You are on page 1of 28

www.smdailyjournal.

com
Weekend July 14-15, 2012 Vol XII, Edition 285
ECO-FRIENDLY TARGET
STATE PAGE 5
APPEL TO STAY
AT STANFORD
SPORTS PAGE 11
IMPOSTER
A MYSTERY
WEEKEND PAGE 17
S.F. CONSIDERING WAYS TO CURB PLASTIC WATER BOTTLES
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A 2-year-old boy died and three others,
including a reghter, were injured in a two-
alarm house re in San Bruno Friday morn-
ing, according to re ofcials.
Fireghters responded to a call from the
100 block of Lake Drive at 8:45 a.m. The
cause of the two-story house re is still under
investigation but is believed to have started in
a shrine in the hallway, possibly with a reli-
gious candle, said Deputy Chief Dave
Downing.
Its believed that multiple families live in
the residence. Those who were injured are
thought to be a couple in their 50s or 60s and
their 2-year-old grandchild, said a neighbor,
who gave her name only as Meg.
Smoke was visible before re trucks arrived
on the scene and three construction workers in
a neighboring building helped people get out
of the house, Meg said.
There were three young men who went
inside the house, she said. I think that real-
ly made a signicant difference.
Downing agreed. The men used a ladder to
help a person escape from an upstairs win-
dow. Downstairs, the men reported that the
re spread making it impossible to enter the
house, Downing said. The men went around
the house in an effort to help people in the
back rooms but the re was too hot.
A man suffered burns from the re. Two
individuals were trapped in a back, upstairs
bedroom a woman in her 50s or 60s and a
2-year-old boy. Both were transported to the
hospital. The woman was revived but the boy
Boy, 2, dies in SanBruno fire
Driver arrested
after fatal crash
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF AND WIRE REPORTS
A 48-year-old man was arrested on suspi-
cion of vehicular manslaughter involving
alcohol after a crash that turned fatal on
Interstate 280 in Daly City on Thursday night,
according to the California Highway Patrol.
The crash was reported at about 9:50 p.m.
on northbound Interstate 280 just north of
Hickey Boulevard.
Kaixuan Lei was driving a 2000 Jeep
Cherokee that went off the road and up an
embankment, CHP ofcials said.
The Jeep then overturned numerous times
and came to rest in the highways center
divide.
Christy Fok, 30, a passenger in the Jeep,
was not wearing a seatbelt and was ejected
from the vehicle, according to the CHP. She
was taken to San Francisco General Hospital
where she died at approximately 9:30 a.m.
Friday.
Lei and a 31-year-old woman who was also
in the car were wearing their seatbelts and suf-
fered minor to moderate injuries. They were
also taken to the hospital and it was deter-
mined that Lei was under the inuence of
alcohol, CHP ofcials said.
400 local students
earn biliteracy seal
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Nearly 400 students in the Sequoia Union
High School District were among the rst
10,000 high school students in California to
achieve prociency in multiple languages and
earn the State Seal of Biliteracy.
This year was the rst year graduating stu-
dents could earn the State Seal of Biliteracy,
which was established by Assembly Bill 815,
authored by Assemblywoman Julia Brownley,
D-Santa Monica. It recognizes high school
graduates who have attained a high level of
prociency in speaking, reading and writing
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Name the Numbers has a simple objective
use math to reach a certain number.
Ten-year-olds Adrian and Janet looked at the
cards laid out on a desk. The number six was
showing Janets objective. Then ve other
face cards of different numbers were showing.
The goal was to creatively gure out a math
problem using the numbers on those ve cards
that would result in the target number, six.
While a simple solution was available, sub-
tracting 10 from 16, it wasnt a viable option
for Janet who wanted to use the most cards
possible.
Both students will be fth grade students in
the fall but are getting a jump on the academ-
ics that the middle school years require
through the Peninsula Bridge Program at St.
Matthews Episcopal Day School.
The Peninsula Bridge Program offers a ve-
week, tuition-free academic enrichment pro-
gram for students from lower income areas
who show academic potential. Students can be
with the program for four years, beginning
with the summer before their fth grade year.
Over the years, students will gain access to
accelerated math and language arts exercises
while taking part in art and science enrich-
ment activities. This year was the fourth St.
Matthews hosted students.
On Thursday, a tour was held for parents
and anyone interested in learning more about
the program.
Development Director Sherri Shaner
explained the group works with academically
motivated students, who will be attending fth
through eighth grade in the fall, and are from
resource stretched circumstances.
Lack of funds often means less art and sci-
ence experiments available to students. In
addition, students often lose retention of infor-
mation over summer without practice. Low-
income families normally lose more since
they often cannot afford the cost of summer
Getting a jump on academics
Summer program offers enriching opportunities in San Mateo
HEATHER MURTAGH/DAILY JOURNAL
Ten-year-old Janet,who will go into the fth grade this fall,plays the game Name the Numbers while attending the Peninsula Bridge program
housed at St. Matthews Episcopal Day School in San Mateo Thursday morning.
See BRIDGE, Page 20 See SEAL, Page 20
See CRASH, Page 20
See FIRE, Page 20
FOR THE RECORD 2 Weekend July 14-15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
Publisher: Jerry Lee Editor in Chief: Jon Mays
jerry@smdailyjournal.com jon@smdailyjournal.com
smdailyjournal.com scribd.com/smdailyjournal
twitter.com/smdailyjournal facebook.com/smdailyjournal
Phone: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (650) 344-5200 Fax: (650) 344-5290
To Advertise:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ads@smdailyjournal.com
Events: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . calendar@smdailyjournal.com
News: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . news@smdailyjournal.com
Delivery: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . circulation@smdailyjournal.com
Career: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . info@smdailyjournal.com
As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 250 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the familys choosing.To submit obituaries, email
information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
more than once, longer than 250 words or without editing, please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.
Actor Matthew
Fox is 46.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1912
American folk singer-songwriter
Woody Guthrie (This Land Is Your
Land) was born in Okemah, Okla.
Life has got a habit of not standing hitched.You
got to ride it like you nd it.You got to change
with it.If a day goes by that dont change some
of your old notions for new ones, that is just
about like trying to milk a dead cow.
Woody Guthrie (1912-1967)
Singer-guitarist
Kyle Gass is 52.
Hip-hop musician
taboo is 37.
Birthdays
REUTERS
Lighting strikes over a barn surrounded by a soybean crop in Donnellson, Iowa.
Saturday: Cloudy in the morning then
becoming partly cloudy. Patchy fog and
drizzle in the morning. Highs in the 60s.
South winds around 5 mph...Becoming
west in the afternoon.
Saturday night: Mostly clear in the
evening then becoming cloudy. Patchy fog
after midnight. Lows around 50. Southwest
winds 5 to 10 mph.
Sunday: Cloudy in the morning then becoming sunny.
Local Weather Forecast
Fridays story County hikes animal control, licensing fees
had an incorrect address for the PHS Center for Compassion.
The correct address is 1450 Rollins Road in Burlingame.
Correction
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are No. 09 Win-
ning Spirit in rst place; No.07 Eureka in second
place; and No.04 Big Ben in third place.The race
time was clocked at 1:43.73.
(Answers Monday)
BOOTH CLOTH TWELVE DAWNED
Yesterdays
Jumbles:
Answer: He was going to run for president, but in the
end he ELECTED NOT TO
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
GURYB
NEKTL
SCANIO
SIBOPH
2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
F
in
d

u
s

o
n

F
a
c
e
b
o
o
k

h
t
t
p
:
/
/
w
w
w
.
f
a
c
e
b
o
o
k
.
c
o
m
/
ju
m
b
le

Ans:
5 1 0
6 7 13 24 46 34
Mega number
July 13 Mega Millions
6 22 23 25 31
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
2 4 4 8
Daily Four
1 3 4
Daily three evening
In 1789, during the French Revolution, citizens of Paris
stormed the Bastille prison and released the seven prisoners
inside.
In 1853, Commodore Matthew Perry relayed to Japanese of-
cials a letter from President Millard Fillmore requesting trade
relations. (Fillmores term of ofce had already expired by the
time the letter was delivered.)
In 1881, outlaw William H. Bonney Jr., alias Billy the Kid,
was shot and killed by Sheriff Pat Garrett in Fort Sumner, N.M.
In 1902, the original, centuries-old Campanile di San Marco in
Venice, Italy, collapsed. (The bell tower was rebuilt within a
decade.)
In 1911, Harry N. Atwood became the rst pilot to land an air-
plane (a Wright Model B biplane) on the grounds of the White
House after ying in from Boston; he was greeted by President
William Howard Taft.
In 1913, Gerald Rudolph Ford Jr., the 38th president of the
United States, was born Leslie Lynch King Jr. in Omaha, Neb.
In 1921, Italian-born anarchists Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo
Vanzetti were convicted in Dedham, Mass., of murdering a
shoe company paymaster and his guard. (Sacco and Vanzetti
were executed six years later.)
In 1933, all German political parties, except the Nazi Party,
were outlawed.
In 1960, British researcher Jane Goodall arrived at the Gombe
Stream Reserve in the Tanganyika Territory (in present-day
Tanzania) to begin her famous study of chimpanzees in the
wild.
In 1966, eight student nurses were murdered by Richard Speck
in a Chicago dormitory.
Actor Dale Robertson is 89. Actor Harry Dean Stanton is 86.
Actress Nancy Olson is 84. Actress Polly Bergen is 82. Former
football player and actor Rosey Grier is 80. Actor Vincent Pastore
is 66. Former music company executive Tommy Mottola (muh-
TOH-luh) is 63. Rock musician Chris Cross (Ultravox) is 60.
Actor Jerry Houser is 60. Actor-director Eric Laneuville is 60.
Actor Stan Shaw is 60. Movie producer Scott Rudin is 54.
Country musician Ray Herndon (McBride and the Ride) is 52.
Actress Jane Lynch (TV: Glee) is 52. Actor Jackie Earle Haley
is 51. Rock musician Ellen Reid (Crash Test Dummies) is 46.
Rock singer-musician Tanya Donelly is 46.
After the televeision music show Soul
Train (1971-2006) debuted in 1970, the
Sears and Roebuck department store used
the Soul Train name to promote the record
players they were selling at the time.
***
Dolly Parton (born 1946) met her husband
Carl Dean (born 1942) at the Wishy-
Washy Laundromat in Nashville, Tenn.
They have been married for 44 years.
***
The ball launcher on a pinball machine is
called a plunger.
***
Most major airlines retire ight numbers
after a plane crash. It is not superstitious.
It is done out of respect for family mem-
bers so they do not have to be reminded of
the accident.
***
The shoulder joint is made up of three
bones: the clavicle, scapula and humerus.
***
Kraft introduced Miracle Whip in 1933
with the slogan Salad Miracles with
Miracle Whip Salad Dressing. It was the
rst ready-to-serve spoonable salad dress-
ing.
***
Log cabins in Maine are exempt from
property taxes.
***
There are more than 8,000 species of ants.
***
Prankster Samuel S. Adams (1878-1963)
invented sneezing powder and started the
Cachoo Sneezing Powder Company in
1904. Adams also created us the joy
buzzer, the dribble glass and the squirting
lapel ower.
***
Only about one in 40 babies is born on the
actual due date estimated by the obstetri-
cian.
***
Megalomaniacs are obsessed with the
desire for great power. Pyromaniacs are
obsessed with re. Do you know what
chirablutomaniacs, bibliomaniacs and
technomaniacs are obsessed with? See
answer at end.
***
If you straightened out a French horn it
would be 12-feet long.
***
The cover of the rst issue of Ms.
Magazine in January 1972 pictured a
woman juggling a clock, frying pan, mir-
ror, iron, steering wheel, typewriter and
rake.
***
Abstract expressionist painter Jackson
Pollock (1912-1956) died in an automo-
bile accident at age 44.
***
The rst winning word of the National
Spelling Bee in 1925 was gladiolus. In
1975, it was incisor. In 2005, the winning
word was appoggiatura.
***
Some types of terrestrial salamanders do
not have lungs. They breathe through their
skin. Their skin must remain constantly
moist or they lose the ability to transfer
oxygen.
***
The nickname for St. Stephens Tower in
London is Big Ben, but Big Ben refers to
the bell, not the clock or the tower. The
clocks hour hand is nine-feet long and the
minute hand is 14-feet long.
***
Betsy Ross (1752-1836), the seamstress
credited with sewing the rst American
ag, was widowed three times and had
nine daughters.
***
The Las Vegas icon Vegas Vic, a 40-foot
tall neon cowboy sign on Fremont Street,
was built in 1951. The cowboy once
waved his mechanical arm and said
Howdy, pardner every 15 minutes.
***
Often a bridesmaid but never a bride
was used in the rst ad for Listerine
mouthwash in 1925. They originated the
phrase.
***
Gabriel Fahrenheit (1686-1736) was the
rst person to make a thermometer using
mercury.
***
Answer: A chirablutomaniac excessively
washes his hands. A bibliomaniac is
obsessed with books. A technomaniac is
obsessed with technology.
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of the
Daily Journal. Questions? Comments? Email
knowitall@smdailyjournal.com or call 344-
5200 ext. 114.
12 21 39 40 43 26
Mega number
July 11 Super Lotto Plus
3
Weekend July 14-15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO
Hit and run. A large black SUV dented the
back bumper of another vehicle and ed on
Pecks Lane before 11:19 p.m. Saturday, July
7.
Malicious mischief. Juveniles were throwing
rocks at vehicles near Gellert Boulevard
before 7:34 p.m. Saturday, July 7.
Malicious mischief. The windshields of two
cars were broken in a driveway on Barrington
Court before 12:45 p.m. Saturday, July 7.
Malicious mischief. Tires were slashed and
the sunroof was broken on a Jeep Cherokee on
Holly Avenue before 12:06 p.m. Saturday, July
7.
Missing adult. A man reported that his wife
had left the previous night and not returned yet
on Alta Loma Drive before 5:47 a.m. Saturday,
July 7.
UNINCORPORATED SAN MATEO COUNTY
Incident report. A woman reported her ex-
boyfriend was threatening her and demanding
she return all his prior gifts to her on the 100
block of Culebra in Moss Beach before 7:03
p.m. on Wednesday, July 11.
Arson. A man was arrested for threatening to
burn down his home after being told by his
landlord that he was going to be evicted on the
400 block of Alameda Avenue in Miramar
before 10:53 p.m. Friday, July 6.
Police reports
Life lesson
A man was driving with a juvenile on his
lap steering the vehicle on the 1400 block
of Howard Avenue in Burlingame before
8 p.m. Saturday, June 30.
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
One of several San Mateo County men caught
in an online child pornography sting was sen-
tenced Friday to 10 months in jail for possess-
ing videos and images of young minors in sex-
ual acts.
Gordon Lee, 44, of Daly City, pleaded no
contest to a single felony count of child pornog-
raphy possession in return for no more than 12
months and received just shy the maximum.
Prosecutors had sought 16 months in prison.
Lee must also complete a sex offender pro-
gram and have no contact with minors or
pornography sites.
Lee, free on a $10,000 bail bond, must sur-
render to the county jail
Aug. 25. Lee and nine oth-
ers Paul Michael
Ambler, 58, of San Mateo,
Charles Vela Reyes Jr., 46,
of Menlo Park, Christopher
Daniel Winans, 24, of East
Palo Alto, Paul Tazbaz, 36
and Samnang Chun, 23,
both of San Mateo, Steve
Wilson, 52, and Cruz-
Martin Caseiro-Rosas, 32,
both of South San Francisco and Stephen Wolf,
64, of Portola Valley were arrested in March
after being identied as possibly being in pos-
session of child pornography during a Silicon
Valley ICAC Task Force investigation headed
by the San Jose Police Department. The task
force targets peer-to-peer le sharing online by
tracking images of pre-pubescent children
through individual Internet protocol addresses.
The police then searched the homes where
those addressed originated.
Images and videos of prepubescent boys and
girls engaged in sexual acts were found on a
computer in Lees residence and evidence
showed he both downloaded and shared them,
according to the District Attorneys Ofce.
Chun has since committed suicide and
Ambler also pleaded no contest to felony pos-
session of child pornography.
Michelle Durand can be reached by email:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650)
344-5200 ext. 102.
Man caught in sting sentenced for child porn
Gordon Lee
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A terminated employee of a South San
Francisco business and one friend were each
sentenced to a year in jail and probation after
pleading no contest to charges stemming from
a violent confrontation with his former
employer.
Carlos Velasquez, 23, pleaded no contest to
making felony threats and Marcelo Jose
Castro, 19, pleaded no contest to a felony
count of discharging a rearm in public. Both
face up to 16 months in prison but received a
year with credit for 277 days. They must also
have no contact with gangs.
A third defendant, Rodrigo Alejandro
Aguayo, 33, did not take a
plea deal and returns to
court Aug. 3 to set a new
trial date. He was also
recently indicted by feder-
al prosecutors in an unre-
lated racketeering sweep.
Prosecutors say, on Feb.
25, Velasquez arrived at
his former workplace on
the 400 block of North
Canal Street with the two
others to confront the manager of the business
but a group of employees attempted to inter-
vene. A ght broke out between the suspects
and the employees and Castro allegedly red
several shots from a handgun. Aguayo report-
edly hit one of the employ-
ees with a baseball bat
before the three defendants
ed.
Police found Velasquez
at his house and Aguayo
returning home in a vehi-
cle seen leaving the scene.
Details of Castros appre-
hension were not avail-
able.
Aguayo remains in cus-
tody in lieu of $100,000 bail.
Michelle Durand can be reached by email:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650)
344-5200 ext. 102.
Pair jailed for workplace assault
Carlos
Velasquez
Rodrigo
Aguayo
By James Lanaras
BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE
A Cazadero man has been arrested on suspi-
cion of setting ve wildland res in forestland
in Sonoma and San Mateo counties, a Cal Fire
captain said Friday.
Nathaniel Ridgway Schmidt, 19, is charged
with four counts of arson in Sonoma County
and one count in San Mateo County, Cal Fire
Capt. Ben Nicholls of the Sonoma-Lake-Napa
unit said.
The four res in the Timber Cove area of
Sonoma County burned a total of 2 1/2 acres,
Nicholls said.
Two of the res totaling two acres were on
July 3, 2011 and the other smaller res were
on May 25 and June 9 of this year, Nicholls
said. There were no injuries.
Schmidt was arrested Wednesday and
admitted setting the fires before he was
booked into the Sonoma County jail on four
counts of arson, Nicholls said.
Schmidt has no prior criminal record.
He was arraigned in Sonoma County
Superior Court Friday afternoon but did not
enter a plea, defense attorney Steve Gallenson
said. His next court appearance is Wednesday.
Schmidt is being held in jail on $160,000
bail. Information about the San Mateo County
re on July 11, 2011 was not immediately
available Friday.
Man arrested for setting fires
in San Mateo, Sonoma counties
4
Weekend July 14-15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
VIP Orientation
and get started today!
DojoUSA - San Bruno
www.dojousa.net Schedule your
650.589.9148
Specializing in
.arate training
7aeBo fi tness
8BC body makeovers
Celebrate Freedom!
Train with us free this month!
]ust be age 62+ and own your own home:
Turn home equIty Into cash
Pay oII bIIIs & credIt cards
No more mortgage payments
RemaIn In your home as Iong as you IIve
You retaIn ownershIp (tItIe) to your home
FHA Insured program
Call today for a free, easy to read quote
650-453-3244
R
EVERSE
MORTGAGE
CALL FOR A FREE BROCHURE OR QUOTE
SERVING THE ENTIRE BAY AREA
Carol ertocchini, CPA
NMLS D #455078
Reverse Mortgage
SpecIaIIst and a CPA
wIth over 25 years
experIence as a
IInancIaI proIessIonaI
S1L NMLS D 98161
CA DRE #01820779
Homeowner must maintain property as primary residence and remain current on
property taxes and insurance
Lic: 41560033
MILLS ESTATE VILLA
24 Hour Assisted Living Care
Vacation and Short Term Respite
Stays Always Welcome
650.692.0600
1733 California Drive, Burlingame
www.CiminoCare.com
Gmj^Yeadq
nY[YlagfoYk
[Yj]%^j]]o`ad]
EgeoYkaf
_gg\`Yf\kYl
Eaddk=klYl]NaddY
^gjYo]]c&
5
Weekend July 14-15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
Part of Delaware Street to be
closed to non-local traffic for weeks
Pacific Gas and Electric will be installing
automated valves at Delaware Street and
Birch Avenue resulting in the closure of por-
tions of the street for four to six weeks.
Valves are installed at various points along
pipelines and can be closed to stop the flow
of natural gas for maintenance or during
emergencies. With automated valves, PG&E
can quickly cut the flow of gas and improve
emergency response times. Work will take
place from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. starting July 18
and continuing for four to six weeks.
While work is going on, no through traffic
will be allowed on Delaware Street from
10th through 16th avenues for the duration
of the project. Full closure allows the project
to be done as efficiently and as safely as pos-
sible.
A detour will be available on South
Claremont Street.
Anyone with questions regarding the clo-
sure may call the San Mateo Department of
Public Works at 522-7300.
Westborough Park to re-open
Summer is the prime time for using local
parks and South San Franciscos
Westborough Park will re-open Saturday
with a ribbon cutting ceremony.
Occupying 11 acres, Westborough Park,
2380 Galaxy Drive, was originally dedicated
in 1970. The park has been very well used by
the community over the past 40 years, but
was in dire need of a makeover. Park-in-lieu
fees generated by recent residential develop-
ment in the area, and a donation from the
Westborough Swimming Pool Fundraising
Committee, funded a renovation that
includes a spacious new group picnic pavil-
ion; two new age-appropriate playgrounds;
restoration of the basketball court; resurfac-
ing of two tennis courts; rehabilitation of
park rest rooms; new walkway and plaza
areas; removal of declining trees and the
planting of 66 new trees; new irrigation sys-
tem; and new landscape.
The upper portion of the park is a baseball
field, which is outside the scope of this proj-
ect, however, a non-functioning set of rest
rooms at the field were also renovated. The
park renovations were designed to reduce
water consumption by using more efficient
irrigation equipment, limited areas of turf
and low-water landscape.
From 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. a ribbon-cutting
celebration will take place at the park. The
event, which is open to the public, will fea-
ture comments from the mayor and Parks
and Recreation Commission, a ribbon cut-
ting, free hot dogs prepared on the gas grills
in the new picnic shelter and activities for
children.
For more information about how to rent
the recreation building or picnic area, or for
information about the Adopt-a-Park pro-
gram, contact the Parks and Recreation
Department 829-3800.
Two arrested in daytime
Burlingame burglary attempt
Efforts by four men attempting to break
into a Burlingame home were thwarted
Friday morning when a resident called
police resulting in the arrest of two,
Burlingame Police said.
A resident on the 2100 block of Easton
Drive noticed a group of suspicious men in a
neighbors backyard around 10:55 a.m.
Friday morning, according to a press release
from the Burlingame Police Department.
Not recognizing the men, she called the
police.
Officers responding found four subjects
fleeing on foot. Two suspects Broderick
D. Pryor or San Francisco and Black A.
Green of South San Francisco, both 18
were arrested and charged with attempted
burglary and conspiracy in regards to the
Easton incident, according to police. Both
were also charged with burglary and posses-
sion of stolen property in connection with a
residential burglary that happened about 30
minutes earlier on the 100 block of
Burlingame Avenue.
The men were found with a stolen car
taken two days earlier from a residential bur-
glary in Fairfield, according to police.
Burlingame detectives are working with
other agencies to determine if the suspects
are connected to a rash of daytime residen-
tial robberies throughout the county.
Despite an extensive search with the help
of other agencies the other two suspects
were not found.
Local briefs
CITY GOVERNMENT
The San Carlos Transportation and Circulation Commission
will consider revising the bicycle transportation plan and possibly
changing its name.
The commission meets 7 p.m. Tuesday, July 17 at City Hall, 600
Elm St., San Carlos.
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A San Francisco man accused of posing as a
San Bruno explosion victim to secure money
and other aid meant for victims of the deadly
gas line catastrophe was sentenced Friday to
three years in prison.
Deonte James Bennett, 27, pleaded no con-
test in May to identity theft and perjury. He
also admitted having a prior conviction.
Bennett faced up to 48 months in prison but
Judge Robert Foiles struck his prior which
involved holding a gun to the head of a woman
during a robbery.
He must serve 18 months and receives three
days credit. Bennett had been free on a
$50,000 bail bond but was remanded back into
custody.
Bennett, along with three women who pre-
viously accepted negotiat-
ed plea deals, allegedly
entered the San Bruno vic-
tim assistance center ve
days after the Sept. 9,
2010 explosion and fire
claiming to have lost all
their belongings. The re
killed eight people,
destroyed dozens of
homes and devastated the
neighborhood.
On Sept. 14, 2010, the four suspects report-
edly presented addresses within the disaster
zone found on the Internet. They tried getting
new identication from the Department of
Motor Vehicles so they could then receive aid
from Pacic Gas and Electric but were appre-
hended by San Bruno police.
San Bruno fire scammer
imprisoned three years
By Juliet Williams
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO Nearly two-thirds of
California voters cast their vote by mail in the
June election, a record for the state, but fewer
than a third of registered voters turned out,
Secretary of State Debra Bowen reported
Friday.
Bowens ofce ofcially certied the results
of the primary election, which was the rst
time Californians tested two new voter-
approved changes: a top-two primary system
and new congressional and legislative bound-
aries drawn for the rst time by an independ-
ent commission.
The new primary system led to a crowded
ballot in many races; U.S. Sen. Dianne
Feinstein faced 24 challengers. She faces
Republican Elizabeth Emken in November.
Bowen reported that only 31 percent of the
states registered voters, or about 5.3 million
people, turned out. The gure is low, but still
slightly higher than the 28 percent record low
turnout in June 2008.
Sierra, Alpine and Amador counties had the
highest turnout as percentage of registered
voters, while San Bernardino, Orange and Los
Angeles counties had the lowest turnout.
Bowens office also reports that voters
rejected a proposed $1-a-pack tax on ciga-
rettes to pay for cancer research by a slim mar-
gin of 24,076 votes. That measure,
Proposition 29, remained too-close-to call for
weeks, but campaign supporters conceded
defeat on June 22.
Two-thirds of voters cast ballots by mail
Deonte
Bennett
By Jason Dearen
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO Scientists studying
the carcass of a 47-foot n whale that washed
up on a beach in the Point Reyes National
Seashore last month found the creatures spine
and ribs severed, likely from the propeller of
one of the huge cargo ships that sail those
waters.
There have been many victims of such acci-
dents in recent years as migrating blue, n and
humpback whales have been lured close to
Californias shore by plentiful krill, the
shrimp-like organisms they eat. All three
species are endangered.
Now, after a two-year effort spurred by the
uptick in accidents, federal maritime ofcials
have approved a plan to protect whales in and
around San Francisco Bay. It includes rerout-
ing shipping trafc and establishing better
ways to track whale locations.
The changes crafted by the National
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration,
shipping industry representatives, whale
researchers and the Coast Guard will likely
take effect next year, after a nal review by the
United Nations International Maritime
Organization.
In 2010 it really struck home when a
female blue whale carrying a calf was found
dead on the beach, said Maria Brown,
NOAAs superintendent for the Gulf of the
Farallones National Marine Sanctuary. And
blue whales numbers are so small to lose a
female and a new whale coming into the pop-
ulation really sent home the message that we
needed to look at the whale strike issue.
The shipping industry worked with federal
authorities to establish new cargo lanes in one
of the worlds busiest ports.
Nobody wants to hit a whale, just like any-
body driving down the highway doesnt want
to hit anything either, said John Berge, vice
president of the Pacic Merchant Shipping
Association, who worked on the plan. We
want to do whatever can be done to mitigate
the risk, but do it based on good science and
good management strategies as opposed to
saying, Lets just try this and see if it
works.
Feds to reroute S.F. Bay
ships to protect whales
Nobody wants
to hit a whale, just
like anybody driving
down the highway doesnt
want to hit anything either.
John Berge, vice president of the Pacic
Merchant Shipping Association
6
Weekend July 14-15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
www.greenhillsretirement.com
1201 Broadway Millbrae, CA 94030
Lic. 4150600292
CALL TODAY
FOR A FREE TOUR
(650) 742-9150
The Care You
Can Count On
RN on sta full time
24 hour CNA certied caregivers for your daily needs
Memory Care available for Alzheimers and Dementia residents
A full calendar of social events, activities, and entertainment
Delicious meals served restaurant-style three times daily
Emergency call systems in bedrooms and bathrooms
On-site beauty salon
On-site medical services (Podiatrist, Physical and Occupational Terapist)
Centrally located near two major hospitals
Diana L. Dixon
Diana Di Dixon passed away at 50, after losing her two-
year battle with lung cancer, on Wednesday, July 11, 2012.
She died peacefully in her sleep, in her
Redwood Shores home, surrounded by
friends and family.
Dixon was born Oct. 27, 1961 in
Redwood City to Jill and Michael Dixon
Sr. She grew up in Belmont and was big
sister to Michael Mick Dixon Jr. She
graduated from Carlmont High School
class of 79 and continued on to Ponce
Beauty College. Her biggest accomplish-
ment was her son, Mark, who was born in January 1986.
Dixon loved laughing and spending time with friends and
family. She was an established hair stylist and accomplished
her dream of opening her own salon, Heads Up, with her
best friend, Robin. Dixon had so much love to give as evi-
dent by the many young people that called her mom or
auntie. She loved vacationing to Hawaii with her fianc and
family and was an amazing step-mom to his two children.
Dixon is survived by her loving fianc Kendall Gomez, her
son Mark Olivo, father Michael Dixon, brother Mick Dixon
and wife Norma, the Gomez family, nieces and nephews,
many friends and a menagerie of pets.
Friends may pay their respects at the service 1 p.m.
Wednesday, July 25 at the Crippen and Flynn Carlmont
Chapel, 1111 Alameda de las Pulgas in Belmont.
John Hale Comstock Jr.
John Hale Comstock Jr., 46, of Litchfield Park, Ariz., died
June 30, 2012 in Goodyear, Ariz. He was born Aug. 9, 1965
in Hollister to John Comstock Sr. and
Nancy Montiel. He grew up in Redwood
City and graduated high school there. He
was an HVAC technician. He moved to
Arizona in 2003. John enjoyed riding
Harleys and boating. He is survived by
his wife Barbara Comstock, his daughter
Kaitlin, his sons John III and Kyle and
his sisters Kelly Comstock-Snell and
Page Comstock. Services are private.
Memorials and condolences may be sent to Kelly
Comstock-Snell via Thompson Funeral Chapel, 926 S.
Litchfield Road, Goodyear, AZ 85338 or www.thompsonfu-
neralchapel.com.
Obituaries
S
an Mateo Middle College High
School, an alternative education
program for juniors and seniors in
the San Mateo Union High School
District, is accepting applications for fall
2012. The application deadline has
passed, but applications will be processed
on a case-buy-case basis.
Students and parents interested in the
program can contact the Middle College
ofce. Applications are available online
on the Middle College website at
www.collegeofsanmateo.edu/middlecol-
lege.
Middle College, located at College of
San Mateo, includes 60 students who
take a combination of high school and
college classes. These classes are intend-
ed to help students meet high school
graduation requirements and college gen-
eral education requirements.
Students who prefer not to attend a tra-
ditional high school campus must demon-
strate the maturity to cope with the rela-
tive freedom of
the college envi-
ronment. Recent
graduates have
attended notable
California col-
leges.
Students are
recommended for
admission by parents, teachers, guidance
counselors and administrators. Other
application procedures include student
testing for reading and writing, an infor-
mation meeting with parents and inter-
views with students and parents.
For more information contact
Principal Greg Quigley at 574-6101 or
middlecollege@smuhsd.org.
Class notes is a column dedicated to school
news. It is compiled by education reporter
Heather Murtagh. You can contact her at (650)
344-5200, ext. 105 or at heather@smdai-
lyjournal.com.
Governor signs law
raising cockfighting fines
SACRAMENTO The ne for stag-
ing a cockght will double in California
under a law signed
by Gov. Jerry Brown.
The governor
announced Friday
that he signed
SB1145 by Hemet
Republican Sen. Bill
Emmerson. The bill
raises the fine for
anyone convicted of
cockghting from a
maximum of $5,000 to $10,000.
The bill also increases nes on other
animal ghting, such as bears and dogs.
Spectators could face as many as six
months in jail and a ne of $5,000, up
from $1,000.
The nes will be raised starting next
year.
S.F. considering ways to
curb plastic water bottles
SAN FRANCISCO San Francisco,
the city that regulated Happy Meal toys
and banned plastic grocery bags, has a
new target in its health-conscious, eco-
friendly crosshairs: plastic water bottles.
City ofcials are considering an ordi-
nance that would require owners of new
and renovated buildings with water foun-
tains to install special bottle-lling taps.
The laws designed to encourage thirsty
people to rell containers instead of
reaching for another bottle of Evian or
Aquana.
This is the appropriate next step to
make it easier for San Franciscans to get
out of the bad habit of using environ-
mentally wasteful plastic water bottles
and into the good habit of using reusable
water containers, said Board of
Supervisors President David Chiu, who
introduced the legislation in June.
Around the state
Jerry Brown
Principal Rita Gleason announced in May that four Notre Dame High School students
were award winners in the Annual Respect Life Essay Contest sponsored by the
Ofce of Public Policy and Social Concerns,Archdiocese of San Francisco.Junior Ellie
Hurley was awarded the grand prize. For the third consecutive year, a Notre Dame
student has earned this honor.Hurley was joined by sophomore Kaylee Kohlmaier
as rst prize winner in San Mateo County and freshmen Simone Conde and Nicole
Bryant who earned honorable mention citations.
7
Weekend July 14-15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
San Mateo County Office of Education
Career Technical Education
NATION 8
Weekend July 14-15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
s Contemporary Fine Art & Crafts
s Fabulous Food &Wine
s Home & Garden Exhibits
s Green Products Showcase
s Artisan Specialty Food Purveyors
s Health &Wellness Displays
s Microbrew &Wine Tasting Tent
s Chefs Demos Under A Shady Tent
Celebrity Chef/Author Joanne Weir,
12:45 p.m. Saturday
s AutoVino Collector Car Show
s Action-Packed Kids Fun Zone
s Stellar Lineup of Rockn Roll,
Blues, Jazz & Party Music
s Saturday Twilight Concert
Featuring THE BIG DIG, Sensational
Party/Dance Band
5:30 - 8 p.m. in Fremont Park
s Radio Disney Road Crew
Games, Music and Prizes
s Bicycle Parking in the
Coldwell Banker Lot, 930
Santa Cruz Ave., Sponsored by
the Rotary Club of Menlo Park
s Free Admission
www.menloparkchamber.com
Info-line: 650-325-2818 | www.miramarevents.com
July 21-22, 10am-6pm
Santa Cruz Avenue, Menlo Park
Get Our Free, New
Festival M
obile App!
FOR APPLE &ANDROID DEVICES
Solar storm barreling toward Earth this weekend
LOS ANGELES The space weather forecast for Earth
looks a bit stormy this weekend, but scientists said not to worry.
A solar storm was due to arrive Saturday morning and last
through Sunday, slamming into Earths magnetic field.
Scientists said it will be a minor event and they have notied
power grid operators, airlines and other potentially affected par-
ties.
This isnt the mother of all anything, said forecaster Joe
Kunches at the governments Space Weather Prediction Center
in Boulder, Colo. We dont see any ill effects to any systems.
The storm began Thursday when the sun unleashed a massive
are that hurled a cloud of highly charged particles racing
toward Earth at 3 million mph.
Panel calls for annual PTSD screening
WASHINGTON The Institute of Medicine recommended
Friday that soldiers returning from Iraq and Afghanistan under-
go annual screening for post-traumatic stress disorder and that
federal agencies conduct more research to determine how well
the various treatments for PTSD are working.
Of the 2.6 million service members deployed to Iraq and
Afghanistan, its estimated that 13 percent to 20 percent have
symptoms of PTSD.
Federal agencies have increasingly dedicated more resources
to screen and treat soldiers, but considerable gaps remain,
according to the Institute of Medicine, an independent group of
experts that advises the federal government on medical issues.
Dogs, dead people get
election docs from nonprofit
OLYMPIA, Wash. The voter registration form arrived in
the mail last month with some key information already lled in:
Rosie Charlstons name was complete, as was her Seattle
address. Problem is, Rosie was a black lab who died in 1998.
A group called the Voter Participation Center has touted the
distribution of some 5 million registration forms in recent
weeks, targeting Democratic-leaning voting blocs such as
unmarried women, blacks, Latinos and young adults.
But residents and election administrators around the country
also have reported a series of bizarre and questionable mailings
addressed to animals, dead people, noncitizens and people
already registered to vote.
Around the nation
By Jim Kuhnhenn
and Philip Elliott
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LACONIA, N.H. His credibility
under attack, Republican presidential
hopeful Mitt Romney insisted on Friday
that he had no role whatsoever in the
management of a private equity rm
after early 1999, and demanded that
President Barack Obama apologize for
campaign aides who persist in alleging
otherwise.
This is simply beneath the dignity of
the presidency of the United States,
Romney said in an interview on ABC,
one of several he granted to network and
cable stations in hopes of extinguishing
the controversy.
Under pressure from Democrats and
even some Republicans to release tax
returns going back several years,
Romney indicated he wouldnt do so.
You can never satisfy the opposition
research team of the Obama organiza-
tion, he told CBS.
Romney said after he left Bain
Capital he retained ownership until
we were able to negotiate a departure
from the company he had founded. I
had no role whatsoever in the manage-
ment of Bain Capital after February of
1999, he said, adding that officials at
the company and independent fact-
checkers had said the same thing.
He also said, I was an owner, and
being a shareholder doesnt mean youre
running the business. He said he could-
nt recall attending any Bain manage-
ment meetings after he moved to Salt
Lake City to oversee the Olympic
Games.
The precise role Romney played at the
rm between 1999 and 2001 is impor-
tant not only because critics have raised
questions about his truthfulness, but also
because Bain was sending jobs overseas
during that period.
That, in turn, goes to the core issue of
the race for the White House in dreary
economic times, Romneys claim that as
a former businessman, he has the ability
to create jobs and nally pull the country
out of a downturn that has lingered
throughout Obamas term. The Obama
campaign has criticized Romney as run-
ning a rm that pioneered job outsourc-
ing.
Romney: No role in Bain
management after 1999
By Erik Schelzig
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NASHVILLE, Tenn. Threats,
denunciations and verbal potshots
between the National Rie Association
and the leaders of the Legislature were
common in the decades that Democrats
ran the show in the Tennessee Capitol.
Turns out Republicans are just as good at
running afoul of the powerful gun rights
group.
GOP leaders in Nashville infuriated
the NRA this year by refusing to go
along with a bill to prevent businesses
from banning guns on their property, and
now the group is using its deep pockets
to try to unseat one of them. Elsewhere,
NRA-backed measures also ran into
Republican roadblocks in Georgia,
Alabama, Idaho and North Carolina this
year.
The NRA notes recent successes in
the legislatures of Virginia, Ohio and
South Carolina, describing the recent
setbacks as temporary.
First of all the legislative process is
rarely quick and is rarely pretty, chief
NRA lobbyist Chris W. Cox said in a
phone interview. We certainly take the
long view and were committed to bring
this not only to Tennessee but across the
country.
The NRA is backing up its words with
campaign cash in Tennessee, spending
$75,000 in an effort to defeat the No. 3
Republican in the state House, Rep.
Debra Maggart of Hendersonville.
NRA finds some GOP lawmakers resistant to gun laws
REUTERS
Mitt Romney speaks to workers and staff at the Care and Share of Southern Colorado
food bank in Colorado Springs.
OPINION 9
Weekend July 14-15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Letter to the editor
By Michle M. Bissada
A
lthough divorce is common in our
society, there are misconceptions
about the processes and issues peo-
ple face when confronted with splitting up.
This guest perspective is meant to address
just a few of the issues and is not intended to
be a full list. I urge people to consult a quali-
ed family law attorney regarding their situa-
tion.
The process takes a minimum of six
months from when second party is served
with the petition ling. Contrary to popular
belief, there is no common law marriage in
California.
Process options
A dissolution can be handled in different
ways, from sitting around the kitchen table
with your spouse to expensive litigation.
Some alternatives to court litigation include
alternate dispute resolution options of media-
tion, collaborative law, private settlement
judges or all-purpose judges. These can be
used to reach a negotiated agreement, avoid-
ing the need to appear in court. Using one of
these options gives the freedom to creatively
design an agreement, instead of accepting the
decision a courthouse judge makes for you.
Property
California is a no-fault state, so neither
party will be awarded more than half the
community assets solely because the other
party acted unethically or socially inappro-
priate. There needs to be a nancial reason
for an unequal division of assets, such as a
reimbursement claim or evidence of separate
property.
The date of separation will affect property
division because it stops the accrual of com-
munity property. Many factors go into the
determination of the date of separation,
including how the parties present themselves
in public, whether they still reside together,
share nances and other factors.
You have to provide credit card and bank
statements. Financial institutions only keep
customer records for seven years, so keep
your account statements, life insurance poli-
cies, tax returns and deeds to property, cars,
etc. To avoid accounting nightmares, get sep-
arate bank accounts and credit cards as of the
date of separation and dis-
close nancial documents,
changes in assets and busi-
ness investments often.
Take a nancial inventory
of the marital estate,
including each partys sep-
arate assets at the date of
separation. If you have
separate property, it needs
to be kept separate or completely traced.
Stock options can be partially community
property even though you continue employ-
ment after the date of separation. Options are
calculated on a formula based on the vesting
schedule, granting date, time of the marriage
up to the date of separation and other possi-
ble factors.
A spouse who remains in the family resi-
dence after the date of separation is generally
responsible for the mortgage, property taxes,
homeowners insurance and normal mainte-
nance until the residence is bought out by
one spouse or sold. If one spouse will buy
out a family residence from the other spouse,
courts will not reduce the value of a family
residence by the costs of sale or capital gains
tax.
Custody
Barring extenuating circumstances, courts
favor an equal timeshare between parents,
and will not micromanage parenting within
acceptable ranges. Make sure both parents
stay involved with kids, monitoring how they
handle the dissolution. Therapy for all chil-
dren during the dissolution process is impor-
tant, because kids need a neutral adult to talk
to about their own issues and dont wish to
burden their parents.
Be cautious regarding your social network-
ing sites (Facebook, Twitter, etc.) because
everything you post can be used against you
in a dissolution or legal proceeding.
Support
Temporary spousal support is intended to
maintain the current situation until the divi-
sion of assets in the dissolution and is based
on a computer program. Longer term support
is determined after the assets have been
divided to include investment income from
those assets and consider long-term factors
like both parties earning capacity, age and
health.
A court will use a several-year average for
income that uctuates. Once a marriage
reaches 10 years in length, the marriage is
considered one of long duration, and a
court will not terminate jurisdiction over
spousal support. Stay up to date on support
payments because unpaid support carries
interest at the legal rate of 10 percent per
year. There is no relief from support until
you le a motion for a modication, even if
you lose your job. Keep track of job search
efforts because it is your burden to show rea-
sonable efforts to nd employment, even if
one has been out of the workforce during the
marriage.
Conclusion
Be smart about how you end up at the end
of the process. You want to look back and be
proud of how you conducted yourself, espe-
cially to your kids. Keep your dissolution
private as much as you think people need
to know what my ex did it ends up
reecting poorly on you. Remember that
everything you say and write can get back to
the judge, so be respectful.
Michle Bissada has practiced family law
since 1994 and is certied by the State Bar of
California as a legal specialist in the area of
family law. Bissada is a named partner at
Flicker, Kerin, Kruger & Bissada, LLP in
Menlo Park. Bissadas practice includes litiga-
tion of complex custody and nancial matters.
Bissadas practice also includes mediation,
both as a consulting attorney and as the medi-
ator, and she is trained in and practices col-
laborative law. This guest perspective is pro-
vided as a community service by individual
members of the San Mateo County Bar
Association. It is the opinion and work product
of the author and not the SMCBA, which has
no responsibility for the content. On all legal
matters, readers are encouraged to seek the
advice of their own attorneys.
Did I say that?
Editor,
Please let me respond to Jorg Aadalhs
accusation in God bless what America
published in the July 7-8 weekend edition of
the Daily Journal, that I dened the sick, the
poor and the most vulnerable in society as
takers. He goes on to say that I think the
young born with diseases and defects due to
industrial pollution are responsible for their
own fate.
Where in my letter did I say any of this
Mr. Aadahl? I do not mind people having a
different point of view than I do, and I feel
that they should have the right to vigorously
defend those views. I just think they should
do it with a little integrity and honesty. Mr.
Aadahl has tied me to words that I clearly
did not say and which can easily be veried
by simply reading my previous letter (God
bless America published in the June 14 edi-
tion of the Daily Journal).
So Mr. Aadahl, I have a simple yes or no
question for you: did I say those things you
that attributed to me or not? If I did not,
which is clearly the case, do you think you
might owe me both a retraction and an apolo-
gy for misquoting me? Or is this how you
attack folks who disagree with your point of
view.
Christopher P. Conway
San Mateo
Things people should know about divorce Other
voices
State gets that
sinking feeling
The Press Democrat
W
ith or without the Big One,
the Golden State is slipping
into the Pacific.
A new report from the National
Academy of Sciences says sea level along
the coast south of Cape Mendocino will
rise as much as a foot over the next 20
years, two feet by 2050 and up to 5 1/2
feet by the end of the century.
As a result, almost a half-million peo-
ple living in low-lying areas will be at
increased risk of flooding from high tides
and winter storms. So will the San
Francisco and Oakland airports and other
waterfront buildings.
Climate change is a major factor; melt-
ing ice and expanding oceans are
encroaching on coastal areas around the
globe at an accelerating rate. Theres an
added complication for California. Even
as sea level is rising, the report says, the
state is sinking along much of its 1,100-
mile coastline, a result of natural geologi-
cal forces.
Yet another natural geological force
could swiftly remake the coast. An earth-
quake of magnitude 8 or larger could
cause sea level to rise suddenly by an
additional three feet, according to the
report, which was commissioned by
California, Oregon and Washington.
The findings are an early warning.
Theyre a summons to prepare, not an
invitation to rekindle the climate change
debate or, worse, to stick our heads in the
(eroding) sand.
Its pointless to keep debating whether
human activities have caused or can
reverse climate change. Its time to
address the results. As one of the reports
authors told the Los Angeles Times, Sea
level rise isnt a political question, its a
scientific reality.
The scientific reality wont manifest
itself as a single big disaster. Instead, as
sea level continues to rise, big waves,
storm surges and high tides will pose
larger and larger threats to low-lying
areas.
As an example of what could become
common, the report cites the El Niqo
winter of 1983, when storms destroyed 33
oceanfront homes and caused $200 mil-
lion damage along Californias coast.
Tidal gauges show that sea level
increased an average of seven inches
around the world over the past century,
with the pace quickening since the mid-
1990s. The impacts can be seen in com-
munities including Gleason Beach, north
of Bodega Bay, where homes have been
abandoned or demolished because of ris-
ing seas and eroding bluffs.
The National Academy of Sciences
report says it will cost about $14 billion
to build levees and sea walls to protect
Bay Area airports and oceanfront commu-
nities.
State and local planners must begin
studying the conclusions and making
choices about where to fortify the coast-
line and where to allow natural processes
to work.
Presented with a similar warning, North
Carolina has chosen denial.
State legislators in Raleigh are debating
a bill that would effectively outlaw sea-
level projections based on climate change
data, allowing only forecasts based on
past patterns. Lets hope California takes
a more thoughtful approach to the rising
tide of science.
Guest
perspective
Follow us on Twitter and Facebook:
facebook.com/smdailyjournal
twitter.com/smdailyjournal
Onlineeditionat scribd.com/smdailyjournal
OUR MISSION:
It is the mission of the Daily Journal to be the most
accurate, fair and relevant local news source for those
who live, work or play on the MidPeninsula.
By combining local news and sports coverage, analysis
and insight with the latest business, lifestyle, state,
national and world news, we seek to provide our readers
with the highest quality information resource in San
Mateo County. Our pages belong to you, our readers, and
we choose to reect the diverse character of this
dynamic and ever-changing community.
SMDAILYJOURNAL.COM
Jerry Lee, Publisher
Jon Mays, Editor in Chief
Nathan Mollat, Sports Editor
Erik Oeverndiek, Copy Editor/Page Designer
Nicola Zeuzem, Production Manager
Kerry McArdle, Marketing & Events
Michelle Durand, Senior Reporter
REPORTERS:
Julio Lara, Heather Murtagh, Bill Silverfarb
Susan E. Cohn, Senior Correspondent: Events
Carrie Doung, Production Assistant
BUSINESS STAFF:
Charlotte Andersen Jim Dresser
Blanca Frasier Charles Gould
Gale Green Jeff Palter
Kris Skarston Kevin Smith
INTERNS, CORRESPONDENTS, CONTRACTORS:
Paniz Amirnasiri Carly Bertolozzi
Jenna Chambers Kore Chan
Elizabeth Cortes JD Crayne
Rachel Feder Darold Fredricks
Brian Grabianowski Ashley Hansen
Kevin Harris Drake Herrador
Erin Hurley Rosie Linares
Melanie Lindow Andrew Lyu
Nick Rose Andrew Scheiner
Sally Schilling Samantha Weigel
Chloee Weiner Sangwon Yun
Letters to the Editor
Should be no longer than 250 words.
Perspective Columns
Should be no longer than 600 words.
Illegibly handwritten letters and anonymous letters will not
be accepted.
Please include a city of residence and phone number where
we can reach you.
Emailed documents are preferred. No attachments please.
Letter writers are limited to two submissions a month.
Opinions expressed in letters, columns and perspectives are
those of the individual writer and do not necessarily represent
the views of the Daily Journal staff.
Correction Policy
The Daily Journal corrects its errors. If you question the
accuracy of any article in the Daily Journal, please contact
the editor at news@smdailyjournal.com or by phone at:
344-5200, ext. 107
Editorials represent the viewpoint of the Daily Journal editorial
board and not any one individual.
BUSINESS 10
Weekend July 14-15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 12,777.09 +1.62% 10-Yr Bond 1.499 +1.35%
Nasdaq2,908.47 +1.48% Oil (per barrel) 87.050003
S&P 500 1,356.78 +1.65% Gold 1,588.10

By Matthew Craft
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK JPMorgan Chase blew
away a cloud of concern hanging over the
banking industry Friday and set off a
rally in stocks. Relieved investors drove
up bank stocks, ended a six-day losing
streak for the market and sent the Dow
Jones industrial average up 204 points,
the best day this month.
JPMorgan jumped 6 percent, the
biggest gain in the Dow by far. The coun-
trys largest bank earned $5 billion in the
most recent quarter, easily beating Wall
Streets forecasts, even as it took a deep-
er loss from a complex trade that went
wrong. The results brightened the out-
look for other major banks. If JPMorgan
could sustain such a hard hit and still post
stronger earnings, the thinking went,
maybe others could, too.
Today is all about bank uncertainty
getting resolved, said Doug Cote, chief
market strategist at ING Investment
Management. To me, thats what is real-
ly driving the market.
JPMorgan revealed that the loss from a
derivative trade it rst disclosed in May
had grown to $5.8 billion, nearly triple
the original estimate. Its stock shot up
$2.03 to $36.07.
The banks underwriting business also
fared better than many expected. That
rubbed off on the investment banks
Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley,
driving both up more than 3 percent.
Goldman jumped $3.41 to $97.43.
Morgan Stanley rose 50 cents to $14.05.
The Dow gained 203.82 points to close
at 12,777.09.
Wells Fargo, the other major bank
reporting results Friday, said a strong
pickup in lending lifted its net income 18
percent. Wells Fargo has managed to
avoid problems plaguing other big banks
and is now the countrys largest mortgage
lender. The banks stock gained 3 per-
cent, or $1.06, to $33.91.
Todd Salamone, director of research at
Schaeffers Investment Research, said
the rally in bank stocks shows that
investors had expected the worst. When
theyre too gloomy on an industry, the
slightest bit of good news can jolt their
stocks up.
The bar for earnings is set extremely
low, and a lot of people have been betting
against banks he said. The lower the
bar, the easier it is for positive surprises.
The rally swept across the stock mar-
ket. Five stocks rose for every one that
fell on the New York Stock Exchange,
and all 10 industry groups within the
S&P 500 rose, led by nancial rms.
Stocks rally on Friday
Wall Street
Stocks that moved substantially or traded
heavily Friday on the New York Stock Exchange
and Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
JPMorgan Chase & Co., up $2.03 at $36.07
The bank said that a bad trade had cost it $5.8
billion this year,but investors were relieved the
mess was mostly behind it.
Wells Fargo & Co., up $1.06 at $33.91
The banks net income and revenue rose in the
second quarter thanks to a pickup in lending
and a drop in the amount of bad loans.
New York & Co. Inc., up 67 cents at $4.21
The womens retailer said that it now expects
revenue at stores open at least a year to grow
slightly during the second quarter.
Lexmark International Inc.,down $3.95 at $20.36
The printer makers shares fell to a nearly three-
year low after it said it fared worse during the
second quarter than it expected.
Bridgepoint Education Inc.,down $3.20 at $9.77
An education group is reviewing standards of
the for-prot educators Ashford University after
another group denied it accreditation.
Nasdaq
Panera Bread Co., up $3.69 at $147.31
Citing its growth prospects, a KeyBanc analyst
initiated coverage of the casual restaurant with
a Buyrating and a $175 price target.
Green Mountain Coffee Roasters Inc., down
$1.57 at $19.70
Stifel Nicolaus cut its 2013 earnings outlook on
the maker of single-cup coffee machines
because of the coming expiration of a patent.
iGATE Corp., down 2 cents at $15.98
The information-technology company said that
its second-quarter net income totaled $5.4
million, reversing last years loss.
Big movers
By Barbara Ortutay
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK With new public
stock offerings for guitar maker Fender
and travel booking website Kayak on
deck next week, there are signs demand
is starting to grow for IPOs after a ve-
week freeze triggered by a steep decline
in nancial markets and exacerbated by
Facebooks rocky May 18 debut.
Five companies are scheduled to go
public next week alone, including
Fender, Kayak and Palo Alto Networks,
a maker of computer network security
products. After Facebook, just four deals
made it to market by the end of June,
marking the longest stretch without an
initial public offering of stock since
August-October 2011. Stocks sank then
in the wake of the U.S. debt limit show-
down and a deepening European nan-
cial crisis.
The resurgence now is a welcome
indication that dealmakers are regaining
condence about raising money through
IPOs.
But the situation is far from rosy.
There are 68 companies expected to
raise $14.4 billion through IPOs later
this year, according to research rm
Dealogic, Last year at this time there
were almost double that amount of com-
panies 135, looking to raise $23.6 bil-
lion.
If the market stays healthy the
overall market I think we will see a
lot of IPO activity in the second half,
said Nick Einhorn, an analyst with
Renaissance Capital. But another plunge
in stock markets could make it difcult
for companies to raise money by selling
shares.
The types of companies that try to
raise money will also affect the IPO
market. Mutual funds and the other big
investors who tend to buy IPO shares are
less likely now to be attracted to tech-
nology companies like social networks
and games maker Zynga Inc. Theyve
shifted to business technology compa-
nies such as Palo Alto Networks, which
they consider more stable.
Stocks of several of these kinds of
companies have performed well since
their IPOs. ServiceNow Inc., a provider
of so-called cloud technology services
to companies, went public in late June,
pricing at $18, above its expected range
of $15 to $17. The stock has risen 34
percent from its debut. Jive Software
Inc., which makes internal social net-
works for corporations, started trading in
December and has climbed 56 percent
from its IPO price.
Well-known consumer brands also
help drum up excitement for IPOs
among retail investors, the regular
people who buy and sell stocks. There
are high hopes for Fender Musical
Instruments Corp., the company behind
the famous Fender Stratocaster electric
guitars. Its looking to raise up to $160.5
million in its IPO next week.
After Facebook, IPO market starts to thaw
By Pallavi Gogoi
and Daniel Wagner
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK JPMorgan Chase
said Friday that its traders may have
tried to conceal the losses from a soured
bet that has embarrassed the bank and
cost it almost $6 billion far more than
its CEO rst suggested.
The bank said an internal investigation
had uncovered evidence that led execu-
tives to question the integrity of the
values, or marks, that traders assigned to
their trades.
JPMorgan also said that it planned to
revoke two years worth of pay from
some of the senior managers involved in
the bad bet, and that it had closed the
division of the bank responsible for the
mistake.
This has shaken our company to the
core, CEO Jamie Dimon said.
The bank said the loss, which Dimon
estimated at $2 billion when he dis-
closed it in May, had grown to $5.8 bil-
lion, and could grow larger than $7 bil-
lion if financial markets deteriorate
severely.
Dimon said the worst appeared to be
behind the bank, and investors seemed to
agree: They sent JPMorgan stock up 6
percent, making it the best performer in
the Dow Jones industrial average.
Daniel Alpert, a founding managing
partner with the New York investment
bank Westwood Capital Partners LLC,
said the bank and Dimon appeared to
have learned from the crisis.
He said Dimon now realizes how com-
plex and difcult to manage the bank is,
will be more diligent in the future and
probably wont be the crusader he has
been against some proposed nancial
regulation.
Did it cost shareholders a few bucks?
Yup, he said. But it was a non-horrible
way of learning the lesson, in the sense
that the entire institution didnt burn
down, the lessons been taught and
Dimon seems ready to take it.
For his part, Dimon concluded: We
are not proud of this moment, but we are
proud of our company.
Mortgage applications
boost Wells Fargo results
Wells Fargo reported higher earnings,
higher revenue, and a record number of
mortgage applications on Friday.
Its just that nobody was paying all that
much attention.
The spotlight instead was on JPMorgan
Chase, where executives elded ques-
tions about a giant $5.8 billion trading
loss, which surprised investors when it
was announced in May and has only
become more troublesome as estimates
about the scope of the problem have
grown. Then again, thats the way Wells
Fargo usually works: Getting ahead by
staying under the radar.
The comparison was not lost on Wells
Fargos chief nancial ofcer, Tim Sloan.
Its not that we dont make mistakes,
he said in an interview with the
Associated Press. But we dont take on a
risk and then decide that the way we get
comfortable with it is by hedging it. We
just dont do it in the rst place.
The bank, based in San Francisco far
from its New York peers, was considered
a large regional bank until the end of
2008, when it stepped onto the national
scene by scooping up Wachovia, a major
bank in the South that was teetering on
the brink of collapse.
JPMorgan traders may have sought to conceal losses
Business brief
<< As open second half with win, page 12
Ex-players stand by Joe Paterno, page 13
Weekend, July 14-15, 2012
BREES HITS THE JACKPOT: NEW ORLEANS SAINTS AND STAR QUARTERBACK REACH $100M CONTRACT AGREEMENT>>> PAGE 12
By Antonio Gonzalez
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO Madison
Bumgarner pitched seven innings of two-hit
ball, Buster Posey homered and the San
Francisco Giants beat the Houston Astros 5-1
on Friday night.
Bumgarner (11-5) retired 13 straight until
Chris Snyders solo shot in the seventh inning
in another dominating start for the blossoming
lefty. He struck out ve and walked two.
Posey hit his team-leading 11th home run of
the season in the rst off Wandy Rodriguez,
who allowed seven hits and two walks in seven
innings. Rodriguez (7-7) also had four strike-
outs to begin a 10-game
road trip for the last-place
Astros.
Santiago Casilla struck
out the only two batters he
faced for his 22nd save in
26 chances.
Pablo Sandoval put the
punctuation on a fog-lled
night under the lights in
San Franciscos waterfront
ballpark by following up
his bases-clearing triple in the All-Star game
with a triple in the eighth. Sandoval, listed at a
generous 240 pounds, tagged up on Angel
Pagans y to left and barreled into Snyder at
the plate to jar the ball loose and score San
Franciscos nal run.
The All-Star break seemed to rejuvenate the
Giants.
After losing ve of six to end the seasons
rst half, San Francisco started four players
Posey, Matt Cain, Pablo Sandoval and MVP
Melky Cabrera in the Mid-Summer
Classic, where they helped the National
League roll past the AL 8-0 and brought the
momentum back to the Bay Area.
Posey showed some immediate pop when he
drove a ball over the wall in center eld, and
off the roof of a concession stand to give the
Giants a 2-0 lead in the rst. A ballpark score-
board estimated the shot at 448 feet, landing in
a place and with the kind of acceleration
rarely seen at AT&T Park since home run king
Barry Bonds retired.
Angel Pagan, Brandon Belt and Joaquin
Arias each singled to open the second to put
San Francisco ahead 4-0. Before Bumgarner
even returned to the mound, he had all the sup-
ported he needed.
The left-hander brought his season total to
104 strikeouts reaching the century mark
by getting Brian Bixler swinging for the sec-
ond out in the rst and never faced any seri-
ous opposition from a depleted Astros lineup.
Bumgarner gets Giants off to strong second-half start
Giants 5, Astros 1
Madison
Bumgarner
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
College football no longer takes extended
breaks from the game. The season may end in
December or January but preparing for the next
game never ends. Teams now practice in the spring
and summer, leaving just a few weeks of down
time before preparation for the 2012 season begins
in earnest in early August.
The College of San Mateo program is no excep-
tion. Except for a couple weeks off here and there,
the Bulldogs have been preparing for the next sea-
son since the conclusion of last season.
Tim Tulloch, CSM defensive coordinator and
co-head coach, said almost immediately following
the end of the 2011 season there were 10 weeks of
fundamental drills through the winter. After spring
break, the Bulldogs get 15 practice days before the
end of school and with the start of the summer
school semester, the Bulldogs enjoy another cou-
ple weeks of practice before taking the rest of July
off and opening camp Aug. 2.
Friday was the last summer practice of the sea-
son and the Bulldogs wrapped it up with the annu-
al Blue-White Game. Two teams are drafted
from among the team at large, mixing rst
stringers with guys who may not be back when
CSM takes the eld again in early August.
What it does for us (coaches) is give us a
chance to evaluate guys in game situations, pres-
sure situations, Tulloch said. Its great to see all
these guys have to make plays. Can this quarter-
back lead the team down the eld and nish, down
four point with a minute 30 on the clock? Were
creating those types of things.
Since so many players are rotating in and out of
the game, it may take a while to notice a standout
player but one thing is for sure the Bulldogs
defense appears to be as stingy as ever. With Bret
Pollack, Bulldogs offensive coordinator and head
coach, calling plays for both offenses, the defens-
es held the CSM offense in check as they com-
bined for three rst-half scores two for the
A dress rehearsal
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
Rika Levi, right, a freshman out of SouthCity, splits the gap and sets his sights on quarterback
Blake Pattsmier during CSMs annual Blue-White Game Friday afternoon.
By Ronald Blum
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Highly touted pitcher Mark Appel spurned
the Pittsburgh Pirates and decided to remain at
Stanford for his senior season, the rst big
casualty of baseballs new restrictions on ama-
teur signing bonuses.
Appel was the only unsigned player among
31 rst-round picks, turning down an offer of
$3.8 million from the
Pirates. Projected by some
to be the No. 1 selection,
some teams shied away
from the right-hander
because of the expected
demands of his adviser,
Scott Boras. Appel was
selected eighth by the
Pirates.
That slot was assigned $2.9 million from the
drafting teams bonus pool in baseballs new
labor contract, which imposes penalties on
clubs that exceed the threshold the totals of
the slots for a teams selections in the rst 10
rounds.
Pittsburgh was prepared to go as much as 5
percent above its threshold and incur the rst
level of penalty, a 75 percent tax on the over-
age. But the Pirates didnt want to fall into
higher levels, which include the loss of future
draft picks.
After much thought, prayer and analysis of
both opportunities, I came to the conclusion the
best decision is to remain at Stanford continu-
ing my studies, nishing my degree, and doing
all I can to assist the Cardinal baseball team in
our goal to win a national championship,
Appel spurns Pirates, will stay at Stanford
Mark Appel
CSM football wraps up summer session with Blue-White Game
See CSM, Page 15
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
If youre interested is nding out what the
2012-13 high school basketball season will
look like, you can get a sneak preview this
weekend and next as Skyline College hosts its
32nd annual High School Basketball
Tournament.
[This tournament is] kind of the end of the
summer in terms of the high school teams,
said Justin Piergrossi, Skyline mens coach
and tournament director.
Its been a whirlwind of activity for
Piergrossi, who in addition to putting together
the high school tournament, just wrapped up
his annual Nor Cal Showcase, an event that
featured 18 Northern California junior col-
leges playing in front of four-year coaches.
Each team played four games over two days,
Thursday and Friday.
Its all for the exposure (of junior college
players) and a chance to coach our guys,
Piergrossi said of the showcase. We get 50 to
60 four-year school coaches to come and
watch.
Its nice for us and nice for Northern
California.
While handling the operations of the college
showcase, Piergrossi, at the same time, has
been juggling the high school tournament as
well.
I dont even know whos coming and there
are 28 teams, Piergrossi joked.
A dozen Peninsula Athletic League schools
are represented: El Camino, Half Moon Bay,
Hillsdale, Jefferson, Menlo-Atherton, Mills,
Oceana, Sequoia, South San Francisco, Terra
Nova, Westmoor and Woodside. Four public
schools from San Francisco, including peren-
nial power Lowell, will play. Serra, Riordan
and defending state champion Mitty represent
Skyline:
Hoops
central
See SKYLINE, Page 14
See APPEL, Page 14
SPORTS 12
Weekend July 14-15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MINNEAPOLIS Aside from one swing
from Jonny Gomes, the Oakland Athletics had
no chance against Francisco Liriano on Friday
night.
That one swing was all it took for Oakland to
escape with a win, though.
Gomes grand slam helped the As overcome a
career-high 15 strikeouts
from Liriano and beat the
Minnesota Twins 6-3.
Lirianos 15 strikeouts
were the second most in
Twins history and most
since Johan Santana fanned
17 Texas batters at the
Metrodome on Aug. 19,
2007.
You got to swing, said
Gomes, who hit the slam on
the rst pitch of his second at-bat after whifng
on three straight in his rst plate appearance.
You just hope its a strike, not like the rst three
pitches I swung at. You have to be aggressive,
often.
It was the 23rd time since 1961 that a pitcher
had 15 or more strikeouts and lost the game.
Josh Willingham hit two home runs for
Minnesota which has lost ve of six.
A.J. Grifn (1-0) battled through six innings
to earn his rst career win and lead the As to
their seventh victory in eight games.
It might not have been my best outing, said
Grifn, whose father is from Grand Rapids,
Minn., and had nine family members in the
stands to witness his rst win. I was just trying
to compete after the break. Its good to get that
rst one.
Liriano (3-8) looked unhittable most of
Friday. The inconsistent lefty used a diving slid-
er and nasty changeup to fan eight of the rst 10
hitters he faced and record nine of his rst 10
outs via strikeout.
Twins center-elder Denard Span dropped a
y ball with one out in the fourth and Liriano
walked the next batter to load the bases.
Gomes hit Lirianos next pitch into the second
deck in left eld, his rst grand slam this season
and third in his career.
Youve got to make the plays, Twins man-
ager Ron Gardenhire said. You should have
been sitting in the dugout and it ends up Gomes
coming up in a big situation and got a rst pitch
that kind of drifted in towards him, inner-half of
the plate and he put it in the seats. Thats whats
disappointing. He should have been in the
dugout.
Oakland beats Twins
As 6, Twins 3
More legal woes for Dykstra
LOS ANGELES Former All-Star outeld-
er Lenny Dykstra pleaded guilty Friday and
could face 20 years in prison for hiding and sell-
ing sports memorabilia and other items that were
supposed to be part of his bankruptcy ling.
Dykstra, 49, entered his plea in U.S. District
Court to one count each of bankruptcy fraud,
concealment of assets and money laundering.
It was the latest legal problem for Dykstra,
who earned the nickname Nails because of his
gritty style of play, and spent his 12-year career
with the New York Mets and Philadelphia
Phillies. He previously
pleaded no contest to grand
theft auto and exposing
himself to women he met
through Craigslist.
Dykstra, who bought a
mansion once owned by
hockey star Wayne Gretzky,
led for bankruptcy three
years ago, claiming he
owed more than $31 mil-
lion and had only $50,000 in assets.
After the ling, Dykstra hid, sold or destroyed
more than $400,000 worth of items without per-
mission of a bankruptcy trustee, prosecutors
said.
Baseball brief
Lenny Dykstra
By Brett Martel
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW ORLEANS Drew Brees and the
Saints reached a deal on par with the quarter-
backs record-setting play, giving New
Orleans fans some news they can celebrate
after an offseason rife with turmoil.
The team announced Friday that it had
agreed to a ve-year contract with Brees. A
person familiar with the
deal said its for $100 mil-
lion, with $60 million
guaranteed.
The deal will also pay
the quarterback $40 mil-
lion the rst year, the per-
son told The Associated
Press on condition of
anonymity because nan-
cial details had not been
publicly announced.
Brees posted a note on his Twitter page
reading, Deal is Done! Love you, Who Dat
Nation. See you soon!
He had been tagged as the Saints exclusive
franchise player and could not negotiate with
other teams.
Had a deal not been reached, the tender for
a quarterback was worth $16.3 million. Brees
would have had to play for that amount or
hold out for a better one-year deal, which
would have left his long-term future in New
Orleans uncertain.
Brees skipped the Saints offseason prac-
tices while holding out for his new long-term
contract, which now gives him the highest
average annual pay ($20 million) in NFL his-
tory. Buffalo defensive end Mario Williams
also has a $100 million contract, but for six
years.
With a contract like this, people can say
theyre paying me what you earned or what
you deserved. In my mind, I always feel like
Ive got to go out every day and earn it and
show people why youre at that level, Brees
said in an interview Friday night with the
Saints radio network, WWL-AM. I can tell
you from the start of this negotiation, I have
not thought once about, Hey, I want to be the
highest-paid guy or what have you. ... It was
more about trying to look truly, just objective-
ly, at the numbers the last decade for a top-tier
quarterback and where it has been and where
it is going and just trying to do what is fair and
justied.
Now Brees is set to report for the opening of
Saints training camp on July 24, a needed
dose of good news for a club whose offseason
has been plagued by the bounty scandal that
resulted in the season-long suspensions of
coach Sean Payton and linebacker Jonathan
Vilma, among other sanctions.
What Drew has accomplished in his time
with the Saints, he deserves to be the highest
paid player in the league, Saints general man-
ager Mickey Loomis said. We are excited to
have this deal done and behind us and look
forward to the next ve years with Drew as
our quarterback.
Brees teammates quickly took to Twitter to
congratulate him.
Safety Malcolm Jenkins wrote Congrats
bro ... Youve changed the game on and off the
eld!!! No one deserves it more than you.
Tight end Jimmy Graham tweeted:
Congrats (at)drewbrees ... very happy for
you, your family and all the Whodat Nation ....
lets go get the trophy.
Even LSU coach Les Miles chimed in,
tweeting: Its a great day for New Orleans
and the state of Louisiana. Congrats to both
Drew Brees and the Saints on reaching a deal.
Who Dat!
The contract, which includes a $37 million
signing bonus, also gives the Saints more ex-
ibility under the NFLs salary cap. Because
bonuses count against the cap on a pro-rated
basis over the life of the contract $7.4 mil-
lion per year in Brees case the quarterback
will cost the club only $10.4 million against
the cap in 2012. That gives Loomis nearly $6
million more in wiggle room to manage the
entire roster than if Brees had played for the
franchise tag.
Saints Brees a $100M man
Drew Brees
Norman Sas, electric
football inventor, dies at 87
Norman Sas, a mechanical engineer who creat-
ed electric football, a tabletop game with a vibrat-
ing metal eld and unpredictable plastic players
that captivated and frustrated children and nostal-
gic grown-ups for decades, has died. He was 87.
Sas died June 28 at his home in Vero Beach, his
daughter Martha OConnor conrmed Friday.
Sas father Elmer owned Tudor Metal Products
in New York, surviving through the Depression by
making xylophones and a six-slot Budget Bank
that allowed users to divide their savings for dif-
ferent purposes. The company eventually devel-
oped technology that used a small motor to create
vibrations on a metal plate, the basis for car and
horse racing games.
Electric football became so popular that several
competitors popped up to challenge Tudor. The
game evolved, with the players becoming much
more detailed, a grandstand complete with crowd
added and an NFL licensing deal that allowed fans
to have their favorite teams on the eld. Its popu-
larity endured into the 1980s, when video football
games began to emerge.
Football brief
Jonny Gomes
SPORTS 13
Weekend July 14-15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
COMMUTE
TO THE CITY?
Need car service?
Drop off your car on
the way to work!
Domestic Foreign
Excellent, High Quality Service
SCHWERIN AUTO SERVICE
1430 Bush Street, SF
415-673-9333
Quality Servic
WERIN AUTO SERVIC
COMMUTER
SPECIAL
Oil Change
$19.99
Most Cars Bring This Ad
By Genaro C. Armas
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. Penn State tailback Silas Redd still
stands by his former coach Joe Paterno. Defensive tackle Jordan
Hill does, too.
Redd, Hill and the rest of the Nittany Lions are trying to weath-
er another stormy period after former FBI Director Louis Freehs
investigation of the Jerry Sandusky child sex abuse scandal con-
cluded that Paterno and three other top school ofcials concealed
allegations against his former defensive coordinator.
Most Nittany Lions, before a player-organized charity event
Friday, said they didnt watch the news conference Thursday
about the probe, but had at least heard of the ndings.
Nearly all the Nittany Lions declined comment about the report
itself, trying to refocus attention for the Uplifting Athletes char-
ity event for which they had gathered to raise money for the
Kidney Cancer Association.
It has nothing to do with us, Redd said about the ndings.
Were just talking about this event and this season.
But Redd said his opinion of Paterno, the coach that recruited
him to Penn State, hadnt changed. He said Paterno, in his view,
remained the best college football coach of all time.
Some newspaper columnists and former Florida State coach
Bobby Bowden have said the statue should be taken down but
not Redd.
Because I feel he did a lot more good than bad for this univer-
sity, he said.
Hoping to take a picture at the statue in cap and gown when he
graduates, Hill said he would be sad if the statue was removed.
His opinion of Paterno hasnt changed, either.
Im still a big supporter of coach Paterno and he is one of the
reasons that Im here, he said. All you can really say is no man
is perfect at all.
Now that Freehs ndings have been released, Penn State can
now concentrate on answering the NCAAs own inquiry into the
scandal. President Rodney Erickson has said the school plans to
respond to questions about institutional control and ethics in the
coming weeks.
Its possible the NCAA could then launch a formal investiga-
tion which could lead to sanctions.
Whether that could include the so-called death penalty
where a program is shut down seems unlikely, at least for now.
It has happened just once, against SMU back in the 1980s.
Current NCAA rules limit the penalty to colleges already on pro-
bation that commit another major violation.
Some Penn St.
players stand
by former coach
By Brian Mahoney
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Not quite a Dream Team, still the Olympic favorite.
The U.S. mens basketball team heading to London isnt the
powerhouse it could have been, a squad that might have been so
stacked that its only worthy rival would have been history.
Injuries have cost the Americans three top players, along with
probably any notion they could have won a mythical matchup
against the famed 1992 champions.
What remains is good enough to make the Americans golden
again.
I think this team will be a stronger team than we had in 08,
USA Basketball chairman Jerry Colangelo said.
If we do what were capable of doing and we stay focused
and have the mental toughness, then we should prevail. I believe
that in my heart of hearts, but we have to go out and do it.
The Americans always face comparisons to the Dream Team,
and Colangelo even invited the connection when he named a 20-
man roster pool in January.
But Dwight Howard, Derrick Rose, Dwyane Wade and Blake
Grifn have since been lost to injuries, removing four players
who started in the All-Star game. Whats left is still potent
how about LeBron James and Kevin Durant in the same front-
court? but probably not good enough to beat Michael Jordan,
Magic Johnson, Larry Bird and the rest of their Hall of Fame
predecessors.
Thats no big deal for this U.S. team, which is more worried
about Pau Gasol, Manu Ginobili and Tony Parker.
Its possible now that some will say with those losses, well
then any discussion about comparison is probably out the win-
dow, and you know its really not that important or signicant,
Colangelo said. That was then, this is now. That was them, and
this is us. You know, lets go out and do the job we have to do
and then people can make any comparisons they wish after the
fact.
Kobe Bryant, Carmelo Anthony, Chris Paul and Deron
Williams are all back for the reigning gold medalists. Durant,
who had the best tournament ever by an American player two
years ago at the world basketball championship, headlines the
returnees from that team.
As for the notion that the Americans are so weakened they
could actually gasp lose?
They got to get the ratings up, dont they? They got to ask
something, it cant be all good things, Anthony said.
Turning serious, Anthony added: If we go out there and do
what we have to do, and prepare for this Olympics like we did
in 08, well be ne.
Even at full strength many Dream Teamers dismissed the
Americans chances of beating them. Charles Barkley insists the
current group wasnt deep enough; Johnson saying his team
would crush them. But Chris Mullin was at least originally
willing to consider that this could have been the best team ever,
noting that the 2012 squads top players were all in their primes,
while Bird and Johnson were near the end of their careers in 92.
Kobe, LeBron, Dwyane Wade, all the best guys are playing,
Mullin said earlier this year. Derrick Rose, you name it.
Dwight Howard.
Well, forget Howard, who had back surgery. Forget Rose, who
tore knee ligaments. And forget Wade, who needs knee surgery.
Fellow Heat star Chris Bosh also dropped out after straining an
abdominal muscle during the second round of the playoffs.
Their competitors also have problems, from Spain losing daz-
zling rookie point guard Ricky Rubio to a knee injury, to
Parkers eye injury in a bar brawl that put his availability for the
French in jeopardy.
The Americans are positioned to handle their losses better,
thanks largely to the national team program Colangelo began
building in 2005. The U.S. reacted poorly to withdrawals before
the 04 Olympics, randomly picking replacements without
thought to how they would t, and the team ultimately nished
third.
U.S. men thinking basketball gold
If we do what were capable of
doing and we stay focused and
have the mental toughness, then we
should prevail. I believe that in my heart of
hearts, but we have to go out and do it.
Jerry Colangelo, USA Basketball chairman
SPORTS 14
Weekend July 14-15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Find out why were one of the fastest growing construction companies in the Bay Area!
t: 650.274.4484
dom@risecon.com
P.O. Box 117414
Burlingame CA 94011
www.risecon.com
L#926933
t 650 274 4484 P O Bo 117414 risecon com
Fin Findd o d o t ut ut h why why we were re on one o e o e of t f t f the he he ffas fasttes test g t grow rowiing ing co co t nst nstruc ructio tio tion c n c n com omp omp i ani anies es iin in th the the BBa Ba A y A y Area rea!!!
t 650 274 4484 P O B 117414 i
Call us today for a FREE design consultation
the West Catholic Athletic League,
while three-time defending Central
Coast Section champion Sacred
Heart Prep and Kings Academy will
play out of the West Bay Athletic
League.
The 28 teams are split into seven
pools of four. Saturday and Sunday
features pool play, with the top 16
teams qualifying for the double-elim-
ination tournament July 21 and 23.
We love (hosting it at Skyline),
Piergrossi said. Its great to just
open up our facilities and campus to
the community. Its just fun being in
the gym. Its [four] long days of bas-
ketball, but its fun.
Heck, maybe those college coach-
es should just make a weekend of it
at Skyline. After watching the col-
lege showcase Thursday and Friday,
they can get an early look at the crop
of CCS talent.
Not so fast, Piergrossi said.
The DI coaches can not (attend
the high school tournament). Its not
certied through the NCAA. The
(college) showcase is certified
through the NCAA, Piergrossi said.
Some of the DII and DIII coaches
will probably swing by (this week-
end).
Continued from page 11
SKYLINE
Appel said in a statement. I greatly
valued the prospect of a professional
opportunity and I will pursue a pro-
fessional baseball career after getting
my Stanford degree.
Appel, who turns 21 on Sunday,
also failed to sign in 2009, when
Detroit selected him in the 15th
round with the 450th pick after his
nal season with Monte Vista High
in San Ramon, Calif. Appel will go
back into next years draft.
Under the labor deal, agreed to in
November, the deadline for draft
picks to sign was 5 p.m. Friday, a
month earlier than under the previ-
ous collective bargaining agreement.
Trying to end a record streak of 19
consecutive losing seasons, the
resurgent Pirates began Friday with a
one-game lead in the NL Central.
Third baseman Pedro Alvarez, the
No. 2 pick overall in 2008, signed a
four-year deal worth $6,355,000 and
has 16 homers and 50 RBIs this sea-
son despite a .231 average. There are
several top pitching prospects in
Pittsburghs minor league system.
Jameson Taillon, the No. 2 overall
pick in 2010, got a $6.5 million sign-
ing bonus and is in A-ball. Gerrit
Cole, the No. 1 pick last year,
received an $8 million signing bonus
and recently was promoted to
Double-A.
We drafted Mark Appel to sign
Mark Appel. We were excited about
the opportunity to add him to a
plethora of quality, young arms,
Pirates general manager Neal
Huntington said during a telephone
conference call. It didnt happen. So
now we turn the corner. This, too,
shall pass. We move forward.
Because Appel didnt sign, the
Pirates will receive an extra rst-
round pick in next Junes draft, the
ninth selection overall. The Pirates
also could gain an extra selection
from baseballs rst competitive bal-
ance draft, which will be held
Wednesday in Secaucus, N.J.
We may be looking at three of the
top 45 picks in the country,
Huntington said. Some have argued
next years draft class is going to be
better than this years draft class.
Boras also represented Alvarez
and Cole in their negotiations with
the Pirates.
Selecting Mark was a calculated
risk, as we knew he would be a dif-
cult sign, Huntington said. As an
organization, we need to continue to
take these types of calculated risks.
While we wouldve preferred to add
Mark to the group of talented
prospects in our system, we wish
Mark, and his family, nothing but
success in the future.
Appel was 10-2 with a 2.56 ERA
for Stanford this year with 130
strikeouts in 123 innings, raising his
college record to 18-10.
We are all excited to have him
back at Stanford for his senior sea-
son, Cardinal coach Mark Marquess
said. He is one of the premier pitch-
ers in college baseball and will again
play an integral role in our quest to
get back to the College World Series.
Im sure it was a difcult decision for
him and his family, but I know Mark
is excited to complete his degree in
engineering and then embark on a
long and successful pro career.
Continued from page 11
APPEL
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Relay sprinter Debbie Dunn took
her name off the U.S. Olympic team
roster Friday after testing positive
for excessive testosterone.
Dunn, who nished fourth in the
400 meters at Olympic trials, was
selected for the American relay
pool. She is the 2010 world indoor
champion at 400 meters and would
have been a likely candidate to run
in the Olympic 1,600-meter relay,
which the American women have
won every year since 1996.
But she released a statement
acknowledging a positive doping
test and said she was withdrawing
from the Olympics while the U.S.
Anti-Doping Agency pursues the
case.
I do not want any issue like this
to distract from my teammates
focus for the biggest meet of their
lives, Dunn said. I wish Team
USA (the) best in London as I work
toward resolving this matter.
The Chicago Tribune rst report-
ed Dunns positive test.
USADA CEO Travis Tygart said
the agency is analyzing Dunns B
sample. If that comes back positive,
Dunn would have the choice of
accepting a sanction or taking the
case to arbitration.
U.S. sprinter Dunn out of Olympics after doping test
SPORTS 15
Weekend July 14-15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Equity Based Direct Lender
Homes Mu|ti-Fami|y Mixed-Use Commercia|
Good or Bad Credit
Purchase / Renance / Cash Out
Investors We|come Loan Servicing Since 1979
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker, CA Dept. of Real Estate #746683
Nationwide Mortgage Licensing System ID #348288 650-348-7191
ALL ELECTRIC SERVICE
650-322-9288
FOR ALL YOUR ELECTRICAL NEEDS
SERVICE CHANGES
SOLAR INSTALLATIONS
LIGHTING / POWER
FIRE ALARM / DATA
GREEN ENERGY
FULLY LICENSED
STATE CERTIFIED
LOCALLY TRAINED
EXPERIENCED
ON CALL 24/7
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
@Phillies
4:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/20
@WCaps
4p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/22
vs.Fire
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/28
vs.Seattle
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/11
@Montreal
4:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
8/18
vs.Rapids
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/25
vs.RSL
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/14
@Braves
9:10a.m.
CSN-BAY
7/19
vs.FCDallas
8p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/18
vs. Rangers
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/17
vs. Yankees
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/19
vs. Rangers
12:35p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/18
@Phillies
1:05p.m.
FOX
7/21
vs. Yankees
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/20
vs. Yankees
6:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/21
vs.Astros
6:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/14
vs. Astros
1:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/15
@Braves
4:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/17
@Twins
4:10p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/14
@Braves
4:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/18
@Twins
11:10a.m.
CSN-CAL
7/15
East Division
W L Pct GB
Washington 50 34 .595
Atlanta 47 39 .547 4
New York 46 41 .529 5 1/2
Miami 41 45 .477 10
Philadelphia 37 51 .420 15
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Cincinnati 48 38 .558
Pittsburgh 48 38 .558
St. Louis 46 41 .529 2 1/2
Milwaukee 41 45 .477 7
Chicago 34 52 .395 14
Houston 33 54 .379 15 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Los Angeles 48 40 .545
San Francisco 47 40 .540 1/2
Arizona 42 44 .488 5
Colorado 34 52 .395 13
San Diego 34 54 .386 14
FridaysGames
Chicago Cubs 8, Arizona 1
Cincinnati 5, St. Louis 3
Washington 5, Miami 1
Atlanta 7, N.Y. Mets 5
Milwaukee 10, Pittsburgh 7
Colorado 6, Philadelphia 2
L.A. Dodgers 2, San Diego 1
San Francisco 5, Houston 1
SaturdaysGames
Arizona (J.Saunders 4-5) at Chicago Cubs (Demp-
ster 4-3), 10:05 a.m.
N.Y. Mets (Dickey 12-1) at Atlanta (Hanson 10-5),
1:05 p.m.
St.Louis (Lohse 9-2) at Cincinnati (Leake 3-6),1:05
p.m.
Pittsburgh (Correia 5-6) at Milwaukee (Estrada 0-
3), 4:10 p.m.
Washington (G.Gonzalez 12-3) at Miami (Buehrle
8-8), 4:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (Worley 4-5) at Colorado (Guthrie 3-
8), 5:10 p.m.
Houston (Harrell 7-6) at San Francisco (Lincecum
3-10), 6:05 p.m.
San Diego (Volquez 5-7) at L.A. Dodgers (Harang
6-5), 6:10 p.m.
East Division
W L Pct GB
New York 53 33 .616
Baltimore 45 41 .523 8
Tampa Bay 45 42 .517 8 1/2
Boston 44 43 .506 9 1/2
Toronto 43 44 .494 10 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 47 38 .553
Cleveland 45 41 .523 2 1/2
Detroit 45 42 .517 3
Kansas City 37 47 .440 9 1/2
Minnesota 36 50 .419 11 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 52 34 .605
Los Angeles 48 39 .552 4 1/2
Oakland 44 43 .506 8 1/2
Seattle 36 51 .414 16 1/2
FridaysGames
Detroit 7, Baltimore 2
N.Y.Yankees 6, L.A. Angels 5
Cleveland 1,Toronto 0
Boston 3,Tampa Bay 1
Oakland 6, Minnesota 3
Chicago White Sox at Kansas City, late
Texas at Seattle, late
SaturdaysGames
L.A. Angels (Williams 6-5) at N.Y.Yankees (F.Garcia
3-2), 10:05 a.m.
Cleveland (Jimenez 8-7) at Toronto (Laffey 0-1),
10:07 a.m.
Detroit (Scherzer 8-5) at Baltimore (W.Chen 7-5),
1:05 p.m.
Boston (Buchholz 8-2) at Tampa Bay (Price 11-4),
4:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Peavy 7-5) at Kansas City
(Hochevar 6-8), 4:10 p.m.
Oakland (Milone 8-6) at Minnesota (De Vries 2-1),
4:10 p.m.
Texas (Darvish 10-5) at Seattle (F.Hernandez 6-5),
6:10 p.m.
SundaysGames
L.A. Angels at N.Y.Yankees, 10:05 a.m.
Cleveland at Toronto, 10:07 a.m.
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Kansas City 10 5 3 33 23 17
D.C. 10 5 3 33 34 22
New York 9 5 4 31 32 27
Chicago 8 6 4 28 21 21
Houston 6 5 7 25 22 24
New England 6 7 4 22 24 22
Columbus 6 6 4 22 17 17
Montreal 6 11 3 21 27 36
Philadelphia 5 9 2 17 18 18
Toronto FC 3 11 4 13 21 35
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
San Jose 11 4 4 37 36 24
Real Salt Lake 11 6 3 36 31 21
Seattle 8 5 6 30 23 19
Vancouver 8 5 6 30 21 22
Los Angeles 7 10 2 23 28 29
Colorado 7 10 1 22 25 24
Chivas USA 5 7 5 20 11 18
Portland 5 8 4 19 16 24
FC Dallas 3 9 7 16 17 27
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie.
Saturdays Games
Sporting Kansas City 0, Houston 0, tie
Real Salt Lake 3, Portland 0
FC Dallas 0, San Jose 0, tie
Chivas USA 0, Vancouver 0, tie
Seattle FC 2, Colorado 1
Sundays Games
Los Angeles 2, Chicago 0
Philadelphia 3, Toronto FC 0
New England 2, New York 0
Columbus at Montreal, late
Wednesday, July 11
Toronto FC 3, Vancouver 2
Saturday, July 14
Montreal at Philadelphia, 4 p.m.
Sporting Kansas City at Columbus, 4:30 p.m.
Toronto FC at New England, 4:30 p.m.
Vancouver at Chicago, 5:30 p.m.
FC Dallas at Colorado, 6 p.m.
Real Salt Lake at San Jose, 7:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at Portland, 8 p.m.
NL STANDINGS AL STANDINGS MLS STANDINGS
Blue Team late in the second quarter
and the opening score by the White
Team midway through the rst.
The Blake Plattsmier-run White
Team offense appeared to be in sync
a little bit quicker than the Jon Willis-
led Blue Team offense. Both saw
extensive time playing for the
Bulldogs last year and should provide
leadership and condence for the
upcoming season.
The running game appeared to be
ahead of the passing attack at this
point of the game. Grayshirt fresh-
man George Naufahu out of San
Mateo High, showed a nice burst on
20-yard scoring run for the White
Team in the rst quarter. Another
freshman runner, D.J. Peluso of El
Camino, also showed some nice
strength and strong inside running.
Defensively, former South City
standout Rika Levi made his pres-
ence felt on a couple of series. The
Blue Team defensive lineman had
two sacks and would have had a third,
if he wasnt held. But Levi showed
tremendous quickness for a guy who
is 6-3, 350 pounds.
While the game, ultimately, is to
prepare the current crop of CSM
players for the 2012 campaign, it also
serves as a reunion of sorts for the
extended Bulldog family. Since most
college programs are already in their
summer dead time, it allows alumni
to return to the place that allowed
them to continue their careers at the
four-year level. Hoko Fanaika, who
recently signed with LSU, was in
attendance, as was former Menlo-
Atherton standout Vaughn Smith,
who Tulloch said has already locked
down the starting running back job at
Carrollton College in Texas.
Even one of CSM biggest alums
Julian Edelman, former Woodside
standout and current New England
Patriot makes it to the intrasquad
game to relive memories.
[The Blue-White Game] is a
reward for all the stuff you worked on
in practice, Edelman said, who
played in just one Blue-White Game,
prior to the 2005 season, before head-
ing off to Kent State University.
Edelman was a true freshman
when he took his rst snaps in this
game seven years ago.
Its a little more complex (than the
high school game), Edelman said.
It was fun to go out and run around
(playing football).
Edelman said he tries to stop by
whenever he is in town not only
to check in with his former coaches
but also to use the world-class facili-
ties.
I like to use the eld (to work
out), Edelman said. You dont get a
view like this too often on the East
Coast.
[CSM] is kind of where it all start-
ed on my journey (to the NFL). Its
[my] roots.
Adding a little intrigue to the game
is the fact it is played without pads or
helmets but that does not take away
from the physicality. Guys were still
running at full speed and were not
shying away from running between
the tackles.
Coaches were quick with the whis-
tle but there was still a number of col-
lisions between players just the
nature of the game.
Its as physical as you can get
without being in pads, Tulloch said.
The guys get up for it.
Continued from page 11
CSM
16
Weekend July 14-15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
WORLD
By Elizabeth A. Kennedy
and Zeina Karam
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BEIRUT The U.N. singled out govern-
ment forces Friday for blame in the latest
massacre in Syria, a frenzy of killing that rais-
es new questions about whether diplomacy
has any chance to end the crisis more than 16
months into the bloodiest revolt of the Arab
Spring.
As the violence turns ever more chaotic,
analysts warn the effort by special envoy Ko
Annan has become nothing more than a pre-
tense, with government forces, rebels,
jihadists and others ghting for power.
Violence and escalation have outpaced
political and international diplomacy, said
Fawaz A. Gerges, director of the Middle East
Center at the London School of Economics.
I dont see a light at the end of the tunnel.
... All I see is more violence and more escala-
tion, and this horrible massacre is another
sign that Syria is spiraling out of control.
Scores of people were killed Thursday
when Syrian gunners bombarded the impov-
erished village of Tremseh with tanks and hel-
icopters in what rebels claim was among the
worst single days of bloodshed in the uprising
against President Bashar Assad.
The accounts of the killings and death tolls
varied widely. Late Friday, local activists
backed away from early reports that more
than 200 people were killed. One said he had
conrmed 74, but had only 20 names. Another
provided a list of 103 names.
For its part, the Syrian government said
more than 50 people were killed when Syrian
forces clashed with armed gangs that were
terrorizing village residents. The regime
refers to its opponents as terrorists and gang-
sters.
Much remains unclear about what hap-
pened in Tremseh, an isolated hamlet in Hama
province, including why it was targeted and
whether all of the dead were civilians. One
activist group said dozens of victims were
rebel ghters.
An amateur video posted online showed a
young man wailing over the body of an elder-
ly, gray-haired man wrapped in a blanket.
Come on, Dad. For the sake of God, get
up, the man sobbed as a boom was heard in
the background.
U.N.blames regime forces for Syria massacre
By Aya Batrawy and Ashraf Sweilam
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CAIRO The Egyptian Bedouin who
abducted two Boston natives and their guide
on Friday vowed he would take more hostages
of different nationalities if police do not
release his uncle from prison.
Speaking to the Associated Press by tele-
phone, Jirmy Abu-Masuh of the Tarbeen tribe
in Egypts Sinai Peninsula, said the captives
would remain safe, but that more would be
abducted if his uncle is not released.
If my uncle gets 50 years (in prison), they
will stay with me for 50 years. If they release
him, I will release them, he said of the cap-
tives. Tomorrow I will kidnap other national-
ities and their embassies will be notied for
the whole world to know.
Abu-Masuh, a 32 year-old truck driver, said
the American man, 61, and woman, 39, were
treated as guests and given tea, coffee and a
traditional lamb dinner reserved for special
occasions in Bedouin culture. He said that the
man is a pastor from Massachusetts and that
he had been allowed to call his wife.a
I told them nothing will happen to you.
You are my guest, he said.
The two Americans could not be immedi-
ately reached for comment. Abu-Masuh said
they were asleep in his home located deep in
central Sinais rugged mountains.
The two Americans were abducted in broad
daylight when Abu-Masuh stopped the tour
bus they were in with dozens of other tourists
along a major road linking Cairo to the sixth-
century St. Catherines Monastery, located at
the foot of Mount Sinai where the Old
Testament says Moses received the stone
tablets with the Ten Commandments. The
route to the monastery is a frequent target by
Bedouins who abduct tourists to pressure
police to meet their demands, which is usual-
ly to release of a detained relative they say has
been unjustly arrested.
While armed, Abu-Masuh said he told the
man and woman to get off the bus and took
their Egyptian tour guide with them to trans-
late.
The Americans with me are scared, but we
were treated well, tour guide Haytham
Ragab, 28, told the AP from the captors
phone.
Ragab said he is not allowed to use his own
mobile phone except by permission from his
captor.
Egypt captor holding two vows more abductions
REUTERS
Men walk past destruction in Bab-Todmor in Homs, Syria.
Clinton talks with
reformist Myanmar president
SIEM REAP, Cambodia Secretary of
State Hillary Rodham Clinton declared
Myanmar open to
American investment
Friday, introducing the
reformist president to
leaders of some of the
U.S.s biggest corpora-
tions and still prodding
him to do more to expand
democracy in his long-
reclusive country.
Following the Obama
administrations recent loosening of sanctions
against Myanmar, Clinton met President
Thein Sein for an hour in the Cambodian city
of Siem Reap, praising him for several pro-
democracy reforms while suggesting more
could still be done.
Clinton and Thein Sein shared a warm
greeting in a hotel courtyard, their national
ags and tropical foliage behind them. The
two seemed much more personally engaged
than when they met last year, when Clinton
became the rst U.S. secretary of state in half-
a-century to visit Myanmar. The city hosts the
famous centuries-old temples of Angkor,
recalling an earlier age of regional glory.
I brought a very prestigious business dele-
gation to see you. I wanted them all to hear
from you tonight about your plans for the
future, Clinton told Thein Sein, and she also
asked after his family.
They then met the largest delegation of
American businesses to Southeast Asia,
including Coca Cola, Ford Motor Co.,,
General Electric, General Motors, Goldman
Sachs and Google.
With slower growth,
China cant play economic hero
BEIJING Chinas economic growth fell
to a three-year low, and a potential recovery
later this year will probably be too weak to
pull the world out of its slump.
The worlds second-largest economy grew
by 7.6 percent over a year earlier in the three
months ending in June, its slowest since early
2009 during the global crisis, data showed
Friday.
Analysts pointed to strong bank lending as a
sign of a possible recovery in the second half,
but slower growth in retail sales and factory
output left them uncertain how fast or how
vigorously the economy will improve.
The soft landing is still on track largely as
expected, but the rebound may be slightly
more drawn out, said Moodys Analytics
economist Alaistair Chan in a report.
The latest data dampen hopes China can
make up for weak demand from debt-crippled
Europe and the United States, which is strug-
gling with a sluggish recovery.
It is not certain whether or not there will be
a strong upward rebound. But at least the eco-
nomic growth rate will stop coming down,
said economist Xiao Li at Industrial Bank in
Shanghai.
Iran reports: War games
showed missile accuracy
TEHRAN, Iran War games this month
showcased missiles with improved accuracy
and ring capabilities, Iranian media reports
said Friday, an apparent response to stepped
up Western moves against Irans nuclear pro-
gram.
Irans powerful Revolutionary Guards con-
ducted the exercise in the central desert, ring
ballistic missiles including a long-range vari-
ety meant to deter an Israeli or U.S. attack.
The targets were models of foreign military
bases, and the stated goal was to show that
Irans missiles can hit Western bases and
Israel.
The U.N. Security Council has imposed
several rounds of economic sanctions on Iran,
aimed at persuading Iran to halt its uranium
enrichment program. The sanctions have hit
Irans economy, but its leaders have refused to
scale down the nuclear program.
In the latest step, The European Union put a
ban against purchase of Iranian oil in force on
July 1. EU purchases accounted for 18 percent
of Irans oil exports.
Around the world
Hillary Clinton
By Andrew Lyu
S
ummertime is in full swing, and as
usual, I am busy engaging in intern-
ships. Although I have ofcially left
high school, not a second of my life has
slowed down: I wake up
at 6 a.m. as usual, sleep at
12 a.m. as usual. A whole
month into my summer
vacation, I honestly could
not imagine my summer
any other way.
Earlier this year, the
Aragon Outlook ques-
tioned Who killed the
American summer? The editorial argued
that the iconic American summer, which
should be reserved for relaxation and pursuit
of capricious interests, had been swallowed
by the academic pressures of studying, work,
resume padding and internships. It concludes
staunchly: So, world if you expect us to
ll our summers with what is essentially an
extension of the pressures we face during the
school year and in our work, we deserve to
not be treated as children anymore. If you
expect us to work like adults, treat us like
adults. And if you are not quite ready to give
us that respect of choice, give us back our
summers. (To read the entire editorial, you
can visit www.aragonoutlook.net.)
Looking back at the editorial, which I ini-
tially agreed with, I wonder, has my summer
been swallowed whole? Have I fallen into the
societal trap of academic pressures, so much
so that I do not recognize my right to an hon-
est American summer? I argue not.
I have completed high school. I have gone
through the whole college application deal. I
have chosen a college to attend, of which I
love. And yes, I am spending my summer
working as an intern. Perhaps my current
couple of internships will look impressive on
my resume. And perhaps I could spend my
summer idling around, pursuing miscella-
neous passions, and following an agenda
which is not intrinsically academic. But,
quite frankly, I love my internship.
At my internship, I have coworkers who
have come to become my friends. I have got-
ten remarkable opportunities to meet unique
people, of whom I would not be able to meet
on my own accord. I have learned an
immense amount of interesting academic
material. And to top it all off, I have learned
a great deal about myself as well. In no way,
shape or form do I feel like I have had my
summer stolen from me.
I will admit that my summer is not the
glowing image of an American summer, as
Is the American
summer dead?
Vacation time
Visit Glacier National
Park in Montana
SEE PAGE 19
Walk with a Doc
Walk with a Doc. 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.
Saturday. Sawyer Camp Trail, Skyline Blvd. &
Crystal Springs Road, San Mateo. Hosted by
the San Mateo County Medical
Associations Community Service
Foundation. Free.
Woody Guthries 100th
Birthday Sing-A-Long
Woody Guthries 100th Birthday Sing-A-
Long. Local musical group Folk leads the
music. Snacks and beverages. Donations
accepted to pay the musicians and
support the work of the Peninsula Peace
and Justice Center. 2 p.m. Saturday. 178
South Blvd., San Mateo.
reachandteach.com. Free.
Summer Concert Series
Summer Concert Series. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Sunday. Twin Pines Park, 30 Twin Pines
Lane, Belmont. The band Blue performs
California good time music. Bring a
blanket. Food available for purchase. 595-
7441. Free.
The Murder of Napoleon Bonaparte
The Murder of Napoleon Bonaparte. The
great Napoleon dead at the age of 51.
How and why? A century and a half after
Napoleons death, modern forensic
pathologists provide the answer: The
General, the Emperor, the Conqueror of
Europe was murdered. Join historian
Michael Svanevik as he follows the
process of how this crime was nally
revealed. 2 p.m. Sunday. Cypress Lawn
Reception Center. 1370 El Camino Real,
Colma. 550-8811. Light refreshments
served. Free.
Best bets
By Christy Lemire
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
In 1994, a 13-year-old boy
named Nicholas Barclay was
reported missing from his
home in San Antonio, Texas.
Three and a half years later, he
turned up in Spain of all
places, to the obvious delight
of his worried family.
Or did he?
Who this person is and how
he insinuated himself into the
lives of unsuspecting
strangers is the subject of
The Imposter, a gripping
documentary lled with the
kind of twists, turns and dra-
matic character revelations of
a page-turner mystery. This is
a movie in which earlobes
provide a crucial plot point,
Bart Laytons movie offers a spellbinding mystery
By Christy Lemire
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES With
The Imposter, director Bart
Layton takes a non-fiction
subject the disappearance
of a 13-year-old boy and the
emergence of a man who
claims to be him years later
and depicts it with all the ten-
sion, twists and turns of a
gripping mystery. He accom-
plishes much of this feat
through clever use of reenact-
ments a tactic the great
Errol Morris used to revolu-
Inspired by Imposter, five stylish documentaries
See IMPOSTER, Page 18
See FIVE, Page 18
See STUDENT, Page 20
18
Weekend July 14-15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
WEEKEND JOURNAL
tionize documentaries decades ago.
It got me thinking about other
stylish documentaries Ive loved
over the years, ones that infused fas-
cinating, real-life tales with the
beauty and artistry of feature lms.
There are so many to choose from, I
realize Im scratching the surface
here. But I only get to choose ve
each week. Thats why the game is
fun:
Man on Wire (2008): James
Marshs Oscar-winning documen-
tary about Philippe Petit, the
diminutive French daredevil who
walked a tightrope between the
World Trade Center towers in 1974,
plays more like an intricately timed,
high-stakes heist ick. You know
from the start that Petit makes it
hes alive and all too happy to talk
about himself but youll still hold
your breath as he and his partners in
crime relive the feat. One of the
neatest tricks Marsh pulls off here is
creating the sensation that were
actually watching Petit make the
walk. But were not. No footage is
available. Marsh seamlessly pieces
together the event through photo-
graphs and recreations. Sitting in
the audience, feeling as if were in
on the scheme with Petit and his
motley crew of co-conspirators is
just one of the lms many joys.
Waltz With Bashir (2008):
Unlike anything Id ever seen
before, this changed my ideas about
the possibility of lm. Its a breath-
takingly gorgeous animated docu-
mentary, which may sound like a
contradiction in terms, but Israeli
writer-director Ari Folman breaks
all the rules with exhilarating cre-
ativity. Folman reconstructs the
hazy memories of his time as a
young soldier at war in 1980s
Lebanon by visiting friends and
then animating their talks. The
result looks like a graphic novel
brought brilliantly to life. Dark
shadows suggest impending danger,
and bright splashes of color provide
unexpected jolts of energy. That the
gures on screen resemble real peo-
ple, without appearing entirely real-
istic, adds to the fascination.
Hell and Back Again (2011):
Director and photographer Danfung
Dennis crafted this Oscar-nominat-
ed documentary about the war in
Afghanistan with the engrossing,
dreamlike artistry of a feature lm.
And yet he maintains the bracing,
intimate realism needed to authenti-
cally tell a story about battle, sur-
vival and redemption. He jumps
back and forth between a 25-year-
old Marine sergeants return to his
North Carolina hometown and the
mission that left him seriously
wounded. Dennis is so in the thick
of things, hell repeatedly make you
wonder how he got that amazing
shot. Match cuts and clever sound
editing provide a seamless flow
between past and present.
Bob Dylan: Dont Look Back
(1967): Pioneering lmmaker D.A.
Pennebaker set the standard for the
rock documentary with this classic,
behind-the-scenes look at Bob
Dylans 1965 concert tour of
England. This was impish 23-year-
old Dylan before he famously went
electric, and Pennebaker depicts this
fortuitous moment of flux with
grainy, intimate, black-and-white
camerawork. The images he cap-
tured here became endlessly copied
and parodied, from the 1987 INXS
video for Mediate, in which the
band members toss away cue cards
the way Dylan does with
Subterranean Homesick Blues, to
Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox
Story, which parodies this time in
Dylans life with dead-on hilarity.
The rough-hewn aesthetic is a thing
of restless beauty.
Stop Making Sense (1984):
One of the coolest concert lms
ever, its probably also my favorite
Jonathan Demme lm; the way he
structures it is just mesmerizing.
Stop Making Sense begins on a
stage with only lead singer David
Byrne singing Psycho Killer and
playing a guitar with a boom box on
the oor behind him. And then song
by song, piece by piece, the place
builds and lls up until the whole
stage is full with the complete band,
other musicians and an array of
instruments. The process happened
right before your eyes but it was so
subtle and deliberate, you may not
even have noticed it. Its a great
example of a band being playful and
inventive rather than self-serious.
And of course, the music is great.
Continued from page 17
FIVE
just to give you an idea of the kind of
detail we get into here.
Director Bart Layton takes a story
that was already fascinatingly weird
to begin with and makes it even
more compelling by structuring it as
a shadowy lm noir, offering infor-
mation in expertly paced, precisely
measured amounts to maximize sus-
pense. His inventive approach
includes reenactments of some
events, or as he describes them,
subjective visualizations of what
the key gures are describing in their
interviews. Some viewers may have
a problem with this tactic its one
that James Marsh also employed
recently in Man on Wire and
Project Nim but they make
sense within this stylish aesthetic.
Layton doesnt judge any of the
people involved, but rather uses this
extraordinary situation in which they
all found themselves to explore the
nature of truth: how we manufacture
it and what we will allow ourselves
to believe. Rashomon-style recol-
lections of events reinforce the sen-
sation that what were watching is
disorienting and thrilling at once.
At the center, and happily serving
as our tour guide from the very
beginning, is the imposter himself: a
French-Algerian man named
Frederic Bourdin who thoroughly
explains what he did, step by step.
Its as if hes even impressed with
himself for having pulled off this
scam; he repeatedly breaks into a
boyishly proud grin as he recalls his
actions. This person is obviously
dangerous and untrustworthy to us
but its also easy to see how he could
charm his way into or out of any sit-
uation. Hes cunning hes a sur-
vivor.
Bourdin shares how he discovered
the name of the missing boy and
assumed his identity. After manipu-
lating various authorities in Spain,
he was on his way to the United
States, accompanied by Nicholas
excited but understandably confused
older sister, Carey, whod own out
to retrieve him.
One look at this guy, with his
brown hair and dark eyes, and its
obvious hes not the blonde-haired,
blue-eyed Nicholas.
Never mind the fact that
he was also six years
older than Nicholas
would have been (and
looks it), and that he
spoke in heavily-accent-
ed English. Carey,
Nicholas mother,
Beverly, and the rest of
the family were so happy
to have their boy back,
they were willing to
accept anything espe-
cially once the fake
Nicholas began telling them stories
about the life-altering physical and
psychological torture he supposedly
suffered at the hands of his captors.
Whether the family members are
truly that gullible or they have
something to hide themselves, as its
suggested at one point its clear
that theyve lived long and difcult
lives. Perhaps the reemergence of
the long-lost Nicholas provided a
desperately needed source of opti-
mism, one they couldnt bring them-
selves to question.
Once Bourdins actions are clear,
The Imposter then becomes a
question of motive. And once you
think youve got that gured out,
Layton reveals more characters and
more twists, including a folksy, no-
nonsense private investigator who
could easily be the subject of his
own reality series on A&E.
With the help of beautifully seam-
less editing and an eerie score,
Layton moves between interviews
with Bourdin (now in his mid-30s)
and Nicholas family and recon-
structions of events, creating a uid
energy thats spellbinding until the
very end.
Continued from page 17
IMPOSTER
4:30 PM - 8:30 PM
Bar Only
WEEKEND JOURNAL 19
Weekend July 14-15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
HOPE EV HOPE EVANGELICAL ANGELICAL
LUTHERAN CHURCH LUTHERAN CHURCH
600 W. 42nd Ave., San Mateo
Pastor Eric Ackerman
Worship Service 10:00 AM
Sunday School 11:00 AM
Hope Lutheran Preschool
admits students of any race, color and
national or ethnic origin.
License No. 410500322.
Call (650) 349-0100 Call (650) 349-0100
HopeLutheranSanMateo.org
Baptist
PILGRIM BAPTIST CHURCH
Dr. Larry Wayne Ellis, Pastor
(650) 343-5415
217 North Grant Street, San Mateo
Sunday Worship Services at 8 & 11 am
Sunday School at 9:30 am
Website: www.pilgrimbcsm.org
LISTEN TO OUR
RADIO BROADCAST!
(KFAX 1100 on the AM Dial)
Every Sunday at 5:30 PM
Buddhist
LOTUS
BUDDHIST CIRCLE
(Rissho Kosei-kai of SF)
851 N. San Mateo Dr., Suite D
San Mateo
650.200.3755 650.200.3755
English Service: 4th Sunday at 10 AM
Study: Tuesday at 7 PM
www.lotusbuddhistcircle.com
Buddhist
SAN MATEO
BUDDHIST TEMPLE
Jodo ShinshuBuddhist
(Pure Land Buddhism)
2 So. Claremont St.
San Mateo
(650) 342-2541
Sunday English Service &
Dharma School - 9:30 AM
Reverend Ryuta Furumoto
www.sanmateobuddhisttemple.org
Church of Christ
CHURCH OF CHRIST
525 South Bayshore Blvd. SM
650-343-4997
Bible School 9:45am
Services 11:00am and 2:00pm
Wednesday Bible Study 7:00pm
Minister J.S. Oxendine
Clases de Biblicas Y Servicio de
Adoracion
En Espanol, Si UD. Lo Solicita
www.church-of-christ.org/cocsm
Congregational
THE
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
OF SAN MATEO - UCC
225 Tilton Ave. & San Mateo Dr.
(650) 343-3694
Worship and Church School
Every Sunday at 10:30 AM
Coffee Hour at 11:45 AM
Nursery Care Available
www.ccsm-ucc.org
Non-Denominational
Church of the
Highlands
A community of caring Christians
1900 Monterey Drive
(corner Sneath Lane) San Bruno
(650)873-4095
Adult Worship Services:
Friday: 7:30 pm (singles)
Saturday: 7:00 pm
Sun 7, 8:30, 10, & 11:30 am,
5 pm
Youth Worship Service:
For high school & young college
Sunday at 10:00 am
Sunday School
For adults & children of all ages
Sunday at 10:00 am
Donald Sheley, Founding Pastor
Leighton Sheley, Senior Pastor
REDWOOD CHURCH
Our mission...
To know Christ and make him known.
901 Madison Ave., Redwood City
(650)366-1223
Sunday services:
9:00AM & 10:45AM
www.redwoodchurch.org
By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL
SENIOR CORRESPONDENT
BLACK BEARS AND RED
BUSES IN GLACIER NATION-
AL PARK. When Red Bus passen-
gers on a recent morning tour of
Glacier National Park in Montana
saw a young black bear a few feet
away, it was the high point of sev-
eral days of collective sightings of
moose (lazing in a river), an eagle
(on a lakeshore treetop) and deer
(everywhere). While there is no
guarantee of bear sightings,
Glaciers iconic Red Buses are a
sure thing and a must do.
The distinctive 17-passenger
vehicles were manufactured from
1936-1939 and at one time operat-
ed in seven National Parks. Today,
Glacier National Park uses 33 of
its original buses, fully restored by
Ford Motor Company, to provide
half-day and all-day tours of the
park. The Red Bus drivers are
called Jammers because of the
jamming sound they made when
they double-clutched the buses
unsynchronized transmissions on
the steep roads of the park. (The
original standard transmissions
were replaced in 1989 with newer
automatics, removing the trade-
mark jamming sound.) Jammers
knowledgeably provide commen-
tary about everything from park
history and geology to its flora and
fauna while they guide the buses
over Glaciers famous Going-to-
the-Sun Road. In inclement weath-
er, riders are under cover and even
provided with lap blankets, but on
sunny days, the buses canvas con-
vertible tops are rolled back and
the glorious Rockies are all
around.
Veteran Jammer Glenn Walker
said, Tours all take in the spectac-
ular scenery of this Continental
Divide area thats called The
Crown of the Continent. Its a
journey you wont forget! one
family recently confirmed while
on their 11th annual tour. Each
tour, they beamed, left them with
an exciting, memorable experience
on their Ride Back in Time.
For information about Red Bus
tours or to make reservations con-
tact www.glacierparkinc.com or
call (406) 892-2525.
HISTORIC LAKE MCDON-
ALD LODGE. Red Buses make
stops at the parks four historic
lodges, including the rustic Swiss
Chalet-style Lake McDonald
Lodge, 10 miles inside the parks
west entrance, just off the Going-
to-the-Sun Road. Opened in 1914
by a private owner, the three-story
lodge on the shore of Lake
McDonald, the parks largest lake,
was designed to continue the Swiss
theme already developed by the
Great Northern Railway as it built
other hotels and backcountry
chalets in the park.
Lake McDonald Lodges soaring
three-story lobby centers on a mas-
sive stone fireplace in an oversized
inglenook around which guests
happily gather. Many of the
lodges original furnishings remain
in place, and the lobbys striking
hanging lanterns are exact succes-
sors to the originals made by
Kanai craftsmen. The balconies
overlooking the lobby are decorat-
ed with skins and taxidermy
mounts of native species acquired
by the lodges builder. The lobbys
concrete floor is stamped in a flag-
stone pattern and inscribed with
messages in Kootenai (a Native
American dialect), such as wel-
come, new life to those who
drink here and looking toward
the mountain. The front desk pro-
vides a guide to the sayings and to
the animal mounts. Pick one up
and take a look.
In the 1920s, Lake McDonald
Lodge was a favorite haunt of
Cowboy artist Charles Russell,
who had a cabin across the lake.
Russell would sit in one of the
rockers on the lodges back veran-
da and enjoy a drink (or two) while
he admired the lake view and told
cowboy stories to lucky Glacier
Park visitors. Now, you can sit in
one of those same rockers with
your favorite beverage, enjoy the
same lovely view and, given a
serendipitous wildlife sighting on
a Red Bus tour, tell stories of your
own.
Lake McDonald Lodge is open
from late May through late
September. Amenities include
restaurants, a gift shop and boat
tours of Lake McDonald.
Information at www.glacierpark-
inc.com or (406) 888-5431.
GLACIER PARK GROUP
TOURS. Glacier Park, Inc., the
National Park Services authorized
concessioner, has comprehensive
tours that offer transportation from
the airport or Amtrak station,
overnights at historic park lodges,
fly-fishing, rafting, Afternoon Tea
at the Prince of Wales Hotel and,
of course, a trip on a Red Bus.
Information at greatglacieradven-
ture.com, (406) 892-6729 or
agreen@glacierparkinc.com. Road
Scholar offers six-night trips with
full-day excursions into the park
from a base near Whitefish, Mont.
Information at
www.roadscholar.org or (877)
426-8056.
GETTING TO GLACIER
COUNTRY. United Airlines
offers seasonal direct flights from
San Francisco to Missoula, Mont.,
while Allegiant offers year-round
direct flights from Oakland to
Missoula and Oakland to Glacier
Park International Airport.
Amtraks Empire Builder stops at
the Belton station, at the west
entrance of the Park.
AND REMEMBER: Unusual
travel suggestions are dancing les-
sons from God. Kurt Vonnegut.
Susan Cohn is a member of Bay Area
Travel Writers and North American
Travel Journalists Association. She
may be reached at susan@smdai-
lyjournal.com.
GLACIER COUNTRY TOURISM
Red Bus riders enjoy a look at Mount Reynolds during a tour of Glacier National Park in Montana.
WEEKEND JOURNAL 20
Weekend July 14-15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
depicted in cartoons like Ed, Edd, n
Eddy or Phineas and Ferb. I do have a
day-to-day routine, I do have responsibili-
ties which I am not absolutely exhilarated
for and I do have deep dark bags beneath
my eyes. But my internships are a reflec-
tion of my interests. Working does not pre-
clude my pursuit of passion.
Perhaps when the Outlooks team ques-
tioned who killed the American summer, it
had recognized a legitimate trend. More stu-
dents are spending their summers working
internships and jobs and taking classes. But
this trend is not a signal of the death of the
American summer.
I believe that the American summer is
only truly dead for those individuals who
submit to academic pressures. If an individ-
ual chooses to take SAT classes over the
summer, maybe that individuals summer is
what the Outlook would describe as dead
(unless of course, the individual has a pro-
clivity to the SAT). Otherwise, opportunities
to take jobs and internships are not murderers
of summer. Students can nd resume-impres-
sive jobs and concurrently follow interests.
At least, I know that is the case for me.
Andrew Lyu is a recent graduate of Aragon High
School. Student News appears in the weekend edi-
tion. You can email Student News at news@smdai-
lyjournal.com.
Continued from page 17
STUDENT
SATURDAY, JULY 14
Bike 4 Breath fundraising bike ride.
7 a.m. (time varies depending on race).
Life Technologies, 4000 E. Third Ave.,
Foster City. Hundreds of participants
will ride to promote lung health and
clean air policy in the Bay Area. $25 for
kids under age 18 for 10 miles. For
more information call 994-5868 or visit
ggphp.org.
The American Red Cross Northern
California Region Mobile Blood
Drive. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. St. Raymond
Parish, 1100 Santa Cruz Ave., Menlo
Park. The Red Cross recommends
scheduling an appointment to donate
blood. Open to the public.The sponsor
code is INTERFAITHCOMMUNITY. Free.
For more information visit
redcrossblood.org.
TheRiP-TiDEs! 9 p.m. to midnight.The
Iron Gate Restaurant, 1360 El Camino
Real, Belmont. Come enjoy great oldies
and contemporary music, including
several songs never before heard. For
more information visit iron-gate.com.
Blessing of the Animals. 10 a.m.
Benthany Presbyterian Church, 2400
Rosewood Drive, San Bruno. All
animals welcome. Wonder Dog
Rescue, a small dog rescue
organization, will have dogs on site for
adoption. Please bring unopened dog
or cat food for donation. Free. For more
information call 589-5303.
Walk with a Doc. 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.
Sawyer Camp Trail, Skyline Blvd. &
Crystal Springs Road, San Mateo.
Hosted by the San Mateo County
Medical Associations Community
Service Foundation. Free. For more
information contact
robeck@smcma.org.
Wedding Event by Wedding Day
Hostess. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Plaza Florist,
1171 San Carlos Ave., San Carlos. Meet
local vendors, sample appetizers and
cakes and win raffle prizes. Event is
open invitation invite your friends.
Free. For more information email
Nicole@WeddningDayHostess.com.
Erin Ann Thomas signs her book,
Coal in Our Veins: A Personal
Journey. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Barnes and
Nobles, Hillsdale Shopping Center, 11
West Hillsdale Blvd., San Mateo. For
more information call 341-5560.
Maphilindo Silat Camp. 1 p.m. to 5
p.m. Tandez Academy of Martial Arts,
1931 Old Middlefield Way, Unit C,
Mountain View. Bring one friend for
$10 off. Continues Sunday, July 15 at
the same time. Sifu Adrian Tandez
shares his knowledge of Indonesian
Silat. For more information visit
www.jkdkickboxing.com/events.html.
Woody Guthries 100th Birthday
Sing-A-Long. 2 p.m. Reach and Teach,
178 South Blvd., San Mateo. Local
musical group Folk This will lead the
music. There will be snacks and
beverages. Donations will be accepted
to pay for the musicians and to
support the work of the Peninsula
Peace and Justice Center. Free. For
more information visit
reachandteach.com.
Introduction to Drama Therapy
Workshop. 3 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Unitarian Universalist Church, 300 E.
Santa Inez Ave., San Mateo. Drama
therapy uses acting, improvisation,
theatre games and psychodrama as
tools for personal growth and change.
Presented by the Living Arts
Counseling Center.Those who wish to
attend must register in advance. $15.
For more information and to register
call (415) 820-9696.
Saturday Ballroom Dance Party. 8
p.m. to midnight. Boogie Woogie
Ballroom, 551 Foster City Blvd., Suite
G, Foster City. East Coast Swing Lesson
from 8 p.m. to 9 p.m., followed by a
Ballroom Dance Party until midnight.
$12 at 8 p.m., $10 at 9 p.m. For more
information call 627-4854.
SUNDAY, JULY 15
Tour de Peninsula. 6 a.m. (time varies
depending on race), Coyote Point Park,
San Mateo. This established Bay Area
bike ride offers a variety of routes to suit
everyone from kids and rst time riders
to serious cyclists. After the race listen to
live music, picnic and enjoy family
activities. Sponsor Expo from 8 a.m. to 3
p.m. Adults $55 day of or $50 by Aug. 4.
Ages 12-17 $25. Under age 11 free. For
more information visit
www.supportparks.org or call 321-1638.
Sunday Dhamma Service and
Vegetarian Potluck. 9:30 a.m. to 1
p.m. Karuna Buddhist Vihara, 279
Aviador Ave., Millbrae.This is a time for
the community to gather and practice
at Karuna Buddhist Vihara a great
way to start the new week. For more
information contact
info@KarunaBV.org.
Music in the Park. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
Washington Park, 850 Burlingame
Ave., Burlingame. Featuring Hobo
Paradise. Free.
Third Sunday Ballroom Dance:
Dancing with the Bob Gutierrez
Band. 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. San Bruno
Senior Center, 1555 Crystal Springs
Road, San Bruno. $5. For more
information call 616-7150.
Summer Concert Series. 1 p.m. to 4
p.m. Twin Pines Park, 30 Twin Pines
Lane, Belmont. The band Blue will
perform California good time music.
Those who plan on attending should
bring a blanket. Food will be available
for purchase. Free admission. For more
information call 595-7441.
Sunday Music Jam. 4 p.m. Pioneer
Saloon, 2925 Woodside Road,
Woodside. Free. For more information
call 851-8487.
Country and West Coast Swing
Dance Party. 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Boogie
Woogie Ballroom, 551 Foster City Blvd.,
Suite G, Foster City.This months dance
is hosted by Heide D. She will be
teaching Mean Line Dance and
Beginning Country Two Step from 5
p.m. to 6 p.m. and Intermediate
Country Two Step from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Country and West Coast Swing Dance
Party until 9 p.m. $15 for one or both
lessons and dance party. $10 for dance
only. For more information call 627-
4854.
Downtown Jazz. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Courthouse Square, 2200 Broadway,
Redwood City. Octobop featuring Lisa
Engelken will be performing. Free. For
more information call 780-7340 or visit
http://www.redwoodcity.org/events/
movies.html.
MONDAY, JULY 16
Monday Group Series Dance Class.
7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Boogie Woogie
Ballroom, 551 Foster City Blvd., Suite
G, Foster City. Beginning Linday from
7 p.m. to 8 p.m. American Smooth
Level One Tango from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
American Smooth Level Two Tango
from 8 p.m. to 9 p.m. American Rhythm
Samba Three from 8 p.m. to 9 p.m. For
more information call 627-4854.
Handcrafted and Through the Lens:
Nature Interpreted. 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Filoli, 86 Caada Road, Woodside. This
juried, multiple-media exhibit features
two dimensional drawings, paintings
and photographs inspired by nature.
Event continues through Oct. 21. For
more information call 364-8300 ext.
508.
TUESDAY, JULY 17
Senior Meals Lunches. 11:30 a.m.
Foster City Recreation Center, Senior
Wing, 650 Shell Blvd., Foster City.
Luncheons are held on the first and
third Tuesday of each month. $4. For
more information go to the front desk
at the Foster City Senior Wing.
San Mateo CountyNewcomers Club
Luncheon. Noon. Sixteen Mile House,
448 Broadway, Millbrae. Speaker Laura
Fannuchi of HIP Housing will explain
how the group assists the
disadvantaged and disabled living in
San Mateo County. RSVP deadline is
July 11; checks must be received by
that date. $25. For more information
call 286-0688.
Wellness Lecture: Hormone
Balancing. 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. New
Leaf Community Markets, 150 San
Mateo Road, Half Moon Bay. Join Dr.
Shannon Wood for a discussion about
the importance of hormone balancing
in all three phases of a womans life.
Will explain ways to recreate balance.
Free. To register call 726-3110.
SaveSign Hill. 6:30 p.m. Boys and Girls
Club, 291 Hillsdale Blvd., South San
Francisco. Urgent meeting to find
solutions for preserving the northern
face of Sign Hill. Meeting is hosted by
Friends of Sign Hill and San Bruno
Mountain Watch Conservatory. Open
to public. Free. For more information
call 873-1022.
Ellen Ullman will read from By
Blood. 7 p.m. Light refreshments will
be served. Free. Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont. For
more information call 591-8286.
Tuesdays Group Series Dance Class.
7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Boogie Woogie
Ballroom, 551 Foster City Blvd., Suite
G, Foster City. Beginners-only series
class learning Salsa One from 7 p.m.
to 8 p.m. Beginning West Coast Swing
Class from 7:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Same-
sex learning West Coast Swing from 8
p.m. to 9 p.m. Intermediate West Coast
Swing Class from 8:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.
For more information call 627-4854.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
programs. Peninsula Bridge Program aims to
give these students tools to choose an academ-
ic path later in life, Shaner said.
St. Matthews hosts a class of fth and sixth
grade students. Each student receives lessons
in math and English in the morning and
enrichment activities in the afternoon.
Ariana, 10, welcomed the tour group to her
math class and explained students had been
learning about decimals and fractions.
This is my favorite class because I like
math, she said.
In the fth grade language art class, students
were writing summaries and drawings for a
book they just read called Bud, Not Buddy.
Ten-year-old Esteban really enjoyed the
10th chapter. He recalled a specic scene he
enjoyed from the book. For Esteban, the extra
help in math is really nice. He enjoyed getting
feedback on his work.
Executive Director Deirdre Marlowe, who
is relatively new to the organization which has
been around for more than 20 years, noted it
works with many Hispanic students. That
same group of students has a higher rate of
diabetes. Fighting that took some strategy. As
a result, new this year are lessons on health for
sixth grade students. On Thursday morning,
students were using colorful dough to discuss
portion sizes.
Also, the students are all wearing pedome-
ters this year. The amount of walking they do
during the day is collected. Throughout the
nine sites, the goal has been to walk the dis-
tance to the Olympics in London. Some stu-
dents have been walking six to seven miles a
day.
Middle school is often the time when stu-
dents lose their enthusiasm for school, said
Marlowe. But thats never what Marlowe sees
at the Peninsula Bridge sites.
Its such a simple thing, but its magic, she
said of students engage and energized by the
learning.
One parent said her son, who will attend
Horrall Elementary School in San Mateo this
fall, has truly enjoyed how learning is like a
game.
This year, the program is serving just more
than 400 students from San Mateo to
Mountain View. Organizers hope to expand
that to 600 by the summer of 2014. Doing so
will require more fundraising and support
from the community, said Marlowe.
To support the Peninsula Bridge Program
visit www.peninsulabridge.org.
Heather Murtagh can be reached by email:
heather@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650)
344-5200 ext. 105.
Continued from page 1
BRIDGE
in one or more languages in addition to
English. Participation in the program is volun-
tary. To mark the accomplishment, a gold seal
is added to the high school diploma of quali-
ed students.
Fluency in a second language helps our
students be well-prepared to compete in a
global marketplace, State Superintendent
Tom Torlakson wrote in a prepared statement.
The gold seal on their high school diploma
recognizes and celebrates a second language
as an asset not just for themselves, but for our
state, nation and world.
In San Mateo County, schools in the
Sequoia Union High School District partici-
pated. Locally, 394 students earned the seal.
Menlo-Atherton High School had 129 stu-
dents achieve the seal, followed by Sequoia
with 109, Woodside with 79 and Carlmont
with 77. Those who earned the seal locally did
so in French, German, Latin, Mandarin or
Spanish.
Throughout the state, more than 70 percent
of students earned the seal by demonstrating
prociency in Spanish, followed by 10 percent
excelling in French, 7 percent in Mandarin
and 2 percent in Japanese, Cantonese and
German. More than 40 different languages,
including American Sign, are represented in
this years class, according to the California
Department of Education.
To qualify for the seal, a high school gradu-
ate must: Complete all English-language arts
requirements for graduation with an overall
grade point average of 2.0 or higher; pass the
California Standards Test in English-language
arts administered junior year at the procient
level; and show prociency in one or more
languages in addition to English demonstrated
by passing a foreign language advanced place-
ment exam with a score of three or higher or
an international baccalaureate exam with a
score of four or higher or by successfully
completing a four-year high school course of
study in a world language resulting in an over-
all GPA or 3.0 or higher.
Heather Murtagh can be reached by email:
heather@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650)
344-5200 ext. 105.
Continued from page 1
SEAL
was pronounced dead at the hospital, he said.
The boys name has not been released.
The woman remains in critical condition.
Seven agencies responded to the re San
Bruno, Millbrae, Daly City, South San
Francisco, Central County, Colma, AMR and
County Dispatch, said Downing. One re-
ghter sustain an injury to his hand from bro-
ken glass that required 10 stitches.
Bay City News contributed to this report.
Heather Murtagh can be reached by email:
heather@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650)
344-5200 ext. 105.
Continued from page 1
FIRE
After being medically cleared, Lei was
booked into Maguire Correctional Facility,
according to the CHP.
He is being held on $250,000 bail and will
appear in court Monday afternoon if prosecu-
tors le charges.
Anyone with information about the crash is
encouraged to call the CHP at (707) 551-4100.
Continued from page 1
CRASH
SATURDAY, JULY 14, 2012
CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- Provided you make
a few positive changes, your fscal picture can be
much better than you might realize. You should
construct a budget in which your expenditures dont
exceed your income.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Persons with whom you get
involved on a project will respect your organizational
qualities. They instinctively know that once you take
the helm, youll steer the correct course.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Even if youre not one
of the frst out of the starting block, youre likely to
be a strong fnisher. Know that youre lucky when it
comes to endings.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- If you have a serious
matter to discuss with a close friend, lead up to
your subject gradually, if you can. Patience in your
presentation will lessen the possibility of a misun-
derstanding.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Unless you are materi-
ally motivated, conditions in general are likely to be
rather run-of-the-mill for you. Make acquisition one
of your objectives, and your aims will be fulflled.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- It behooves you to
be an attentive listener in conversations with persons
whose ideas and thinking you respect. What you
learn can further your aims immensely.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Some repayment
might be in the offng from one whose debt youve
been trying to collect. If you dont have a ft over the
installment being small, theyll continue making good.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- An involvement that
might appear to be minor to most is likely to be
crucial for a very practical reason. Its an activity that
proves hard things can be done an easy way.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- The possibilities for
achieving an extremely important objective are
excellent. Youll know how to adjust to developments,
making a backup plan very effective.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- Your ideas and con-
cepts have real promise, and could even be superior
to those of your colleagues. Dont sell yourself short
regardless of how much another brags about his or
her achievements.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- Changes that occur,
even those initiated by others, are likely to prove to
be more to your beneft than anybody elses. If youre
smart, youll go with the fow.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- Dont waste your time
trying to make a deal with someone who is not
empowered to make any decisions. Youll go further
faster by dealing with those who call the shots.
COPYRIGHT 2012 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
COMICS/GAMES
7-14-12
fRIDAYS PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOkU
ANSwERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
kids Across/Parents Down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


Each row and each column must contain the numbers 1
through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes, called
cages, must combine using the given operation (in any
order) to produce the target numbers in the top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in the
top-left corner.
K
e
n
K
e
n

is
a
r
e
g
is
te
r
e
d
tr
a
d
e
m
a
r
k
o
f N
e
x
to
y
, L
L
C
.
2
0
1
2
K
e
n
K
e
n
P
u
z
z
le
L
L
C
. A
ll r
ig
h
ts
r
e
s
e
r
v
e
d
.
D
is
t. b
y
U
n
iv
e
r
s
a
l U
c
lic
k
fo
r
U
F
S
, In
c
. w
w
w
.k
e
n
k
e
n
.c
o
m
7
-
1
4
-
1
2
ACROSS
1 Nursery word
5 -- Raton, Fla.
9 Crunch targets
12 Aspen transport (hyph.)
13 Time long past
14 London lav
15 Prefx for second
16 Insults
18 Crushes grapes
20 Cheesy snack
21 QED part
22 Indent key
23 Cutlass kin
26 Holm and Fleming
30 Microwave
33 Mammoth
34 Bangkok native
35 Outback mineral
37 Keep for later
39 Fitting
40 Slimy
41 Decree
43 Food fsh
45 Promising
48 Indiras dad
51 Crazy Horses foe
53 Flowering shrub
56 Rational
57 Laid up
58 Safekeeping
59 Is, in Madrid
60 Sharp knock
61 Rapier
62 Bogus
DOwN
1 Natural elevs.
2 Subside
3 Lords digs
4 Scents
5 Farewells
6 Comic strip caveman
7 Dernier --
8 Insurance giant
9 Obi-Wan player
10 This and that
11 Nothing special (hyph.)
17 Regular routine
19 Chief god of Memphis
22 Fountain in Rome
24 Transported kids
25 Major Hooples word
27 Cry of discovery
28 Siesta
29 Be idle
30 Monkey haven
31 PFC mail drop
32 La --, Bolivia
36 Spandex fber
38 Pantyhose shade
42 Mixes the salad
44 Weight unit
46 Squirrel away
47 Gossipy type
48 Roulette color
49 First name in jazz
50 Beatles movie
51 Canadian tribe
52 Squeeze oranges
54 Skip stones
55 Before
DILBERT CROSSwORD PUZZLE
fUTURE SHOCk
PEARLS BEfORE SwINE
GET fUZZY
Weekend July 14-16, 2012 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Weekend July 14-15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY DRIVER
FOSTER CITY
ROUTE
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide deliv-
ery of the Daily Journal six days per week, Mon-
day thru Saturday, early morning. Experience
with newspaper delivery required. Must have
valid license and appropriate insurance coverage
to provide this service in order to be eligible.
Papers are available for pickup in San Mateo at
3:00 a.m. or San Francisco earlier.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday only, 10am
to 4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
105 Education/Instruction
CALVARY
PRESCHOOL
OPEN
ENROLLMENT
Little Learners: age 2.5-3.5
Big Explorers: age 3.5-5
calvarypreschoolmillbrae.com
(650)588-8030 (650)588-8030
106 Tutoring
TUTORING
Spanish, French,
Italian
Certificated Local
Teacher
All Ages!
(650)573-9718
106 Tutoring
TUTORING
Credential Teacher
Resume Available
Pre-K to College
Multiple Subjects
Contact Elizabeth
opendoortutoring@yahoo.com
110 Employment
CLEANERS - We are looking for House
Cleaners/Laundry personnel in the Bur-
lingame area. Please call Bao @
(209)471-7348.
110 Employment
EDUCATION -
SPECIAL EDUCATION CO-
TEACHER, Arbor Bay School, San Car-
los CA: Provides classroom support to
Special Education Teachers, including
assisting with lesson planning, teaching
paperwork, attending to any physical
needs the students may have, and over-
seeing students activities to ensure safe-
ty and positive instructional environment.
Associate degree & 2 years experience.
Mail RESUME TO Arbor Bay School,
1017 Cedar Street, San Carlos, CA
94070.
HOME CARE HOME CARE AIDES AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus,
1yr exp required.
Matched Caregivers
(650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or
(888)340-2273
110 Employment
JANITORIAL -
F/T Janitorial Supervisor. M-F.
Security clearance required. Using floor
equipment and have commercial
cleaning experience. Fax resume at
510-222-8741$15.39/hr
JEWELRY SALES
Entry up to $13 Dia up to $20
650-367-6500 FX:650-367-6400
jobs@jewelryexchange.com
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
110 Employment
NOW HIRING COOKS & BUSBOYS -
FT & PT, Good pay (B.O.E.). Apply in
person @ Neals Coffee Shop, 1845 El
Camino Real, Burlingame,
(650)692-4281
PLUMBER - Experienced needed, serv-
ice & repair, repipe & remodels. RE-
quired to have minimum 5 years experi-
ence. Fax resume to Attention Angie,
(650)595-2639.
RESTAURANT -
COUNTER PERSON, Sandwich shop,
P/T, need flexible schedule. Apply 1480
El Camino Real, Belmont.
RESTAURANT -
Experienced line, Night / Weekends.
Apply in person,1201 San Carlos Ave.,
San Carlos.
SALES -
WellnessMatters Magazine is seeking
independent contractor/advertising
sales representatives to help grow
this new publication for the Peninsula
and Half Moon Bay. WellnessMatters
has the backing of the Daily Journal.
The perfect contractor will have a pas-
sion for wellness and for sharing our
message with potential advertisers,
supporters and sponsors. Please
send cover letter and resume to: in-
fo@wellnessmattersmagazine.com.
Positions are available immediately.
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
TELEPHONE WORK
Appointment Setting -
From Leads
EXPERIENCE PREFERRED
not required
TOP PAY & BONUSES
Training Provided
Mr. Tempus
(650)570-7663
WEEKLY
SALARY + BONUS
Flexible Hour,
Outside Position,
Full Training
NO EXPERIENCE REQUIRED
to $38.75 per hour
Call Mr. Cannon
(650)372-2810
VETERANS WELCOME
YOURE INVITED
Are you: Dependable
Friendly
Detail Oriented
Willing to learn new skills
Do you have: Good English skills
A Desire for steady employment
A desire for employment benefits
If the above items describe you,
please call (650)342-6978.
Immediate opening available in
Customer Service position.
Call for an appointment.
Crystal Cleaning Center
San Mateo, CA 94402
127 Elderly Care
FAMILY RESOURCE
GUIDE
The San Mateo Daily Journals
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.
Every Tuesday & Weekend
Look for it in todays paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.
23 Weekend July 14-15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 514118
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Angelina Sheri Franceschini
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Angelina Sheri Franceschini
filed a petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Angelina Sheri France-
schini, aka Angelina S. Franceschini, aka
Angelina Piccolotti, aka Angelina S. Pic-
colotti, aka Angelina Sheri Piccolotti
Proposed name: Angelina Sheri Piccolot-
ti
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on August 7,
2012 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2E, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 06/18/2012
/s/ Mark R. Forcum /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 06/14/2012
(Published, 06/30/12, 07/07/12,
07/14/12, 07/21/12)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250872
The following person is doing business
as: Coastside Bookkeeping Services,
8231 Pescadero Rd., LOMA MAR, CA
94021 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Carron Gomes, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
11/4/2002
/s/ Carron Gomes /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/12/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/23/12, 06/30/12, 07/07/12, 07/14/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251029
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Brehmers Handmade Candies, 2)
Brehmers Candies 126 Alvaravo St.,
BRISBANE, CA 94005 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Cynthia
Brehmer, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 05/01/2007.
/s/ Cynthia Brehmer /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/21/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/23/12, 06/30/12, 07/07/12, 07/14/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251047
The following person is doing business
as: California Association of Lubang and
Looc, 725 Kathryne Ave., SAN MATEO,
CA 94401 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: California Association of
Lubang and Looc, CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Sonia Sanchez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/22/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/23/12, 06/30/12, 07/07/12, 07/14/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251148
The following person is doing business
as: Jolly Junkman, 851 N. Amphlett Blvd.
#315, SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Jo-
seph Michael Lamoureux, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on .
/s/ Joseph Michael Lamoureux /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/29/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/30/12, 07/07/12, 07/14/12, 07/21/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251209
The following person is doing business
as: Bayshore Mobile Notary, 304 Dolphin
Isle, FOSTER CITY, CA 94404 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Steven
M. Cohn, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Steven M. Cohn /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/03/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/07/12, 07/14/12, 07/21/12, 07/28/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250792
The following person is doing business
as: Salmeron Painting, 2159 Ralmar
Ave, EAST PALO ALTO, CA 94303 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Noel A. Salmeron, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/ Noel A. Salmeron /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/07/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/07/12, 07/14/12, 07/21/12, 07/28/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251220
The following person is doing business
as: Nesian Pride Creations, 563 Weeks
St., EAST PALO ALTO, CA 94303 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Lucia K. Musunamasi, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
/s/ Lucia K. Musunamasi /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/03/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/07/12, 07/14/12, 07/21/12, 07/28/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251150
The following person is doing business
as: Lyfestyle Ink, 1923-A South El Cami-
no RealSAN MATEO, CA 94401 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Daniel Hernandez, 475 B St, Colma, CA
94014. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Daniel Hernandez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/29/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/07/12, 07/14/12, 07/21/12, 07/28/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250898
The following person is doing business
as: Peninsula Furniture Assembly, 1013
Madera Ave # D, MENLO PARK, CA
94025 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Darryl L. Warren, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
06/13/2012
/s/ Darryl L. Warren /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/14/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/07/12, 07/14/12, 07/21/12, 07/28/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251096
The following person is doing business
as: Roosevelt Liquor & Grocery, 1700 El
Camino Real, REDWOOD CITY, CA
94063 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Seong Ik Kim and Hyun Jao
Hwang, 768 N. Rengstorff Ave., #118,
Moutain View, CA 94043. The business
is conducted by Husband and Wife. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ Seong Ik Kim /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/26/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/07/12, 07/14/12, 07/21/12, 07/28/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250861
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Nor Cal DJs, 2) The Gomez Broth-
ers, 63 Mooring Lane, DALY CITY, CA
94014 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Hugo Gomez, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
/s/ Hugo Gomez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/12/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/07/12, 07/14/12, 07/21/12, 07/28/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251062
The following person is doing business
as: ASC Construction Services, 4080
Campbell Ave., MENLO PARK, CA
94025 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: RW Zukin Corporation, CA.
The business is conducted by a Corpora-
tion. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Scott Mennuccy /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/25/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/07/12, 07/14/12, 07/21/12, 07/28/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251270
The following person is doing business
as: V.S. Car Service, 1070 Carolan Ave
#212, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is here-
by registered by the following owner: Val-
ter Silas Da Silva, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on N/A
/s/ Valter Da Silva /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/6/2012. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/14/12, 07/21/12, 07/28/12, 08/04/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250920
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Para La Comunitad, 135 W.
25th Ave., Ste #1109, SAN MATEO, CA
94403 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Armando Sandoval, and Mary
Beth Sandoval, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by Husband and Wife.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/ Armando Sandoval /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/15/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/14/12, 07/21/12, 07/28/12, 08/04/12).
210 Lost & Found
FOUND - Evan - I found your iPod, call
(650)261-9656
LOST - SET OF KEYS, San Mateo.
Reward. 650-274-9892
LOST - 2 silver rings and silver watch,
May 7th in Burlingame between Park Rd.
& Walgreens, Sentimental value. Call
Gen @ (650)344-8790
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST SIAMESE CAT on 5/21 in
Belmont. Dark brown& tan, blue eyes.
REWARD! (415)990-8550
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
294 Baby Stuff
B.O.B. DUALLIE STROLLER, for two.
Excellent condition. Blue. $300.
Call 650-303-8727.
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
296 Appliances
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24 wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SMALL SLOW cooker. Used once, $12
(650)368-3037
STAINLESS ELECTROLUX dishwasher
4 years old $99 (650)366-1812
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER Eureka canister
like new, SOLD!
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
VIKINGSTOVE, High End beauitful
Stainless Steel, SOLD!
WASHER AND Dryer, $200
(650)333-4400
WATER HEATER $75, (650)333-4400
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
THULE BIKE rack, for roof load bar,
Holds bike upright. $100 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
"STROLLEE" WALKING Doll in Original
Box Brunette in Red/white/black dress
$25, (650)873-8167
1936 BERLIN OLYMPIC PIN, $99.,
(650)365-1797
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
3 MADAME ALEXANDER Dolls. $40 for
all. SOLD!
67 OLD Used U.S. Postage Stamps.
Many issued before World War II. All
different. $4.00, (650)787-8600
AMISH QUILLOW, brand new, authen-
tic, $50. (650)589-8348
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
298 Collectibles
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEANIE BABIES in cases with TY tags
attached, good condition. $10 each or 12
for $100. (650) 588-1189
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
COLLECTIBLE CHRISTMAS TREE
STAND with 8 colored lights at base / al-
so have extra lights, $50., (650)593-8880
COLLECTIBLES: RUSSELL Baze Bob-
bleheads Bay Meadows, $10 EA. brand
new in original box. (415)612-0156
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
GAYLORD PERRY 8x10 signed photo
$10 (650)692-3260
JIM BEAM decorative collectors bottles
(8), many sizes and shapes, $10. each,
(650)364-7777
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK MCGUIRE hats, cards, beanie
babies, all for $98., (650)520-8558
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, 1 1/2 x 3 1/2,
all $40., (650)518-0813
POSTERS - Message in a Bottle Movie
Promo Sized Poster, Kevin Costner and
Paul Newman, New Kids On The Block
1980s, Framed Joey McEntyre, Casper
Movie, $5-12., call Maria, (650)873-8167
RAT PACK framed picture with glass 24"
by 33" mint condition $60. (650)871-7200
SIGNED AUTOGRAPH Art and Gloria
Clokey, $40., (650)873-8167
STACKING MINI-KETTLES - 3
Pots/cover: ea. 6 diam; includes carry
handle for stacking transit. Unique.
Brown speckle enamelware, $20.,
(650)341-3288
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
BILINGUAL POWER lap top
6 actividaes $18 650 349-6059
LEGO'S (2) Unopened, NINJAGO, La-
sha's Bite Cycle, 250 pieces; MONSTER
FIGHTERS, Swamp Creature, ages 7-14
$27.00 both, (650)578-9208
WIND-UP TOY train set, complete in the
box from the 50s, $80 obo (650)589-
8348
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
50s RRECORD player Motorola, it
works $50 obo Sold!
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18 high, $70
(650)387-4002
CHINA CABINET - Vintage, 6 foot,
solid mahogany. $300/obo.
(650)867-0379
303 Electronics
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
32 TOSHIBA Flat screen TV like new,
bought 9/9/11 with box. $300 Firm.
(415)264-6605
46 MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
AUDIO SPEAKERS, (2) mint condition,
works great, Polt stereo for computer,
TV, $10.00 both SOLD!
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
H/P WINDOWS Desk Jet 840C Printer.
Like New. All hookups. $99.00
(650)344-7214
NINTENDO NES plus 8 games,Works,
$30 (650)589-8348
303 Electronics
HP COLOR Scanner, Unopened box,
Scan, edit, organize photos/documents
480 x 9600 DPI, Restores colors,
brightness, $40.00 (650)578-9208
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
304 Furniture
2 DINETTE Chairs both for $29
(650)692-3260
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
4 DRAWER metal file cabinet, black, no
lock model, like new $50 (650)204-0587
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
CAST AND metal headboard and foot-
board. white with brass bars, Queen size
$95 650-588-7005
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CHANDELIER WITH 5 lights/ candela-
bre base with glass shades $20.
(650)504-3621
COFFEE TABLE - 30 x 58, light oak,
heavy, 1980s, $40., (650)348-5169
COMPUTER DESK from Ikea, $40
(650)348-5169
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DESK SOLID wood 21/2' by 5' 3 leather
inlays manufactured by Sligh 35 years
old $100 (must pick up) (650)231-8009
DESK, METAL with glass top, rolls, from
Ikea, $75 obo, SOLD!
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DISPLAY CASE wood & glass 31 x 19
inches $30. (650)873-4030
DRAFTING TABLE 30 x 42' with side
tray. excellent cond $75. SOLD!
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
DUNCAN PHYFE Mahogany china
cabinet with bow glass. $250, O/B.
Mahogany Duncan Phyfe dining room
table $150, O/B. Round mahogany side
table $150, O/B.SOLD!
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
END TABLES (2)- Cherry finish, still in
box, need to assemble, 26L x 21W x
21H, $100. for both, (650)592-2648
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8 x 30, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
HAWAIIAN STYLE living room chair Re-
tton with split bamboo, blue and white
stripe cushion $99 (650)343-4461
KITCHEN/BAR STOOL wooden with
high back $99 (650)343-4461
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36 Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable vi-
nyl medium brown $70, (650)368-3037
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
304 Furniture
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TWIN BEDS (2) - like new condition with
frame, posturepedic mattress, $99. each,
SOLD!
VANITY ETHAN Allen maple w/drawer
and liftup mirror like new $95
(650)349-2195
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $30 each or both for $50. nice
set. (650)583-8069
VINTAGE WING back chair $90,
(650)583-8069
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five avaial-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
6 BOXES of Victorian lights ceiling & wall
$90., (650)340-9644
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
CEILING FAN multi speed, brown and
bronze $45. (650)592-2648
DINING ROOM Victorian Chandelier
seven light, $90., (650)340-9644
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
FANCY CUT GLASSWARE-Bowls,
Glasses, Under $20 varied, call Maria,
(650)873-8167
IRONING BOARD $15 (650)347-8061
KITCHEN FAUCET- single handle,
W/spray - not used $19 (650)494-1687
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
RONCO ROTTISERIE - New model,
black, all accessories, paid $150., asking
$75., (650)290-1960
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
WE BUY GOLD
Highest Prices Paid on
Jewelry or Scrap
Michaels Jewelry
Since 1963
253 Park Road
Burlingame
(650)342-4461
308 Tools
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10,
4 long x 20 wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CLICKER TORQUE Wrench, 20 - 150
pounds, new with lifetime warranty and
case, $39, 650-595-3933
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
24
Weekend July 14-15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Rakes
10 Speedy
15 Chicago
university
founded in
1945
16 Participate in a
secret joint
venture?
17 Bag material
18 Orange __
19 Prefix meaning
beyond
20 Comfort, say
22 Marked simply
23 Justin
Timberlake
nickname
28 ER workers
30 SALT topic
31 Tank top
33 Party at the
shore
38 Sixth-century
pope
39 1960s music
phenomenon
41 Alice star
42 Tourist
information
center
handouts
43 Heavy weight
45 Fjord cousin
46 Cal. units
47 Casino Best
Actress nominee
54 Windy City
travel org.
56 Japanese
veggie
57 A part of
58 Ruths mother-
in-law
60 Trademarked
name for
epinephrine
64 Stickpin target
65 Popular pie
topper
66 Gordon __:
Wall Street
role
67 Campers tools
DOWN
1 Writers problem
2 Many an online
shopper
3 Longtime Chicago
Symphony leader
4 Cuisine category
5 Pic source
6 Tiny tube
travelers
7 Old Philly
stadium, with
The
8 Half __ ...
9 Remove
10 Workout unit
11 Familiar game
show address
12 Its often seen in
a stack
13 Apple products
14 Two-point
Scrabble tile
21 Ball game treat
24 Spanish roads
25 Drops off
26 College World
Series setting
27 Bed threads
29 Quick trip
32 1998 N.L. MVP
33 Engine block
component
34 County fair sight
35 Fighting
36 White wine
apritif
37 1 in Spain,
perhaps
39 Leave, in slang
40 Fruitless
44 Vietnams Ngo
Dinh __
48 Conform
49 Clowns
employer
50 Item of royal
attire
51 Just about off
52 Printer problem
53 County seat of
County Clare
55 Without
restraint
58 Noodge
59 Nagano Olympic
flame lighter
61 Washing
machine meas.
62 MPG determiner
63 Bk. after Ezra
By Barry C. Silk
(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
07/14/12
07/14/12
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
308 Tools
FMC TIRE changer Machine, $650
(650)333-4400
GENERATOR 13,000 WATTS Brand
New 20hp Honda $2800 (650)333-4400
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
SCNCO TRIM Nail Gun, $100
(650) 521-3542
STADILA LEVEL 6ft, $60
(650) 521-3542
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
309 Office Equipment
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. (650)878-9542
EPSON WORKFORCE 520 color printer,
scanner, copier, & fax machine, like new,
warranty, $30., (650)212-7020
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
10 PLANTS (assorted) for $3.00 each,
(650)349-6059
14 SEGA genius games 2 controllers
$20 (650)589-8348
2 CANES 1 Irish Shillelagh 1 regular $25
SOLD
20 TRAVEL books .50 cents ea
(650)755-8238
21 PIECE Punch bowl glass set $55.,
(650)341-8342
30 NOVEL books $1.00 ea,
(650)755-8238
3D MOVIE glasses, (12) unopened,
sealed plastic, Real 3D, Kids and adults.
Paid $3.75 each, selling $1.50 each
(650)578-9208
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes $100,
(650)361-1148
310 Misc. For Sale
5 PHOTOGRAPHIC CIVIL WAR
BOOKS plus 4 volumes of Abraham Lin-
coln books, $90., (650)345-5502
6 BASKETS with handles, all various
colors and good sizes, great for many
uses, all in good condition. $15 all
(650)347-5104
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42 X 18 X 6, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
9 CARRY-ON bags (assorted) - extra
large, good condition, $10. each obo,
(650)349-6059
AMERICAN HERITAGE books 107 Vol-
umes Dec.'54-March '81 $99/all
(650)345-5502
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BEADS - Glass beads for jewelry mak-
ing, $75. all, (650)676-0732
BEAUTIFUL LAMPSHADE - cone shap-
ed, neutral color beige, 11.5 long X 17
wide, matches any decor, never used,
excellent condition, Burl, $18.,
(650)347-5104
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK - Fighting Aircraft of WWII,
Janes, 1000 illustrations, $65.,
(650)593-8880
BOOK NATIONAL Geographic Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
BOOKS 20 HARDCOVER WW2 USMC
Korea, Europe. $50 (650)302-0976
CAR SUITCASES - good condition for
camping, car, vacation trips $15.00 all,
(650)578-9208
CEILING FAN - Multi speed, bronze &
brown, excellent shape, $45.,
(650)592-2648
FULL QUEEN quilt $20 (650)871-7200
310 Misc. For Sale
CLASSIC TOY Train Magazines, (200)
mint condition, SOLD!
CLEAN CAR Kit, unopened sealed box,
7 full size containers for leather, spots,
glass, interior, paint, chamois, $25.00
(650)578-9208
COLEMAN TWO Burner, Propane, camp
stove. New USA made $50 Firm, SOLD!
DELONGHI-CONVENTION ROTISSER-
IE crome with glass door excellent condi-
tion $55 OBO (650)343-4461
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good con-
dition $50., (650)878-9542
FREE DWARF orange tree
(650)834-4926
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
GOLF CART Pro Kennex NEVER USED
$20 SOLD!
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10), (650)364-
7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
JAMES PATTERSON BOOKS - 3 hard-
back @$3. each, 5 paperbacks @$1.
each, (650)341-1861
JEWELRY DISPLAY CASE - Hand-
made, portable, wood & see through lid
to open, 45L, 20W, 3H, $65.,
(650)592-2648
JOHN K KENNEDY Mementos, Books,
Magazines, Photos, Placards, Phono-
graph Records, Ect. $45 all
(650)223-7187
LIMITED QUANTITY VHS porno tapes,
$8. each, (650)871-7200
310 Misc. For Sale
MASSAGER CHAIR - Homedics, Heat,
Timer, Remote, like new, $75., (650)344-
7214
MENU FROM Steam Ship Lurline Aug.
20 1967 $10 (650)755-8238
MIRROR, ETHAN ALLEN - 57-in. high x
21-in. wide, maple frame and floor base,
like new, $95., (650)349-2195
NATURAL GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM
- Alkaline, PH Balance water, with anti-
oxident properties, good for home or of-
fice, brand new, $100., (650)619-9203.
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OLD 5 gal. glass water cooler bottle $20
(650) 521-3542
ONE BOYS Superman Christmas Wrap-
ping paper $2., (650)873-8167
OUTDOOR SCREENS - New 4 Panel
Wooden Outdoor Screen, Retail $130
With Metal Supports, $85. obo, call Ma-
ria, (650)873-8167
PICTORIAL WORLD History Books
$80/all (650)345-5502
PLANT - Beautiful hybrodized dahlia tu-
bers, $3 to $8 each (12 available), while
supplies last, Bill (650)871-7200
QUEEN SIZE inflatable mattress with
built in battery air pump used twice $40,
(650)343-4461
SESAME STREET toilet seat excellent
condition $12 650 349-6059
SF GREETING Cards (300 w/envelopes)
factory sealed $20. (650)207-2712
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48 x 69
$70 (650)692-3260
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
STRAWBERRY SHORTCAKE Christ-
mas Wrapping Paper Retail $6 selling $2
each 6-7 yards, (650)873-8167
STUART WOODS Hardback Books
2 @ $3.00 each. (650)341-1861
TABLECLOTH - Medium Blue color rec-
tangular tablecloth 70" long 52" wide with
12 napkins $15., (650)755-8238
TICKETS, BROADWAY by the Bay, (3)
Marvelous Wonderets Sat. 7/14; Chorus
Line Sat 9/22; Broadway by Year Sat.
11/10 Section 4 main level $80.00 all.
TIRE CHAINS - brand new, in box, never
used, multiple tire sizes, $25., (650)594-
1494
TIRE CHAINS - used once includes rub-
ber tighteners plus carrying case. call for
corresponding tire size, $20.,
(650)345-5446
TO THE MOON The 1969 story in pic-
tures, text and sound. $35
(650)223-7187
TOILET SINK - like new with all of the
accessories ready to be installed, $55.
obo, (650)369-9762
TOTE FULL of English novels - Cathrine
Cookson, $100., (650)493-8467
TRUMPET VINE tree in old grove pots 2
@ $15 ea SOLD
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VICTORIAN DAYS In The Park Wine
Glasses 6 count. Fifteenth Annual
with Horse Drawn Wagon Etching 12 dol-
lars b/o (650)873-8167
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WALL LIGHT fixture - 2 lamp with frost-
ed fluted shades, gold metal, great for
bathroom vanity, never used, excellent
condition, $15., Burl, (650)347-5104
WELLS FARGO Brass belt buckle, $40
(650)692-3260
WOOD PLANT STAND- mint condition,
indoor, 25in. high, 11deep, with shelves
$15.00, (650)578-9208
311 Musical Instruments
12 STRING epiphone guitar. New, with
fender gig bag. $150 firm (650)430-9621
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
3 ACCORDIONS $110/ea. 1 Small
Accordion $82. (650)376-3762.
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
JENCO VIBRAPHONE - Three Octave
Graduated Bars, vintage concert Model
near mint condition, $1,750.,
(650)871-0824
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
312 Pets & Animals
HAMSTER HABITAT SYSTEM - 2 cage
system with interconnecting tunnels,
Large: 9 1/2 x 19 1/2; Small 9 1/2 x 9
1/2, with water bottles, food bowls, exer-
cise wheel, lots of tunnels & connectors
makes varied configurations, much more.
$25., (650)594-1494
REPTILE CAGE - Medium size, $20.,
(650)348-0372
SMALL DOG wire cage; pink, two doors
with divider $50.00 (650) 743-9534.
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BATHROBE MENS navy blue plush-ter-
ry and belt. Maroon piping and trim, 2
pockets. Medium size. $10., (650)341-
3288
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BOOTS - purple leather, size 8, ankle
length, $50.obo, (650)592-9141
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
HARDING PARK mens golf dress shirts
(new) asking $25 (650)871-7200
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LEATHER COAT medium size (snake
skin design) $50 (650)755-8238
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
LEVIS MENS jeans - Size 42/30, well
faded, excellent condition, $10.,
(650)595-3933
MEN'S SUIT almost new $25.
650-573-6981
MENS DRESS SHOES - bostonian cas-
ual dress tie up, black upper leather, size
8.5, classic design, great condition,
$60.,Burl., (650)347-5104
MENS PANTS & SHORTS - Large box,
jeans, cargos, casual dress slacks,
34/32, 36/32, Burl, $85.all,
(650)347-5104
MENS SHIRTS - Brand names, Polos,
casual long sleeve dress, golf polo,
tshirts, sizes M/L, great condition, Burl,
$83., (650)347-5104
REVERSIBLE, SOUVENIR JACKET
San Francisco: All-weather, zip-front,
hood. Weatherproof 2-tone tan.; Inner:
navy fleece, logos SF & GG bridge.
$15.00 (650)341-3288
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
316 Clothes
NANCY'S TAILORING &
BOUTIQUE
Custom Made & Alterations
889 Laurel Street
San Carlos, CA 94070
650-622-9439
SNOW BOOTS, MEN'S size 12. Brand
New, Thermolite brand,(with zippers),
black, $18. (510) 527-6602
TUXEDOS, FORMAL, 3, Black, White,
Maroon Silk brocade, Like new. Size 36,
$100 All OBO (650)344-8549
VINTAGE CLOTHING 1930 Ermine fur
coat Black full length $35 650 755-9833
WOMENS SUMMER 3 pc.SUIT:
blue/white stripe seersucker, jacket,
slacks, shorts, size 12, $10., (650)341-
3288
317 Building Materials
2 ANTIQUE Glass Towel bars $60 pair
(650)271-0731
3 FRAMLESS shower door 3/8th thick,
25x66, 24x70, 26x74, $30 ea.
(650)271-0731
50 NEW Gray brick, standard size,
8x4x2 $25 obo All, (650)345-5502
WHITE STORM/SCREEN door. Size is
35 1/4" x 79 1/4". Asking $50.00. Call
(650)341-1861
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $40., (650)368-3037
13 ASSORTED GOLF CLUBS- Good
Quality $3.50 each. Call (650) 349-6059.
BASKETBALL RIM, net & backboard
$35/all 650-345-7132 Leave message.
BOOGIE BOARD, original Morey Boogie
Board #138, Exc condition, $25
(650)594-1494
COLEMAN "GLO-MASTER" 1- burner
camp stove for boaters or camping. Mint
condition. $35.00 (650)341-3288
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18 di-
meter, Halex brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
GOLF BALLS - 155+, $19., SOLD!
GOLF SHOES women's brand new Nike
Air Charmere size 7m $45 SOLD!
ICE SKATES, Ladies English. Size 7-8
$65 Please call Maria (650)873-8167
ONE BUCKET of golf balls - 250 total,
various brands, $25., (650)339-3195
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call(650)208-5758
THULE BIKE rack. Fits rectangular load
bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
TREADMILL PROFORM 75 EKG incline
an Staionery Bike, both $400. Or sepa-
rate: $150 for the bike, $350 for the
treadmill. Call (650)992-8757
TWO YOGA Videos. Never used, one
with Patrisha Walden, one by Rebok with
booklet. Both $6 (650)755-8238
WATER SKI'S - Gold cup by AMFA Voit
$40., (650)574-4586
322 Garage Sales
DOWN SIZING SALE
Saturday, July 14
9am-2pm
4019 Bayview Ave.,
San Mateo
Tools, Books, Nice Chairs.
Large Plush Toys and More!
FABULOUS
FINDS
in Pescadero
July 14 at
Town-Wide Barn Sale
Maps and details at
http://www.pescaderobarnsale.info
and at all 14 locations and the pocket
park on the corner of
Stage and Pescadero Creek Roads.
A bonanza of bargains: antique Mon-
arch wood stove, motorcycles, horse
tack, fishing gear, bikes, Lazy Boy
leather chair, BBQ/smoker, fine col-
lectibles, jewelry, toys, and pet sup-
plies, vintage china and linens, art-
work, Christmas decorations, antique
garden art, fresh lavender bundles
and luggage. Food sales benefit local
Girl Scout troop and Pescadero PTA
and supports the annual school trip to
Washington DC. Every site will be
clearly designated, several selling on
July 15.
GARAGE SALE GARAGE SALE
SATURDAY JULY 14
8am to 12pm
717 Masson Ave,
SAN BRUNO
Bookcases, sofa, loveseat,
furniture, tools, fridge,
kitchenware, misc.
and more!
25 Weekend July 14-15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALE
1020 Irwin Street
BELMONT
SUNDAY ONLY
9am-3pm
All kinds of great stuff
MULTI-FAMILY
GARAGE SALE
1383 Parrott Dr.
San Mateo
July 14 & 15
9AM-4PM
Tools, Antiques, clothing,
furniture, plants,
refrigerator, stove,
housewares, toys and
More!
SAN MATEO
Sat, July 14th
8:30am 3:30PM
Fiesta Gardens
Neighborhood
Garage Sale
Over 30 homes
Delaware @ Bermuda
Follow Signs
THE THRIFT SHOP
BAG SALE !!!
July 14, 21, 28
10-2 pm Thurs. & Fri.
10-3 pm Saturday
Episcopal Church
1 S. El Camino Real
San Mateo 94401
(650)344-0921 (650)344-0921
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
325 Estate Sales
ESTATE
SALE
Four houses
worth of treasure
811 Revere Way,
Emerald Hills
SUNDAY
JULY 15
10am to 5pm
Antiques, Eastlake
furniture,electronics,
bedroom furntiure, collecti-
ble dolls, carousel horse,
crystal, linens, fabrics, kitch-
enware, Oriental rugs, throw
rugs, lots of wicker, garden
supplies, clothing, bed lin-
ens and much more!
Cash Only.
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
HONEYWELL PENTAX 35mm excellent
lens, with case $65. (650)348-6428
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
345 Medical Equipment
FOUR WHEEL walker with handbrakes,
fold down seat and basket, $50.
(650)867-6042
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom $1550. 2 bedroom $1900.,
New carpets, new granite counters, dish-
washer, balcony, covered carports, stor-
age, pool, no pets. (650) 591-4046
REDWOOD CITY- 1 Bedroom, all elec-
tric kitchen, close to downtown,
$1095./month, plus $700 deposit. Call
Jean (650)361-1200.
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
93 FLEETWOOD Chrome wheels Grey
leather interior 237k miles Sedan $ 2,500
or Trade, Good Condition (650)481-5296
CHEVY HHR 08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
MERCEDES 06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
620 Automobiles
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
HONDA 10 ACCORD LX - 4 door se-
dan, low miles, $19K, (650)573-6981
625 Classic Cars
DATSUN 72 - 240Z with Chevy 350, au-
tomatic, custom, $3,600 or trade.
(415) 412-7030
PLYMOUTH 72 CUDA - Runs and
drives good, needs body, interior and
paint, $8,000 /obo, serious inquiries only.
(650)873-8623
635 Vans
1999 CHRYSLER Town & Country Van,
Runs Well $700 SOLD!
NISSAN 01 Quest - GLE, leather seats,
sun roof, TV/DVR equipment. Looks
new, $15,500. (650)219-6008
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW 03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON 83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 ccs,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
VARIOUS MOTORCYCLE parts USED
call for what you want or need $99
(650)670-2888
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
PROSPORT 97 - 17 ft. CC 80 Yamaha
Pacific, loaded, like new, $9,500 or trade,
(650)583-7946.
650 RVs
73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
670 Auto Service
HILLSDALE CAR CARE
WE FIX CARS
Quailty Work-Value Price
Ready to help
call (650) 345-0101
254 E. Hillsdale Blvd.
San Mateo
Corner of Saratoga Ave.
MB GARAGE, INC.
Repair Restore Sales
Mercedes-Benz Specialists
2165 Palm Ave.
San Mateo
(650)349-2744
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
2 RADIAL GT tires 205715 & 2356014
$10 each, (650)588-7005
2 SNOW/CABLE chains good condition
fits 13-15 inch rims $10/both San Bruno
650-588-1946
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
67-68 CAMERO PARTS - $85.,
(650)592-3887
ALUMINUM WHEELS - Toyota, 13,
good shape, Grand Prix brand. Includes
tires - legal/balanced. $100., San Bruno,
(415)999-4947
CAMPER/TRAILER/TRUCK OUTSIDE
backup mirror 8 diameter fixture. $30.
650-588-1946
HEAVY DUTY jack stand for camper or
SUV $15. SOLD!
HONDA CIVIC FRONT SEAT Gray Col-
or. Excellent Condition $90. San Bruno.
415-999-4947
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
670 Auto Parts
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
31 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 82,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Cabinetry
Contractors
RISECON
NORTH AMERICA
General Contractors / Building
& Design
New construction, Kitchen-Bath Re-
models, Metal Fabrication, Painting
Call for free design consultation
(650) 274-4484
www.risecon.com
L#926933
Cleaning
Cleaning
Concrete
Concrete
POLY-AM
CONSTRUCTION
General Contractor
Free Estimate
Specializing in
Concrete Brickwork Stonewall
Interlocking Pavers Landscaping
Tile Retaining Wall
Bonded & Insured Lic. #685214
Ben: (650)375-1573
Cell: (650) 280-8617
Construction
De Hoyos
Framing Foundations
(650) 387-8950
General Framing
Doors & Windows
Siding
(Hardy Plank Specialist)
Dry Rot & Termite
Additions
Finely Crafted Decks
Repairs
Lic# 968477 Ins/Bons
Construction
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed Insured Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben at (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
J.B. GARDENING SERVICE
Maintenance, New Lawns,
Sprinkler Systems, Clean Ups,
Fences, Tree Trimming,
Concrete work, Brick Work,
Pavers, and Retaining Walls.
Free Estimates
Cell: (650) 400- 5604
Gardening
Servicing Hillsborough,
Burlingame, Millbrae,
and San Mateo
We are a full service
gardening company
650 218-0657
to the
Burlingame
Leafblower
Law
Fully Compliant
Quality
Gardening
Flooring
DHA
WOODFLOORING
Wood Flooring
Installation
& Refinishing
Lic.# 958104
(650)346-2707 (650)346-2707
26
Weekend July 14-15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Pictures on Yelp
Qualing
Special
at & low
slope roofs
650-594-1717
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TOYOU.
FLOORING
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGOS
FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
Handy Help
ADW SERVICES
Small Jobs, Hauling, Car-
pentry, Flooring, Decks,
Dry Rot Repair, Siding,
Bathrooms
( ( 650)438-0454 650)438-0454
Lic. 968619
DISCOUNT
HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Carpentry Plumbing Drain
Cleaning Kitchens Bathrooms
Dry Rot Decks
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
Handy Help
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior Roof Re-
pair Base Boards New Fence
Hardwood Floors Plumbing Tile
Mirrors Chain Link Fence Window
Glass Water Heater Installation
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
SENIOR HANDYMAN
Specializing in Any Size Projects
Painting Electrical
Carpentry Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
Refinish
High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
AM/PM HAULING
Haul Any Kind of Junk
Residential & Commercial
Free Estimates!
We recycle almost everything!
Go Green!
Call Joe
(650)722-3925
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
JONS HAULING
Serving the Peninsula since 1976
Free Estimates
Junk and debris removal,
Yard/lot clearing,
Furniture, appliance hauling.
Specializing in hoarder clean up
(650)393-4233
Hauling
Interior Design
REBARTS INTERIORS
Hunter Douglas Gallery
Free Measuring & Install.
247 California Dr., Burl.
(650)348-1268
990 Industrial Blvd., #106
SC (800)570-7885
www.rebarts.com
Landscaping
SERVANDO ARRELLIN
Landscaping & Demolition
Sprinkler systems New fences
Flagstone Interlocking pavers
New driveways Clean-ups
Hauling Gardening
Retaining walls Drainage
(650)771-2276
Lic#36267
Painting
GOLDEN WEST PAINTING
Since 1975
Interior/Exterior,
Complete Preparation.
Will Beat any
Professional Estimate!
CSL#321586
(415)722-9281
Painting
CRAIGS PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work w/
Reasonable Rates
Free Estimates
(650)553-9653
Lic# 857741
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
LEMUS PAINTING
650.271.3955
Interiors / Exteriors
Residential / Commercial
Free Estimates
Reasonable Rates
Lic#913961
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
Plumbing
Home Improvement
CINNABAR HOME
Making Peninsula homes
more beautiful since 1996
* Home furnishings & accessories
* Drapery & window treatments:
blinds & shades
* Free in-home consultation
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E San Carlos
Wed Sat 12:00- 5:30pm,
or by appt.
650-388-8836 650-388-8836
www.cinnabarhome.com
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
Marble, Stone & porcelain
Kitchens, bathrooms, floors,
fireplaces, entryways, decks,
tile, ceramic tile
repair, grout repair
Free Estimates Lic.# 955492
Mario Cubias
(650)784-3079
JZ TILE
Installation and Design
Portfolio and References,
Great Prices
Free Estimates
Lic. 670794
Call John Zerille
(650)245-8212 (650)245-8212
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tors State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Accounting
FIRST PENINSULA
ACCOUNTING
Benjamin Lewis Lesser
Certified Public
Accountant
Tax & Accounting
Services
Businesses
& Individual
(650)689-5547 (650)689-5547
benlesser@peninsulacpa.com
Attorneys
* BANKRUPTCY *
Huge credit card debt?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650)363-2600 (650)363-2600
This law firm is a debt relief agency
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
KAYS
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin &
Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
27 Weekend July 14-15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Divorce
DIVORCE CENTERS
OF CALIFORNIA
Low Cost
non-attorney service
UNCONTESTED
DIVORCE
650.347.2500
520 So. El Camino Real #650
San Mateo, CA 94402
www.divorcecenters.com
Se habla Espaol
I am not an attorney.
I can only provide self help services
at your specic directions
Food
AYA SUSHI
The Best Sushi
& Ramen in Town
1070 Holly Street
San Carlos
(650)654-1212
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
FIND OUT!
What everybody is
talking about!
South Harbor
Restaurant & Bar
425 Marina Blvd., SSF
(650)589-1641
GOT BEER?
We Do!
Holiday Banquet
Headquarters
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
Food
GULLIVERS
RESTAURANT
Early Bird Special
Prime Rib Complete Dinner
Mon-Thu
1699 Old Bayshore Blvd. Burlingame
(650)692-6060
JACKS
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEALS COFFEE
SHOP
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
Senior Meals, Kids Menu
www.nealscoffeeshop.com
1845 El Camino Real
Burlingame
(650)692-4281
RED CRAWFISH
CRAVING CAJUN?
401 E. 3rd Ave.
@ S. Railroad
San Mateo
redcrawfishsf.com
(650) 347-7888
SUNDAY CHAMPAGNE
BRUNCH
Crowne Plaza
1221 Chess Dr., Hwy. 92 at
Foster City Blvd. Exit
Foster City
(650)570-5700
SUNSHINE CAFE
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
1750 El Camino Real
San Mateo
(Borel Square)
(650)357-8383
THE AMERICAN BULL
BAR & GRILL
19 large screen HD TVs
Full Bar & Restaurant
www.theamericanbull.com
1819 El Camino, in
Burlingame Plaza
(650)652-4908
Food
THE MELTING POT
Dinner for 2 - $98.
4 Course Fondue Feast &
Bottle of Wine
1 Transit Way San Mateo
(650)342-6358
www.melting pot.com
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500 (650)579-1500
Fitness
DOJO USA
World Training Center
Martial Arts & Tae Bo Training
www.dojousa.net
731 Kains Ave, San Bruno
(650)589-9148
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754 650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
Health & Medical
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STRESSED OUT?
IN PAIN?
I CAN HELP YOU
Sessions start from $20
Call 650-235-6761
Will Chen ACUPUNCTURE
12220 6th Ave, Belmont
www. willchenacupuncture.com
TOENAIL FUNGUS?
FREE Consultation for
Laser Treatment
(650)347-0761
Dr. Richard Woo, DPM
400 S. El Camino Real
San Mateo
Home Care
CALIFORNIA HOARDING
REMEDIATION
Free Estimates
Whole House & Office
Cleanup Too!
Serving SF Bay Area
(650)762-8183
Call Karen Now!
Insurance
AARP AUTO
INSURANCE
Great insurance
Great price
Special rates for
drivers over 50
650-593-7601
ISU LOVERING
INSURANCE SERVICES
1121 Laurel St.,
San Carlos
BARRETT
INSURANCE
www.barrettinsuranceservices.net
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
HEALTH INSURANCE
Paying too much for COBRA?
No coverage?
.... Not good!
I can help.
John Bowman
(650)525-9180
CA Lic #0E08395
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues,Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
A+ DAY SPA MASSAGE
$60 one hour
body massage + table shower
45 mins $50, Half hour $40
Open every day, 9:30am to 9:30pm
(650)299-9332
615 Woodside Rd #5
Redwood City
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
GRAND OPENING
ASIAN MASSAGE
$50 for 1 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING!
CRYSTAL WAVE SPA
Body & Foot Massage
Facial Treatment
1205 Capuchino Ave.
Burlingame
(650)558-1199
HAPPY FEET
Massage
2608 S. El Camino Real
& 25th Ave., San Mateo
(650)638-9399
$30.00/Hr Foot Massage
$50.00/Hr Full Body Massage
HEALING MASSAGE
SPECIAL $10 OFF
SWEDISH MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
SUNFLOWER MASSAGE
Grand Opening!
$10. Off 1-Hour Session!
1482 Laurel St.
San Carlos
(Behind Trader Joes)
Open 7 Days/Week, 10am-10pm
(650)508-8758 (650)508-8758
Massage Therapy
TRANQUIL
MASSAGE
951 Old County Road
Suite 1
Belmont
650-654-2829
YOU HAVE IT-
WELL BUY IT
We buy and pawn:
Gold Jewelry
Art Watches
Musical Instrument
Paintings Diamonds
Silverware Electronics
Antique Furniture
Computers TVs Cars
Open 7 days
Buy *Sell*Loan
590 Veterans Blvd.
Redwood City
(650)368-6855
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes Multi-family
Mixed-Use Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
ODOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
28
Weekend July 14-15, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Coins Dental Jewelry Silver Watches Diamonds
1Z11 80fll08M0 90 0J400
Expert Fine Watch
& Jewelry Repair
Not afliated with any watch company.
Only Authentic ROLEX Factory Parts Are Used
t%FBMWJUI&YQFSUTt2VJDL4FSWJDF
t6OFRVBM$VTUPNFS$BSF
XXX#FTU3BUFE(PME#VZFSTDPN
Tuesday - Saturday
11:00am to 4:00pm
www.BestRatedGoldBuyers.com
KUPFER JEWELRYsBURLINGAME
(650) 347-7007
$0
OFF ANY
ROLEX SERVICE
OR REPAIR
MUST PRESENT COUPON.
EXPIRES 7/31/12
WEBUY