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Flexibility : Static Flexibility Test - Shoulder & Wrist

Testing and measurement are the means of collecting information upon which subsequent performance evaluations and decisions are made but in the analysis we need to bear in mind the factors that may influence the results.

Objective
The objective of this test is to monitor the development of the athlete's shoulder and wrist flexibility.

Required Resources
To undertake this test you will require: 18" Stick Metre Ruler Assistant

How to conduct the test


The athlete warms up for 10 minutes The athlete lays prone on the floor, forehead on the ground, and arms extended holding the 18 stick with both hands shoulder width apart The assistant measures and records the athletes arm length from the acromial extremity to the stick The athlete raises the stick as high as possible whilst keeping their forehead on the ground The assistant measures and records the vertical distance from the ground to the bottom of the stick Repeat the test 3 times recording the vertical distance achieved The assistant subtracts the longest recorded vertical distance from the recorded arm length and the result is used to assess the athletes performance

Assessment
For an evaluation of the athlete's performance select the gender, enter the distance and then select the 'Calculate' button.

Gender
Male

Distance

inches

Assessment -

Normative data for the Shoulder and Wrist flexibility test (Johnson 1986)[1]
Rating Poor Fair Average Good Excellent Men >12.50 11.50 -12.50 8.25 - 11.49 6.00 - 8.24 <6.0 Women >11.75 10.75 - 11.75 7.50 - 10.74 5.50 - 7.49 <5.50

Analysis
Analysis of the test result is by comparing it with the athlete's previous results for this test. It is expected that, with appropriate training between each test, the analysis would indicate an improvement in the athlete's shoulder and wrist flexibility. The following link provides a variety of factors that may influence the results and therefore the test reliability.

Target Group
These tests are suitable for active individuals but not for those where the test would be contraindicated.

Reliability
Test reliability refers to the degree to which a test is consistent and stable in measuring what it is intended to measure. Reliability will depend upon how strict the test is conducted and the individual's level of motivation to perform the test.

Validity
Test validity refers to the degree to which the test actually measures what it claims to measure and the extent to which inferences, conclusions, and decisions made on the

basis of test scores are appropriate and meaningful. This test provides a means to monitor the effect of training on the athlete's physical development.

Advantages
Minimal equipment required Simple to set up and conduct Can be conducted almost anywhere

Disadvantages
Assistant required to administer the test

Referenced Material
1. JOHNSON, B.L. and NELSON, J.K. (1986) Practical Measurements for Evaluation in PE. 4th ed. Minneapolis: Burgess Publishing

Page Reference
The reference for this page is: MACKENZIE, B. (2007) Static Flexibility Test - Shoulder and Wrist [WWW] Available from: http://www.brianmac.co.uk/flextest2.htm [Accessed 23/6/2013]

Associated Pages
The following Sports Coach pages should be read in conjunction with this page: Articles on Performance Evaluation Evaluation and Performance Tests

Additional Sources of Information


For further information on this topic see the following: BEASHEL, P. & TAYLOR, J. (1996) Advanced Studies in Physical Education and Sport. UK: Thomas Nelson & Sons Ltd. DAVIS, B. et al. (2000) Physical Education and the Study of Sport. UK: Harcourt Publishers Ltd. McARDLE, W. et al. (2000) Essentials of Exercise Physiology. 2nd ed. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins BEASHEL, P. & TAYLOR, J. (1997) The World of Sport Examined. UK: Thomas Nelson & Sons Ltd. GALLIGAN, F. et al. (2000) Advanced PE for Edexcel. Oxford; Heinemann Educational Publishers BIZLEY, K. (1994) Examining Physical Education. Oxford; Heinemann Educational Publishers CHU, D. (1996) Explosive Power and Strength. USA; Human Kinetics Publishers, Inc.

Agility : Burpee Test


Testing and measurement are the means of collecting information upon which subsequent performance evaluations and decisions are made but in the analysis we need to bear in mind the factors that may influence the results.

Objective
The objective of this test is to monitor the development of the athlete's agility and balance.

Required Resources
To undertake this test you will require: Flat non-slip surface Stopwatch Assistant

How to conduct the test


The test requires the athlete to perform as many Burpees as possible in 30 seconds. The correct technique for one Burpee is: stand erect with the arms by the side bend the knees and place the hands on the floor in front of the feet (squat position) - thrust the legs back to assume a push up position with a straight line from the shoulders to the heels - return to the squat position - return to the standing position. The athlete warms up for 10 minutes The assistant gives the command GO, starts the stopwatch and the athlete commences the test The assistant counts the number of correctly performed Burpees The assistant keeps the athlete informed of the remaining time The assistant stops the test after 30 seconds and records the number of correctly performed Burpees

Assessment
A good result for this test is >16 Burpees for men and >12 for women.

Analysis
Analysis of the test result is by comparing it with the athlete's previous results for this test. It is expected that, with appropriate training between each test, the analysis would indicate an improvement in the athlete's strength, agility and balance.

Target Group
This test is suitable for active athletes but not for individuals where the test would be contraindicated.

Reliability
Test reliability refers to the degree to which a test is consistent and stable in measuring what it is intended to measure. Reliability will depend upon how strict the test is conducted and the individual's level of motivation to perform the test. The following link provides a variety of factors that may influence the results and therefore the test reliability.

Validity
Test validity refers to the degree to which the test actually measures what it claims to measure and the extent to which inferences, conclusions, and decisions made on the basis of test scores are appropriate and meaningful. This test provides a means to monitor the effect of training on the athlete's physical development.

Advantages
No equipment required Simple to set up and conduct Can be conducted almost anywhere

Disadvantages
Assistant required to administer the test

Page Reference
The reference for this page is: MACKENZIE, B. (2005) Burpee Test [WWW] Available from: http://www.brianmac.co.uk/burpee.htm [Accessed26/6/2013]

Associated Pages
The following Sports Coach pages should be read in conjunction with this page:

Articles on Performance Evaluation Evaluation and Performance Tests

Additional Sources of Information


For further information on this topic see the following: BEASHEL, P. & TAYLOR, J. (1996) Advanced Studies in Physical Education and Sport. UK: Thomas Nelson & Sons Ltd. DAVIS, B. et al. (2000) Physical Education and the Study of Sport. UK: Harcourt Publishers Ltd. McARDLE, W. et al. (2000) Essentials of Exercise Physiology. 2nd ed. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins BEASHEL, P. & TAYLOR, J. (1997) The World of Sport Examined. UK: Thomas Nelson & Sons Ltd. GALLIGAN, F. et al. (2000) Advanced PE for Edexcel. Oxford; Heinemann Educational Publishers BIZLEY, K. (1994) Examining Physical Education. Oxford; Heinemann Educational Publishers