between
,daybreak
and
sunris
and
beotwee
sunset
andnightfaL.
(S,
O,V.)
And
;c
i
j1l
I
met
him
at
the
two
extremities
of
the
daj
(A,
TA.)
Dhu-r-Rummeh
says,
*
ct>c4;
6--
meaning
As
though
I
wereone,
i.
e.
a
came
yearning
towards
hisplace
of
abode,tvhich
a
eeningand
a
morning,
in
evening
a
binding
t
the
fore
shank
to
the
arm
and
in
the
mornir
a
shackling
of
the
legs,
turn
[or
kheep]
anw
from
a
sttled
abiding-place:
or,asAboo-'Ali
relates
it,
[1;,
asa
partial
substitute
f,
s;
.,]
meaning,
an
~
ng,
when
there
is
binding
of
the
fore
shank
to
the
arm,and
morning,
when
there
is
a
~/ackding
of
the
leg
for
theybind
the
camerl's
fore
shank
to
his
ar
in
the
eveningwhen
he
is
lying
down,
and
thi
shacklehis
legs
in
themorning
so
that
he
may
pasture[but
not
stray]:
anotherreading
is
4.
[hi
morning
and
evening].
(TA.)
-
One
says
also,Ci
.
.
i.
e.
0sU
[app.meaning
It
is
over
against,
or
corresponding
to,such
a
thing].
(0,1
.)
an
inf.
n.
of
1.
(,
K.)
And
i.
q.
,
..
1].)
See
the
latter
in
two
places.Seealso
i,
former
half.£
-
[Also
Either
of
twoopposite
conditions
inwhich
oneis
orstands
&c.
in
respect
of
an
affair
or
case.]
One
says,
,
8i[I
soug
,
nor
an,
Odf
n
.
such
a
one,
an
object
of
want,
andt/en
turned
away,
and
I
know
not
in
rwhich
of
the
twooppo-
site
conditions
he
was
in
respect
of
his
affair,
or
case];
i.
e.,his
affair,
or
case,
did
not
become
apparent,
or
clear,
or
known,
to
me.
(S,
O,
].')
And
a
poet
says,
ci;s
-
!
8
5
-
u
[And
I
went,
and
bade
not
farewell
toLcylA,
r
and
shehnew
not
in
which
of
thetwo
opposite
(
conditions
in
respect
of
her
affair,
or
case,
I
was
going];
i.e.,
whether
I
went
from
her
presence
retainingattachment,
or
forsaking;
($,
TA;)
or,
e
as
Zsays,
in
a
condition
of
success
or
of
disap-
I
pointment.
(TA.)
-
Seealso
*,
in
the
middle
of
the
paragraph.
-
AlsoA
like;
a
similar
person
or
thing;
and
so
V-.
(O,
g1.)
One
says,
,
,
(S,O)
and
:t..
 
(O)
lwey
tw,o
are
likce:
(S,O:)
and
so
'
8c.
($.)
And
.oo
.kl
and,
Th2us
is
the
like
of
him,i
or
it:
and
so
,.h
and
.,,
&c.
(IA,r,
TA.)
_And
A
strand
of
a
rope:
(0,1g:)
and
so
·:
(0:)
pl.
(0,
15)
and
·
b.
(0.)
a
.0
A
single
act
of
throwing
down,
or
pros-
trating,
on
the
ground;
or
a
single
.su~erin
of
prostration.
(1,
TA.)
See
also
a,.
-
And
A
state,
or
condition:
(0,
]
:)
so
in
thesaying,
i;s'y
e
3
4)
[He
does
it
in
evy
state,
or
condition]:
(0:)
[see
also
ey
:]
or,
accord.
tothe
"
Mufradat
"[of
Er-R6ghib],
the
state,
or
condition,
of
him
who
is
thrown
down,
or
prostrated.
(TA.)
J
.,o
One
whois
often
thrown
down,
or
pros-
trated,
by
men.(1:)
ac,.
A
mode,
or
manner,
of
throring
donn,
or
prostrating;
or
of
being
thrown
down,
or
prostrated:
(S,·
K,
TA:)
a
wordsimilar
to
4L,b
and
LJ.q.
(8.)
Hence,
(g,)
one
says,
ye"
Ya
ye
--
 
.
F
JI;
.
1LThe
bad
manner