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The Career Explorer

Corporate Human Resource Tools

Career Planning Workbook

These materials were prepared by Human Resource Systems and Corporate Development, Department of Human Resources, and the Career and Transition Services, Department of Education, for the Province of Nova Scotia. The Succession Management Process has been designed to support the leadership and career planning of government employees. The Province of Nova Scotia may revise The Career Explorer workbook to reflect legislative, legal, or practice changes. This manual is protected by copyright. obtained for reproduction. The consent of the copyright owner must be

Contact: Innovation & Growth Nova Scotia Public Service Commission One Government Place 1700 Granville Street PO Box 943, Station Central Halifax, NS B3J 2V9 Tel: (902) 424-8384 or RegistrarTraining@gov.ns.ca

Table of Contents
Introduction
Career Management in a Changing Government Succession Management Process The Career Explorer 2 3 4

How to Use This Workbook


How to Use This Workbook Activity Key 5 6

Managing Your Career


Managing Your Career The Three Spheres of Life Activity 1: My Three Spheres of Life The Career Development Process Career Planning Beliefs Activity 2: Career Planning Beliefs 8 9 14 17 18 18

Knowing Yourself
Knowing Yourself Your Life Interests Activity 3: The Class Reunion Activity 4: Patterns From My Life Story Work Values Activity 5: What Matters Most to Me Personality Type Emotional Intelligence Influences on Career Decisions Activity 6: Current Influences in My Life Your Skills Portfolio Activity 7: Significant Experiences Skills and Todays Leader Activity 8: Assessing My Skills/Competencies Professional and Management Positions Corporate Leadership Competencies Snapshot of Managerial and Professional Positions 22 22 23 26 30 31 34 34 35 36 38 39 45 45 52 52 54

Knowing What is Out There


Knowing What is Out There Researching Opportunities Information Meeting Questions Activity 9: Researching Opportunities Accessing Your Allies Activity 10: Accessing My Allies Validating Your Experiences 60 60 63 64 68 69 71

Making Career Decisions


Making Career Decisions No Guarantees The Career Explorer and the Succession Management Process Wrap Up Career Planning Summary Career Development Plan 73 73 74 74 75 76

The Career Explorer


Corporate Human Resource Tools

Introduction

Leadership consists of the capacity to get people to do what one wants them to do, or to chart a course, or to inspire. Laurier L. Lapierre

Career Management in a Changing Government Succession Management Process The Career Explorer

Introduction

Career Management in a Changing Government


The rapidly changing demands of todays workplace have created some interesting challenges for all levels of management within the Nova Scotia Civil Service. Yesterdays workplaces were relatively static, and workers who consistently performed well were recognized and rewarded through regular promotion within the organization. In the past decade, Government has been faced with shrinking resources, a reduced workforce who has limited opportunity for career progression, and a management group that is quickly approaching retirement. At the same time, the public is demanding that Government offer value, quality, innovation, and customer service. Our workplaces and our workersare expected to be flexible, adaptable, creative, innovative, responsive, and continuously improving. Managers are expected to possess a strong sense of personal responsibility as well as a strategic corporate perspective. We are, in short, being asked to create the well-performing organization or to do more, do it better, and do it faster with no guarantee of reward. What is a well-performing organization? Well-performing organizations are those that: are clear on their mission define outcomes and focus on results empower workers can leverage the power of a diverse workforce motivate and inspire people to succeed are flexible and adjust to new conditions are competitive in terms of performance restructure work processes to meet customer needs maintain communications with stakeholders

If these are the characteristics of well-performing organizations, what qualities and skills must well-performing managers/leaders have? How can the Nova Scotia Government ensure that current civil servants are equipped to take on future management roles? The decision around how we spend our working life is critically important. To manage your career effectively in an environment of continuing change and uncertainty, you need to be aware of your personal interests, skills, and values and the opportunities that are available to you.

The Career Explorer

Introduction

Succession Management Process


The Government of Nova Scotia promises a corporate succession management process as a means to help ensure that there is strong leadership continuity and diversity within the civil service for the future. Through the process, employees who show interest in and potential for future management roles will be provided with opportunities to develop their leadership capabilities. An integral part of the performance review process is the Career Development Plan. Employees should map out a Career Development Plan in consultation with their managers. The Career Development Plan identifies the employees areas of strengths, and those areas that require further development as they relate to the employees career goal. Departments can support their employees Career Development Plans by providing information on future employment opportunities, by offering ongoing coaching and feedback, and by making developmental assignments and activities available. Employees should have ongoing discussions with their managers as their career plans evolve.

The Career Explorer


The Career Explorer is an interactive, self-directed Career Planning Guide that helps you create a picture of yourself by identifying those interests, values, and skills you already have and which allow you to contribute productively to your workplace. It allows you see more clearly which competencies and life interests you want to continue to use in a work setting and those you may want to develop further. It also helps you to explore your interest in pursuing future leadership roles within the Nova Scotia Government and gives you tools and resources through which you can conduct your research. Through a series of self-exploration activities, The Career Explorer allows you to capture a wealth of information about yourself and potential work opportunities information that you can use to help develop your Career Development Plan. The workbook will help you see what work gives meaning to your life and what gives meaning to your work. Career planning will help you develop strategies to maximize your opportunities for meaningful work in the future. You can contact your departments manager or director of Human Resources to discuss your departments approach to succession management.

The Career Explorer

Introduction

The Career Explorer


Corporate Human Resource Tools

How to Use This Workbook

Your work is to discover your work and then with all your hear to give yourself to it. Buddha

How to Use This Workbook Activity Key

How to Use This Workbook

How to Use This Workbook


Many of us have difficulty in making career plans and developing goals because we do not express our ideas and goals. We tell ourselves I cant achieve this or that opportunity is not available to me. When working through these exercises, withhold judgment and let your imagination flow. Produce ideas first, without suppressing your thoughts. After you have completed these exercises, you can evaluate how realistic they are. Do not be concerned by the length of this workbook. The best way to approach it is by completing one or two exercises at a time. Set a schedule over the next few weeks and keep to it. You will probably get the best results if you can complete the entire workbook within a two- to three-week period. That way, you will still have your earlier findings clearly in mind as you complete the later exercises and the process will take on a momentum of its own. You will profit greatly by spending time and investing effort in completing this workbook. It may be tempting to just read through the exercises and complete them in your head, but you will get much greater benefit by sitting down and completing them. Focus on areas most relevant to your current career situation. Complete those exercises that are most meaningful to you. The Activity Key that follows will help you decide what exercises you will gain most from completing. Talk to others, such as your friends, spouse or partner, colleagues, and manager about your interests, skills, and potential and about the organization and its business plans. This will give you a personal perspective on information about yourself and assist in career planning.

The Career Explorer

How to Use This Workbook

Activity Key
Assessing Skills/Competencies Can you clearly and persuasively describe... My three Spheres of Life Career Planning Beliefs

Current Influences in My Life

Patterns From My Life Story

Researching Opportunities
x
6

What Matters Most to Me

Significant Experiences

- if not, complete activity:

Page Your balance with work, education, and leisure Your beliefs or perceptions about career development that may hinder or support your ability to make career decisions Your work style and preferences that contribute to your work/life satisfaction Your core values & how well they are satisfied Any issues or concerns that currently influence the career decisions you make Your key skills and knowledge assets which contribute most to your employability Viable career options for the future What you need to maximize for future success

9 x

18 23 26 x x x x

31 36 39 45 60 69

x x x x

Learning

Work/Life Balance

Can you describe what you learned in the last six Are you feeling you wished you had more time to months? Yes ( ) No ( ) do things that are important to you? Are you feeling stretched in a positive way? Yes ( ) Yes ( ) No ( ) No ( ) Are you concerned about not spending enough time with family and friends? Yes ( ) No ( ) Do you know what skills and knowledge you could market to another employer? Yes ( ) If Yes, COMPLETE: My Three Spheres of Life No ( ) on Page 14.

If No, COMPLETE: Assessing My Skills, Competencies on page 45.

The Career Explorer

Accessing My Allies

The Class Reunion

The Career Explorer


Corporate Human Resource Tools

Managing Your Career

Vision is the stuff of our dreams. Passion is our energy to make it real. The two go together like a horse and rider. In the mind of one is the goal. In the power of the other lies the means to get there. Know your own values. important to you. Listen to your heart. Find out what is

Peter Urs Bender Managing Your Career: The Birds Eye View The Three Spheres of Life The Career Development Process Career Planning Beliefs

Managing Your Career

Managing Your Career: The Birds Eye View


Many of us made career plans e arly in our working lives, then left it up to luck or chance to see us to where we are today. Some of us have fared quite well and others not so. Some of us have felt so buffeted by the dramatic changes in the world of work in the past decade that we haven't dared to re-evaluate where we are or how we feel. But making decisions about your place in the world of work is not a one-time event. Nor should it be left to chance or luck, nor is it done in isolation of other aspects of your life. You cannot manage your work/life effectively if you do not understand WHO YOU ARE, WHAT OPTIONS YOU HAVE and HOW YOU CAN GET TO WHERE YOU WANT TO GO. You may not be able to control all the circumstances that impact upon your life, but you can influence the direction your life is going; and you can make decisions that are right for you. When we talk about career, we are talking about more than just your job. It's easy to believe that we are what we do. Society places a great deal of emphasis on having a job and making something of one's life. We often devalue the other roles in which we can find meaning. But human beings are more richly complex than just their work roles. And our career consists of more than just what we are paid to do. In addition to the role of worker, career consists of a complex interweaving of other life roles including family member, community member, learner, teacher, friend, and so on. Each role requires us to develop certain skills, expects us to perform certain activities, and gives us certain satisfactions; pretty much the same way that the worker role does. Each role affects the others in both positive and negative ways. People who have satisfying work lives often focus more positively on family responsibilities and personal relationships when they are at home. People who are job dissatisfied or overloaded at work may be too tired, too busy, or too stressed to devote time pursuing community service or recreational activities. Similarly, workers who are preoccupied or overwhelmed with family or personal matters may find it difficult to concentrate on the job and their work performance suffers. When we talk about the interrelating aspects of a person's career life, we can understand them better as the Three Spheres of Life .

The Career Explorer

Managing Your Career

The Three Spheres of Life


The Three Spheres of Life consist of: Work: Work includes both paid and unpaid activities. What is work to one person may be leisure or education to another (e.g., gardening, learning new software programs, reading science journals, housework, volunteer work, etc.). It depends on how you view it. Education: Education involves both formal and informal lifelong learning... it includes academic programs, continuing education courses, personal and professional development courses/seminars, reading, self-instruction activities, mentorship, on-the-job training, wherever and however you are learning. Leisure : Leisure includes those areas where you spend your discretionary time including family, community, sport, or activities that are creative, recreational, or spiritual. Leisure involves those activities that revitalize you and allow you to come back to your work and education spheres energized and positively charged. At different times in our lives the s pheres shrink and expand in size, depending on where we choose or are required to place our energies. Sometimes we concentrate on our work with education and leisure taking a backseat. Sometimes we are learners, and work and leisure are less prominent. Usually we are most contented with our lives when our spheres are in relative balance, when our time and energies are spent moving amongst the spheres. On the flipside, we usually feel a void, or are most vulnerable, when we neglect one of the spheres and do not develop that aspect of our life. This is particularly apparent in times of stress, such as when we are overworked, or dissatisfied with our work, or feeling our skills are outdated. The other thing about the Spheres of Life is that they are inter-connected. Your work is not separate from your leisure; your education is not separate from your work. Anyone who has had to take work home with them or been called away from work to deal with a family emergency knows this. We can use this inter-connection to our benefit if we can come to see that work is an integrated part of our whole life and that each Sphere complements and supports the other. Volunteering as the treasurer for a community group (Leisure) or taking an accounting course at night (Education) can improve our financial management skills on the job (Work). In addition, if we understand that we can find meaning and fulfillment from a variety of activities in all three Spheres, we are not so apt to demand that one Sphere satisfy all of our needs.

The Career Explorer

Managing Your Career

Let's take a look at four scenarios to see how the Spheres of Life connect and relate to one another.

Scenario A: Work Predominates

Leisure Work

Education

This scenario shows a person who is spending a great deal of time at WORK, so much so that the other two spheres are relegated to minor parts of his/her life. Perhaps it's just a particularly busy time at work, or perhaps this situation has become a way of life. This person may not even be conscious that work is dominating his/her life to the exclusion of other activities. But, if the person is stressed, dissatisfied, exhausted, or unfulfilled; it may explain why. It would be important to look at the imbalance in this person's life when s/he was looking to make a career move. WORK Manager of an Information Technology Services Division who supervises a large number of technical staff. The unit is always short staffed, with constant demands from users to solve technical problems quickly. The manager is frequently on-call for emergencies in the evenings and on weekends and is intensely committed to being a hands-on problem solver. Plays on a curling team, but frequently has to cancel out on games due to emergencies at work. Considers him/herself to be family oriented, but is never far away from his/her beeper during family outings. Subscribes to all the latest computer magazines, but never has the time to read them.

LEISURE

EDUCATION

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Managing Your Career

Scenario B: Education Predominates

Work

Education

Leisure

In this scenario, the EDUCATION sphere dominates the person's time and relegates the other two spheres to minor roles. Typically this situation is of a specific durationwhile a person is attending an educational institution full time or is trying to manage both studies and work. Problems may develop over the long term if family and leisure activities are neglected, or if the person's performance at work suffers because of the studies, or if the person is not able to find paid or unpaid work to satisfy other aspects of their life. EDUCATION On one year's full-time educational leave to complete a Masters Degree in Public Administration. Senior Policy Analyst who has not kept in touch with the office during a time when new legislation has been passed, new policies introduced, and new software programs installed. Family, friends, and social activities are squeezed in as time permits.

WORK

LEISURE

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Managing Your Career

Scenario C: Work is Minor

Leisure

Education

Work

In this scenario, the WORK sphere is the smallest because this person is not engaged in his/her work. S/he has been in the job too long, or the job is beyond his/her capabilities/interests. The person is using the other spheres to provide meaning in his/her life and to compensate for being bored and frustrated at work. This can also be the picture of a person who is unemployed and is using the other spheres to cope with the stress and discouragement of not working. This scenario also applies to the person who is retired and has a range of activities other than work to provide meaning and satisfaction. WORK Supervisor of an established public program that has not changed focus in a decade. There has been no new money, few staff changes and no new initiatives introduced. The work is routine maintenance only. Taking a wide range of community education courses from tai chi to Gaelic. Volunteer literacy tutor, Big Brothers/Big Sisters, competitive bridge player, wooden toy maker and Scout leader.

EDUCATION

LEISURE

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Managing Your Career

Scenario D: Balanced Career Life

Work

Education

Leisure

This scenario shows a person who is involved in meaningful activities in all three Spheres of Lifesomeone that has a relatively balanced life between WORK, EDUCATION and LEISURE. This person has a challenging job, but still finds time to participate in leisuretime and educational activities. This person has found a way to have each sphere support and enhance the others: s/he uses work-related skills to volunteer in the community; continues to develop skills to enhance work performance; devotes time to personal interests which keeps him/her energized and is involved as a parent. WORK Director of Financial Services; volunteer Secretary-Treasurer, United Way campaign; team leader of federal-provincial agreement negotiations. Enrolled in Executive Development program; using Internet to research alternative housing construction methods; self-tutoring in new financial software programs. Building bale construction house; parent volunteer at school; swims three times a week; member of a monthly book club

EDUCATION

LEISURE

What do your Three Spheres of Life look like right now? How satisfied are you with your Spheres? Are they relatively balanced? Complete Activity 1 to find out.

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Managing Your Career

ACTIVITY 1: My Three Spheres of Life


1. In the chart below, list the major activities that you are presently involved with under the categories Work, Education and Leisure. Remember that the category in which you place each activity depends on how you perceive it for yourself.

Work (paid/unpaid)

Education (Learning)

Leisure (Discretionary Time)

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Managing Your Career

2. Based on the list that you have developed, draw and label three spheres that represent the relative size of your Three Spheres of Life as they are right now.

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Managing Your Career

3. What is the relative size of each of your Spheres right now? How satisfied are you with the relative balance of your three Spheres? (Balance does not have to mean 'equal'. One sphere may predominate over the others for perfectly legitimate reasons and that's fine. Just be aware that extreme imbalances over long periods of time may become problematic.) _____________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________

4. What changes, if any, would you like to make to your Three Spheres of Life? _____________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________

5. Go to the Career Planning Summary on page 76. In the Issues To Be Considered column, record any imbalances in your Spheres of Life that you will need to keep in mind as you consider future career moves. _____________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________

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Managing Your Career

The Career Development Process


When we talk about career development or career planning, we're talking about a lifelong process that allows you to navigate through life's turbulence while making plans for the future. Basically, career planning consists of the following three steps:

Know YourselfWho Am I?
(Personal Management) Follow your heart by identifying your current interests, values, personality, skills and competencies. Identify what skills, qualities and attitudes you need to develop or want to use in your next career move. Also identify the issues or influences which are impacting your life right now and/or could in the future.

Know What is Out There


(Exploring Work and Learning Opportunities) Research work opportunities that are available to you in the civil service and learning/educational options that could better position you for these opportunities. Use every resource at your disposal: read printed material, check websites, request information meetings, seek out mentorships, job shadowing, or special assignments, or talk to people who can connect you with others or point you in the right direction.

Know How and Be Able to Make Decisions


(Life/Work Building) Develop an action plan that includes day-to-day steps and long range goals. Be prepared to be flexible and make changes. Know that nothing decided today might remain the same tomorrow!

To repeat. Career planning does not guarantee that you will avoid the insecurities of the changing workplace. It does mean, however, that you may begin to take more control of your career. You may actively seek opportunities that are more meaningful for you and take charge of your decisions. You may grow and develop more as you re-examine your commitment to yourself, your lifestyle and your work.

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Managing Your Career

Career Planning Beliefs


People have many beliefs or perceptions about career development and how to move ahead with one's life. Some of these beliefs have come as a result of personal experience, or what people have heard through the grapevine. But blind faith acceptance of these beliefs can influence the way you live and how you make decisions about your life. If you never examine your beliefs to see how valid they may be, you will limit your vision of your future, you will never dare to dream, or risk, or push yourself beyond the safe and predictable (which is no longer safe and predictable anyway). What beliefs do you hold about making career decisions? Complete Activity 2 and check on your perceptions around the value of career planning.

ACTIVITY 2: Career Planning Beliefs


Strongly Agree (S/A) Agree (A) Disagree (D) Strongly Disagree (S/D)

Belief 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. It's whom you know, not what you know that gets you a job You can get ahead if you don't screw up Counseling professionals can tell you what to do with your life It doesn't matter what I'd like to do; it's what job I can get The position is filled before they even run the competition It's all luck or chance if you're happy in your career I've been at this job so long; I couldn't get another one It is silly to talk about satisfaction in a job; your job is what you are paid to do I have no control over my future Jobs go to the person with the best interviewing skills If you're good at what you do, they want to keep you in that job Adults should know what they want out of life If you stay around long enough, you'll be next in line for promotion Getting a job is all about being in the right place at the right time

S/A

S/D

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Managing Your Career

Career Planning Beliefs: A Second Look


If you Agreed or Strongly Agreed with statements 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 9, or 12, you may have some misconceptions about career life planning. If you take a passive approach to your career (i.e., I have no control, it's all luck, it doesn't matter, satisfaction is for those who can afford it, dreaming is for kids); you are accepting an all or nothing view of the world. You are saying, that's how it is, and that's how it will be. There is no point in dreaming or in trying anything new. But new beginnings start with a first step, and each step takes you to the next step. Over time the steps gather momentum, and soon you are moving in the direction of your goal. Along the way you are accumulating knowledge, skills, and insights that keep you energized, keep you focused, and keep you moving. Maybe you never reach your original goal; maybe you change your mind. As the saying goes, It's the journey, not the destination. The very act of starting down that road means that you are more open to seizing opportunities when they come your way, more attuned to getting the most out of every experience, and more intentional in guiding your future in the direction that is best for you. If you Agreed or Strongly Agreed with statements 1, 5, 7, 10, 11, 13, or 14, you may have some misconceptions about the job search process. Many of us probably know people who have gotten jobs or promotions based on who they know, personality, clout, waiting their turn, playing it safe, and the like. So knowing people who can hire you or refer you is an advantage. Being liked and having a pleasing personality is an asset. Being in the right place at the right time does help. But, increasingly, these attributes on their own do not ensure a person of a job or progress in their career. Fair hiring practices require that open competitions be based on a set of pre-established screening criteria and standard interview procedures. Downsizing and increased workloads mean that managers are seeking the best-qualified personnel for every position that becomes available. Within this framework, you can increase your opportunities of being a strong candidate by developing a network of contacts, being pro-active in taking on new assignments within your organization, implementing new practices or procedures, and continuing to learn new skills. If you believe that every competition is cooked and there is no point in even trying, you will deny yourself the opportunity to learn about other options, meet new contacts, or become known to others as someone who is interested in making a move.

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Managing Your Career

Go to your Career Planning Summary on page 76. In the section Issues To Be Considered, record any career beliefs that you have that could hinder your ability to make and carry through with career decisions. In the section Factors Which Will Support Me, record any career beliefs that you have that will support and encourage you to carry through with career decisions.

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The Career Explorer


Corporate Human Resource Tools

Knowing Yourself

You cannot tell me who I am, and I cannot tell you who you are. If you do not know your own identity, who is going to identify you? Others can give you a name or a number, but they can never tell you who you really are. That is something you yourself can only discover from within. Thomas Merton

Your Life Interests Work Values Personality Type Emotional Intelligence Influences on Career Decisions Your Skills Portfolio Skills and Todays Leader Professional and Management Positions in the Nova Scotia Civil Service Corporate Leadership Competencies Wrap-up

Knowing Yourself

Knowing Yourself
Why do you pursue the work and the life you do? What activities are you drawn to? What keeps you engaged and energized? What gives you the greatest satisfactions and wanting to strive for excellence? These questions are at the heart of knowing yourself. In this section of The Career Explorer, you will begin to identify your life interests, personality traits, and values that in turn drive your passions. You will work on skills later in the workbook.

Your Life Interests


We are all creatures of habit. Our life interests start showing themselves in childhood and remain relatively stable throughout our lives, even though they may reveal themselves in different ways at different times. We like this, we do not like that; we value this, we think that is worthless; we are drawn to this, indifferent to that. The sum total of all these patterns is who we are. You may have a clear picture of your life interests, or only be vaguely aware of them. They may have been front and centre when you made your life career decisionsor completely ignored. Frequently when people find themselves in the wrong job, it is because they do not know what kind of activities will make them happy, and they do not know their own deeply embedded life interests. But you can become aware of the patterns in your life, those themes or interests that keep recurring in whatever work, education, leisure activities, and experiences bring you the greatest satisfaction. John Holland, a noted career development theorist, has developed an easy way of identifying the themes or patterns that keep recurring in your life. Holland has classified life interests according to six themes or types. While each of us is more than one type, we tend to have stronger preferences for certain types of interests. Once you are aware of what types of interests make you most happy, you are in a better position to understand what types of work activities will make you most satisfied and fulfilled over the long term.

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Knowing Yourself

ACTIVITY 3: The Class Reunion


Use your imagination to picture yourself at your twenty-year class reunion. Everyone is there when you arrive, and they have already congregated according to similar interests. You are wondering with which group you want to spend the evening. Which groups will be most interesting to you? Which groups will have people with the same interests as you? Follow the instructions below.

INSTRUCTIONS 1. Wander from group to group on pages 24 and 25 and read the description of each group. Ask yourself if you are interested in this conversation? Would I have anything to talk about with these people? Would I want to know these people, spend more time with them? Underline any interests or activities that you share with the members of each group. If you find that you are underlining most of the activities, then you can cross out the activities that do not interest you. When you have circulated around the room, decide which two groups closely match your own interests. Write the letters that represent the two groups in the spaces on page 25. These two themes likely represent long-held interests for certain types of activities, and therefore, hold a vital clue to the kinds of work that you might love. You may find it quite easy to identify one group that closely matches your own interests, but have difficulty identifying the second group. You may be equally interested in several groups or not too interested in any others. That is okay: you can choose just one group. You may also find it easy to identify certain groups that do not interest you, that you would not want to join. That is good information too because it shows where you do not want to be.

2.

3.

4.

Now begin reading page 24.

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Knowing Yourself

The Class Reunion


R
Realistic people are intrigued by the inner workings of things. They enjoy working with technology, tools, machines, and equipment. They are curious about knowing how things work, finding better ways to solve problems, or redesigning processes, systems, and operations. They prefer concrete problems to ambiguous, abstract problems, and want to see tangible results. For recreation, they like to be outdoors, be physically active, or build and fix things. They read computer magazines and technical manuals for fun; they are excited when the office installs new computer hardware. In short, realistic people are excited by the possibility that things can be tinkered with and improved. They like to solve problems by DOING. Investigative people love to think and talk about abstract ideas. They are more interested in the why of a strategy rather than the how. They enjoy pondering big picture concepts, gathering information, uncovering new facts or theories, and analyzing and interpreting data. They are often drawn to academic or research environments and enjoy pursuing advanced degrees. For fun, investigative people like to tinker with computers, do puzzles or read mysteries, or watch nature or scientific television programs. They often prefer to work independently, relying on themselves rather than on others in a group project. They like to solve problems by THINKING. Artistic people are often seen as imaginative, out-of-the-box thinkers. They thrive on newness, making something original, and coming up with unconventional ideas. Many of them have a passion for the arts, but others do not. Artistic types frequently express their artistic interests in leisure or recreational activities (designing, writing, performing, creating artwork, playing musical instruments, etc.), as well as in career activities. Often you can tell an artistic person merely by their choice of unconventional clothing, but certainly you can recognize them by how excited they are when talking about their latest creative production. Many artistic types prefer to work independently. They like to solve problems by being CREATIVE. Social people like to work with other people. They enjoy teaching and guiding others in a mentoring, coaching, or counselling capacity. They like to help others grow and improve and are drawn to organizations that provide services they perceive to hold a high social value. They like to work with groups through leading discussions, soliciting input, offering feedback, and acknowledging feelings. Many are drawn to hobbies and volunteer work that allow them to perform hands-on community service. They like to solve problems by using their FEELINGS .

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Knowing Yourself

Enterprising people enjoy working with people too, but in a different way. They derive a great deal of satisfaction from working with and managing people in order to accomplish goals and outcomes. Selling, purchasing, political manoeuvring, entertaining clients, leading committees or groups, and giving speeches or talks are activities that provide satisfaction. Enterprising people often liked to organize activities even when they were kids: they like to make things happen and tend to ask for as much responsibility as possible in any work situation. Enterprising people may like to take financial and interpersonal risks and to participate in competitive activities. They solve problems by TAKING CHARGE. Conventional people like activities that require organization, attention to detail, and accuracy. They often enjoy mathematics and may gravitate towards activities that involve numbers. They may enjoy conducting financial analysis, forecasting, building systems procedures, setting up accounting practices, analysing research data, studying charts and graphs, etc. They prefer to use quantitative analysis in order to figure out business solutions, forecast future performance, determine optimal production, undertake organizational analysis, etc. Conventional people prefer hobbies and recreational activities where they follow directions (whether it is recipes, patterns, rules, instructional manuals, etc.). They solve problems by BEING METHODICAL.

THE ONE OR TWO THEMES (R I A S E C) MOST CLOSELY SIMILAR TO ME ARE:

_________________ and _________________

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Knowing Yourself

ACTIVITY 4: Patterns From My Life Story


Now that you have been introduced to the Life Interests Themes, spend some time going back through your own life history to capture some of the significant activities from your Three Spheres of Life . Complete the activity chart on pages 27 and 28, as instructed below.

INSTRUCTIONS 1. Read each statement in the Sphere of Life Column and respond in the Description Column. Write down those activities that you enjoyed the most, that gave you great satisfaction, energized you, or completely engaged you so that you lost all sense of time. You can use point form. See the example below. In the Holland Themes Column, assign one letter (R I A S E C) to each response that best describes what that activity involved. Refer back to the descriptions of the Holland Themes on pages 24 and 25. Complete the Dreams Section as instructed and assign a Holland Themes Letter to each response. Use additional notepaper if you need more room. Feel free to give more examples or write more details. The more you write, the more clearly themes will emerge. On the other hand, if you are unable to recall engaging activities from some area of your life that you want to record, then leave that category blank. Better still, talk to a friend or family member who may be able to jog your memory about activities you loved when you were younger. Review all the Holland Themes that you assigned to your activities and complete the Observations Section of the chart.

2.

3.

4.

5.

EXAMPLE Sphere of Life Leisure When I was a child, I liked to participate in these three activities: Description Holland Theme

canoeing camping butterfly collecting

R R I

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ACTIVITY 4: Patterns From My Life Story


Sphere of Life LEISURE (hobbies, interests, sports,
church, family, community, etc.) When I was a child, I liked to participate in these three activities:

Description

Main Holland Theme RIASEC

When I was a young adult, I liked to participate in these three activities:

I currently like to participate in these three activities:

EDUCATION
The three subjects I enjoyed the most when I was in secondary school were:

The three subjects I enjoyed the most in my post-secondary education were:

My education/training after public school (certificates, diplomas, degrees) includes:

Currently I like to pursue lifelong learning (reading, courses, self-instruction, etc.) by:

WORK (paid and/or unpaid)


Three jobs I enjoyed were: (include typical duties that you enjoyed )

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ACTIVITY 4: Patterns From My Life Story


Sphere of Life DREAMS (BACK TO THE FUTURE) When I was a child, I liked to tell everyone I would be a: Description Main Holland Theme RIASEC

When I first thought about paid work, I imagined I would be a:

When I completed my post-secondary studies, I imagined my future would include these three things:

These days I think that my life interests and abilities would be most fulfilled if I were doing work that involved:

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OBSERVATIONS 1. The one or two themes that came out as a result of The Class Reunion Activity (Activity 3) were: ______ & _______ 2. The one or two themes that occurred most frequently in My Life Story (Activity 4) were: ______ & _______ 3. If there were differences between the themes you chose in these two activities, go back and re-read the descriptions of the themes. The two themes that are most like me are: ______ & _______ 4. I can find evidence of these two themes in my current work situation in the following ways. *Be specific by writing statements that describe your preferences for different activities or work environments. (e.g., I get to build financial spreadsheets fulfills a C interest; I get to teach diverse populations when I facilitate professional development courses fulfills an S interest; I get to design layouts and choose graphics when I work on our marketing campaigns fulfills an A interest.)

If the most important themes in your life are not part of your work life, you should review your current job role with your manager to determine if new assignments and responsibilities could be added to build your career satisfaction. Remember that some of the important themes in your life may not be lived out in

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5.

your work role. Leisure, family, and educational activities complete your career/life picture, and you should think about how these can be blended into your career/life plan. Go back to the Holland Theme Descriptions. Re-read the descriptions for the one or two themes you chose, and pay particular attention to the statements that you underlined. Choose 5 to 10 statements that describe activities or work environments that you would prefer to find in a future work situation. Use the Holland Theme Descriptions as a guide only: write your statements so that they are specific and real for you. Record your statements in your Career Planning Summary under the section Characteristics of My Preferred Future (page 77).

Work Values
If you want to be satisfied in your work life, the work that you do must be in line with the values that you hold dear. For example, if you value creativity, you probably will not be happy working where everything is structured and pre-programmed. If you value teamwork, you probably will not be happy working in an isolated cubicle with a computer all day long. If you value independence, you probably will not be happy having to get approval for every action you take. So, just like life interests, values matter. Our values are what we care about most. Values give direction to our work and our lives, enriching each day with a heightened sense of meaning. Most of us have many important values. Asked to describe them, we might say, time to spend with my family, challenging work, decent income, and so on. But the reality is that some values are more important to us than others. In thinking about your career and your life, you need to know what is most important to you. Otherwise, you may end up drifting or making bad decisions. Sometimes our core values conflict with or are not satisfied by the work we are required to perform. In these cases, we must decide what matters to us most: do we stay in our work roles for practical reasons and seek to have our values fulfilled elsewhere, or do we look for new work assignments that are more congruent with our values? Let us look at what values are important to you. Complete Activity 5: What Matters Most to Me on page 31.

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ACTIVITY 5: What Matters Most To Me


Below are a number of work-related values, things that make work meaningful for people. There are no right or wrong answers; no better or worse values. Values are what matter to you. Follow the instructions below. INSTRUCTIONS 1. 2. 3. Read each statement and place a check mark beside those values that are very important to you as they relate to work. Once you have gone through the list, choose the 3 to 5 values that are most important to you, and that you would prefer to have in your next work situation. Record those values in your Career Planning Summary in the section Characteristics of My Preferred Future on page 77.

VARIETY It is important for me to: ___ do different tasks every day ___ find new ways to complete tasks ___ have a number of different responsibilities ___ have surprises and frequent changes ___ develop new skills INDEPENDENCE It is important for me to: ___ work on my own ___ be able to organize my own schedule and make my own hours ___ be left to figure out things for myself and come up with my best ideas ___ work without a lot of direct supervision ___ make decisions on my own STRUCTURE It is important for me to: ___ have regular working hours that do not change from day to day ___ have clearly defined responsibilities so I know what to do and how to do it ___ follow a regular routine ___ have some supervision and someone I can ask for guidance ___ know information in advance so I can plan and strategize

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ACTIVITY 5: What Matters Most To Me


CREATIVITY It is important for me to: ___ find new ways to complete tasks and solve problems ___ be able to use my artistic talents in the work I do ___ use my imagination to express myself ___ be part of creating something original and unique ___ be able to incorporate unconventional ideas into the work that I do SECURITY It is important for me to: ___ be able to count on my job for the long term ___ have high-paying work ___ be able to count on regular pay increases ___ have benefits such as health insurance from my employer ___ have a safe job with little chance of on-the-job injury IMPACT It is important for me to: ___ help others ___ dedicate my work to causes in which I believe ___ know that my work affects the lives of others ___ try to make the world a better place ___ make a difference, even if I am not recognized TEAMWORK It is important for me to: ___ brainstorm ideas in a group ___ work with others rather than work alone ___ be able to cooperate and share with others ___ have equality in a working group ___ work with a diverse group of people so that many ideas and perspectives affect my work

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ACTIVITY 5: What Matters Most To Me


AUTHORITY It is important for me to: ___ take on a lot of responsibility ___ be a leader and able to influence others ___ be able to make decisions ___ be responsible for long-range planning ___ be able to direct projects, people or situations PRESTIGE It is important for me to: ___ be recognized for the work I do ___ know that others respect and look up to me for the work I do ___ know many people and be well known in the community ___ have a good salary, nice office, or extra work benefits associated with my position ___ be able to associate with important/powerful people because of my work TIME It is important for me to: ___ have time outside of work to pursue hobbies and interests ___ be able to deal with family and personal situations without feeling guilty ___ be able to work accurately at a steady pace and not feel rushed ___ be able to structure overtime hours in a way that best suits me

Now go to page 77 under the section Characteristics of My Preferred Future to record the 3 - 5 values that are most important to you.

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Personality Type
The Myers -Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) is a popular instrument that assesses personality types according to four ranges of personality traits: Extrovert-Introvert (how we get our energy), Sensing-Intuitive (how we take in information), Thinking-Feeling (how we make decisions) and Perceiving-Judging (lifestyle and work habits we prefer). We all have bits of each type, but we tend to favour one end of the scale over the other. We will not be doing a personality type inventory in this workbook, but if you want to learn more about Myers-Briggs Personality Indicator, visit the following web sites: 1. 2. 3. www.personalitypage.com www.keirsey.com/ www.cis.ufl.edu/~dts/resources/MBType.html

You may have taken the Myers-Briggs Personality Indicator or some other personality type inventory in a professional development program. If you have, you may remember some of the statements that described your preferences for different activities or work. Record any of those statements in your Career Planning Summary under the section Characteristics of My Preferred Future on page 77.

Emotional Intelligence
Emotional intelligence is a relatively new term that refers to specific characteristics that successful people exhibit as emotional habits. It includes emotions such as optimism, trust, honesty, empathy, interpersonal relationships, impulse control, and ability to handle stress. Studies on success are showing that people with the traits that mark emotional intelligence are poised and outgoing, committed to people and causes, sympathetic and caring, and have a rich, but appropriate emotional life. For leaders, emotional intelligence can help you: preserve your high performance relationships with your team maintain good physical health handle the stress associated with managing others

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We will not be doing an emotional intelligence inventory in this workbook, but if you are interested in the topic, check out the following web site: www.queendom.com/emotionaliq.html If you have taken an emotional intelligence inventory as part of a professional development program, you may want to record any of the personal traits that were identified in your Career Planning Summary in the section Characteristics of My Preferred Future on page 77.

Influences on Career Decisions


You do not make career decisions in isolation of who you are and what your life circumstances are. Whether you think you have limitless opportunities or insurmountable barriers depends on how you view your family, financial, environmental, and personal situation. Whether or not you are conscious of these influences; they, in fact, affect your decision makingeither positively or negatively. Your circumstances do not remain static and neither does the influence they hold over you. Sometimes circumstances change you and sometimes you change circumstances. By recognizing what influences inform your career decisions, you can begin to mobilize the positive aspects to work for you and take steps to remedy those influences that work against your ability to make good decisions. What issues or concerns currently influence the career decisions you make? the Current Influences in My Life Activity on page 36. Complete

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ACTIVITY 6: Current Influences In My Life


The checklist below lists a number of factors that could influence your ability to make and carry through with any career move or decision that you may be considering. For each factor, check whether it affects you Positively, Negatively, or Does not Affect Me. At the bottom of the list, add any other factors not included that affect you either negatively or positively.

Influence
Age Gender Religion Race Physical health (injuries/disabilities) Emotional health (stress management, selfconfidence) Addiction issues Financial situation Emotional support (family/friends) Childcare/Elder care Self-knowledge (my aspirations, interests, personality, aptitudes, values) Educational qualifications Specialized skills Relevant work experience Knowledge of other opportunities Location of work Job search skills: 1. Networking 2. Resume writing ability

Positive

Negative

Does Not Affect Me

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Influence
Political situation Economic situation Willingness to take risks Ability to deal with uncertainty Others (list) ________________________ ________________________ ________________________

Positive

Negative

Does Not Affect Me

OBSERVATIONS 1. The three factors that will most positively support my efforts to make a career decision are: 1 2 3 2. The three factors that will most negatively impact on my ability to make a career decision are: 1 2 3 3. Some things I might do to minimize/overcome the effects of these negative factors are:

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4.

Go to your Career Planning Summary . Under the section Issues to be Considered (page 76), record any factors that could negatively impact upon your ability to make career decisions. Under the section Actions to Help Me Address Issues (page 77), record anything that you can do to minimize the effects of these negative factors. Under the section Factors Which Will Support Me (page 78), record any factors that will assist and support you as you make and carry out your career decisions.

Your Skills Portfolio


By the time you have reached mid-career, you have developed an i mpressive repertoire of skills. You have honed a set of technical skills that has progressed you in your chosen career field. You have acquiredor are starting to acquirea set of management and leadership skills that are taking you in a new direction. The question is what skills do you want to be using now? Do you want to be doing more of some things, less of others, and nothing of still others? Do you want to be doing something entirely different? The best way to plan your future is to start building on your existing strengths. One of the best ways to identify your skills and core competencies is to examine achievements that gave you lasting satisfactionat work, in learning and in your personal life. By doing so, you can find the linking themes that run through all of your accomplishments defining who you are, what you like to do and what you have to contribute. Some people find this exercise difficult because they find it hard to acknowledge their accomplishments. They lessen or discard even quite significant accomplishments. Use personal satisfaction and pride as your criteria in selecting these experiences and do not let modesty interfere with completing this exercise. Regardless of what others might have thought about your accomplishments, select an experience that you found the most satisfying. If learning a foreign language was more satisfying than an achievement at work that earned you high praise, select that experience. Complete Activity 7: Significant Experiences on page 39.

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ACTIVITY 7: Significant Experiences


Think back to times in your life where you took a leading role in getting something accomplished. You were totally engaged in what you were doing and you excelled at the task. At the end, you were able to stand back and honestly say, Good work. I am proud of what I did. Maybe someone else complimented you on a job well done. Think particularly about incidents that happened in the following time periods in your life. A time in your youth where you successfully demonstrated leadership and/or management skills. A time when you were completing your formal studies where you successfully demonstrated leadership and/or management skills. A time in the first part of your work life where you successfully demonstrated leadership and/or management skills. A time in your current work situation where you successfully demonstrated leadership and/or management skills.

INSTRUCTIONS 1. For each of these times in your life, write a story that is no longer than one page in length. In each story, describe in detail what you did, what was the result (what you accomplished), what skills you used and why it made you feel proud. In particular, describe the activity in terms of how you managed people, money, or time. If you cannot think of a significant pride experience from one time period in your life, write two stories from another time period. Do not worry about what anyone else might have thought of the experience, or even if anyone else noticed it. What is important is that you are proud of what you did. Do not worry about spelling or grammar. rather than paragraphs, that is fine too. If you prefer to write in point form

2.

3.

4.

If you want to write more than four stories, that is great. You may find that, once you get started, writing your stories comes easier. You may begin to think of other experiences, or ones that illustrate your successes better. Write or rewrite as many stories as you want. This activity is to get you thinking about what experiences are particularly meaningful to you so that you can use this information as you take steps to move in your new career direction.

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EXAMPLE: This will not do . . . I have managed a small Government unit for three years of my life. This is better . . . Currently I administer a unit in the Department of Education that looks after correspondence studies for those who want to receive academic secondary school credits. I feel like a juggler in a circus and I love the action. I supervise five administrative staff who enroll students in courses and keep their marks updated in a database. Everything must work like clockwork. We have to keep materials stocked and process the enrolments daily; we have to keep marks up-to-date and send certificates out immediately. The phones and mail are crazy in the fall and New Year. It is a thousand details to remember and keep on top of. I have to oversee all the details, move staff to where they are needed and change the priorities to keep all the balls in the air. I am also the editor of all the new courses that we develop. When I hire writers, I have to make sure that our products meet curriculum standards. But they also have to be fun, engaging and easy to read: I love working with designers to come up with interesting graphics and beautifully lay out each page. I have produced 14 new courses in three years, which is an impressive output and have received many compliments from students. On top of all this, I am the problem solver for students, schools, parents and agencies whenever anything goes wrong with a course. This requires tact, patience and negotiating skills. Solutions must work for everyone concerned. This job requires me to work in an action-packed, fast-paced, ever-changing environment and I thrive on it. When I took over the job, every aspect of the operation was backlogged or outdated; four years later, our daily operations are up-to-date and our products are becoming so. We have satisfied customers and a happier staff: I take pride in being instrumental in improving the quality of the courses, establishing efficient systems and instilling teamwork in the staff.

DO NOT CONTINUE UNTIL YOU HAVE COMPLETED ALL FOUR STORIES

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My Story #1

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My Story #2

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My Story #3

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My Story #4

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Skills and Todays Leader


Today it is not enough simply to be competent and effective. You also have to be able to talk about what you do best and the results you have achieved. You need to be able to talk about your core competencies - how you get things accomplished. These key talents are central to you making a contribution and delivering value to your employees, clients and stakeholders in the future. Let us begin to take stock of your leadership competencies now. Complete Activity 8: Assessing My Skills/Competencies.

ACTIVITY 8: Assessing My Skills/Competencies


The chart on pages 4 6 to 49 outlines the leadership competencies requested by managers in the Nova Scotia Public Service in fulfilling their job responsibilities. Complete this activity by following the instructions below. INSTRUCTIONS 1. Go back to each of your four stories in Activity 7 and decide if you used any of the skills that are listed here. Place a check mark beside those that you used. Have someone whose opinion you value read your stories and discuss them with you. Have them comment on the skills that you used, based on their reading of the story or their previous knowledge of you. Have them challenge you on parts they think might be missing. There may be skills that you overlooked or details that you left out. By having a second opinion a whole wealth of competencies may suddenly become apparent. If you like, go back and edit or re-write your story to include additional details that you originally missed. If you remember another story that better illustrates your management/leadership skills, then write that story and analyze it for the skills that you demonstrated. Just Remember: Before you can give yourself a check for a skill, you must have actually performed that skill during the time that you are writing about (even if you forgot to write it down). You cannot say, Oh, I can do that. I just did not do it there. Complete the Observations section of the activity on pages 46-49.

2.

3.

4.

5.

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ACTIVITY 8: Assessing My Skills/Competencies


Competency / Skill Development of People
Communicates vision and goals Helps others learn Shares expertise and information Recognizes talents of others Recruits individuals that build a team Assigns responsibilities/directs others easily Rewards accomplishments Provides feedback and coaches others Acts as a change agent Motivates others Promotes career development with others

Story

#1

#2

#3

#4 Total

Skill/Competency Decisiveness
Takes ownership of decisions Recognizes conflicting situations and determines appropriate responses. Implements ideas and approaches that add value Monitors risks and determine acceptable risk tolerance Makes strategic decisions based on principles, values and business cases. Makes decisions when faced with different stakeholder opinions

Story

#1

#2

#3

#4 Total

Skill/Competency Strategic Orientation


Considers whether short term goals will support long-term vision Reviews own actions against the organizations strategic plan Anticipates reactions to different initiatives Has a vision and long-term plan Actively increases ones own knowledge of the business and competitive environment Develops a business strategy Ensures contingency plans for problems that may occur

Story

#1

#2

#3

#4 Total

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Considers how present policies, processes and methods might be affected by future development and trends Establishes a course of action to accomplish a long-term goal

Skill/Competency Relationship Building


Develops effective working relationships with others Initiates/participates in social or special gatherings Matches staff to appropriate stakeholder contacts Develops new ways to reach out to clients Develops/maintains a network of professional relationships Uses professional network for identify opportunities Taps into professional network to resolve problems

Story

#1

#2

#3

#4 Total

Skill/Competency Team Leadership


Creates a team identity by working on shared vision, values, and mission Fosters collaboration and exchange of ideas Contributes individual expertise and experience Gives recognition to team members Actively supports team decisions Negotiates difficult issues within the team Deals with conflict constructively Builds rapport with others Enlists the assistance of others Inspires confidence, generates excitement and enthusiasm.

Story

#1

#2

#3

#4 Total

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Skill/Competency Self-Confidence and Courage of Convictions


Speaks up when in disagreement with management or clients Acknowledges personal responsibility for decisions Takes on challenging positions or projects Instills a desire in groups to take actions

Story

#1

#2

#3

#4 Total

Skill/Competency Achievement Orientation


Sets and achieves individual performance targets Organizes own work to stay on track Keeps others apprised of progress or barriers to achievement Accepts responsibility for actions Assumes responsibility for personal career development Develops personal leadership and management skills Inspires and encourages others to do their best Revises priorities as necessary Schedules and coordinates the work of others Sets performance standards

Story

#1

#2

#3

#4 Total

Skill/Competency Impact and Influence


Adapts presentations/discussions to appeal to audience Anticipates and prepares for others reactions Uses chains of influence Uses experts or third parties to influence Builds behind the scenes support for ideas

Story

#1

#2

#3

#4 Total

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OTHER COMPETENCIES/SKILLS List any other skills that you have demonstrated, but which have not been included in this checklist. Place a check for each story where that skill was demonstrated. Skill/Competency Story #1 #2 #3 #4 Total

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OBSERVATIONS 1. List 10 well-developed management/leadership skills that you have demonstrated from your life stories (those with four check marks).

1 2 3 4 5
2.

6 7 8 9 10
List up to 8 management/leadership skills in which you require additional development (those with 0-1 check marks).

1 2 3 4
3.

5 6 7 8
How is your current work situation allowing you to demonstrate management and leadership skills?

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4.

To what extent are you interested in developing your management and leadership skills further?

5.

Go to the Career Planning Summary . Under the section Characteristics of My Preferred Future (page 77), record those well-developed leadership skills that you have demonstrated from your life stories and that you would like to continue to use in your future career path. Under the section Areas of Development (page 78), record those leadership skills that you have indicated as needing development.

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Professional and Management Positions in the Nova Scotia Government


There are generally four broad levels of professional management positions within the Nova Scotia Civil Service: Frontline Supervisor Middle Manager Executive Technical/Professional The core functions of each level are grouped into the following categories: Departmental operation Policy development Central agency operations Exposure to political level

Corporate Leadership Competencies


The Nova Scotia Civil Service recognizes there are a number of competencies required to ensure success for all managers. These competencies form the basis of standard leadership behaviour, which can be consistently applied across the management community. Civil Service leaders must exhibit these leadership competencies. Decisiveness The ability to make decisions based on analysis of the information presented in the face of ambiguous or conflicting situations, or when there is an associated risk. Strategic Orientation The ability to link long-range visions and concepts to daily work. It implies the ability to think conceptually and to see the big picture. It includes an understanding of capabilities, nature and potential of the department and the organization. It involves taking calculated risks based on an awareness of societal, economic and political issues as they impact the strategic direction of the department and the organization. Development of People Involves working to develop peoples contribution and potential. Involves a genuine intent to foster the long-term learning or development of others, including direct reports, peers, team members or other staff. The focus is on the developmental intent and effect rather than on a formal role of training.

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Team Leadership The intention to take a role as leader in a team or other group. Leadership involves communicating a compelling vision and embodying the values of the Nova Scotia Public Service. Team Leadership is generally, but not always, shown from a position of formal authority. The team here should be understood broadly as any group in which the person takes on a leadership role, including the organization as a whole. Achievement Orientation Involves working to achieve results and improve individual and organizational contribution. Achievement Orientation is a concern for working well or for surpassing a standard of excellence. The standard may be ones own past performance (striving for improvement); an objective measure (results orientation); outperforming others (competitiveness); challenging goals one has set; or trying something new that will improve organizational results (innovation). Achievement Orientation also involves effectively managing internal and external resources to achieve the Governments goals. Self-Confidence/Courage of Convictions The belief in ones own capability as expressed in increasingly challenging circumstances and confidence in ones decisions or opinions, within the framework of public interest, ethics and values and organizational integrity. It may include providing leadership, direction, and inspiration to others by making difficult decisions and taking actions that may not be popular but are in the best interests of the organization and its clients. Impact and Influence An intention to persuade, convince, influence or impress others (individuals or groups) in order to get them to go along with or to support the organizations direction. The key is understanding others, since Impact and Influence is based on the desire to have a specific impact or effect on others where the person has his or her own agenda, a specific type of impression to make, or a course of action that s/he wants the others to adopt. Relationship Building The ability to develop contacts and relationships internal and external to the organization to facilitate work efforts or to gain support/cooperation. It implies building long-term or on-going relationships with clients or stakeholders (e.g. someone internal or external to the organization, on whom your work has an impact). This type of relationship is often quite deliberate and is typically focused on the way the relationship is conducted. If you are interested in pursuing career opportunities at any of these levels, you should evaluate your readiness by assessing yourself against the leadership competency assessment and the Leadership Career Path Model, both of which are available online at http://iweb.gov.ns.ca/humr/perfman/perfman.htm.

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SNAPSHOT OF MANAGERIAL AND PROFESSIONAL POSITIONS IN THE NOVA SCOTIA GOVERNMENT

Position: Frontline Supervisor Departmental operations


Coordinates the delivery of a program or service of a department Supervises and coaches employees to achieve desired results Requires an ability to improve processes and work teams Operates within a defined time frame and well established procedures Supervises by establishing working principles, precedents, policies and objectives Management of human and financial resources Provides input on policies that directly involve the work unit May provide advice in the development of policies involving issues in an area of importance to the Nova Scotia public May provide advice that has a demonstrable impact on the development of policies within a field of expertise May have exposure to Cabinet and/or Central Agency decision-making processes Exposure to political levels through the consultation process and assisting with the preparation of briefing materials for the Minister or Deputy Minister

Policy Development

Central Agency Operations Exposures to Political Levels

* Note these profiles are intended to give a general overview of the levels of management positions in Government for career planning purposes only. They are not job descriptions or all inclusive.

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SNAPSHOT OF MANAGERIAL AND PROFESSIONAL POSITIONS IN THE NOVA SCOTIA GOVERNMENT


Position: Middle Manager Departmental operations
Manages a departmental work unit, program deliverables or program functions Coaches employees to achieve desired result Manages human and financial resources, and in some cases may involve management through subordinate managers Provides advice that has an impact on the achievement of objectives Defines problems, develops alternatives and recommends courses of action Provides input in the development of policies involving issues that impact or relate to a work unit or department Provides advice that has an impact on the development of policies May have exposure to Central Agency decision-making processes Responsible for managing portions of individual elements of government agenda issues including reporting and identifying solutions

Policy Development

Central Agency Operations

Exposures to Political Levels

Exposure to political levels through the preparation of briefing materials for the Minister or Deputy Minister

* Note these profiles are intended to give a general overview of the levels of management positions in Government for career planning purposes only. They are not job descriptions or all inclusive.

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SNAPSHOT OF MANAGERIAL AND PROFESSIONAL POSITIONS IN THE NOVA SCOTIA GOVERNMENT


Position: Executive Departmental operations
Manages a major operation with significant program deliverables or program functions Manages human and financial resources, including management through subordinate managers Coaches and mentors managers Provides advice that has a demonstrable impact on the achievement of objectives Manages decisions and makes recommendations that have a demonstrable impact on the achievement of departmental objectives Is responsible for overseeing strategic direction of the departmental business planning process Is exposed to pressures and demands as a result of new initiatives and ongoing accountabilities Provides leadership in the development of policies involving highly complex issues in an area of importance to the Nova Scotia public Develops policies involving inter-departmental, intergovernmental or public consultation, in an area of importance to the Nova Scotia public Provides advice that has a demonstrable impact on the development of policies Considerable exposure to Cabinet and/or Central Agency decision-making processes Responsibility for coordinating major government agenda issues and through various phases of development, identifying potential problem areas and resolving conflicts that may arise Exposure to political levels through the preparation of briefing materials for the Minister or Deputy Minister

Policy Development

Central Agency Operations

Exposures to Political Levels

* Note these profiles are intended to give a general overview of the levels of management positions in Government for career planning purposes only. They are not job descriptions or all inclusive.

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SNAPSHOT OF MANAGERIAL AND PROFESSIONAL POSITIONS IN THE NOVA SCOTIA GOVERNMENT


Position: Technical/Professional Departmental operations Policy Development
Role in delivering program development or program functions for clients Provides advice in the development of policies involving highly complex issues in an area of importance to the Nova Scotia public Provides guidance or developmental policies involving inter-departmental or public consultation, in any area of importance to Nova Scotia public policy Provides advice that has a demonstrable impact on the development of policies within a field of expertise May have exposure to Cabinet and/or Central Agency decision-making processes Exposure to political levels through the consultation process and assisting with the preparation of briefing materials for the Minister or Deputy Minister

Central Agency Operations Exposures to Political Levels

* Note these profiles are intended to give a general overview of the levels of management positions in Government for career planning purposes only. They are not job descriptions or all inclusive.

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Wrap-up
We have given you a brief snapshot of who you are. At this point, you should have a better idea of: your life interests your work values your well-developed leadership skills your leadership skills that need developing any issues that may impact on your ability to make career decisions any supports you have that will help you make career decisions

You can continue the process of self-exploration by talking to people who you trust and respecta manager, co-worker, partner, friend, family member, or counselling professional. You can read career planning books or complete other self-assessment inventories and tools (such as those suggested in this workbook). All self-information adds to completing the portrait. The next step is to look at the work and training opportunities that are available so that you are able to move to the final stepdeveloping a short- and long-term game plan.

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The Career Explorer


Corporate Human Resource Tools

Knowing What is Out There

There are three things extremely hard: steel, a diamond and to know oneself. Benjamin Franklin

Knowing What is Out There Researching Opportunities Information Meeting Questions Activity 9: Researching Opportunities Accessing Your Allies Activity 10: Accessing Your Allies Validating Your Experiences Wrap Up

Knowing What is Out There

Knowing Whats Out There


So far, the focus on your career planning has been on YOUhow you see yourself and how others see you. This section of The Career Explorer helps you explore future management or leadership roles within the Nova Scotia Civil Service. Knowing Whats Out There involves three aspects: researching work and learning opportunities, accessing your allies and validating your experiences. We will look at each aspect in turn.

Researching Opportunities
It seems self-evident that, before you can go after a work or learning opportunity, you have to know that it exists. You probably know about vacancies in your own division, branch, or maybe even department. But what about vacancies in other departments? How do you learn about opportunities before they even become vacancies? What training or development opportunities are available in your own department that could help prepare you to make a career move? How do you know if something is a viable opportunity for you? You need to have informationongoing, reliable information that you can evaluate against what you know about yourself. Just as you formulated a picture of who you are in the first part of this workbook (your life interests, values and skills), you need to create a picture of the types of work and learning opportunities that are compatible with your picture of self. To do that, you need to explore brand new career fields or familiar ones with a new eye; you need to unearth work opportunities before they become opportunities and you need to determine what types of training or developmental activities will enhance your leadership competencies. There are any number of sources of information, from printed to electronic to people. All can form a vital link in your search for work opportunities that have meaning for you. 1. Printed Information Most Government departments produce printed information in the form of annual reports, technical publications or brochures. This is a good way to get a general overview of the activities, programs and services of a departmentparticularly if you are unfamiliar with the workings of that department. On pages 54 to 58 we have provided you with an overview of the different levels of management and professional positions that are found in any department in the Nova Scotia Government. Moving beyond the Government environment, professional associations frequently produce trade magazines that report on current practices, trends, regional happenings and sometimes employment opportunities. The more you can learn about a career field, the better positioned you are to know whether or not that field holds promise for you.

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2.

The Internet The Government of Nova Scotia currently (2005) works with CareerBeacon.com in promoting job opportunities within the Nova Scotia Public Service. All information pertaining to these jobs including job descriptions, classification, start dates and application deadlines are posted on this site. Jobs in each category are displayed in chronological order by date posted. Career Beacon gives employees the ability to browse all available jobs or to do advance searches based on specific criteria. Career Beacon also provides the user with the ability to email his or her cover letter and resume. You can access this site by going to www.CareerBeacon.com All Government departments have websites that contain information on the operation of that department. Each website differs, but you may be able to find the following types of information: organizational charts names of divisions and brief descriptions of activities names, job titles and telephone numbers of key personnel updates on key initiatives list of publications

Again, this type of information gives you a general overview of the major responsibilities of a department and contact names if you want to explore an area further. You can access any department's website through the Nova Scotia Government website: www.gov.ns.ca/gov_index.asp 3. Information Meetings As you conduct your paper and electronic research, patterns or trends may begin to emerge: What departments/career fields are experiencing openings? What skills/qualifications are most commonly required? What types of jobs and work responsibilities continue to attract me? In what areas would I like more information? Whenever a position, department, or career field interests you, it is time to explore further with an information meeting. You do not have to wait for a specific job opening; in fact, that may be leaving it too late. You want to have an accurate picture of that workplace beforehand in order to be prepared when an opportunity does come upwhether it's that exact job, a similar job in a different department, or something completely different. It's also a good way to bring positive attention to yourself: if people in that branch, division, or department have met you, they already have some idea of who you are and what you can do. The best information comes from someone actually doing that work, or someone working in the area. Information meetings are based on the simple notion that, if you want to know what a financial administrator does, you talk to a financial administrator. That way, you get a real sense of what the work and work environment are like, both the good and not so good points.

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You may find it intimidating to ask people about the work they do or to talk to complete strangers. The following tips can help get you started. 1. Do some homework first. Read all the print materials you can find on the position, career field, or department. Develop a list of questions that you want answered. What are the important features of this job or workplace? What do you need to know in order to decide if this work opportunity is a fit for you? (See page 71 for suggested interview questions.) Start with people you know. Do you know anyone working in that career field with whom you could converse? Do you know someone who knows someone who could refer you? If you're concerned about contacting a complete stranger, ask yourself, What do I have to lose? You haven't lost anything if the person doesn't have information to give you, or is not interested in talking. On the other hand, you stand to gain a lot if the person is a valuable source of information. Before you approach anyone, be prepared. Have your questions ready in case a meeting happens on the spot over the phone. Update your resume so that you are knowledgeable about your current portfolio of skills and accomplishments. You are not going for a job interview, but you want to be able to discuss your competencies in relation to the requirements of the organization and to assess the potential fit. If you have agreed to a meeting, be organized and punctual. Respect the person's time and make the best use of it. Get to the heart of why you are there and ask the questions that are pertinent to you. Unless you are invited to stay longer, don't take any more time than you promised you would (15 or 20 minutes shows consideration). Keep records from the start. Too many people fail to record what they've learned so it's as if there was no learning. Note every person with whom you have spoken including their job title, work address, telephone number and what they had to say. Record the names and telephone numbers of other referral contacts (along with the name of the person who referred them). Do not rely on memory. You should follow-up in a few months to keep your contacts updated on what you've been doing, to thank them for any promising referrals that they made, to seek further information or advice, or whatever seems appropriate for the relationship that has developed. Be sincere. The information meeting (usually called information interviewing) has taken a knock in recent years as people have used it as a ploy to sell themselves as job seekers. You are asking a person to share a valuable resourcethe knowledge they possess. Be thoughtful in the questions you ask, interested in the answers given, and appreciative of the time that was offered.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

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8.

A thank you note is still good etiquette. written on plain paper.

It should be short, businesslike and

Information Meeting Questions


Use the following questions as a guide only. Develop your own set of questionsbased on the type of work opportunity you are researching, what you already know, and what you need to learn. 1. 2. What are the typical duties in this type of work? What is the work environment like (leadership, vision, autonomy, flexibility, ability to make decisions, pace of work, work independently/part of a team, etc.)? What does the interviewee like about the work or work environment? What qualificationseducation, technical skills, management experienceare required to be successful in this work? skills and previous

3. 4.

5.

What human resource changes might be anticipated in the future (leaves, retirements, secondments, reorganizations, new program developments, etc.)? What opportunities have previous employees moved on to? What critical activities must be performed to move this organization forward? What developmental opportunities are available to new employees?

6. 7. 8.

As the interview progresses, the following types of questions may be appropriate: 9. 10. Are you aware of any similar roles/positions in other departments? Do you know of other people with whom I could speak to gain more information? (Get specific names.) Could I use your name to contact that person? Would you be able to briefly scan my resume to see if my skills and qualifications fit with your workplace? Based on your scan of my resume, do you think I should be exploring other types of work opportunities, or talking with other groups of people?

11.

12.

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ACTIVITY 9: Researching Opportunities


The workplace has changed. Organizational life has changed. Research potential work or learning opportunities that interest you by using two different methods. 1. First, use either print or internet sources of information to learn more about a specific job opening, training opportunity, career field, or section of Government that interests you. Complete the questionnaire on page 65 to record your information. Second, using the questions on page 63 as a guide, develop a set of questions about a work opportunity or career field that interests you. Set up an Information Meeting with someone who can provide you with sound information about that opportunity. Record your information on page 67 (or staple the questions and responses into your workbook if you have created them on a separate page). Remember to record the interviewee's name, position, work address and telephone/fax/email numbers.

2.

On the basis of your research, are there any developmental activities you need to undertake in order to be positioned for your next career move? If yes, record those activities in your Career Planning Summary under the section Areas of Development (page 78). Are there any next steps you can take that will keep you moving towards your career goal (e.g. more research, more contacts, additional work experience or training, etc.)? If yes, record these steps in your Career Planning Summary in the section Next Steps (page 78). Be specific: for example get university calendars for Labour Relations courses; set up information meeting with Executive Director, Marketing or explore opportunity to join interdepartmental Committee on Aging.

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ACTIVITY 9: Researching Opportunities:


Print/Internet Information Questionnaire 1. What information source did you use?

2. What area/topic did you seek information on?

3. What information did you locate?

4. How sound (valid) was the information?

5. Did the information add to your awareness of work/training opportunities? Explain.

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6. Are you still interested in continuing to explore this work/training opportunity further?

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ACTIVITY 9: Researching Opportunities:


Information Meeting Record Name: _______________________________________________________________ Position: _____________________________________________________________ Work Address: ___________________________Email: _______________________ ________________________________________Phone: _______________________ ________________________________________Fax: What I want to ask/learn/share: ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ Notes during meeting: ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ [Use this worksheet as a model. Draw up your own.] _______________________

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Knowing What is Out There

Accessing Your Allies


There is truth in the sayings, it's who you know, being in the right place at the right time, and no man's an island. But that doesn't mean that y ou have to have a bulging Rolodex and it doesn't mean you're weak for needing help. We all need help and support at times in our lives. Making a career move is definitely one of those times. We need people (allies) to encourage us, to understand what we are trying to do and why, and to give us advice and feedback. It's actually a sign of strength to have the confidence and maturity to recognize when you need support. What are allies and who are they in your life? They are ordinary people who are prepared to act extraordinarily on your behalf. By extraordinarily, we mean your allies are prepared to give you their time, listen to you, teach or coach you, be a sounding board, make connections for you, or give you tips, suggestions and leads. No one person can give you all of this, but by having different allies for different reasons, you have a formidable network of support backing you up and giving you the courage to move forward with your plans. Because you are entering into a relationship with your allies, they must be people who you respect and trust. Your allies should have the knowledge or experience in the area in which you need assistance and they should be confident and secure enough in themselves that they are not threatened or annoyed by sharing what they know with you. That being said, allies come in all shapes, sizes and walks of life. You need both personal and professional allies so your next door neighbour can be as effective an ally as your Deputy Minister. Neighbours, friends, family, professional or business associates, club and organization members, instructors, co-workers, bosses, former co-workers and bosses are all part of your network of contacts, resources and support. Too often people feel alone as they face a major decision in their lives, like making a career move. It keeps them from even thinking that there are options, let alone taking any steps towards turning a dream into a reality. But just as frequently, people keep their thoughts and feelings to themselves, afraid that family, friends or co-workers will react negatively. So it becomes a double bind: you feel alone, but you don't dare reveal your needs, so you remain alone. One of the ways to break the isolation is to identify and actively recruit those people n i your life who understand, who do care, who can be supportive. Those people, in turn, have a network of supports surrounding their lives. Tap into your support network and you tap into theirs. To get started, create a picture of your current network of allies by completing Activity 10: Accessing My Allies on page 69.

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ACTIVITY 10: Accessing My Allies


Using the Three Spheres of Life diagram on page 70, identify those people currently in your life who you would consider to be an ally as you continue to consider your future career moves. INSTRUCTIONS In each of the three Spheres, write the actual names of people that you know you can count on for support. After their names, briefly list what kind of support you can expect from them: work/education information, contacts, emotional support, financial support, advice, feedback, instruction/tutoring, coaching, mentoring, sponsorship, work experience, job shadowing, or any other source of assistance you can think of. Just as you decided what activities fit into the three categories of Work, Education and Leisure in Activity 1, you will choose what people fit into which category based on the kind of support they can provide you.

EXAMPLES: A co-worker may know all the best marketing programs that would be useful for you to take. That person goes in your Education sphere. Your son's hockey coach belongs to the same Kinsmen club as an Executive Director you would like to meet and has agreed to make the connection for you. That person goes in your Work sphere. Your family has no problem with you taking a one-year secondment in another town because it's a job you really love. That's family support and it goes in your Leisure sphere.

While no one person can give you everything you need, one person can give you a number of different kinds of support. If you have people in your life that give you support on a number of fronts, include them in all of the spheres that apply. EXAMPLE: An ex-boss still has a lot of contacts in the field and is willing to put in a good word for you (Work). She has become a consultant offering professional development courses in health services administration, some of which would position you well for your next career move (Education). She is a long-standing friend and your weekly weight lifting workouts allow you to bounce ideas off her and keep you encouraged (Leisure). When you have completed this activity, transfer the names of those people who are your allies to your Career Planning Summary in the section Factors Which Will Support Me on page 78.

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Knowing What is Out There

ACTIVITY 10: Accessing My Allies

Leisure

Education

Work

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Knowing What is Out There

Validating Your Experiences


One of the very best ways of learning about work opportunities is to actually work in the area. You gain hands-on experience doing the work (or work that is related) and you get an inside look at what the work environment is really like. From there, you are in a better position to validate for yourself whether an opportunity is a fit with your own interests, skills and values.

1.

Working on Special Projects/Assignments Volunteering to take on special projects or assignments gives you the opportunity to learn new subject matter, to stretch your skills and abilities in new directions, or find out about the functions within other parts of the Government. It can also bring you positive attention by being seen as a doer and it can open doors within your organization and beyond. You can take on additional assignments within your own work site or department, become a member of a departmental, intra- or interdepartmental Task Force or Committee, or be temporarily transferred to another division or department for a specific assignment.

2.

Secondments Secondments are formalized agreements whereby employees are temporarily assigned to other positions for a specified period of time, say six months or a year, with the understanding that they can return to their original position at the end of the time period. Secondments can be arranged within the same department, in another department within the Nova Scotia Government, or in another public or private organization. A secondment is an excellent opportunity to try on a new job and develop a new set of skills to see if you, the work and the work environment are compatible.

Wrap-up
Seeking information is not a one-shot effort. As you start to gather information, you will open yourself to new possibilities. You will want to find additional information, confirm what you have learned with others, expand upon your contacts and supports and rethink the options you were originally contemplating. Each activity takes you to a higher level of awareness and develops the direction in which you are travelling. In the final section, we will look at creating a career plan.

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The Career Explorer


Corporate Human Resource Tools

Making Career Decisions

Believe you can. Believe you cant. Either way youll be right. Henry Ford

Making Career Decisions No Guarantees The Career Explorer and the Succession Management Process Wrap Up Career Planning Summary Career Development Plan

Making Career Decisions

Making Career Decisions


In this third and last, section of The Career Explorer, you will put what you have learned about yourself together with what you've learned about work and learning opportunities. You will begin to develop a career action plan that includes immediate steps as well as longer-range plans. You may have done the self-assessment activities in The Career Explorer for your own personal interest. The information that you discovered will be invaluable as you seek out new opportunities and evaluate them against your deepest held interests and values and the skills you most want to use. You may decide to pursue some opportunities and leave others behind. An action plan allows you to stay focussed and moving forward towards your goal. Career planning is an ongoing process: while you may never do the self-assessment activities again, you may revisit some aspects to update information as you acquire new experiences. You may begin to automatically seek out information on work opportunities, or use your network of allies for support, or seek learning opportunities wherever you can find them. This is all part of career planning and it puts you more in control of your future.

No Guarantees
No one knows exactly where you will be a few years from now. But that's all the more reason to develop and strive for a vision. If you set goals for yourself, you will take control over your future and avoid drifting, never sure of where you are heading. Even though you may not know what work you will be doing, there is much that you can plan for. Focus on what you want to achieve most, in your current organization or elsewhere, including: learning goals-skills and knowledge you need to develop types of job/work assignments you want ways of improving the balance between your work and personal life personal development goals roles you want to play

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The Career Explorer and the Succession Management Process


If you have been working through this workbook as part of your preparation for your departments succession management process, you should now have a considerable amount of information that will equip you for your discussions with your manager. You should now be able to d raft a Career Development Plan which includes listing your career goals, your areas of strength and areas for development and the potential moves leading to your career goals. You have summarized a lot of this information in your Career Planning Summary (page 76) and can use that as a starting point when creating your Career Development Plan. In Activity 8, you completed a Skills/Competencies assessment in which you analyzed those leadership skills that you have clearly demonstrated in the past. You can refer back to that activity as you complete your Leadership Competencies Assessment Form as part of your departments Succession Management process. These activities allow you to have an informed discussion with your manager about future leadership roles within your department or beyond and next steps to take. As you begin to act on your career goals, you and your manager may seek out special developmental activities and assignments that will provide you with the knowledge, skills or experiences that you require to move to a new leadership role in the Nova Scotia Civil Service. You will want to be proactive in managing your own career by developing and maintaining your network of supports, keeping your eyes open for work opportunities that match your interests and skills and continuing to learn and grow through a variety of training or developmental activities. You will also want to maintain ongoing dialogue with your manager to review your progress and to re-evaluate where your career plan is going. Work environments are dynamic. To be able to take advantage of the opportunities that become available, you must stay informed, be flexible to changing circumstances and be active in moving your career in a chosen direction.

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Making Career Decisions

Wrap-up
Some people worry about committing themselves to a particular career goal. What if they choose incorrectly? Don't worry about it. Your goals are not written in stone. They will change and evolve over time to reflect a changing work environment and your own changing interests and experiences. You will find yourself using different competencies in different combinations to respond to new demands and opportunities. Knowing your competencies and assets will help you imagine what options are available to you. You will then be able to stay flexible to take advantage of them. As a self-directed resource, The Career Explorer has tried to provide an overview of the most important elements of the career planning process. You may be interested in taking this process further by completing a formal assessment process using recognized inventories and tools, or by working through an individual career planning process with a counselling practitioner. If you are interested in these options, then talk with your Human Resources representative.

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Making Career Decisions

Career Planning Summary


Date :

Issues to be Considered (When Making Decisions About My Work/Life Future) From Activity 1: Three Spheres of Life

From Activity 2: Career Planning Beliefs

From Activity 6: Current Influences In My Life

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Actions to Help Me Address These Issues From Activity 6: Current Influences In My Life

Characteristics Of My Preferred Future (Areas of Strength) From Activity 4, 5, and 8: Patterns From My Life Story, What Matters Most To Me and Assessing My Skills and Competencies.

Factors Which Will Support Me In My Decision Making From Activity 2, 6 and 10: Career Planning Beliefs, Current Influences In My Life and Accessing My Allies (also any other you can identify now).

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Areas Of Development From Activity 8and 9: Assessing My Skills/Competencies and Researching Opportunities (also any others you can identify now)

Next Steps To keep Moving Towards My Goal From Activity 9: Researching Opportunities (also any others you can identify now).

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