VISION OUT OF THE CORNER OF ONE EYE Luisa Valenzuela (Argentina) It’s true, he put his hand on my ass

and I was about to scream bloody murder when the bus passed by a church and he crossed himself. He’s a good sort after all, I said to myself. Maybe he didn’t do it on purpose or maybe his right hand didn’t know what his left hand was up to. I tried to move farther back in the bus--searching for explanations is one thing and letting yourself be pawed is another--but more passengers got on and there was no way I could do it. My wiggling to get out of his reach only let him get a better hold on me and even fondle me. I was nervous and finally moved over. He moved over, too. We passed by another church but he didn’t notice it and when he raised his hand on his face it was to wipe the sweat off his forehead. I watched him out of a corner of one eye, pretending that nothing was happening, or at any rate not making him think I liked it. It was impossible to move any farther and he started jiggling me. I decided to get even and put my hand on his behind. A few blocks later I got separated from him by a bunch of people. Then I was swept along by the passengers getting off the bus and now I’m sorry I lost him so suddenly because there was only 7,400 pesos in his wallet and I’d have gotten more out of him if we’d been alone. He seemed affectionate. And very generous.

Vision Out of the Corner of One Eye: Literary Analysis
The main character of "Vision out of the Corner of One Eye ", a short story by Luisa Valezuela, goes through a complete one hundred-eighty degree change over the course of the story. In the beginning of the story, the main character is completely distraught. A man on the bus continues to fondle her, but rather than call attention to him she would rather save face for him. She hates the situation but she wants to believe he's a good person so she begins to make excuses for him: "maybe he didn't do it on purpose" or "maybe his right hand didn't know what his left hand was up to". All the while trusting, and having her trust broken. The second phase the main character went through was the attempt to flee. When she finally tried wiggling out of his reach it just gives him a better angle to touch her. As she moved away, he was right there. She was like a fox hunted by wild dogs. No matter where she went, she was trapped. The final phase was getting even. She figured she would put her hand on his butt and show him how it felt to molested. It turns out, she got more than the satisfaction of revenge, but also his wallet. The main character has lots of moral and emotional choices to make. Though in the beginning she wants nothing more than to put the incident behind her, by the end she ironically throws all of her morals out the window and steals the man's wallet.

All the while trusting. The main character has lots of moral and emotional choices to make. No matter where she went. Though in the beginning she wants nothing more than to put the incident behind her. A man on the bus continues to fondle her. but also his wallet. The second phase the main character went through was the attempt to flee. by the end she ironically throws all of her morals out the window and steals the man's wallet. She hates the situation but she wants to believe he's a good person so she begins to make excuses for him: «maybe he didn't do it on purpose» or «maybe his right hand didn't know what his left hand was up to». she was trapped. goes through a complete one hundred-eighty degree change over the course of the story. She figured she would put her hand on his butt and show him how it felt to molested. she got more than the satisfaction of revenge. he was right there. a short story by Luisa Valezuela. In the beginning of the story. It turns out.Literary analysis: Vision Out Of the Corner of One Eye The main character of «Vision out of the Corner of One Eye «. and having her trust broken. The final phase was getting even. the main character is completely distraught. but rather than call attention to him she would rather save face for him. She was like a fox hunted by wild dogs. When she finally tried wiggling out of his reach it just gives him a better angle to touch her. As she moved away. .

the lady to whom he was presenting one of the letters of introduction came into the nice division. I shall just give you letters of introduction to all the people I know there." said a very self-possessed young lady of fifteen. and your nerves will be worse than ever from moping. "Her great tragedy happened just three years ago. "Then you know practically nothing about my aunt?" pursued the self-possessed young lady." his sister had said when he was preparing to migrate to this rural retreat. when she judged that they had had sufficient silent communion. "Hardly a soul. you know. "Do you know many of the people round here?" asked the niece. "you will bury yourself down there and not speak to a living soul.The Open Window by H." He made the last statement in a tone of distinct regret. An undefinable something about the room seemed to suggest masculine habitation. Mr." said Framton. Some of them. some four years ago." said the child." admitted the caller. Sappleton was in the married or widowed state. "in the meantime you must try and put up with me. and she gave me letters of introduction to some of the people here. Munro (Saki) (1870-1916) "My aunt will be down presently. Sappleton. were quite nice. Nuttel. at the rectory. H. "Only her name and address." Framton Nuttel endeavored to say the correct something which should duly flatter the niece of the moment without unduly discounting the aunt that was to come. "My sister was staying here. "that would be . as far as I can remember. Privately he doubted more than ever whether these formal visits on a succession of total strangers would do much towards helping the nerve cure which he was supposed to be undergoing "I know how it will be. He was wondering whether Mrs." Framton wondered whether Mrs.

His aunt has given him letters of introduction to several members of the gentry and he is making a round of visits. and Ronnie.since your sister's time. because she said it got on her nerves. indicating a large French window that opened on to a lawn. Their bodies were never recovered. quiet evenings like this. The niece points out to him the open widow in the parlor and says he is probably wondering why they keep a window open in the middle of October (a cold period in England). That was the dreadful part of it. "It is quite warm for the time of the year. somehow in this restful country spot tragedies seemed out of place." said the niece. three years ago to a day. "but has that window got anything to do with the tragedy?" "Out through that window. In crossing the moor to their favorite snipe-shooting ground they were all three engulfed in a treacherous piece of bog. That is why the window is kept open every evening till it is quite dusk. three years ago to a day. They never came back. why do you bound?' as he always did to tease her. The niece explains it to him: "Out through that window. I almost get a creepy feeling that they will all walk in through that window--" ANALYSIS "The Open Window" is narrated by Mr Framton Nuttell who has been ordered by his doctor to take a rest in the country. and places that were safe in other years gave way suddenly without warning. her youngest brother. Do you know. They never came back. and walk in at that window just as they used to do. her husband and her two young brothers went off for their day's shooting. they and the little brown spaniel that was lost with them." said Framton." "Her tragedy?" asked Framton. her husband and her two young brothers went off for their day's shooting." Here the child's voice lost its self-possessed note and became falteringly human. singing 'Bertie. "You may wonder why we keep that window wide open on an October afternoon. Mr Nuttell is waiting in the parlor of one of the houses he is visiting with the 15 year old niece of the family he is visiting and has not yet met. It had been that dreadful wet summer. "Poor aunt always thinks that they will come back someday. Poor dear aunt. she has often told me how they went out. sometimes on still. In crossing the moor . you know. her husband with his white waterproof coat over his arm.

they and the little brown spaniel that was lost with them." said the bearer of the white mackintosh. and walk in at that window just as they used to do" When he meets the aunt and she tells him she is expecting her husband and his hunting party friends to return through the open window at any moment he essentially humors her but is aghast by her madness." said the niece calmly. my dear. He was gay but because of the repressive laws of the era (remember what happened to Oscar Wilde who went to jail when Saki was 25) he kept this side of his life in confidence." said Mrs. but most of it's dry." Here the child's voice lost its selfpossessed note and became falteringly human. Here is what then happens: Framton grabbed wildly at his stick and hat. "he told me he had a horror of dogs. I think I prefer the style of Saki to O Henry but I see the similarities as will all who read them. the hall door. That was the dreadful part of it. Here it is Romance at short notice was her speciality. It had been that dreadful wet summer.to their favourite snipe-shooting ground they were all three engulfed in a treacherous piece of bog. Sappleton. you know. "Poor aunt always thinks that they will come back someday. and the front gate were dimly noted stages in his headlong retreat. and had to spend the night in a newly dug grave with the creatures snarling and grinning and foaming just above him. A cyclist coming along the road had to run into the hedge to avoid imminent collision. "fairly muddy. He turns with surprise when the Aunt says in a very matter of fact way with no surprise at all in her voice she sees her husband now. . At age 43 (way over the age at which he could be drafted -Ford Madox Ford did the same thing) he volunteered for service in WWI and was killed in combat. One would think he had seen a ghost. He was once hunted into a cemetery somewhere on the banks of the Ganges by a pack of pariah dogs. "could only talk about his illnesses. Their bodies were never recovered. "Here we are. Saki also wrote a novel and a history of Russia modeled on Gibbons' Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire. a Mr. Nuttel. Enough to make anyone lose their nerve. the gravel drive. and places that were safe in other years gave way suddenly without warning. Who was that who bolted out as we came up?" "A most extraordinary man. coming in through the window." I said at the start of my post that this story created a catch phrase. and dashed off without a word of goodby or apology when you arrived." "I expect it was the spaniel.

. Nuttel listens. Vera goes into detail about the clothes they were wearing. Sappleton brightens as she tells Nuttel that they have returned. When Mrs. the niece of Mrs. and the song that Mrs. Vera says that three years ago to the date. PlotFrampton Nuttel suffers from a nervous condition and has come to spend some time alone. Vera says that her grief-stricken aunt watches out the window expecting their return.Summary of Story: H. but Vera replies that he is deathly afraid of dogs. Sappleton enters. Sappleton has in fact gone crazy. thinking that Mrs." he finds himself in an unfamiliar situation that ultimately has a negative effect on his seemingly nervous personality. Suddenly. Vera tells Nuttel some information about the family. Vera keeps Nuttel company while he waits. Sappleton. Munro's (Saki) "The Open Window" brilliantly portrays how one's nerves affects his/her personality. Sappleton's brother sang upon their return. Sappleton doesn't understand Nuttel's strange behavior. Mrs. she tells Nuttel that she expects her husband and brothers to return at any moment. Sappleton's husband and two younger brothers went on a hunting trip and never returned. As Framton embarks on a trip intended as a "nerve cure.H. He becomes frightened and leaves in a rush. the dog that accompanied them. His first visit is to the Sappleton house where he meets fifteen-year-old Vera. Mrs. Mrs. His sister sets up introductions for him with a few members of the community. Nuttel turns only to see the "dead" hunters. Upon hearing that Nuttel has not met the Sappletons.

She has given him a number of letters of introduction with which he is to make himself known to a number of people in the town. He brings a letter of introduction to Mrs. He believes her story. her niece keeps him company and tells him a story about why a window in the room has been left open. that the window remains open in hopes that Mrs. Sappleton’s husband and brother. Later. will one day return. Nuttel. Mrs. when Nuttel looks out the window and sees figures approaching who match . Framton Nuttel Mr.Not until the end of the story does the reader realize that Vera has tricked Mr. Sappleton in order to make her acquaintance for his stay in her village. who the niece says are long dead." Characters Framton Nuttel’s Sister Framton Nuttel’s sister once spent time in the same town to which Framton has come for relaxation. This is revealed with the last line of the story: "Romance at short notice was her [Vera's] specialty. Mr. and it is this that brings Nuttel to her home. Sappleton is the recipient of such a letter.Sappleton to appear. Framton Nuttel suffers from an undisclosed nervous ailment and comes to the country in hope that its atmosphere will be conducive to a cure. While he waits for Mrs.

that eventually causes Framton Nuttel’s breakdown. Sappleton’s husband. with Mr. who have disappeared during a hunting trip. Sappleton to appear. Mrs. Mr. of the death of some relatives who went hunting long ago. Vera relates an elaborate story surrounding a window in the room that has been left open. Sappleton’s younger brother. Sappleton. has been away on a hunting expedition. a young woman whose forte is “romance at short notice. Sappleton’s younger brother. She tells Nuttel that the window is left . keeping vigil for her departed husband and brother. Vera Vera is the niece of Mrs. Sappleton Mr. who. She lives with her young niece. Sappleton is a widow. While Nuttel waits with her for Mrs.” She is an exquisite and intuitive actress. equally skilled at deceit and its concealment. Sappleton Readers are first led to believe that Mrs. Ronnie. He has been away during most of the story on a hunting expedition with Mrs. the woman to whom Framton Nuttel plans to give a letter of introduction. It is this story.the descriptions of the long-dead hunters in the niece’s story. Ronnie Ronnie is Mrs. he suffers a mental breakdown and flees the house. She is a teller of tales. Sappleton is Mrs. Sappleton.

Fifteen-year-old Vera keeps Nuttel company while they wait for her aunt. as he is likely to do.open as a sign of her aunt’s hope that the dead hunters will one day come home and provides a detailed description of the men. Sappleton well. Saki refers to Vera as “self-possessed. He is in the country undergoing a rest cure for his nerves and is calling on Mrs. admitting that of Mrs. After Nuttel flees upon seeing these men return. Sappleton at the request of his sister. Vera asks if Nuttel knows many people in the area. Sappleton’s husband and two younger brothers walked through the window to go on . Vera recounts. Vera invents a story explaining his departure as well. she worries that her brother will suffer if he keeps himself in total seclusion. just as Vera has described them. their behavior and attire. Nuttel replies in the negative. After a short silence.” which literally means that she has selfcontrol and poise. Vera then informs him that her aunt’s “great tragedy” happened after his sister was acquainted with her. Vera indicates the large window that opened on to the lawn. Though she does not know Mrs. it is clear that this is the quality that allows her to lie so well — Vera’s self-possession allows her to maintain a cool head and calm believability while relating that most outlandish of tales. Sappleton he only knows her name and address. Exactly three years ago. Mrs. Plot Summary Framton Nuttel has presented himself at the Sappleton house to pay a visit. In the context of this story.

She still talks of them often to her niece. why do you bound?” Vera herself admits to sometimes believing the men will all come back through that window. Sappleton excuses the open window. a spaniel following them. Mr. and their bodies were never found. and she continues to talk on quite cheerfully about shooting. apologizing for keeping him waiting and hoping that Vera has been amusing him. But she suddenly brightens up. so she keeps the window open. They never came back. They were drowned in a bog. At that moment. Sappleton thinks they will come back some day.a day’s hunt. Sappleton muses over Nuttel’s departure that was so sudden it was if he had seen a ghost. she tells her aunt and uncle that Nuttel is terrified of dogs ever since being hunted into a cemetery in . “Bertie. Sappleton tremendously. why do you bound?” Nuttel grabs his hat and walking stick and flees from the house. but Vera is staring out through the open window with a look of horror in her eyes. Sappleton comes through the window and greets his wife. repeating the words of one of her brother’s favorite songs. Nuttel finds this conversation gruesome and attempts to change the subject by talking about his rest cure. She then breaks off her narration with a shudder. explaining that her husband and brothers will be home soon. along with their spaniel. Mrs. Sappleton’s husband and brothers walking across the lawn. Mrs. Mrs. Vera says that she believes it was the spaniel that frightened him. Mrs. Nuttel turns around to the window and sees Mrs. crying ”Here they are at last!” Nuttel turns to Vera to extend his sympathy. Sappleton enters the room. a topic which bores Mrs. and hears a voice singing “Bertie.

As Saki remarks at story’s end. “romance at short notice.” is Vera’s specialty. . making up stories that add a bit of excitement to life.India by wild dogs and having to spend the night in a newly dug grave.

the struggle for daily bread. took bribes. "It's not you I am kissing. her whole psychology lies open before him. You are a psychologist. I looked for happiness -. so varied. My father was a poor clerk in the Service. Voldemar.vous comprenez?-. or "Novelli" as he calls them. I understand you to your inmost depths!" says the Secretary of Special Commissions. I am a suffering soul in some page of Dostoevsky. who from time to time publishes long stories of high life. We have not been in the train an hour together. titanic. I understand. he fathoms it. foolish novel-reading. a budding young author. My mother -.ah. He drank. You know us women. and you have already fathomed my heart. You know the monstrous education at a boarding-school. He is watching. I am unhappy. Do you remember Raskolnikov and his kiss?" . do not force me to recall it! I had to make my own way. you will be triumphant! Yes!" "Write about me. Voldemar!" says the pretty lady. tell me!" "Listen. a pince-nez keeps dropping off her pretty little nose. responsive soul is seeking to escape from the maze of ---. enigmatic nature. the struggle is terrific. Yes. "Oh. On the seat opposite sits the Provincial Secretary of Special Commissions. like a boat on the ocean." "Tell me! I beseech you. so chequered.I do not blame my poor father. Above all. You will understand.Yes. Her soul. He had a good heart and was not without intelligence. In that I saw my happiness!" "Exquisite creature!" murmured the author. Unhappily I have an intense nature. the errors of early youth. with a mournful smile. But do not lose heart. It was awful! The vacillation! And the agonies of losing faith in life. catching every shade of this exceptional. "My life has been so full. but the suffering of humanity. in oneself! Ah. the first timid flutter of love. kissing her hand near the bracelet.but why say more? Poverty. gambled. Reveal that hapless soul.and what happiness! I longed to set my soul free. An expensive fluffy fan trembles in her tightly closed fingers. gazing intently. the brooch heaves and falls on her bosom. studying. Reveal my soul to the world. "Your sensitive.of his environment -. He understands it. He is gazing into her face. the consciousness of insignificance -. but the spirit of the age -. in the leading paper of the province. She is greatly agitated. kissing her hand close to the bracelet. you are an author. with the eyes of a connoisseur.An Enigmatic Nature by Anton Chekhov (1860-1904) On the red velvet seat of a first-class railway carriage a pretty lady sits half reclining.

but -.be happy. renown.an old general -very well off. and senseless all our life is! How mean it all is.though I will be fair to him -.Voldemar.why affect modesty? -every nature above the commonplace. to be happy -. indeed there is!" The pretty lady flutters her fan more violently. to uphold his ideals. There were moments -. I restored the family fortunes. She wants to be free to give herself to her love wholeheartedly but is held back by the desire to marry wealthy old generals who will pamper her. repulsive. that then I would begin to live as I liked. what anguish! -. listen. Voldemar! It was self-sacrifice.to find rest -. The author props on his fist his thought -heavy brow and ponders with the air of a master in psychology. above the common lot of woman! And then -. Voldemar.but -. like every -.com/books/romance/1806071-enigmatic-nature/#ixzz25nq6lR3v . I am wretched. renunciation! You must see that! I could do nothing else.how ignoble. I had only to let it in -. was able to travel.there crossed my path -. wretched! Again there is an obstacle in my path! Again I feel that my happiness is far. I was free as a bird of the air.terrible moments -but I was kept up by the thought that from day to day the old man might die. Understand me. Now is the moment for me to be happy. how loathsome to me were his embraces -. to help . I yearned for something extraordinary. to give myself to the man I adore -. Voldemar. success. She stands in her own way to happiness. how revolting. Voldemar. A spider that preys on wealthy old generals who are on the nethers of life. There is such a man.if only you knew what anguish!" "But what -. far away! Ah."Oh. Despite the trappings of her upper-end life she is unhappy for she doesn’t love the men she stays with. pretty lady is a spider. isn't it.shvoong.and then -. to do good.what stands in your way? I implore you tell me! What is it?" "Another old general. I longed for glory. She goes on: "But at last the old man died. Her face takes a lachrymose expression. ANALYSIS Not quite a femme fatale in the ordinary sense of the word. He left me something. Source: http://www. Yet how I suffered. to become the partner of his life.he had fought nobly in his day. very well off----" The broken fan conceals the pretty little face. The engine is whistling and hissing while the window curtains flush red with the glow of the setting sun. Her claim of being driven to do what she does by poverty is plausible but the magnet that makes her stay in such arrangements strikes one as self centred. I implore you! Now is the time for me to give myself to the man I love. wretched. Voldemar? Happiness comes tapping at my window.

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