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com
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Tuesday • April 1, 2014 • Vol XIII, Edition 194
DEADLINE DASH
HEALTH PAGE 17
GIANTS WIN
OPENER 9-8
SPORTS PAGE 11
RUSSIA PULLS
TROOPS BACK
WORLD PAGE 7
HEALTH LAW SIGN-UPS ON TRACK TO HIT 7M
New charter
school could
land at Mills
Design Tech High School previously
wanted to end up in Burlingame
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A new charter school focused on hands-on projects and
design concepts could soon be occupying space at Mills
High School starting this fall.
Although Design Tech High School’s leadership wanted it
to be housed at Burlingame High School, the San Mateo
Union High School District said there isn’t space at the
growing Burlingame school. Last week, the district
approved sending a letter to the charter offering six class-
rooms, each with 960 square feet of space, at the Mills loca-
tion for the new school. The school initially requested at
least eight classrooms and the district previously had
offered five.
“Burlingame is a built-out site,” said Liz McManus,
Sen. Leland Yee’s lawyer
questions FBI investigation
By Paul Elias
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — A lawyer for a
California state senator charged last
week with accepting bribes and gun traf-
ficking on Monday challenged the three-
year FBI investigation that led to the
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The innovative Draper University of
Heroes in downtown San Mateo has been
running on a temporary permit and city offi-
cials and citizens want to see the school fol-
low through with its terms of approval by
completing the agreed upon campus
improvements.
“There’s not a lot of things, but we’re a
little frustrated that they’re not completed,”
Councilman Jack
Matthews said. “I think
these things are all solv-
able and it’s our desire as
a city and as a council to
partner with Draper and
to make them successful
and be an addition to our
downtown. And working
together, I think we can
make everything better. ”
For the second time this year, city offi-
cials will sit down with
Draper staff Tuesday to
discuss the landscape
improvements in the
alleyway between Third
and Fourth avenues and
the need for pop-up retail
space at the Collective
building.
The city’s Downtown
Plan originated during
the dot-com boom and calls for ground floor
retail space, City Manager Larry Patterson
said.
Draper’s trending pop-up retail concept
was intended to satisfy the city’s zoning
code, yet it hasn’t come to fruition and the
university appears to be using the
Collective building as office space,
Patterson said.
Venture capitalist Tim Draper bought the
Benjamin Franklin Hotel, Collective build-
Draper University’s loose ends
San Mateo to discuss school’s outstanding obligations
Leland Yee
See SCHOOL, Page 8
See YEE, Page 20
See DRAPER, Page 20
T
here were countless good performances from thousands of athletes from nearly two
dozen schools during the winter prep sports season. But there are a handful who did it
better than the rest and it is those male and female athletes in basketball, soccer and
wrestling who are selected as the Daily Journal’s Athletes of the Season. SEE PAGE 11
Tim Draper Jack Matthews
Search ends for man
swept away off California
GUADALUPE — Rescuers have
ended their search for a 43-year-old
man swept to sea during a baptism cer-
emony on a Southern California beach.
The U.S. Coast Guard says the search
was called off about midnight Sunday
and there are no plans to resume it.
Awave pulled three people into the
ocean about 10 a.m. off Rancho
Guadalupe Dunes Preserve and only two
managed to return to shore on their
own.
Pastor Maurigro Cervantes of Jesus
Christ Light of the Sky Church says
his cousin, Benito Flores, was helping
perform a baptism when he was swept
away.
Fire Capt. David Sadecki said
Monday that it would be difficult for
anyone to survive more than 30 min-
utes in the cold water.
California skydiving
fatality ID’d as kin of racer
SAN DIEGO — Askydiver found dead
after a collision with another para-
chutist in eastern San Diego County
has been identified as the 27-year-old
brother-in-law of NASCAR driver
Jimmie Johnson.
The county medical examiner’s office
says in a statement Monday that
Jordan Jor-El Janway died Sunday
while skydiving with two others at
Jamul. Janway collided with one of the
other jumpers during freefall, failed to
open his parachute and impacted the
ground.
A statement posted on Johnson’s
website says Janway was the brother of
Johnson’s wife, Chandra. The state-
ment asks for prayers and privacy.
Skydive San Diego owner Buzz Fink
told reporters the victim was a veteran
of more than 1,000 jumps.
The medical examiner has yet to
schedule an examination of the body.
California man runs
from police, jumps in river
REDDING — Authorities have called
off the search for a man who jumped
into a river while running away from
police in Northern California.
Redding police Sgt. Aaron Maready
tells the Record Searchlight of Redding
that 48-year-old Darryl Brice
Cunningham was last seen struggling
in the Sacramento River Saturday
evening. He then went under and didn’t
resurface.
Maready said an officer had
approached Cunningham, who was
fighting with a woman. Cunningham
ran off before jumping off a bridge into
the river.
Ahelicopter and Sheriff’s Office boat
was called out to look for him, but the
search was called off because of heavy
rain.
Deacon who fell into
grave sues archdiocese
LOS ANGELES — Adeacon who acci-
dentally fell into a grave during a burial
at San Gabriel Mission Cemetery is
suing the Archdiocese of Los Angeles.
City News Service reported Monday
that Alfonso Valles broke his left arm
in several places when a platform he
was standing on collapsed and caused
him to fall in August 2012.
The claim, which names the archdio-
cese and the San Gabriel Mission as
defendants, was filed last week. It seeks
unspecified damages.
Hospital asks patients
to get tested for diseases
SAN FRANCISCO — ASan Francisco
hospital has asked nearly 200 patients
to get tested for HIV, hepatitis and
other blood-borne diseases after it
failed to properly sterilize equipment.
California Pacific Medical Center
sent letters earlier this month to 198
patients who underwent procedures
between July 2010 and February 2014
at its California Street campus using
one of three pieces of equipment: a
rigid bronchoscope, laryngoscope or
esophagoscope.
The instruments are used to examine
lungs and the digestive tract. Hospital
officials say they were washed by hand
and put through a decontaminator that
reaches temperatures over 200 degrees.
FOR THE RECORD 2 Tuesday • April 1, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
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As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 200 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the family’s choosing.To submit obituaries, email
information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
more than once, longer than 250 words or without editing, please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.
Rapper-actor
Method Man is 43.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1789
The U.S. House of Representatives
held its first full meeting in New York;
Frederick Muhlenberg of
Pennsylvania was elected the first
House speaker.
“Our wisdom comes from our experience,
and our experience comes from our foolishness.”
— Sacha Guitry, French actor-writer-director (1885-1957)
Reggae singer
Jimmy Cliff is 66.
Actor Josh
Zuckerman is 29.
Birthdays
REUTERS
Amphibious assault vehicles of the South Korean Marine Corps throw smoke bombs as they move to land on shore during
a U.S.-South Korea joint landing operation drill in Pohang.
Tuesday: Showers likely in the morning.
A slight chance of thunderstorms.
Showers in the afternoon. Some thunder-
storms may produce gusty winds and
small hail. Highs in the mid 50s. West
winds 5 to 15 mph...Becoming south 10
to 20 mph in the afternoon.
Tuesday night: Showers likely and a
slight chance of thunderstorms in the evening...Then a
chance of showers after midnight. Some thunderstorms may
produce gusty winds and small hail in the evening. Lows in
the mid 40s. West winds 10 to 20 mph.
Wednesday: Mostly cloudy in the morning then becoming
partly cloudy. Aslight chance of showers in the morning.
Highs in the upper 50s. Northeast winds 5 to 10 mph.
Chance of showers 20 percent.
Local Weather Forecast
I n 1853, Cincinnati, Ohio, established a fire department
made up of paid city employees.
I n 1912, the city of Branson, Mo., was incorporated.
I n 1924, Adolf Hitler was sentenced to five years in prison
for his role in the Beer Hall Putsch in Munich. (Hitler was
released in Dec. 1924; during his time behind bars, he wrote
his autobiographical screed, “Mein Kampf.”)
I n 1933, Nazi Germany staged a daylong national boycott
of Jewish-owned businesses.
I n 1939, the United States recognized the government of
Gen. Francisco Franco in Spain, the same day Franco went
on radio to declare victory in the Spanish Civil War.
I n 1945, American forces launched the amphibious inva-
sion of Okinawa during World War II.
I n 1954, the United States Air Force Academy was estab-
lished by President Dwight D. Eisenhower.
I n 1963, New York City’s daily newspapers resumed pub-
lishing after settlement was reached in a 114-day strike. The
daytime drama “General Hospital” premiered on ABC-TV.
I n 1972, the first Major League Baseball players’ strike
began; it lasted 12 days.
I n 1976, Apple Computer was founded by Steve Jobs,
Steve Wozniak and Ronald Wayne.
I n 1984, recording star Marvin Gaye was shot to death by
his father, Marvin Gay (cq) Sr. in Los Angeles, the day
before his 45th birthday. (The elder Gay pleaded guilty to
voluntary manslaughter, and received probation.)
I n 1992, the National Hockey League Players’Association
went on its first-ever strike, which lasted 10 days.
Ten years ago: President George W. Bush signed into law
new protections for the unborn that for the first time made it
a separate federal crime to harm a fetus during an assault on
the mother. Michigan won the NIT championship with a 62-
55 victory over Rutgers.
In other news ...
(Answers tomorrow)
BATCH GLAZE DOODLE CACTUS
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: The service at the comedy club was so bad
that it was — LAUGHABLE
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
UGEGO
OSEHU
TENXET
NACDEN
©2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
J
u
m
b
le

p
u
z
z
le

m
a
g
a
z
in
e
s

a
v
a
ila
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a
t

p
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Print answer here:
Actress Jane Powell is 85. Actress Grace Lee Whitney is 84.
Actress Debbie Reynolds is 82. Country singer Jim Ed Brown
is 80. Actor Don Hastings is 80. Baseball Hall of Famer Phil
Niekro is 75. Actress Ali MacGraw is 75. Rhythm-and-blues
singer Rudolph Isley is 75. Baseball All-Star Rusty Staub is 70.
Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito is 64. Rock musician Billy
Currie (Ultravox) is 64. Actress Annette O’Toole is 62. Movie
director Barry Sonnenfeld is 61. Singer Susan Boyle (TV:
“Britain’s Got Talent”) is 53. Country singer Woody Lee is 46.
Actress Jessica Collins is 43. Movie directors Allen and Albert
Hughes are 42. Political commentator Rachel Maddow is 41.
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Hot Shot, No.
3, in first place; Lucky Charms, No. 12, in second
place;and Whirl Win,No.6,in third place.The race
time was clocked at 1:49.85.
6 8 0
2 3 9 50 73 12
Mega number
March 28 Mega Millions
2 3 12 27 28 17
Powerball
March 29 Powerball
4 7 9 11 34
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
0 2 1 8
Daily Four
2 6 8
Daily three evening
12 20 24 30 42 7
Mega number
March 29 Super Lotto Plus
3
Tuesday • April 1, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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EVERSE
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SAN MATEO
Burglary. A computer, an Xbox and some
medical supplies were taken from the 3200
block Llano Street before 5:43 p.m.
Tuesday, March 25.
Burglary. Atheft occurred on the 300 block
of South Fremont Street before 9:08 a.m.
Tuesday, March 25.
Burglary. A robbery occurred at the 2700
block of Edison Street before 11:23 a.m.
Monday, March 24.
MILLBRAE
Publ i c i ntoxi cati on. Aperson was found
to be intoxicated in public on Magnolia and
Millbrae avenues before 2:20 a.m. Thursday,
March 27.
Tres pas s i ng. Aperson trespassed on prop-
erty at the 500 block of El Camino Real
before 3:04 p.m. Thursday, March 27.
Stored vehi cl e. Officers towed and stored a
vehicle that was abandoned on the 400
block of Richmond Drive before 2:58 p.m
Thursday, March 27.
Police reports
Wrong direction
Aman said he approached a person who
drove the wrong way down a one way
street and they got upset on the 100
block of De Anza Boulevard San Mateo
before 5:18 p.m. Monday, March 24.
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Acollege student and South San Francisco
native is getting a taste of entrepreneurship
this summer with an internship as a manager
of his own painting company.
Vincent Bregman, 20, is a sophomore at
University of California at Santa Cruz and
began work as an intern this February with
College Works Painting, a company based
out of Irvine, Calif. that teaches undergradu-
ate students how to manage their own paint-
ing businesses.
“It’s a great chance to get experience,”
said Bregman, who graduated from El
Camino High School. “It’s very difficult to
get experience. It’s not easy to get an intern-
ship these days if you don’t have any prior
experience.”
The program allows him to start his own
exterior painting business on the Peninsula,
primarily working in San Mateo. He is in
charge of marketing for the company and
hiring employees through September.
“You’re given an opportunity to run essen-
tially a franchise,” he said. “I’m interested
in the business management side of it.”
Bregman is a history and, possibly, poli-
tics double major and wants to own a restau-
rant one day, possibly some kind of diner.
He’s not sure what lies beyond his ambition
to own a restaurant but definitely has an
interest in entrepreneurship.
“Mostly stemming from a lack of desire to
have to work for someone else on their
schedule, I have always wanted to be my own
boss, just based on various work experi-
ences I have had and stories I’ve heard from
others that I know. Specifically, hearing the
stories and successes of Elon Musk and Jeff
Bezos, the CEOs of Tesla and Amazon
respectively, has been a great motivator and
source of inspiration,” he said.
Last summer, Bregman worked for a pro-
motional marketing company in San
Carlos.
“It’s my first time running a business,” he
said. “It’s totally different work.”
Bregman sees a lot of benefits to the
internship, including being able to gain
experience, marketing, learning business
management, relating to customers, net-
working and building up confidence.
His profit will be based off how well he
runs his venture, he said.
If you’re interested in painting services
from Bregman, he can be contacted by email
at vebregman@yahoo.com or by phone at
218-8830.
Man flashes woman
after asking for directions
Aman exposed himself to a woman walk-
ing her dog in San Bruno after he asked her
for directions.
Awoman was walking her dog on Sneath
Lane near Siskiyou Court around 7:16 p.m.
Sunday when a man pulled alongside her in
his car, according to the San Bruno Police
Department.
He asked her for directions to Tanforan
and, when she leaned over, she noticed the
man was not wearing pants, according to
police.
The man then drove off heading west on
Sneath Lane toward Skyline Boulevard,
according to police. The man is described as
Filipino in his early 20’s with a dark com-
plexion and short black hair. He was wearing
a red and white sports jersey and was driving
a white four-door older model car that may
have been a Toyota, according to police.
Anyone with information should contact
San Bruno Police at (650) 616-7100.
Peninsula college student to run summer business
South City’s Vincent Bregman interning with College Works Painting
Local brief
4
Tuesday • April 1, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Park ranger injured
by falling tree limb
A falling tree limb injured a San Mateo
County park ranger Monday morning in
Memorial County Park, a sheriff’s spokes-
woman said.
The ranger had been cutting trees when a
limb came down and hit him on the head,
sheriff’s Deputy Rebecca Rosenblatt said.
Fire and medic crews responded to the
park, which is along Pescadero Creek Road,
Rosenblatt said.
She did not know the extent of his
injuries.
Two robbed on baseball field
Two people were robbed at knifepoint
while in a baseball field in South San
Francisco Sunday.
The two victims were at Westborough
Park around 9:45 p.m. March 30 when they
were approached by two men, according to
the South San Francisco Police Department.
One of the men had a knife and demanded
the victims hand over their belongings. A
physical fight ensued and one of the victims
suffered minor injuries, according to police.
The suspects were unable to steal the vic-
tims’ property and fled on foot toward a
nearby school, according to police.
Both suspects are described as black men
between 20 and 25 years old with slender
builds. One of the suspects was about 6 feet
2 inches tall with short hair and was wearing
a ski mask, blue jeans and a white sweatshirt
with a multi-colored hood, according to
police.
The other suspect was about 5 feet 10
inches tall with long “corn-row” type braid-
ed hair and wore jeans and a dark blue hood-
ed sweatshirt, according to police.
Anyone with information should call
South San Francisco Police at (650) 877-
8900 or the anonymous tip line at (650)
952-2244.
Sequoia names new
assistant superintendent
The Sequoia Union High School District
Board of Trustees approved appointing
Bonnie Hansen as the new assistant super-
intendent of educational services, effective
July 1.
Hansen worked as an English teacher and
department chair and district resource
teacher at Menlo-Atherton High School.
She was also instructional vice principal
and principal of Sequoia High School over
the past 10 years.
The district will begin its search for the
new principal of Sequoia High School
immediately, and we will look to compose
an interview panel comprised of representa-
tion from each of the stakeholder groups,
Superintendent Jim Lianides wrote in an
email. The district expects to conduct inter-
views at the end of April, which will allow it
enough time to adequately advertise this
leadership opportunity.
Local briefs
Ernest C. Williams
Ernest C. Williams of Burlingame, Calif.,
died peacefully March 29, 2014. He was 94.
Williams was born Jan. 9, 1920, in Rock
Island, Okla. He was a proud member of the
Burlingame Lions Club, a devoted parish-
ioner of St. Catherine of Siena Church and a
member of the teamsters.
He is survived by his wife, Beth, children
George (Gretchen) Williams and James
(Annalee) Williams, grandson Chris
Williams and sisters Bernice Newberry and
Shirley (Jim) McCollough. He is preceded
in death by his parents, Alfred and Gussie
Williams.
Loved ones are invited to a memorial mass
at 9:30 a.m. Saturday, April 5 at St.
Catherine of Siena Church, 1310 Bayswater
Ave., Burlingame. Donations may be made
in his memory to the church and condo-
lences can be offered through Chapel of the
Highlands in Millbrae at 588-5116.
Irelle Cedora Scott Rose
Irelle Cedora Scott Rose died peacefully in
Redwood City on March 23, 2014.
She was born in Auburn, Calif., and is sur-
vived by her daughter, Suzanne Rose and
son-in-law John Bueno, son Bill Rose and
daughter-in-law Sandra Noble and grandchil-
dren Captain Andrew and Ally Milman,
Jeremy Milman and Heather and Matt
Tilghman.
A memorial service will be 2 p.m.
Thursday, April 3 at Menlo Park
Presbyterian Church, 950 Santa Cruz Ave.,
Menlo Park. A “bon voyage” celebration
will be held at 7 p.m. Saturday, April 5 at
Woodside Terrace, 485 Woodside Road,
Redwood City. In lieu of flowers, donations
can be made to Pets in Need at 367-1405 or
www.petsinneed.org or Heifer International
at (888) 548-6437 or www.heifer.org
As a public service, the Daily Journal
prints obituaries of approximately 200
words or less with a photo one time on the
date of the family’s choosing. To submit
obituaries, email information along with a
jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.
Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity,
length and grammar.
The public is invited to join Fiona Ma, candidate for the
Board of Equalization, for a meet and greet Thursday in
Half Moon Bay. Ma is a former Speaker pro Tempore of the
state Assembly and member of the San Francisco Board
of Supervi sors. She now seeks to be the county’s repre-
sentative on the Board of Equalization. The event is 6 p.m.
to 7:30 p.m. at the Half Moon Bay Brewing Company 390
Capistrano Road, Princeton Harbor.
Obituaries
5
Tuesday • April 1, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Men's issues such as: anger,
father-son relationships,
and self-worth
Call for free phone consultation
650.530.0232
1407 South B St. San Mateo 94402
www.PeninsulaHealingPlace.com
Br uce Coddi ng
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Increasing use of electronic cigarettes
paired with minimal government oversight
of the industry has some politicians calling
for federal support while company represen-
tatives worry misconstrued data is causing
consumers to fear what may be a better alter-
native.
U.S. Rep. Jackie Speier, D-San Mateo,
has called on Congress to investigate the
health effects of e-cigarettes and the indus-
try’s presence in the marketplace.
“Despite clear health concerns, the
booming e-cigarette industry has flown
under the radar of the federal government. E-
cigarettes are being marketed as a way for
smokers to kick the habit but may in the
end prove to be just another addictive and
dangerous device with severe health risks,”
Speier said in a prepared statement.
Cynthia Cabrera, executive director of the
Smoke Free Alternative Trade Association,
represents a vast group of e-cigarette manu-
facturers and retailers. Certain regulations
are appropriate but officials who misinter-
pret data give the industry a bad name,
Cabrera said.
E-cigarettes are battery-operated devices
containing cartridges filled with liquid nico-
tine that create vapor, instead of smoke,
when inhaled. They are touted as an alterna-
tive without the broader health risks associ-
ated with traditional cig-
arettes.
Because e-cigarettes do
not contain tobacco,
unless they’re marketed
for therapeutic purposes,
the U.S. Food and Drug
Administration doesn’t
regulate them.
E-cigarettes have not
been fully studied there-
fore consumers don’t know the potential
health risks and how much nicotine or other
potentially harmful chemicals are inhaled
during use, according to the FDA’s website.
Speier sent a letter March 27 to the House
Committee on Oversight and Government
Reform, expressing her concerns about a
lack of FDAoversight, limited health-relat-
ed testing and the need for regulations to
prevent children from being exposed to e-
cigarettes.
Several California districts and cities
have begun to classify e-cigarettes as
tobacco products and are now treated like
traditional cigarettes effectively banning
them in bars, restaurants and businesses;
yet there are no national e-cigarette stan-
dards, Speier stated.
With reports of nicotine poisoning from
e-cigarettes and the increasing rate of youth
who are trying them, it’s imperative
Congress act immediately, Speier said in
her statement.
Data regarding e-cigarettes and the indus-
try is often misconstrued and much of what
Speier is citing is from a recent article in
the New York Times, Cabrera said.
The news story published March 23,
2014, focuses on the nicotine liquid that a
consumer enhales when smoking an e-ciga-
rette. The author cites data from health care
experts regarding the effects from exposure,
the rates of children suffering nicotine poi-
soning and the costs of the liquid.
“We believe appropriate and proportional
regulation is fine and we’re actually work-
ing on that. But regulation based on a very
flawed and distorted argument in the New
York Times is not appropriate,” Cabrera
said.
Yet studies clearly show that although e-
cigarettes do not contain tobacco, the nico-
tine vapor exhaled during use contains car-
cinogens and toxic chemicals, Speier
wrote.
Because e-cigarettes are not tobacco prod-
ucts, they are a cleaner option for those try-
ing to reduce or switch from traditional cig-
arettes, Cabrera said.
“There are a lot of studies already and
more studies will continue to be done and
that’s fine. There’s no combustion in these
products and we know that combusted
tobacco is what kills people. So if there’s
not combustion and no tobacco, we already
know right off the bat that we’re eliminat-
ing thousands of toxins,” Cabrera said.
At the center of this debate is the concen-
tration of nicotine in e-cigarette liquid.
Most e-liquids range between 1.8 to 2.4
percent concentrations; however, deadlier
7.2 to 10 percent concentrations are widely
available over the Internet, Speier wrote.
Cabrera was contacted and cited in the
New York Times article where this data is
from. She says the story focused on a single
brand that was not representative of indus-
try practices. The vast majority of con-
sumers have access to e-liquids that range
between 0 and 2.4 percent nicotine concen-
trations, Cabrera said.
Many children are exposed to e-liquid,
even if it’s accidental, and are suffering
severe nicotine poisoning, Speier wrote.
In January and February 2014, the
Oklahoma Poison Control Center reported
23 cases of children ages 4 and under suffer-
ing from nicotine poisoning, Speier wrote.
Last year the Minnesota Poison Control
Center reported 29 e-cigarette poisoning
cases involving children ages 2 and under. A
Kentucky woman whose e-cigarette broke
in her bed experienced cardiac problems
after e-liquid was absorbed through her
skin, Speier wrote.
Outside of accidental exposure, the
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
found the rate of middle and high school stu-
dents trying e-cigarettes more than doubled
from 2011 to 2012, Speier wrote.
The industry does not target children but
what would be harmful are fear tactics dis-
couraging parents from switching to e-cig-
arettes, Cabrera said.
“I don’t know of any [e-cigarette] compa-
ny that targets children. Children are not
E-cigarettes: A benefit or health risk?
Congress called to regulate, industry representatives frustrated
Volunteer.
...·T:Te-:o×/o:cee-. ÷¸C·¸¯/·¸î¬C
Jackie Speier
See E-CIG, Page 8
6
Tuesday • April 1, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A San Mateo man accused of robbing a
teen girl of $1 after entering her backyard
and pointing an Airsoft pistol will stand
trial in July.
Matthew Nguyen, 22, pleaded not guilty
to charges of vandalism, robbery and assault
in the Feb. 26 incident on the 3200 block of
Verdun Avenue.
After entering his plea, Nguyen was
scheduled for a July 21 jury trial and he
remains in custody on $50,000 bail.
San Mateo police arrested Nguyen after
responding to calls of a suspected robber
and found him nearby wearing clothing that
matched the girl’s description.
According to the girl, she was sitting at
her dining room table inside the home when
she looked up from her homework to see a
man in a ski mask standing outside the win-
dow pointing a gun. The
man yelled for her “to just
get money” and she
screamed for her father
who called police. The
girl pulled a $1 bill from
her pocket and handed it
to the man through the
door before he fled.
When arrested, Nguyen
had the dollar and airsoft
pistol, according to
police.
While being booked at the San Mateo
police station, Nguyen became enraged and
threw a punch at an officer but missed and
also vandalized the holding room in which
he was kept, according to the District
Attorney’s Office.
Nguyen returns to court July 21 for a pre-
trial conference prior to his jury trial.
T
he Depart ment
o f Theatre and
Dance at Notre
Dame de Namur
Uni versi t y is presenting
the comedy “The
Misanthrope” 7:30 p.m.
April 4, 5 and 12 and 2
p.m. April 6 and 13.
Admission is $10.
To reserve tickets call the
box office at 508-3456 or
email boxoffice@ndnu.edu.
A special admission-free
student matinee perform-
ance is scheduled for 1 p.m. April 10. The
theater is located at 1500 Ralston Ave. in
Belmont.
***
Lorry Lokey and the late Wi l l i am
Spencer will be honored at the 2 0 1 4
Notre Dame de Namur Uni vers i t y
Presi dent’s Gala 6:30
p.m. April 5 at the Hyatt
Regency in Burlingame.
State Sen. Jerry Hi l l ,
D-San Mateo, and KPIX
5 anchor Mi chel l e
Gri ego will be masters of
ceremonies.
***
Menl o School ’s high
school mock trial team
won the Cal i f orni a
State Champi onshi ps
last week in San Jose. It’s
the first time Menlo has
won at states.
Class notes is a column dedicated to school news.
It is compiled by education reporter Angela Swartz.
You can contact her at (650) 344-5200, ext. 105 or
at angela@smdailyjournal.com.
Not guilty plea
in $1 robbery
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A Richmond man arrested on his 26th
birthday after employees of the San Mateo
store he was allegedly trying to rob with a
sawed-off shotgun wrestled him into sub-
mission pleaded not guilty to several
felonies.
Vincent Lee Carter Jr. is charged with two
counts of attempted armed robbery and
resisting arrest stemming from the incident
at the La Raza Market at 380 N. Ellsworth in
San Mateo.
Just before 10 a.m. Feb. 26 — Carter’s
birthday — a man later identified as him
entered the store with the
weapon and told the clerk
“hands up, give me all the
money, don’t move.” The
clerk responded by hit-
ting the alarm and grab-
bing the shotgun. As the
pair wrestled, another
employee joined in and
both subdued the would-
be robber until police
arrived.
Carter claims the store clerks actually
attacked him, according to the District
Attorney’s Office.
Alleged robber pleads not guilty
Matthew
Nguyen
Vincent Carter
By Sudhin Thanwala
and Justin Pritchard
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Asiana Airlines
acknowledged in documents released
Monday that its pilots failed to correct their
fatally slow approach to a landing at San
Francisco International Airport but also
blamed the maker of the jet, saying it did not
automatically maintain a safe speed.
U.S. accident investigators made public a
filing in which the South Korea-based airline
asserted that the Boeing 777 had major
design flaws that led the pilots to believe it
would keep flying at the proper speed and
that failed to warn the cockpit crew in time
when it did not.
Boeing Co. countered in its own filing
with the National Transportation Safety
Board that the airplane performed as expect-
ed, and the pilots were to blame for the July
6 crash because they stuck with a troubled
landing.
The plane slammed into a seawall at the
beginning of a runway during its final
approach. The impact ripped off its back and
scattered pieces of the jet as it spun and skid-
ded to a stop.
In all, 304 of the 307 people aboard sur-
vived. Coroner’s officials concluded that one
of three teens who died, Ye Meng Yuan, was
run over and killed by a rescue vehicle as she
lay on the tarmac.
Asiana acknowledged in its NTSB filing
that the crew failed to monitor air speed in
the moments before the crash and should
have aborted the landing for another go
around.
“The probable cause of this accident was
the flight crew’s failure to monitor and main-
tain a minimum safe airspeed during a final
approach,” Asiana conceded.
However, Asiana argued that the pilots and
co-pilot reasonably believed the automatic
throttle would keep the plane going fast
enough to reach the runway — when in fact
the auto throttle was effectively shut off after
the pilot idled it to correct an unexplained
climb earlier in the landing.
The airline said the plane should have been
designed so the auto throttle would maintain
the proper speed after the pilot put it in
“hold mode.”
Instead, the auto throttle did not indicate
that the plane had stopped maintaining the
set air speed, and an alert sounded too late for
the pilots to avoid the crash, Asiana said.
The airline added that U.S. and European avi-
ation officials have warned Boeing about the
issue, but it has not been changed.
In most other planes, idling the auto throt-
tle would not disengage it for the rest of a
flight, aviation safety consultant John Cox
said.
Cox, president and CEO of Safety
Operating Systems and a former airline pilot
and accident investigator, likened it to the
cruise control in a car. If a driver sets it for 55
mph and then accelerates to pass a car, the
driver would expect the cruise control to re-
engage when the speed slows to 55 mph
again.
“The flight crew had an expectation that
the auto throttle system was going to do cer-
tain things that it did not do,” Cox said.
“Although they were trained about it, it was
not overly intuitive.”
Asiana says jet partly to blame in San
Francisco International Airport crash
David Garrett Grieve (43)
Foster City, CA
Garrett passed away March 10, 2014 with his loving
family by his side. Proud to be a fourth generation San
Francisco native, he was born on November 20, 1970
to Vernon “David” Grieve and Janette L. Renstrom. He
was united in marriage on November 6, 2004 to Lynn
Lehsten in San Mateo, CA.
He attended West Portal Lutheran School and went
on to graduate from St. Ignatius High School. He
continued his education at Marymount College and
Golden Gate University.
Garrett has been both a franchisee and General Manager to the family’s five Supercuts
Salons in the greater San Mateo area for the past 20 years. Garrett’s passions in life
were his family, friends, as well as the San Francisco 49er’s and San Francisco Giants
ball clubs. Garrett was an inspiration to a great many. He was diagnosed with muscular
dystrophy as a young child and met the challenges that came with that head on. He
will forever be remembered for his big bright smile, striking blue eyes, determination
to have a bright outlook on life and his larger than life personality.
Surviving are his wife, Lynn and daughter Shelby; mother, Janette Rabin; sister
and brother-in-law, Lisa and Jeffrey Clyde; mother-in-law, Carol Lehsten; brother-
in-law John (Sue) Lehsten; Godson and nephew, Harrison Clyde; nephews and
nieces, Darren, Stephanie, Lauren and Megan Lehsten. Also surviving are Aunt
Diana and Uncle Andy Bonnici; their children Tony (Amber) Bonnici, Eric Bonnici;
Uncle Byron Rabin (Gabriel Serrato) and many friends. He was preceded in death
by his father Vernon David Grieve; step-mother, June Grieve; step-father, Paul
Rabin; grandparents Edna and Frank Renstrom and Louise and Curley Grieve and
father-in-law, James Lehsten.
Memorials for Garrett can be made to the Muscular Dystrophy Association at
www.mda.org.
There will be a Celebration of Garrett’s Life on Saturday, April 5, 2014. Please contact
janetterab@aol.com for details.
Obituary
NATION/WORLD 7
Tuesday • April 1, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Police: Man dead after
shooting at Georgia university
COLUMBUS, Ga. — Police at Georgia’s
Columbus State University fatally shot a
man over the weekend after officers respond-
ed to a report of someone with a gun, author-
ities said. Alawyer for the man’s family said
Monday that the man was unarmed and a vis-
itor on campus.
Zikarious Jaquan Flint, 20, died Sunday
after receiving two gunshot wounds,
Muscogee County Coroner Buddy Bryan
said Monday.
Flint wasn’t a student at the university and
no one else was hurt in the shooting Sunday
afternoon at the campus, located about 100
miles southwest of Atlanta near the Alabama
state line.
University Police Chief Rus Drew said
officers were called at 2:35 p.m. Sunday and
arrived three minutes later to an area near
some campus apartments and began pursu-
ing a man on foot.
“There was a short foot chase and at some
point the suspect turned and faced the offi-
cers and shots were fired,” Drew said.
More mudslide victims
found as state seeks new aid
DARRINGTON, Wash. — Estimated finan-
cial losses from the deadly Washington
mudslide that has killed at least 24 people
have reached $10 million, Gov. Jay Inslee
said Monday in a letter asking the federal
government for a major disaster declara-
tion.
In seeking additional federal help follow-
ing one of the deadliest landslides in U.S.
history, Inslee said about 30 families need
assistance with housing, along with per-
sonal and household goods. The estimated
losses include nearly $7 million in struc-
tures and more than $3 million in their con-
tents, Inslee’s letter said.
By Laura Mills and Vladimir Isachenkov
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SIMFEROPOL, Crimea — Russia said
Monday it was pulling a battalion of sever-
al hundred troops away from the Ukrainian
border but kept tens of thousands in place,
prompting a worried response from the Kiev
government about what the U.S. warned was
still a “tremendous buildup.”
Russia moved quickly to strengthen its
economic hold on Crimea, with Prime
Minister Dmitry Medvedev arriving in the
newly annexed peninsula with promises of
funds for improved power supplies, water
lines, education and pensions for the elder-
l y.
Russia’s takeover of the strategic Black
Sea region, its troop buildup near Ukraine’s
border and its attempts to compel constitu-
tional changes in Ukraine have markedly
raised tensions with the West and prompted
fears that Moscow intends to invade other
areas of its neighbor.
However, Russian President Vladimir
Putin told German Chancellor Angela
Merkel in a phone call Monday that some
troops were being withdrawn from the
Ukraine border, Merkel’s office said. The
withdrawal involved a battalion of about
500 troops, Russian news reports said.
The U.S. reacted cautiously to the Russian
troop movement, with Secretary of Defense
Chuck Hagel saying that “tens of thou-
sands” of Russian forces still remained
along the Ukrainian border, a situation he
called “a tremendous buildup.”
The new government in Ukraine said the
action only increased its uneasiness about
Russia’s intentions.
“We have information that Russia is car-
rying out incomprehensible maneuvers on
the border with Ukraine,” Ukrainian
Foreign Ministry spokesman Yevgen
Perebyinis said. “Troops in some places are
moving backward, some of them are mov-
ing forward. Which is why, obviously, we
are worried by these movements of armed
forces. We have no clear explanation from
the Russian side about the aim of these
movements.”
Russia pulls back battalion from Ukraine border
Around the nation
REUTERS
A T-72B Russian tank maneuvers shortly after Russian tanks arrived at a train station in the
Crimean settlement of Gvardeiskoye near the Crimean city of Simferopol.
By Rob Griffith and Gillian Wong
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PERTH, Australia — Although it has
been slow, difficult and frustrating so far,
the search for the missing Malaysia
Airlines jet is nowhere near the point of
being scaled back, Australia’s prime min-
ister pledged Monday.
The three-week hunt for Flight 370 has
turned up no sign of the Boeing 777,
which vanished March 8 with 239 people
bound for Beijing from Kuala Lumpur. Ten
planes and 11 ships found no sign of the
missing plane in the search zone in the
southern Indian Ocean, about 1,850 kilo-
meters (1,150 miles) west of Australia,
officials said.
The search area has evolved as experts
analyzed Flight 370’s limited radar and
satellite data, moving from the seas off
Vietnam, to the waters west of Malaysia
and Indonesia, and then to several areas
west of Australia. The search zone is now
254,000 square kilometers (98,000 square
miles), about a 2 1/2-hour flight from
Perth.
Items recovered so far were discovered to
be flotsam unrelated to the Malaysian
plane. Several orange-colored objects
spotted by plane Sunday turned out to be
fishing equipment.
Australia says no time limit on Flight 370 search
LOCAL/WORLD 8
Tuesday • April 1, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Hyung-Jin Kim and Jung-Yoon Choi
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SEOUL, South Korea — North and South
Korea fired hundreds of artillery shells into
each other’s waters Monday in a flare-up of
animosity that forced residents of five front-
line South Korean islands to evacuate to shel-
ters for several hours, South Korean officials
said.
The exchange of fire into the Yellow Sea
followed Pyongyang’s sudden announcement
that it would conduct live-fire drills in seven
areas north of the Koreas’ disputed maritime
boundary. North Korea routinely test-fires
artillery and missiles into the ocean but
rarely discloses those plans in advance. The
announcement was seen as an expression of
Pyongyang’s frustration at making little
progress in its recent push to win outside aid.
North Korea fired 500 rounds of artillery
shells over more than three hours, about 100
of which fell south of the sea boundary, South
Korean Defense Ministry spokesman Kim
Min-seok said. South Korea responded by fir-
ing 300 shells into North Korean waters, he
said.
No shells from either side were fired at any
land or military installations, but Kim called
the North’s artillery firing a provocation
aimed at testing Seoul’s security posture.
There was no immediate comment from North
Korea.
In Washington, White House spokesman
Jonathan Lalley called North Korea’s actions
“dangerous and provocative” and said they
would further aggravate tensions in the
region.
Monday’s exchange was relatively mild in
the history of animosity and violence
between the Koreas, but there is worry in
Seoul that an increasingly dissatisfied North
Korea could repeat the near-daily barrage of
war rhetoric it carried out last spring, when
tensions soared as Pyongyang threatened
nuclear strikes on Washington and Seoul in
response to condemnation of its third nuclear
test.
Koreas trade fire; island residents in shelters
the demographic. Current adult smokers are
the demographic for this product,” Cabrera
said. “In my opinion, what is actually [dam-
aging] or could be dangerous for a child is
that their parents are denied the option to
switching to an alternative that does not
have the same health risks that tobacco
products do.”
Yet with a lack of definitive data, Speier
believes ensuring the health effects are fully
studied and overseeing the industry’s role in
the marketplace is critical.
“It is in the public interest for this com-
mittee to hold a hearing to investigate the
proper role of the FDA and Congress where
it concerns the need for regulation of the e-
cigarette industry,” Speier wrote. “At the
very least, the issues such as marketing to
children, the child-proofing of containers
and labeling requirements should be at the
top of this discussion.”
samantha@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106
Continued from page 5
E-CIG
deputy superintendent of business services.
“There’s a bubble going through the
Burlingame Elementary School District. We
have to look at our long-term projections
with our capacity. In the 2014-15 school
year it will flow into our schools and con-
tinue to grow for the next 15 years. We don’t
anticipate the growth pattern to be as
strong at Mills and it’s a beautiful campus.”
Meanwhile, Ken Montgomery, the
school’s director and current assistant prin-
cipal at Capuchino High School, said the
school has not officially accepted the offer
at this time, but there is a very strong like-
lihood that it will be located at Mills.
“We continue to have a very collaborative
relationship with the [district] and share a
common mission of more quality schools
for [district] students,” he said in an email
to the Daily Journal. “At this time our board
has not yet reviewed the most recent [dis-
trict] offer. ”
The 520-student school will open with a
freshmen class in August, then add on class-
es each year following. The educational
model of the school emphasizes “knowl-
edge in action and extreme personaliza-
tion.” The school contended that a majority
of the school’s students will reside in the
Burlingame High school attendance area, so
that is the appropriate comparison school.
“Recent submissions by Design Tech
show that the largest component of its
future enrollment actually resides in the
geographical area of the Sequoia Union
High School District,” according to the let-
ter approved by the district and signed by
Superintendent Scott Laurence last week.
“Given the geographical complexity of
such an analysis, which your submission
does not show was undertaken merely in
determining that ‘a majority of students
would otherwise attend Burlingame High
School,’ we continue to believe the entirety
of the comprehensive high schools is the
appropriate comparison group for this pur-
pose.”
Proposition 39, passed by California vot-
ers in 2000, requires districts to make “rea-
sonably equivalent” facilities available to
charters. Mills also contains eating facili-
ties, a gymnasium, a library, a courtyard, a
theater, playing fields, equipped science
classrooms and administrative and teacher
lounge space. School districts are allowed
to charge charter schools for use of district
facilities under Proposition 39. In its pre-
liminary proposal, the district declined to
charge a per-square-foot pro rata share of
facilities costs for this facility, and instead
offered to provide the facilities substantial-
ly rent free in order to instead recoup the
cost of supervisorial oversight, not to
exceed 3 percent of the revenue of the char-
ter school pursuant to section 47613(b) of
the California Education Code.
“Please advise me immediately if you
secure facilities other than those offered at
Mills High School,” Laurence wrote in the
letter. “I will bring before the board any
request you might have for an exchange of
facilities use costs in lieu of the use of the
Mills High School facility offered herein.”
School board members are enthusiastic
about the new school.
“I think complies with district’s Prop. 39
obligations,” said Trustee Peter Hanley.
“I’m excited about the high school. They’re
offering to bring something that’s innova-
tive and new to the district. It’s an addition-
al choice for parents to access in this com-
munity and it will be exciting to see it
develop over the next few years.”
In July 2013, Design Tech received
$100,000 in planning grant funding from
Next Generation Learning Challenges for
help with costs associated with opening the
new high school.
For more information visit designtech-
highschool.org.
angela@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
SCHOOL
OPINION 9
Tuesday • April 1, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
NSA spying
Editor,
Cyber wars and spying have inten-
sified, creating greater mistrust
amongst our allies and corporate
competitors. Classified documents
released by Edward Snowden show
that the NSAis targeting the Chinese
Huawei’s network in Shenzhen and
monitored the company’s top execu-
tives.
The NSAis recording every single
phone call made in an undisclosed
foreign country. Asurveillance sys-
tem called MYSTIC stores the bil-
lions of phone conversations for up
to 30 days. Ashkan Soltani, who co-
wrote the Washington Post expose on
MYSTIC, revealed how the NSAuses
Google cookies to pinpoint targets
for hacking and how the NSAsecretly
broke into the main communications
links that connect Yahoo and Google
data centers around the world.
This is another example of U.S.
government overreach. Instead of tar-
geting its very powerful surveillance
systems on terrorists and spies,
they’re doing this bulk collection
that sweeps up a lot of data of inno-
cent people. Responding to mounting
outrage of their citizens, foreign gov-
ernments are shunning America’s
cloud computer industry deemed to be
unsafe to the prying eyes of the NSA.
For example, Microsoft has lost cus-
tomers, including the government of
Brazil. IBM is spending more than $1
billion to build data centers overseas
to safeguard data of their foreign cus-
tomers. Former President Jimmy
Carter has revealed he limits his own
email use out of fear he’s spied on by
U.S. intelligence. In an interview
with NBC News, Carter says he
avoids emails when corresponding
with foreign leaders — instead using
old-fashioned “snail mail.”
Jagjit Singh
Los Altos
Profits take
precedence over lives at GM
Editor,
It took 13 deaths and hundreds of
complaints for the Justice Department
to finally launch a criminal investiga-
tion into why the largest automaker,
General Motors, ignored deadly safety
defects in its compact cars. Contrary
to earlier assertions that the problem
was first discovered in 2003, GM now
admits that the ignition switch on its
Saturn Ion stalled in 2001. The faulty
ignition switch suddenly cuts off
power, leaving bewildered drivers
with no engine power, no power
steering, no breaks and no air bags.
Six GM models made from 2001 to
2007 are affected. Federal regulators
also failed to take action despite
receiving hundreds of complaints
from angry drivers. Last month GM
finally announced a massive recall of
1.6 million vehicles. Longtime con-
sumer advocate Ralph Nader com-
mented that “timidity exists in the
National Highway Traffic Safety
Administration,” which encourages a
laissez-faire culture. It is also grossly
underfunded — $45 million a year,
compared to $650 million a year that
taxpayers pay for guarding the
embassy in Baghdad. Another key
factor that contributed to GM’s appar-
ent lack of concern was its bankrupt-
cy and subsequent tax-payer bailout
in 2009, which immunized it from all
product liability lawsuits. It is tragic
that it took so many deaths and near
fatalities for GM to respond. It seems
once again profits take precedence
over peoples’ lives.
Tejinder Uberoi
Los Altos
Unrivaled human tragedy
Editor,
Mr. Traynor’s letter to the editor in
the March 25 edition of the Daily
Journal was exceptionally poignant
when he describes how the media is
focusing on the San Diego Zoo’s
efforts to save the life of a newborn
baby gorilla while ignoring the plight
of so many of our youngest human
souls. Clearly, our zoos have a moral
imperative to take great care of the ani-
mal life entrusted to them. Yet, there is
seldom (if ever) a national media story
regarding the enormous loss of human
life due to abortion. According to the
Center for Disease Control statistics,
there were an estimated 1 million plus
abortions in the United States last year
alone. Thankfully, the number of abor-
tions per year has recently been on a
downward trajectory.
But what does it say about us that we
devote our attention to the efforts to
save a baby gorilla in distress yet say
nothing about the 2,700 human lives
that are disposed of each and every
day? Mr. Traynor says the electronic
media is “turning a blind eye to the
tragic story of countless unborn chil-
dren with immortal souls and limitless
human potential who are fighting
every hour of the day for the right to
life.” Is there anything sadder than
that? Regardless of the rationale used,
there is no escaping the fact that there
is massive human destruction occurring
within our midst.
Ethan Jones
San Bruno
Letters to the editor
Deseret News, Salt Lake City, Utah
T
he rising rate of unemploy-
ment among teenagers is the
perfect storm of social and
economic trends that is clouding the
future for American youth, particularly
young men. Jobs are harder to come
by. This scarcity is likely to continue
as technology and automation replace
jobs traditionally held by those first
entering the workforce, and as long as
government tinkers with policies that
make it harder for companies to hire
young people.
The consequences may be difficult
to grapple with: young men who are
unable to find employment and voca-
tional skills early in life are less like-
ly to embark on a career path that
ensures stability in adulthood.
One reason for hope is the pro-
grams springing up to provide
apprenticeships for teenagers to gain
real-world work experience as part of
their secondary or post-high school
educations.
In Utah, the rate of teenage employ-
ment is relatively high, according to
an analysis by the Brookings
Institute. The Provo area enjoys the
nation’s highest rate of employment
among 16-19 year olds, at about 49
percent. The national rate is around
26 percent, down from about 45 per-
cent in 2000. The higher job rate in
Utah is attributed to several factors,
primarily the influence of an overall
low unemployment rate, a higher-
than-average number of youth per
capita, and a culture of attaining part-
time employment at an early age.
That culture provides benefits to
individuals and to society at large. To
ensure that it continues, educators in
Utah and nationwide should consider
the kinds of initiatives to partner
schools and businesses in apprentice-
ship programs. Existing programs
could be expanding to a larger scale,
extending their benefit s.
Similarly, both local and national
policy-makers must remember not to
do harm to teenage employment
prospects. Specifically, raising the
national or state minimum wage laws
are certain to narrow the opportuni-
ties available for younger workers.
Jobs for youth
Fool’s gold
T
he Sen. Leland Yee fiasco came just a tad early to
coincide with April Fool’s Day, the annual oppor-
tunity every April 1 to prank and joke and try
pulling the wool over the eyes of the gullible.
If the affidavit is to be believed — and there’s no reason
yet not to — Yee certainly has that last caveat down when
it comes to his colleagues and constituents. Yet sadly,
Yee’s fantastical dilemma is far from a laughing matter.
Except if you ponder the nickname “Shrimp Boy.” That
alone is pretty hilarious. Note to self: childhood nick-
names, like unfortunately themed T-shirts in mug shots,
will always come back to
haunt you. Criminal mas-
terminds, plan according-
l y.
The Shrimp Boy aspect
itself is a gold mine. The
name. The tweets. The
Facebook hot tub photos.
The news anchors and pun-
dits trying to keep a
straight face while refer-
ring to him as such. This
sad day for public trust and
honesty is a great day for
budding comics and screen-
writers mining reality for
fictional inspiration.
Shrimp Boy and Uncle Leland and gunrunning aside,
the apparent fall of yet another elected leader is nothing
to joke about. Unless, of course, we are talking about the
part where a letter of support from him has the going rate
of $10,000. That price tag draws a guffaw or two. Jeez,
I’ll knock one out for $50. Maybe $60 if I’m expected to
use the big fancy words.
Then there’s his apparent envy of the undercover offi-
cer’s life. Yee allegedly wanted to throw everything to the
wind and run away to the Philippines. I’m sure his wife
and children are thrilled to know how much they count.
It’s also hard not to chuckle a little looking back at the
causes and legislation for which Yee took up arms, pun
fully intended. The firearm legislation obviously smacks
of hypocrisy. But what about that 2005 push to strength-
en cleanliness standards for nail salons? Was Yee lying to
Paula Abdul and the California people all along, publicly
demanding hygiene while secretly trading in dirty cuticle
clippers and sketchy emery boards for the right price?
Sure, Yee and company might be looking at prison time
but the mani-pedi set is facing an unknown future with
every buff and polish.
Ah, this indictment is like journalist Christmas. Don’t
think we news scribes won’t milk it for all it’s worth —
at least until the next public figure shows off clay feet.
Chances are, though, it’s going to take quite a fall from
grace to knock Yee’s arrest out of top billing for best
political scandal in recent memory. Straight bribery is so
passé. Arms trafficking to help wipe away one campaign
price tag and finance another, however? Most probably
never thought Yee had it in him.
Yet again, this shouldn’t be funny. Staffers are in
employment jeopardy, constituents want to know if the
seat will just sit empty for the remaining year until it dis-
solves and taxpayers are fuming that Yee and the two
other suspended senators are allowed to continue collect-
ing paychecks while their legal drama plays out. Local
candidates for the June ballot who received an endorse-
ment from Yee scrambled to remove mentions and photos
from websites and campaign materials while around the
county many are quick to say they never really knew or
liked Yee anyway. If that’s true, though, as one officials
recently asked me, how in the heck did he ever get voted
into office? Apparently somebody somewhere felt he was
a good fit .
Again, hindsight is not only 20/20 but can also be ill
timed — and unintentionally comical. The League of
Women Voter’s April 2014 newsletter includes a Feb. 4
interview with Yee. He addresses his priorities, the envi-
ronmental, education and — the best part — money in
politics. To quote, “I absolutely plan on working to
diminish the power of dark money in politics.” And then
this gem: The way our world is now, we can move mil-
lions of dollars in seconds with almost no trace. We have
to work against this so that we know who is financing
propositions and backing candidates.”
Yee may have been a bit early for Tuesday’s celebrating
but when it comes to picking fool’s, he’s looking like
this year’s gold standard
Michelle Durand’s column “Off the Beat” runs every Tuesday
and Thursday. She can be reached by email:
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BUSINESS 10
Tuesday • April 1, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 16,457.66 +134.60 10-Yr Bond 2.72 +0.01
Nasdaq 4,198.99 +43.23 Oil (per barrel) 101.48
S&P 500 1,872.34 +14.72 Gold 1,283.60
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Monday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Lions Gate Entertainment Corp., up $1.53 to $26.73
J.P. Morgan suggests investors ignore a sell-off in the studios’shares this
year, calling the steep decline a buying opportunity.
Edwards Lifesciences Corp., up $3.01 to $74.17
A randomized trial shows that the heart-health technology company’s
heart valve worked better than one from rival Medtronic.
General Motors Co., down 31 cents to $34.42
On top of its recalls for an ignition defect and transmission oil leaks, GM
recalls 1.3 million more cars to fix their power steering.
Novartis AG, up $3.43 to $85.02
The pharmaceutical company ends research into a chronic heart failure
treatment because the drug has proven so effective, sending shares to
an all-time high.
Nasdaq
Prana Biotechnology Ltd., down $7.06 to $2.80
The Australian drug developer said its most advanced drug missed the
main goal in a study of patients with Alzheimer’s disease.
BioFuel Energy Corp., up $4.16 to $7.30
Greenlight Capital revealed a 35.5 percent state in the one-time alternative
fuel company and proposed a real estate investment.
Panera Bread Co., up $2.47 to $176.47
Wedbush issues an upgrade, saying the restaurant chain will beat
estimates based on very favorable trends for sales at established locations.
BlackBerry Ltd., down 33 cents to $8.08
BlackBerry wins ban against Ryan Seacrest’s Typo, preventing it from
selling a physical keyboard add-on for the iPhone.
Big movers
By Ken Sweet
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — If 2013 was a year
where the stock market went straight
up, 2014 has started off as a year where
the stock market moves sideways.
There was plenty for investors to
worry about in the first three months of
the year, from tensions between
Russia and the West over Ukraine and
the winter storms that froze the U.S.
economy in January and February. As a
result, investors focused their atten-
tion on buying and holding “safe”
investments, such as bonds, dividend-
paying stocks, and gold.
The Standard & Poor’s 500 rose 1.3
percent in the first three months of
2013. The Dow Jones industrial aver-
age lost 0.7 percent so far this year,
and the Nasdaq composite is up 0.5
percent.
It was S&P 500’s its fifth-straight
quarterly gain. It was also the index’s
worst quarter since the fourth quarter of
2012.
“I think this bull market is starting
to show signs of fatigue,” said Wayne
Wilbanks, chief investment officer at
Wilbanks, Smith, Thomas in Norfolk,
Va., which manages roughly $2.4 bil-
lion in assets.
It was all about safety this quarter.
Utility and health care stocks, which
typically pay larger-than-average divi-
dends and are less volatile than other
stocks, rose 9 percent and 5.5 percent,
respectively. Those two sectors were
among the laggards last year.
Riskier growth-oriented stocks, par-
ticularly in biotechnology, consumer
discretionary and technology stocks,
fared the worst. Among the biggest
decliners this quarter, Twitter fell 27
percent, biotechnology company
Celgene dropped 17 percent and
Amazon.com fell 16 percent.
Bonds were widely expected to do
poorly in 2014 because the Federal
Reserve was winding down its bond-
buying program and the U.S. economy
was improving. Instead, they did bet-
ter than the stock market. The
Barclays Aggregate Bond Index, a
broad measure of the bond market that
includes Treasurys, corporate and other
types of bonds, is up 1.9 percent this
quarter.
Even gold did well this quarter. After
getting slammed in 2013, gold rose
nearly 7 percent in the first quarter of
2013.
Investors started off the quarter cau-
tiously optimistic. The S&P 500 had
risen 32 percent in 2013, including
dividends, and was trading at an all-
time high early in the year. There were
signs that the U.S. economic recovery
was accelerating. Few investors
expected 2013’s momentum to hold
into this year, however.
“We had such an incredible year last
year, people were willing to take a
break and wait it out,” said J.J.
Kinahan, chief strategist with TD
Ameritrade.
Investors quickly had to shift to
defense mode. Throughout the first
three months of the year, there were
signs that the U.S. economy was neg-
atively impacted by severe winter
storms in December, January and
February, which slowed down job cre-
ation, consumer spending and manu-
facturing nationwide.
Internationally, the tensions
between Russia and the West over
Ukraine drag on. Geopolitical uncer-
tainty is never good for the stock mar-
ket.
Then there’s the Federal Reserve.
The nation’s central bank began to
pull back on its bond-buying econom-
ic stimulus in late December, cutting
its bond purchases from $85 billion to
$75 billion a month. The Fed voted
twice this quarter to further cut back the
program, which now stands at $55 bil-
lion a month.
There’s a large group of traders and
money managers who believe the
Fed’s bond-buying program helped
push the stock market higher because
it was designed to make bonds more
expensive than stocks. Now that the
Fed is pulling out of the market, the
tailwind in the stock market is fading.
“We should expect much more
volatility and more meager returns like
this” Wilbanks said.
Stocks close out a meager Q1 gain
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Facebook CEO Mark
Zuckerberg reaped a $3.3 billion gain last
year by exercising stock options in the
social networking company that he founded
in a Harvard University dorm room.
The windfall saddled Zuckerberg with a
huge tax bill, even though he limited his
Facebook salary to just $1, according to reg-
ulatory documents filed Monday.
It marks the second straight year that
Zuckerberg has realized a huge gain on the
holding that he has accumulated in Facebook
Inc. since he started the company in 2004. In
2012, Zuckerberg made
$2.3 billion off his stock
options.
Zuckerberg, 29, now
has exhausted his supply
of stock options after
exercising 60 million of
them last year a price of 6
cents per share. He then
sold 41.35 million shares
for $55.05 apiece in
December, primarily to
pay for his tax bill on the gains.
Zuckerberg and his wife, Priscilla Chan,
also donated 18 million Facebook shares to a
Silicon Valley nonprofit. The December gift,
then valued at nearly $1 billion, landed the
couple at the top of The Chronicle of
Philanthropy’s annual list of the most gener-
ous Americans.
Even after selling and donating so much
Facebook stock, Zuckerberg still owns 426.3
million Facebook shares currently worth
$25.7 billion. The stock has more than dou-
bled in value during the past year as
Zuckerberg fulfilled his promise to sell more
ads on the smartphones and tablet computers
that bring in most of the traffic to Facebook’s
social networking service.
The Menlo Park company now gets more
than half of its ad revenue from mobile
devices, up from 23 percent at the beginning
of last year.
Like many company founders who have
gotten wealthy off their early stakes,
Zuckerberg asked Facebook to limit his annu-
al salary to $1 annually. Besides that token
sum, Zuckerberg also received perquisites
valued at $653,164. All but $3,000 of that
amount went toward Zuckerberg’s bills for
personal travel on chartered jets.
Excluding stock option gains,
Zuckerberg’s total compensation last year
plunged 67 percent from nearly $2 million in
2012.
Facebook CEO reaps $3.3B gain from stock options
Mark
Zuckerberg
BlackBerry wins ruling
against iPhone keyboard
SAN FRANCISCO — Troubled smart-
phone maker BlackBerry has won an early
round in its legal battle against an iPhone
keyboard made by a startup co-founded by
“American Idol” host Ryan Seacrest.
A court order bans Seacrest’s company,
Typo Products LLC, from selling its iPhone
keyboard in the U.S. while BlackBerry Ltd.
proceeds with a patent infringement case
against the product. BlackBerry contends
Typo Products ripped off the design from the
physical keyboards used for typing on
BlackBerry’s phones.
U.S. District Judge William Orrick in San
Francisco ruled that BlackBerry is likely to
prove its infringement claims against Typo
Products and would be damaged if the sales
of the $99 iPhone keyboard were allowed to
continue.
Jury selection begins
in Apple-Samsung case
SAN JOSE — The world’s two leading
smartphone makers were back in federal
court on Monday, accusing each other of
stealing ideas and features.
The trial in Silicon Valley, which got
underway with jury selection, marks the lat-
est round in a long-running series of law-
suits between Apple Inc. and Samsung.
If Apple prevails in the current case, the
cost to Samsung could reach $2 billion.
Apple’s costs, if it loses the litigation, were
expected to be about $6 million.
By Dee-Ann Durbin
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DETROIT — The head of the nation’s auto
safety watchdog is blaming General Motors
for a failure to act sooner to warn consumers
of a defect in small cars that is linked to 13
deaths.
For its part, GM continues its efforts to
show regulators and consumers that it’s
more focused on safety, announcing the
recall of another 1.5 million vehicles on
Monday.
In written testimony released ahead of a
Tuesday House subcommittee hearing, act-
ing National Highway Traffic Safety
Administration chief David Friedman says
GM had information connecting defective
ignition switches to the non-deployment of
air bags, but didn’t share it until last month.
GM CEO Mary Barra will also testify.
Committee members will press Barra and
Friedman to explain why neither the compa-
ny nor the safety agency moved to recall
millions of small cars with a defective igni-
tion switch, even though GM knew of the
problem as early as 2001.
“Sitting here today, I cannot tell you why
it took years for a safety defect to be
announced in (the small car) program, but I
can tell you that we will find out,” Barra said
in prepared testimony submitted to the sub-
committee.
GM has recalled 2.6 million cars for the
faulty switch. That recall prompted GM to
name a new safety chief and review its recall
processes.
With Monday’s recall, GM has now
recalled 6.3 million vehicles since
February. GM estimates the actions will
cost it $750 million.
The House hearing — and a separate one
Wednesday before a Senate subcommittee —
will likely be tense and emotional. At least
a dozen family members of victims will
attend, wearing blue shirts featuring a photo
of 16-year-old Amber Marie Rose, who was
killed in a 2005 Cobalt crash, and the words
“Protect Our Children.”
Barra will apologize for the loss of life,
but may try to limit her answers to
Congress, citing an ongoing internal
review and government investigations.
GM, safety agency face Congress over recalls
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTA ROSA — A proposed federal rule
that would make it harder for beer breweries
to sell leftover grains as animal feed has
brewers’ blood boiling.
Beer makers complain that the new rules,
if adopted, would force them to dump mil-
lions of tons of “spent grains,” which are
left over after barley, wheat and other
grains are steeped in hot water.
The Food and Drug Administration rule
change would mean brewers would have to
meet the same standards as livestock and
pet-food manufacturers, imposing new san-
itary handling procedures, record keeping
and other food safety processes on brewers.
Bear Republic brewmaster Rich Norgrove
says the rules would be costly and force
brewers to dump the grains, instead of the
more sustainable practice of feeding them
to livestock.
The Northern California brewery sells its
spent grain to local ranches, which use it as
an affordable food source for about 300 head
of cattle.
“Now the government wants to get
involved,” Cheryl LaFranchi, a Knight’s
Valley rancher, said. “What are they going
to do with it? Put it in a landfill?”
The FDA says the rules stem from a new,
broad modernization of the food safety sys-
tem.
“This proposed regulation would help
prevent foodborne illness in both animals
and people,” the agency said in the state-
ment.
The FDA is collecting comment through
Monday, and two of the beer industry’s
major trade groups have mobilized against
the idea.
Chris Thorne of the Beer Institute said he
believes once the FDA has all of the infor-
mation, it will see the benefits of the cur-
rent system of recycling the old grain.
Beer brewers in uproar over new proposed FDA rule
Business briefs
12
Tuesday • April 1, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS 13
Tuesday • April 1, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Will Graves
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PITTSBURGH — Barry Bonds spent a
portion of Monday morning driving around
Pittsburgh, marveling at the changes he’s
seen in the city since baseball’s career home
run king bolted for San Francisco more than
two decades ago.
He drove by his old apartment in the west-
ern suburbs and the reconfigured North
Shore, where Three Rivers Stadium has been
replaced by sparkling PNC Park.
The makeover hasn’t been limited to the
scenery. After 21 years, it appears the old
wounds surrounding Bonds’ abrupt departure
have started to heal, too.
Bonds drew a mixture of boos and cheers
while presenting current Pittsburgh center
fielder Andrew McCutchen with the 2013 NL
MVP award. Bonds was the previous Pirates
player to win the honor,
earning the second of his
record seven career MVP
trophies in 1992.
Standing next to
McCutchen, Bonds
waved to the packed
house and seemed at ease
in his first public appear-
ance in conjunction with
the team where he starred
from 1986-92 before leaving for San
Francisco via free agency.
“It feels good to be back where it all
started,” Bonds said. “We had some great
times here.”
Bonds then sat in the stands and watched as
the Pirates opened against the Chicago Cubs.
Bonds won the 1990 and 1992 MVP
awards while playing for the Pirates from
1986-92 and led the team to three straight
NL East titles. Each playoff trip, however,
fell short of the World Series, most notably
a Game 7 loss to the Atlanta Braves in the
1992 NL championship series that ended
when Bonds’ throw from left field failed to
stop Atlanta’s Sid Bream from scoring the
series-clinching run.
He left for San Francisco and a then-record
six-year, $43-million deal two months later,
where Bonds eventually broke Hank Aaron’s
record for career home runs, finishing with
762 before leaving after the 2007 season.
Bonds declined to draw any comparisons
between himself and McCutchen, who easi-
ly won the MVP award last season a year
after finishing third in the voting.
“He’s got the formula now,” Bonds said.
“Once you do it once, I expect you to do it
again.”
Bonds was joined by a familiar face as the
Pirates put the finishing touches on a break-
out 2013 when they won 94 games and made
it to the NL division series. Former manag-
er Jim Leyland presented current skipper
Clint Hurdle with his NL Manager of the
Year Award and credited Hurdle for helping
turn the franchise around.
After spending years watching his former
club serve as a laughingstock, Leyland is
confident the Pirates are back.
“They’re the real deal now,” Leyland said.
“They should be here for a long time.”
And while he steered clear of the politics
surrounding Bonds’ place in baseball histo-
ry, Leyland left no doubt about whether
Bonds should be in the Hall of Fame. Bonds
fell well short of the 75 percent threshold
required for induction during his second year
of eligibility, with many voters saying
they wouldn’t put him in because of the
steroids cloud.
“In my opinion, Barry Bonds is a Hall of
Fame player,” said Leyland, who managed
the Pirates from 1986-96 and is now retired.
“There’s no doubt about it.”
Mixed reaction for Bonds in return to Pittsburgh
Barry Bonds
By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Since Skyline sophomore
Bryan Hidalgo converted to
the bullpen, the right-hander
has been lights out.
Hidalgo — the 2012 Peninsula
Athletic League strikeout king at
Mills — had never served as a regular
reliever previous to this season. But
on Feb. 22 at San Diego Mesa, a
beleaguered Trojans’ pitching
staff was digging deep to close
out the final game of a three-
game sweep in which San Diego
Mesa outscored them 40-17.
So, just a day after Hidalgo failed to make
it out of the third inning as a starter,
Skyline manager Dino Nomicos called upon
the sophomore to give the team one relief
inning. After Hidalgo fired a scoreless
eighth, the struggling starter was immedi-
ately converted to the closer’s role.
“He wants to be the workhorse,” Nomicos
said of the longtime starter. “But … I needed
someone to close the door and I felt he
would be better as a reliever. And his num-
bers show that he’s done really well.”
He sure has. Through nine games, Hidalgo
has been nearly untouchable in relief, posting
a 1-1 record with three saves and a 0.82 ERA.
“Basically his mindset when he’s a starter
is that he’s got to try and close seven or
eight innings,” Nomicos said. “Now as a
closer … he knows: ‘Give me the ball the
last two innings and I’ll close the door. ’And
that’s basically what he’s done.”
And he’s done it against some big-time
opponents. With a 6-7 record in Coast Pacific
Conference play and 10-15 overall, Skyline
has had its ups and downs this season. But
two of the Trojans’ wins have come against
two of their toughest opponents. On Feb.
25, Skyline upset Cosumnes River — at the
time the No. 1 ranked team among California
Community Colleges — with Hidalgo firing
two no-hit innings in a 10-9 victory.
Then on Saturday, Hidalgo earned the win
as the Trojans knocked off first-place
Cabrillo in dramatic fashion. Hidalgo
worked 3 1-3 innings of shutout ball as
Skyline rallied for two runs in the ninth to
break a deadlocked score and win it 7-5.
“Things fell into [place] for us in those
two games,” Hidalgo said. “Against
Cosumnes, our hitting really came to life
when we put up [10 runs]. And then the game
against Cabrillo, we just kept battling and
never gave up.”
With the win, Skyline has now won three
of its last four. The one loss was a tough one
to swallow, dropping a March 25 matchup
with rival Cañada 14-1.
“The kids are just trying to play hard and
do the best with what we have and they’re
battling, especially coming off [the loss to
Cañada],” Nomicos said. “You would think
most teams would say: ‘OK, we’re done.’
No, they’re still battling.”
Hidalgo has epitomized that battling
mentality. But he’s had to since Skyline
recently lost its mainstay arm when
Hidalgofinds second life as Skyline’s closer
Sophomore right-hander has posted 0.82 ERA with three saves since joining to the Trojans’bullpen
See SKYLINE, Page 16
Bryan Hidalgo has
emerged as big-game
pitcher since loss of ace
Daniel Madigan.
RENEE ABU-ZAGHIBRA
Ump’s call overturned,
first time by expanded replay
An umpire’s call was overturned Monday
for the first time under Major League
Baseball’s expanded replay system, with
Milwaukee Brewers star Ryan Braun ruled
out instead of safe.
Braves manager Fredi Gonzalez challenged
the sixth-inning play at Miller Park in the
season opener won by Milwaukee, 2-0. Braun
was originally called safe at first base by
umpire Greg Gibson on a leadoff infield sin-
gle fielded by third baseman Chris Johnson.
The umpires gathered near the third base
line during the review, while Braun waited
near first base. The call was reversed to out
after a review that lasted 58 seconds, and
Braun ran back to the dugout.
Manager Fredi Gonzalez said after the
game that he thought the review lasted much
longer, and that was going to watch a replay
of the replay play to time the decision.
Still, he was pleased overall.
“You know what? They got the play right.
That’s the bottom line,” Gonzalez said. “It’s
a process that they (were) looking at two to
three years of working through the kinks.”
beat Louisville in their NCAA tourna-
ment opener before losing to Duke.
Montgomery’s only other NCAAtourna-
ment win came last season, when the Bears
beat UNLVin their opener before losing to
Syracuse in the round of 32. The 2012-13
season was marred for Montgomery when
he was publicly reprimanded by the Pac-12
and the school for shoving star player
Allen Crabbe during a game.
Montgomery, whose career as a head
coach began at Montana in 1978,
coached many eventual NBAstars at both Stanford and Cal.
At Stanford, Montgomery reached 12 NCAA tournaments
with 10 straight second-round appearances and a trip to the
1998 Final Four.
Montgomery’s son, John, just completed his third season
as an assistant coach under his father after previously work-
ing as Cal’s director of basketball operations.
SPORTS 14
Tuesday • April 1, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Continued from page 11
CAL
MIke
Montgomery
By Leonardo Haberkorn
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MONTEVIDEO, Uruguay — Uruguayan
soccer has lost its leadership with little
more than two months before its national
team is to compete in the World Cup.
The entire executive committee of the
Uruguayan Football Association quit
Monday in a crisis that also involves
President Jose Mujica and the football play-
ers union.
“It seems nonsensical to me that the exec-
utive committee resigns two months before
the World Cup, because the big loser here
could be the national team,” Edgar Welker,
vice president of the Penarol soccer team,
told The Associated Press.
Uruguay’s clubs will try to designate a
temporary committee to lead the country’s
soccer until the end of the World Cup,
Welker said, adding that the crisis should
not affect the leadership of the national
team’s coach, Oscar Washington Tabarez.
The crisis blew up when Mujica abruptly
withdrew police protection Thursday from
the home stadiums of
Penarol and Nacional,
the most popular teams
in Uruguay, after
Nacional fans injured 40
police officers in
postgame violence the
night before.
“We Uruguayans cannot
continue in this irra-
tionality, accepting
human stupidity. We need to react urgently, ”
the president said.
Uruguay’s soccer federation and its
clubs decided to play Saturday’s games
anyway, but the players pulled out Sunday,
saying they wouldn’t be safe without
police in the stadiums.
After all five leaders of the federation’s
executive committee quit Monday, the coun-
try’s leading newspaper, El Pais, raised the
question of whether the development could
threaten Uruguay’s participation in the
World Cup, which begins June 13 in Brazil.
Citing unidentified sources, El Pais sug-
gested that FIFA, world soccer’s governing
body, could be investigating the resigna-
tions and could suspend Uruguay from the
tournament if it determined Mujica put
political pressure on the committee.
FIFA rules are designed to protect soccer
from political intervention. To make govern-
ments back down in conflicts over the sport,
FIFA can threaten suspension from interna-
tional football matches and meetings.
The body’s media department said FIFA
had no comment on the situation in
Uruguay.
Welker said the government had nothing
to do with the resignation of Uruguayan
Football Association President Sebastian
Bauza and the other executives.
“I don’t see a government move behind
this, nothing of the sort,” he said.
Francisco Figueredo, executive secretary
of the South American Football
Confederation, told the AP in Asuncion,
Paraguay, that neither his group nor FIFA
was investigating the Uruguayan crisis.
“Neither is Uruguay’s participation in the
World Cup at risk, because the selection
(national team) has nothing to do with
police, nor violent fans,” he said.
Uruguay soccer leaders quit amid violence
Jose Mujica
Sports Brief
SPORTS 15
Tuesday • April 1, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Doug Feinberg
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SOUTH BEND, Ind. — Notre Dame’s quest
for perfection will continue at the Final Four.
Jewell Loyd scored 30 points and unbeat-
en Notre Dame advanced to the Final Four
for a fourth straight season with an 88-69
win over Baylor on Monday night.
Natalie Achonwa added 19 points and 15
rebounds for the Irish (36-0), who will face
either Louisville or Maryland in the nation-
al semifinals on Sunday night in Nashville.
Notre Dame became the sixth school to
reach the Final Four in four straight sea-
sons, joining UConn, LSU, Stanford,
Louisiana Tech and Tennessee.
The loss ended the brilliant career of
Baylor guard Odyssey Sims, who finished
this season with 1,054 points — eight
short of Jackie Stiles’ NCAA record for a
single season. Sims scored 33 points for
Baylor (32-5), but had little help on
offense.
The win extended Notre
Dame’s home winning
streak to 28 games.
Baylor was the last team
to beat the Irish in South
Bend — doing so on Dec.
5, 2012 — but that team
had 6-foot-8 star
Brittney Griner.
The loss ended another
superb season for Baylor. The Bears
advanced to the regional final for the fourth
time in five seasons, a year after they —
with Griner — were eliminated in the
regional semifinals by Louisville in one of
the biggest upsets in women’s basketball
history.
The Irish took control in the first half
with senior Kayla McBride on the bench
with early foul trouble. Trailing 21-17 mid-
way through the first half, Loyd and
Achonwa got the Irish going. Achonwa,
who had a double-double in the first half,
started a 14-0 run with a layup. Loyd then
scored the next eight points, including a
highlight reel three-point play that made it
24-21 and whipped up the sellout home
crowd, which included former Irish star
Skylar Diggins.
By the time Sims hit a pullup in the
lane with 5:32 left the Lady Bears trailed
31-24. The Irish led 44-32 at the half as
Loyd finished with 21 points in the first
20 minutes.
Sims rallied the Lady Bears scoring the
first nine points of the second half to cut the
deficit to 46-41. After a Notre Dame basket
Baylor was called for back-to-back offen-
sive fouls — the eighth and ninth called in
the game — and coach Kim Mulkey had seen
enough, letting the officials know her dis-
pleasure. That earned her a technical foul.
The teams traded baskets over the next
few minutes and Baylor closed to within 65-
60 before Notre Dame took over scoring 16
of the next 20 points, including eight from
the free throw line. The Irish were 30 for 33
from the foul line in the game.
The Irish had a scary moment when
Achonwa went down holding her left knee
after getting fouled with just under five min-
utes left. After a few moments she got up
with help and pointed to her teammates
telling them to get it done before heading to
the locker room.
They followed their senior leaders advice
coming away with the victory. And
Achonwa joined her team for the celebra-
tion, wearing sweats.
The win was Notre Dame’s first against
Baylor, which had won the previous four
meetings — including a victory in the 2012
national championship game that complet-
ed a 40-0 season for the Lady Bears.
Now Notre Dame is two wins away from
becoming the eighth team to go through the
season unbeaten.
Notre Dame beats Baylor 88-69 to get to Final Four
Jewell Loyd
By John Rogers
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — Two words — surfboards
and Hobie — were all but synonymous in the
early 1960s, when teenagers who saw
movies such as “Gidget” and “Beach Party”
rushed to the shores of Southern California
to try a mesmerizing new water sport.
The lightweight, maneuverable boards built
by a surfer dude known as Hobie carried people
into the pastime that for decades had remained
all but invisible outside California and Hawaii.
Hobart Laidlaw Alter (it’s unlikely
many users of his gear knew his last name
or even if he had one) toiled in a small
beachfront shop in Dana Point, cranking
out those boards by the thousands.
Hobie surfboards eventually became the
linchpin of a multimillion-dollar, world-
wide empire that, by the time its unassum-
ing namesake died last week, had grown to
include catamarans, skateboards, beach
wear and more.
Hobie died Saturday at his Palm Desert home
after a lengthy battle with cancer. He was 80.
The man who revolutionized surfing with
a cheap, lightweight, easily maneuverable
board might have stayed out of the lime-
light for most of his life, but the boards and
catamarans he created did not.
“The basic surfboard structure for 90 per-
cent of the surfboards around the world
remains the foam core that he developed, and
that was 50 years ago,” Steve Pezman, pub-
lisher of Surfer’s Journal and a longtime
friend of Hobie, said Monday.
When Hobie built his first surfboard, about
the time he graduated from high school in
1950, the old-fashioned, heavy wooden ones
that had limited the sport to the strongest and
most determined athletes were beginning to
give way to lighter balsa wood boards. But
balsa wood was hard to come by.
Afew years after Hobie moved his board-
building operation out of his parents
Laguna Beach garage in 1954, he and his
friend Gordon “Grubby” Clark decided they
could build a better board using a
polyurethane foam core.
It took a year of trial and error, but they
prevailed: The result was a board that was
easy to shape, so light a child could carry it
to the ocean, and so maneuverable a good
surfer could do all sorts of stunts on it.
Soon Hobie was working with a small staff,
producing 250 boards a week and struggling to
keep up with demand.
“Gidget,” the film based on author Frederick
Kohner’s surfing-obsessed teenage daughter
and her goofy friends, had arrived in theaters
in 1959, sending millions on a quest to ride
the wild surf — preferably on a reasonably
priced surfboard.
Soon the Hobie board, which retailed
for a little more than $100, and its dis-
tinctive logo were ubiquitous. The latter
could be found painted on surfers’ cars,
sketched into wet beach sands, even
carved into schoolroom desks.
Surfing legend Hobie Alter dies
By Eric Olson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LINCOLN, Neb. — Music City is the next
stop for a Connecticut women’s team that
just keeps humming along in search of a
record ninth national championship.
Kaleena Mosqueda-Lewis continued her
splendid run through the NCAA tournament
with 17 points, and UConn advanced to the
women’s Final Four for the seventh straight
year with a 69-54 victory against Texas
A&M on Monday night.
The defending national champion
Huskies (38-0) won their 44th straight
game. Their semifinal opponent Sunday
in Nashville will be either Stanford or
North Carolina.
Stefanie Dolson, who
made her 150th career
start to tie the NCAA
record, had 14 points and
10 rebounds and blocked
a career-high eight shots.
Bria Hartley had 14
points, Breanna Stewart
added 13 and Moriah
Jefferson 11.
Courtney Walker led
Texas A&M (27-9) with
14 points. Courtney
Williams had 13 and Jordan Jones 12.
Mosqueda-Lewis, an All-American last
year who missed a total of 12 games this
season because of injury or illness, turned in
another great performance and was named
the regional’s most outstanding player.
UConn women top Aggies 69-54
Kaleena
Mosqueda-
Lewis
attached to Ferrari and his game.
“The negatives were he was selfish. He took too many
shots and handled the ball too much,” Harames said. “I did-
n’t see that. He’s as hard a worker as you’ll find. His attitude
was great. I don’t think I was disappointed in him at all. I
expected a lot and most of it came true.”
In fact, those criticisms couldn’t be further from the truth.
Ferrari sees himself as a true point guard: one who handles the
ball, initiates the offense and gets the rest of the team involved.
Until it’s time for him to take over — which he did at sev-
eral points during the season. He took over in the Panthers’
76-72 overtime win over Aragon during the regular season,
scoring 30 points, including 11 in the overtime period. And
then, of course, there is the now famous 46-point explosion
in an 83-69 win over Leigh in the Open Division playoffs.
But there were other times Ferrari’s shots weren’t falling
and instead of just continuing to force up shots, he looked
to involve his teammates.
“It’s all about a feel. I just tried to play the game as it
comes to me and go from there,” Ferrari said. “It happened
multiple times this year. I felt my team needed me to step up.
I kind of have a little feel for the momentum of the game.”
It’s that feel for the game that helped Ferrari land a schol-
arship to play at University of San Francisco beginning
next season. But even with a scholarship secured, Ferrari
never felt the need to go out and prove he deserved one.
“Alot of guys come out and try to prove, ‘I’m this guy and
I’m going here (for college),’” Ferrari said. “Alot of people
have a cool mode, ‘I’m too cool to do this,’ or ‘I’m too cool
to do that.’ I just wanted to get better. That was my main
concern. I felt I needed to take a step forward to get ready for
college. As the year went on, I got better. ”
So did the rest of his teammates. No-look passes from the
point to baseline that were fumbled out of bounds early in
the season because teammates weren’t expecting it turned
into baseline layups by the end of the season. The highest
accolade you can give a point guard — or any player for that
matter — is he made those around him better. Harames
believes Ferrari did just that.
“He made [his teammates] all way better players, I
thought,” Harames said. “The hard work helped. He worked
hard at practice and [both the practices and his teammates]
were highly elevated by him.”
And despite all the accolades and 20-point games and
amazing plays Ferrari has garnered and made this season, it
was the things the team accomplished — along with just
playing with his friends — that Ferrari will remember the
most from his senior year.
“Beating Serra (in their annual non-league game) was
nice. Going undefeated in league (was nice),” Ferrari said.
“But (just being) day in, day out with the guys. The rela-
tionship on the team was unreal. Being with them every day
and grinding with them (is something I’ll remember).”
Said Harames: “He’s a special player. ”
sophomore left-hander Daniel
Madigan (Carlmont) was lost for the
season with an elbow injury. Madigan
is set to undergo Tommy John surgery
next week, effectively ending his
Skyline career, according to Nomicos.
“His baseball career is not over, ”
Nomicos said. “But for him to stay
another year, and rehab here, and play
here is not worth it for him. His best
situation is to go to a school next year
as a part-time student and compete and
rehabilitate. And then come back and
pitch for two more years at the four-
year level.”
As a result of the injury, Skyline has
had to reinvent its pitching staff in a
hurry. The Trojans have leaned heavily
on freshmen Thomas Caulfield
(Burlingame), sophomore Sean
Collins (Carlmont) and transfer soph-
omore Cage Cascone (Terra Nova) all
season long. But the emerging arm in
the mix has been freshman right-han-
der Aldo Severson (Aragon) who has
pitched in nine of Skyline’s last 10
games.
Further depleting its roster, Skyline
has lost three everyday players with
injuries to sophomore shortstop
Ismael Orozco (Riordan), third base-
man Armando Fajardo (Hillsdale) and
Nic Bongi (Carlmont).
“We’re depending on everybody and
doing different things,” Nomicos said.
“We’re just trying to put it together. ”
It has been Hidalgo who has posi-
tioned himself as the clutch arm on the
staff though. And that’s just the way he
likes it.
“I like having the ball in my hand in
the big situations just trying to close
out games for us and just trying to get
wins,” Hidalgo said.
Skyline is currently in fourth place
in the Coast Pacific, 3 1/2 games back
of first-place Cañada and Cabrillo
(tied) and 2 1/2 games behind second-
place Ohlone.
16
Tuesday • April 1, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
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Continued from page 13
SKYLINE
Continued from page 11
FERRARI
PACIFICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
x-Anaheim 75 49 18 8 106 244 191
x-SanJose 76 47 20 9 103232 184
Los Angeles 76 44 26 6 94 191 162
Phoenix 75 36 27 12 84 206 212
Vancouver 76 34 31 11 79 184 206
Calgary 75 31 37 7 69 192 223
Edmonton 75 26 40 9 61 184 249
Monday’sGames
Ottawa 2, Carolina 1, SO
New Jersey 6, Florida 3
Anaheim 5,Winnipeg 4, OT
Minnesota 3, Los Angeles 2
Tuesday’sGames
New Jersey at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Calgary at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Florida at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Carolina at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Dallas at Washington, 7 p.m.
Colorado at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Montreal at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
Winnipeg at Phoenix, 10 p.m.
Edmonton at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
NHL GLANCE
PACIFICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
x-L.A. Clippers 52 22 .703 —
GoldenState 45 27 .625 6
Phoenix 44 29 .603 7 1/2
Sacramento 25 48 .342 26 1/2
L.A. Lakers 24 48 .333 27
x-clinched playoff spot
Monday’sGames
San Antonio 103, Indiana 77
Charlotte 100,Washington 94
Miami 93,Toronto 83
Detroit 116, Milwaukee 111
Atlanta 103, Philadelphia 95
Chicago 94, Boston 80
L.A. Clippers 114, Minnesota 104
Sacramento 102, New Orleans 97
Memphis 94, Denver 92
New York 92, Utah 83
Tuesday’sGames
Houston at Brooklyn, 8 p.m.
Golden State at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Portland at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.
NBA GLANCE
Monday’sGames
Pittsburgh 1, Chicago Cubs 0, 10 innings
Washington 9, N.Y. Mets 7, 10 innings
Philadelphia 14,Texas 10
Milwaukee 2, Atlanta 0
St. Louis 1, Cincinnati 0
Miami 10, Colorado 1
San Francisco 9, Arizona 8
Detroit 4, Kansas City 3
Philadelphia 14,Texas 10
Baltimore 2, Boston 1
Chicago White Sox 5, Minnesota 3
Tampa Bay 9,Toronto 2
Cleveland 2, Oakland 0
Seattle 10, L.A. Angels 3
Tuesday’sGames
L.A. D.odgers (Greinke 0-0) at San Diego (Kennedy 0-0),
6:40 p.m.
Colorado (Anderson 0-0) at Miami (Eovaldi 0-0), 7:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (Burnett 0-0) at Texas (M.Perez 0-0), 8:05 p.m.
Atlanta (Wood 0-0) at Milwaukee (Lohse 0-0), 8:10 p.m.
San Francisco (Cain 0-0) at Arizona (Miley 0-1), 9:40 p.m.
N.Y. ankees. (Sabathia 0-0) at Houston (Feldman 0-0),
7:10 p.m.
Toronto (Hutchison 0-0) at Tampa Bay (Cobb 0-0), 7:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (Burnett 0-0) at Texas (M.Perez 0-0), 8:05 p.m.
Cleveland (Kluber 0-0) at Oakland (Kazmir 0-0), 10:05 p.m.
Seattle (Ramirez 0-0) at L.A. Angels (Wilson 0-0), 10:05 p.m.
MLB GLANCE
HEALTH 17
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and Josh Lederman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Beating expectations,
President Barack Obama’s health care over-
haul was on track to sign up more than 7
million Americans for health insurance on
deadline day Monday, government officials
told The Associated Press.
The 7 million target, thought to be out of
reach by most experts, was in sight on a day
that saw surging consumer interest as well
as vexing computer glitches that slowed
sign-ups on the HealthCare.gov website.
Two government officials confirmed the
milestone, speaking on condition of
anonymity because they were not author-
ized to discuss the matter ahead of an official
announcement.
Seven million was the original target set
by the Congressional Budget Office for
enrollment in taxpayer-subsidized private
health insurance through new online mar-
kets created under Obama’s signature legis-
lation.
That was scaled back to 6 million after the
disastrous launch of HealthCare.gov last
fall. Several state-run websites also had
crippling problems.
Americans who rushed to apply for health
insurance Monday faced long, frustrating
waits and a new spate of website ills on
deadline day.
“This is like trying to find a parking spot
at Wal-Mart on Dec. 23,” said Jason
Stevenson, working with a Utah nonprofit
group helping people enroll.
At times, more than 125,000 people were
simultaneously using HealthCare.gov,
straining it beyond its capacity. For long
stretches Monday, applicants were shuttled
to a virtual waiting room where they could
leave an email address and be contacted
later.
Officials said the site had not crashed but
was experiencing very heavy volume. The
website, which was receiving 1.5 million
visitors a day last week, had recorded about
2 million through 3 p.m. EDT. Call centers
have more than 840,000 calls.
Supporters of the health care law fanned
out across the country in a final dash to sign
up uninsured Americans. People not signed
up for health insurance by the deadline,
either through their jobs or on their own,
were subject to being fined by the IRS, and
that threat was helping drive the final dash.
The administration announced last week
that people still in line by midnight would
get extra time to enroll.
The website stumbled early in the day —
out of service for nearly four hours as tech-
nicians patched a software bug. Another
hiccup in early afternoon temporarily kept
new applicants from signing up, and then
things slowed further. Overwhelmed by
computer problems when launched last fall,
the system has been working much better in
recent months, but independent testers say
it still runs slowly.
At Chicago’s Norwegian American
Hospital, people began lining up shortly
after 7 a.m. to get help signing up for sub-
sidized private health insurance.
Lucy Martinez, an unemployed single
mother of two boys, said she’d previously
Deadline dash: Glitches slow health care sign-ups
REUTERS
Fifty-four-year-old Natalia Pollack, left, uninsured since 1999, is helped to sign up for health
insurance through the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, by Carlos Tapia, a
certified application councilor at a Single Stop USA site at West Side Campaign Against Hunger
in New York City.
By Andrew Taylor
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Congress is poised to
give doctors who treat Medicare patients an
eleventh-hour reprieve from a cut in their
government fees.
Monday’s planned Senate vote would send
legislation to repair Medicare’s flawed pay-
ment formula for a year to President Barack
Obama for his signature. It comes just hours
before a midnight deadline.
The $21 billion measure would stave off a
24 percent cut in Medicare reimbursements
to doctors for a year and extend dozens of
other expiring health care provisions such
as higher payment rates for rural hospitals.
The legislation is paid for by cuts to health
care providers, but fully half of the cuts
won’t kick in for 10 years.
It’s the seventeenth temporary “patch” to
a broken payment formula that dates to
1997 and comes after lawmakers failed to
reach a deal on financing a permanent fix.
The measure passed the House on
Thursday, but only after top leaders in both
parties engineered a voice vote when it
became clear they were having difficulty
mustering the two-thirds vote required to
advance it under expedited procedures.
Several top Democrats opposed the bill,
saying it would take momentum away from
the drive to permanently solve the payment
formula problem.
There’s widespread agreement on biparti-
san legislation to redesign the payment for-
mula that would doctors 0.5 percent annual
fee increases and implement reforms aimed
at giving doctors incentives to provide less
costly care. But there’s no agreement on
how to pay the approximately $140 billion
cost of scrapping the old formula.
Senate Finance Committee Chairman Ron
Wyden, D-Ore., promised to keep pressing
ahead with a long-term solution, proposing
to use savings from the troop drawdown in
Afghanistan to pay the cost. Republicans
and most budget experts say such savings
are phony and are demanding at least some
of the money to come from cuts to Obama’s
Affordable Care Act.
“Paying for this through (war savings) is
the mother of all gimmicks,” said Sen. Jeff
Sessions, R-Ala.
“We just don’t have the votes right now to
fix this problem for good,” said Majority
Congress to pass bill to stop cut to Medicare doctors
See OBAMACARE, Page 18
See MEDICARE, Page 18
18
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leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., who negotiated
the measure with House Speaker John
Boehner, R-Ohio. “For the millions of eld-
erly Americans and their doctors this fix is
good news. It means the promise of accessi-
ble, quality health care to our nation’s sen-
iors is being honored for another year. ”
The heavily lobbied measure blends $16
billion to address Medicare physicians’
payments with about $5 billion more for a
variety of other expiring health care provi-
sions, like higher Medicare payments to
rural hospitals and for ambulance rides in
rural areas. Manufacturers of certain drugs to
treat kidney disease catch a break, as do
dialysis providers and the state of
California, which receives increases in
Medicare physician fees in 14 counties such
as San Diego and Sacramento that are desig-
nated as rural and whose doctors therefore
receive lower payments than their urban
counterparts.
The bill increases spending by $17 bil-
lion over the next three years, offsetting
the cost with cuts to health care providers.
The authors of the bill employed consider-
able gimmickry to amass the cuts, however,
and fully half of them don’t appear for 10
years. For instance, the bill claims $5 bil-
lion in savings through a timing shift in
Medicare cuts in 2024.
Sen. Tom Coburn, R-Okla., cited the gim-
micks as he lit into the legislation in a lac-
erating floor speech. He said the so-called
offsets were phony and that the measure
delays a long-sought overhaul of Medicare’s
fee-for-service system, which pays doctors
according to the number of tests and treat-
ments they perform.
“We are going to put off until tomor-
row what we should be doing today, ”
Coburn said. “It’s a sham. ... It’s not h-
ing but gimmicks.”
Other savings come from curbs on pay-
ments to hospitals that care for a large share
of indigent patients. But those hospitals
first get a one-year reprieve from cuts sched-
uled in 2016.
The measure would give Medicare doctors
a 0.5 percent fee increase through the end of
the year. It also creates two new mental
health grant programs, including $1.1 bil-
lion over four years for improvements to
community health centers and $60 million
over four years for outpatient treatment for
people with serious mental illness.
The measure solves the fee schedule prob-
lem through next March.
Continued from page 17
MEDICARE
tried to enroll at a clinic in another part of
the city but there was always a problem.
She’d wait and wait and they wouldn’t call
her name, or they would ask her for paper-
work that she was told earlier she didn’t
need, she said. Her diabetic mother would
start sweating so they’d have to leave.
She’s heard “that this would be better
here,” said Martinez, adding that her mother
successfully signed up Sunday at a different
location.
At St. Francis Hospital in Wilmington,
Del., enrollment counselor Hubert Worthen
plunged into a long day. “I got my energy
drink,” he said. “This is epic, man.”
At a Houston community center, there
were immigrants from Ethiopia, Nepal,
Eritrea, Somalia, Iraq, Iran and other con-
flict-torn areas, many of them trying anew
after failing to complete applications previ-
ously. In addition to needing help with the
actual enrollment, they needed to wait for
interpreters. Many had taken a day off from
work, hoping to meet the deadline.
The White House and other supporters of
the law were hoping for an enrollment surge
that would confound skeptics.
The insurance markets — or exchanges —
offer subsidized private health insurance to
people who don’t have access to coverage
through their jobs. The federal government
is taking the lead in 36 states, while 14
other states plus Washington, D.C., are run-
ning their own enrollment websites.
New York, running its own site, reported
more than 812,000 had signed up by Sunday
morning, nearly 100,000 of them last week.
However, it’s unclear what those numbers
may mean.
The administration hasn’t said how many
of the 6 million people nationally who had
signed up before the weekend ultimately
closed the deal by paying their first month’s
premiums. Also unknown is how many were
previously uninsured — the real test of
Obama’s health care overhaul. In addition,
the law expands coverage for low-income
people through Medicaid, but only about
half the states have agreed to implement that
option.
Cheering on the deadline-day sign-up
effort, Health and Human Services Secretary
Kathleen Sebelius planned to spend much of
the day Monday working out of the depart-
ment’s TV studio, conducting interviews by
satellite with stations around the country.
Though March 31 was the last day official-
ly to sign up, millions of people are poten-
tially eligible for extensions granted by the
administration.
Those include people who had begun
enrolling by the deadline but didn’t finish,
perhaps because of errors, missing informa-
tion or website glitches. The government
says it will accept paper applications until
April 7 and take as much time as necessary to
handle unfinished cases on HealthCare.gov.
Rules may vary in states running their own
insurance marketplaces.
The administration is also offering special
extensions to make up for all sorts of prob-
lems that might have kept people from get-
ting enrolled on time: Natural disasters.
Domestic abuse. Website malfunctions.
Errors by insurance companies. Mistakes by
application counselors.
To seek a special enrollment period, con-
tact the federal call center, at 1-800-318-
2596, or the state marketplace and explain
what happened. It’s on the honor system. If
the extension is approved, that brings
another 60 days to enroll.
Continued from page 17
OBAMACARE
HEALTH 19
Tuesday • April 1, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Marilynn Marchione
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Love can sometimes break a heart but mar-
riage seems to do it a lot of good. Astudy of
more than 3.5 million Americans finds that
married people are less likely than singles,
divorced or widowed folks to suffer any type
of heart or blood vessel problem.
This was true at any age, for women as
well as for men, and regardless of other heart
disease risk factors they had such as high
cholesterol or diabetes, researchers found.
“It might be that if someone is married,
they have a spouse who encourages them to
take better care of themselves,” said Dr.
Jeffrey Berger, a preventive cardiologist at
NYU Langone Medical Center in New York.
But “we can’t prove by any means cause
and effect,” he said.
This is the largest look at marriage and
heart health, said Dr. Carlos Alviar, a cardi-
ology fellow who led the study with Berger.
Previous studies mostly compared married
to single people and lacked information on
divorced and widowed ones. Or they just
looked at heart attacks, whereas this one
included a full range from clogged arteries
and abdominal aneurysms to stroke risks
and circulation problems in the legs.
Researchers used health questionnaires
that people filled out when they sought var-
ious types of tests in community settings
around the country from an Ohio company,
Life Line Screening Inc. Some of these
screening tests, for various types of cancer
and other diseases or conditions, are not rec-
ommended by leading medical groups, but
people can still get them and pay for them
themselves.
The study authors have no financial ties to
the company and are not endorsing this type
of screening, Berger said. Life Line gave its
data to the Society of Vascular Surgery and
New York University to help promote
research.
The results are from people who sought
screening from 2003 through 2008. Their
average age was 64, nearly two-thirds were
female and 80 percent were white. They gave
information on smoking, diabetes, family
history, obesity, exercise and other factors,
and researchers had blood pressure and other
health measures.
The study found:
•Married people had a 5 percent lower risk
of any cardiovascular disease compared to
single people. Widowed people had a 3 per-
cent greater risk of it and divorced people, a
5 percent greater risk, compared to married
folks.
•Marriage seemed to do the most good for
those under age 50; they had a 12 percent
lower risk of heart-related disease than sin-
gle people their age.
•Smoking, a major heart risk, was highest
among divorced people and lowest in wid-
owed ones. Obesity was most common in
those single and divorced. Widowed people
had the highest rates of high blood pressure,
diabetes and inadequate exercise.
Researchers don’t know how long any
study participants were married or how
recently they were divorced or became wid-
owed. But the results drive home the mes-
sage that a person’s heart risks can’t be
judged by physical measures alone — social
factors and stress also matter, said Dr. Vera
Bittner, a cardiologist at the University of
Alabama at Birmingham.
She heads the heart disease prevention
committee of the American College of
Cardiology. The study results were released
on Friday ahead of presentation this week-
end at the group’s annual meeting in
Washington.
Study: Married folks have
fewer heart problems
A study of more than 3.5 million Americans finds that married people are less likely than
singles, divorced or widowed folks to suffer any type of heart or blood vessel problem.
By Marilynn Marchione
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — New research is boost-
ing hopes that weight-loss surgery can put
some patients’ diabetes into remission for
years and perhaps in some cases, for good.
Doctors on Monday gave longer results
from a landmark study showing that stom-
ach-reducing operations are better than med-
ications for treating “diabesity,” the deadly
duo of obesity and Type 2 diabetes. Millions
of Americans have this and can’t make
enough insulin or use what they do make to
process food.
Many experts were skeptical that the ben-
efits seen after a year would last.
Now, three-year results show an even
greater advantage for surgery.
Blood-sugar levels were normal in 38 per-
cent and 25 percent of two groups given sur-
gery, but in only 5 percent of those treated
with medications.
The results are “quite remarkable” and
could revolutionize care, said one independ-
ent expert, Dr. Robert Siegel, a cardiologist
at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los
Angeles.
“No one dreamed, at least I didn’t,” that
obesity surgery could have such broad
effects long before it caused patients to lose
weight, he said. Some patients were able to
stop using insulin a few days after surgery.
At three years, “more than 90 percent of
the surgical patients required no insulin,”
and nearly half had needed it at the start of
the study, said its leader, Dr. Philip Schauer
of the Cleveland Clinic. In contrast, insulin
use rose in the medication group, from 52
percent at the start to 55 percent at three
years.
The results were reported Monday at an
American College of Cardiology conference
in Washington. They also were published
online by the New England Journal of
Medicine.
Doctors are reluctant to call surgery a pos-
sible cure because they can’t guarantee dia-
betes won’t come back.
Surgery gives long-term
help for obese diabetics
By Lauran Neergaard
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Edwin Pacheco was in
and out of the hospital for months. He’d sur-
vived one organ transplant and desperately
needed another. But he wasn’t the only one
suffering. Few people asked how his wife
was holding up as she kept vigil, cornered
hard-to-understand doctors and held job and
family together.
“Everybody was like, ‘Oh, you’re a good
caregiver. ’ But inside, I’m dying,” Minerva
Pacheco of New York recalls of those tumul-
tuous days.
Then one day in the intensive care waiting
room at Montefiore Medical Center, a pair of
strangers introduced themselves as volun-
teer coaches for caregivers and offered a
shoulder. It’s part of an unusual program that
recruits retirees and specially trains them to
help overwhelmed family members cope
with a scary hospital stay — for their own
health, and so they can better care for their
loved one.
“The caregiver needs to be taken care of,
too,” said Montefiore coach Dave Wolffe, a
retired high school guidance counselor who
spotted Pacheco’s distress. “If they’re sick,
or they break down, feel helpless or hope-
less, they’re not going to be too helpful to
the patient.”
The coaches offer more than emotional
support and a sympathetic ear. They’re
trained to help people navigate a complex
hospital system and to help them locate
community resources that may ease the
strain, too.
They can track down a doctor to answer a
caregiver’s questions.
Retirees help caregivers cope with hospital stays
DATEBOOK 20
Tuesday • April 1, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
TUESDAY, APRIL 1
Free Oral Cancer Screenings. San
Mateo Center for Cosmetic Dentistry
— Michael Wong, 256 N. San Mateo
Drive, Suite 8, San Mateo. By appoint-
ment only, Mondays, Tuesdays and
Thursdays from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. and
Wednesdays from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Continues through the month of
April. For more information call 342-
9016.
Spring Break Baseball/Softball
Camp in San Bruno. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Lions Field, San Buno. Learn funda-
mental skills, play games and enjoy
competition. For more information
go to
www.NationalAcademyofAthletics.co
m.
‘Japan Revisited’ art exhibit. 10 a.m.
to 5 p.m. Portola Art Gallery at Allied
Arts Guild, 75 Arbor Road, Menlo Park.
This exhibit will run through April 30.
The gallery is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Mondays through Saturdays. For
more information go to www.porto-
laartgallery.com or call 321-0220.
Afterschool Special at
CuriOdyssey. 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.
CuriOdyssey, 1651 Coyote Point
Drive, San Mateo. Receive 50 percent
your admission. Let your child
explore interactive science exhibits
and more than 50 native animals. For
more information call 342-7755.
Chronic Headache Relief Seminar.
5:30 p.m. 750 Kains Blvd., San Bruno.
To RSVP or for more information call
297-2235.
Don’t Fool Around — Use LinkedIn.
5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. San Mateo Main
Library, 55 W. Third Ave., San Mateo.
Renee Sagon, a talent acquisition
consultant at Slingshot Connections,
will teach participants how to man-
age job searching and social net-
working more productively. Free. For
more information call Grace at 522-
0701.
Jazz by the Bay. 8 p.m. Centennial
Tower, 1200 Airport Blvd., South San
Francisco. Music provided by the
Dave Miller Trio and vocalist Rebecca
DuMaine. RSVP by Tuesday. $35 per
person, $60 per couple. For more
information contact
rosa.acosta@ssf.net.
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2
Spring Break Baseball/Softball
Camp in San Bruno. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Lions Field, San Buno. Learn funda-
mental skills, play games and enjoy
competition. For more information
go to
www.NationalAcademyofAthletics.co
m.
Free Tax Preparation. 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. Samaritan House, 4031 Pacific
Blvd., San Mateo.To make an appoint-
ment or for more information call
523-0804.
San Mateo Professional Alliance
Weekly Networking Lunch. Noon to
1 p.m. Spiedo Ristorante, 223 E.
Fourth Ave., San Mateo. Free admis-
sion, but lunch is $17. For more infor-
mation call 430-6500.
Afterschool Special at
CuriOdyssey. 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.
CuriOdyssey, 1651 Coyote Point
Drive, San Mateo. Receive 50 percent
your admission. Let your child
explore interactive science exhibits
and more than 50 native animals. For
more information call 342-7755.
Lifetree Cafe Conversations:
Friends for Life. 7 p.m. Bethany
Lutheran Church, 1095 Cloud Ave.,
Menlo Park. Lifetree Café Menlo Park
hosts an hour-long conversation
exploring the secrets of lasting
friendships. Complimentary snacks
and beverages will be served. For
more information email life-
treecafemp@gmail.com or call 854-
5897.
Chronic Headache Relief Seminar.
5:30 p.m. 750 Kains Blvd., San Bruno.
To RSVP or for more information call
297-2235.
THURSDAY, APRIL 3
Spring Break Baseball/Softball
Camp in San Bruno. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Lions Field, San Buno. Learn funda-
mental skills, play games and enjoy
competition. For more information
go to
www.NationalAcademyofAthletics.co
m.
Lifetree Cafe Conversations:
Friends for Life. 9:15 a.m. Bethany
Lutheran Church, 1095 Cloud Ave.,
Menlo Park. Lifetree Café Menlo Park
hosts an hour-long conversation
exploring the secrets of lasting
friendships. Complimentary snacks
and beverages will be served. For
more information email life-
treecafemp@gmail.com or call 854-
5897.
The Hearing Loss Association of
the Peninsula Monthly Meeting. 1
p.m. Veterans Memorial Senior Center
located,1455 Madison Ave., Redwood
City. The special speaker this month is
Anna Gilmore Hall, Executive Director
of the Hearing Loss Association of
America. Free. For more information
call 345-4551.
Afterschool Special at
CuriOdyssey. 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.
CuriOdyssey, 1651 Coyote Point
Drive, San Mateo. Receive 50 percent
your admission. Let your child
explore interactive science exhibits
and more than 50 native animals. For
more information call 342-7755.
Chronic Headache Relief Seminar.
5:30 p.m. 750 Kains Blvd., San Bruno.
To RSVP or for more information call
297-2235.
Steve and Kate’s Camp Info Night. 6
p.m. to 8 p.m. The Carey School, 1
Carey School Lane, San Mateo. RSVP
needed. For more information email
sanmateo@steveandkate.com.
FRIDAY, APRIL 4
Senior Scam Stopper. 9 a.m. to 11
a.m. Chetcutti Room, 450 Poplar Ave.,
Millbrae. For more information and to
RSVP go to
http://tinyurl.com/lpaut72 or call
349-2200.
How To Grow Your Business Using
YELP Advertising. 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.
Bayshore Corporate Center, 1710 S.
Amphlett Blvd., Suite 126, San Mateo.
Free. For more information email
cathy@proserver.com.
Spring Break Baseball/Softball
Camp in San Bruno. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Lions Field, San Buno. Learn funda-
mental skills, play games and enjoy
competition. For more information
go to
www.NationalAcademyofAthletics.co
m.
San Mateo County History
Museum’s First Free Friday: March.
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. San Mateo County
History Museum, 2200 Broadway.
Free admission and free activities for
children. Museum docents will lead
tours at 2 p.m. Sponsored by the
Redwood City Civic Cultural
Commission. For more information
go to www.historysmc.org.
Free Tax Preparation. 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. Samaritan House, 4031 Pacific
Blvd., San Mateo.To make an appoint-
ment or for more information call
523-0804.
Companions on a Journey Support
Group. 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. VITAS
Office, 1400 Fashion Island Blvd., Suite
920, Conference Room, San Mateo.
Meet on the first Friday of every
month. For more information call
874-4413.
‘The Wizard of Oz.’ 2 p.m. Serra High
School Gellert Auditorium, 451 W.
20th Ave., San Mateo. Mercy
Burlingame, Notre Dame Belmont
and Serra High Schools Tri-School
Productions. $18. For more informa-
tion call 207-7754.
Afterschool Special at
CuriOdyssey. 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.
CuriOdyssey, 1651 Coyote Point
Drive, San Mateo. Receive 50 percent
your admission. Let your child
explore interactive science exhibits
and more than 50 native animals. For
more information call 342-7755.
‘From the Earth, Into the Sky.’6 p.m.
to 8 p.m. Gallery House, 320 S.
California Ave., Palo Alto. An exhibi-
tion of pottery by Thomas Arakawa
and paintings by Maura Carta will be
shown from April 1 to 26.The public is
invited to the reception. For more
information call 326-1668.
Moliere Comedy ‘The
Misanthrope.’ 7:30 p.m. Notre Dame
de Namur University Theatre, 1500
Ralston Ave., Belmont. Dance per-
formance. $10. For tickets call 508-
3456.
Jazz by the Bay. 8 p.m. Centennial
Tower, 1200 Airport Blvd., South San
Francisco. Music provided by the
Dave Miller Trio and vocalist Rebecca
DuMaine. RSVP by April 1. $35 per
person, $60 per couple. For more
information contact
rosa.acosta@ssf.net.
SATURDAY, APRIL 5
Easter Bunnyat Hillsdale Shopping
Center. Hillsdale Shopping Center, 60
31st Ave., San Mateo. Until April 20. All
kids will receive a gift to take home
just for visiting. Photo packages start
at $18.31. For more information email
stephanie@singersf.com.
Skills Development and Mock
Earthquake Exercise. Foster City Fire
Department, 1040 E. Hillsdale Blvd.,
Foster City. For more information call
286-3350.
Rummage Sale and Adoption
Event for Copper’s Dream Rescue. 9
a.m. to 3 p.m. 1839 Arroyo Ave., San
Carlos. Copper’s Dream Rescue will
be holding a rummage sale to raise
funds to cover emergency medical
care. Many great dogs will be avail-
able for adoption as well. For more
information go to www.coppers-
dream.org.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
ing and a former bank building in
downtown San Mateo in 2011 to open
a boarding school for young entrepre-
neurs.
In April and August of last year, the
city issued temporary occupancy per-
mits to allow the school to host its
grand opening prior to finishing land-
scape enhancements. The permits
expired months ago and the university
has done little to follow through with
its terms of approval, Matthews said.
Regardless, the university requested
an encroachment permit to allow the
school to install fiber optic cables
across Third Avenue between the
Draper University buildings to allot
for its data and voice networking
needs, according to a city staff report.
The council voted March 17 to
approve an encroachment license and
potentially waive the $6,000 annual
fee if the school resolves its landscap-
ing and retail requirements.
Members of the public spoke at the
meeting in frustration about the
school’s outstanding obligations and
claimed the city was overlooking its
original vision for downtown.
The council always talks about the
city’s need for tax revenue, however,
it’s allowed the university to misuse
what should be ground floor retail
space, said Maxine Terner, a former
planning commissioner who was
actively involved in the city’s
Downtown Plan revisions.
“He could not even fulfill his condi-
tions for approval for the few things
that would have improved the area for
citizens; the ordinary citizens,” Terner
said. “It’s just hard to know that we’re
still bending over backwards; espe-
cially to know that Draper is on to
something else. This is what venture
capitalists do; they throw money at
lots of ideas and they hope that some-
thing sticks. That’s not what you do in
the heart of your community and that’s
where we are.”
Yet the concept is sticking and the
school has graduated 250 students
from about 30 different countries, Tim
Draper wrote in an email. It has also
started 40 new companies and is home
to Boost, a leading Bitcoin accelerator
through which about 60 companies
have been processed, Draper wrote in
an email to the Daily Journal.
He’s surprised that residents are com-
plaining about small ticket items like
landscaping when the university is
proving to be a benefit to the city.
“I am sure the elected officials can
understand the significance of what we
are doing for their city, so I don’t
understand why we are being held up on
mission critical items like getting
fiber line placed between the buildings
because some citizen complained that
she didn’t like the plants we put in the
alley — which were incidentally dic-
tated by the historic society,” Draper
wrote.
Some of the university’s proposed
ideas, such as its promise to construct
a living wall, have fallen short for one
reason or another, Patterson said.
In the case of landscaping, the his-
toric society recommended against
mounting the elaborate and expensive
plant wall against a historic building,
Patterson said.
Landscaping is the most significant
outstanding property enhancement
and hopefully solutions will be gener-
ated during Tuesday’s meeting,
Patterson said.
The university wants to continue to
collaborate with the city and prove its
value to San Mateo, Draper wrote.
“The people of the city have been
very welcoming and we hope that we
have a very positive long-term benefit
to their businesses,” Draper wrote. “I
will be relieved when the city finally
gives us the certificates of occupancy
we richly deserve so we can actually
get more permanent tenants.”
It’s a unique project and the city is
happy to have the university call San
Mateo home, but it’s time for Draper to
wrap up its loose ends, Matthews said.
“We tried to cooperate, we tried to be
flexible and we understand that what
they’re trying to do is a little different,
a little new,” Matthews said. “Maybe
that will take more time to get going,
but we need a commitment from them
on when they’re going to finish the
project and get a final certificate of
occupancy. I think they’re anxious to
do that and we have to decide on how
they’re going to get there.”
samantha@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106
Continued from page 1
DRAPER
arrest.
Sen. Leland Yee’s attorney Paul
DeMeester asked why it took until
Wednesday for the FBI to file charges
when it appeared the investigation of
his client began in 2011.
“It raises fairness questions,”
DeMeester said after he and Yee made a
brief federal court appearance in San
Francisco. “Is it fair to the public, is it
fair to the senator that it took so
long?”
DeMeester in particular challenged
why the FBI appeared to shift the focus
of its probe from a cash-for-influence
case to an investigation of alleged
connections to international arms
dealers.
“There’s a question of whether the
government felt it didn’t have enough
evidence on the campaign investiga-
tion, so it starts pushing on the arms
trafficking,” DeMeester said.
The U.S. attorney’s office in San
Francisco didn’t immediately respond
to a phone call and email message
seeking reaction to DeMeester’s
claims.
Yee hasn’t entered a plea yet to one
count of conspiracy to traffic in
firearms without a license and to ille-
gally import firearms, and to six
counts of engaging in a scheme to
defraud citizens of honest services.
He is accused of accepting bribes
from undercover operatives needing
political help in Sacramento and of
agreeing to connect an undercover FBI
agent posing as an underworld figure
with an international arms dealer.
DeMeester previously said the senator
plans to plead not guilty.
Yee appeared briefly in court to dis-
cuss details of his release before trial.
His next court date is April 8. He has
been suspended from the Legislature.
Wearing a brown pinstriped suit, Yee
shot a brief smile at reporters assem-
bled in the gallery before approaching
the bench with DeMeester.
Yee is currently free on a $500,000
unsecured bond. Prosecutors want
property the senator owns to be used as
collateral to guarantee he appears at all
court hearings.
Federal prosecutors said they were
close to accepting some property the
senator owns but were still in negotia-
tions with Yee and his lawyers.
Moments before Yee’s appearance,
Raymond “Shrimp Boy” Chow, who
authorities say is a Chinatown crime
syndicate boss, was brought into court
wearing ankle restraints and dressed in
a mustard-yellow jail jumpsuit.
Chow was also arrested last week as
part of the elaborate FBI sting opera-
tion targeting organized crime in the
Chinatown area of San Francisco. A
total of 26 people have been charged
in the case.
Federal public defender Elizabeth
Falk told the judge her office had a con-
flict from previous cases and she was
still searching for a lawyer to repre-
sent Chow at government cost.
Chow was ordered to return to court
on Wednesday. He was denied bail last
week after a judge deemed him a flight
risk.
Chow is accused of money launder-
ing and other activities as the head of a
notorious Chinatown-based gang. He
has not entered a plea.
Continued from page 1
YEE
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COMICS/GAMES
4-1-14
MONDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOKU
ANSWERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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ACROSS
1 Pasture sound
4 Books pro
7 Household members
11 Frozen
12 Plows into
14 Entice
15 Don’t give up (3 wds.)
17 Brainstorm
18 School papers
19 More suggestive
21 Clark or Orbison
22 Oh, gross!
23 Livy’s tongue
26 Stick fast
29 Birthday counts
30 Wingless insect
31 Mouse alert
33 Not just my
34 Good buy
35 Bargain event
36 Internet messages
38 Ultralight wood
39 Remote button
40 Income source
41 — uno
44 Disquiet
48 Nowhere near
49 Rolling stone
51 Harbor town
52 Glut
53 Wildebeest
54 Gets nosy
55 Possessed
56 Sonnet cousin
DOWN
1 Ten-speed
2 Queen beaters
3 Affirmative votes
4 Coloring need
5 Cline of country music
6 Left Bank friend
7 Trite phrase
8 BMW competitor
9 Park feature
10 Scorch
13 Apple pastry
16 Helen of Troy’s lover
20 Ottoman title
23 — -tzu (“Tao” author)
24 Fit of shivering
25 Technical word
26 Anguished wail
27 Genuine
28 Fish without scales
30 Chaps
32 Green parrot
34 Name in fashion
35 Buffalo puckster
37 Circumvents
38 Glued together
40 Coup plotters
41 Wine valley
42 Tabloid topics
43 — my words!
45 Consequently
46 Dispatch
47 Undeniable
50 “Ooh” companion
DILBERT® CROSSWORD PUZZLE
CRANKY GIRL®
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®
GET FUZZY®
TUESDAY, APRIL 1, 2014
ARIES (March 21-April 19) — A new moneymaking
opportunity will develop. Unexpected bills will be
incentive for you to explore new possibilities that could
help increase your earning potential.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — Your skills and
knowledge should be put to better use. Finding ways
to budget better and to increase your skills and talents
will help you get ahead financially and ease stress.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — Don’t let
restlessness be your downfall. Use pent-up energy
to make improvements to your home or self.
Updating your image can provide you with the
inspiration that you need to move forward.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) — Widen your social
circle. Get involved in group activities or a club. Your
generous nature will be put to good use, and you will
make some interesting new friends.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Now is a favorable time to
make a move. Use every resource available to you.
Interviews and employment possibilities will have
positive results. You will impress others with your
professional insight.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — You may be hardworking,
but you need some recreation also. Mix business with
pleasure and you’ll make new allies. Stimulate your
creativity by exploring different cultures and customs.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — It’s time for a change.
If an emotional situation is causing you anxiety
or headaches, consider moving on. Take a look at
available real estate or a community that interests you.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Spice up your love life
with a little romance. Whether you go dining, dancing
or just stay at home, tune out any distractions and
devote yourself to someone you enjoy being with.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Strive to get
into a position that allows you to help others. Use
any chance you get to improve your professional
relationships and gain respect. Offer assistance
and you’ll get high returns.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Interacting and
socializing with clients and co-workers will help
you gain valuable business connections. Consider
taking in a sporting event, or devise your own
friendly competition.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — You’ll face
opposition regarding a decision that changes the
landscape at home or your workplace. You will win
in the end, but don’t go over- budget if you want to
avoid being ridiculed.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — Whether you are
involved in group functions or meetings, compromise
will be the key. Get together with loved ones and plan
a trip or activity that everyone will enjoy.
COPYRIGHT 2014 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Tuesday • April 1, 2014 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Tuesday • April 1, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
BUS DRIVER JOBS
AVAILABLE TODAY
AT MV TRANSPORTATION
Join us in providing safe, reliable and professional
community transportation in San Francisco, San Mateo,
Alameda and Santa Clara Counties. Please call your
nearest MV Division in:
San Francisco (415) 206-7386
Redwood City (650) 482-9370
Half Moon Bay (650) 560-0360 ext. 0
Brisbane (415) 657-1916
San Jose I (408) 292-3600 ext. 1000
San Jose II (408) 282-7040 Jennifer
Union City I (510) 471-1411
Union City II (510) 453-6043
Both CDL and Non-CDL Drivers needed immediately
for Passenger Vehicle, Small Bus and Large Bus
routes.
Paid classroom and behind-the-wheel training from
exceptional instructors and trainers. The future is
bright for Bus Drivers with an expected 12.5% growth in
positions over the next ten years!
DELIVERY
DRIVER
PENINSULA
ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide
delivery of the Daily Journal six days per week,
Monday thru Saturday, early morning.
Experience with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be
eligible. Papers are available for pickup in down-
town San Mateo at 3:30 a.m.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday, 9am to
4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
NOW HIRING
For An Assisted Living and Memory Care Community
Caregivers/CNA’s
AM/PM/NOC shifts available
On-Call/PT/FT positions available
Starts at $9.75/hour
Activity Assistant
AM/PM shifts available
PT position available
Starts at $10.50/hour
Dishwasher/Servers/Kitchen Helper
AM/PM shifts available
PT positions available
Starts at $9.10 - $9.40/hour
On the job training provided!
Apply in person at
Atria Hillsdale
2883 S. Norfolk Street
San Mateo, CA 94403
650-378-3000
www.atriahillsdale.com
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CASHIER - PT/FT, will train. Apply at
AM/PM @ 470 Ralston Ave., Belmont.
110 Employment
CHILD CARE / NANNY-
Part time, two days per week, 8:30 to
5:30pm, plus occasional babysitting
for two kids, ages 4 and 6.5. Position
is in Belmont. Watch kids at home,
and also transport them to school if
necessary.
Requires reliability, experience with
similarly aged kids, driver’s license,
car and clean driving record.
Please call (650)303-6735.
Limo Driver, Wanted, full time, paid
weekly, between $500 and $700,
(650)921-2071
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
110 Employment
CRYSTAL CLEANING
CENTER
San Mateo, CA
Customer Service/Seamstress;
Are you…..Dependable,
friendly, detail oriented,
willing to learn new skills?
Do you have….Good English skills, a
desire for steady employment and
employment benefits?
Immediate openings for customer
service/seamstress.
If you possess the above
qualities, please call for an
Appointment: (650)342-6978
DAYCARE -
EXPERIENCED DAYCARE Assistant for
fast paced environment. Working with In-
fant & Toddlers. P/T must be flexible
CPR cert., fingerprinting a must.
(650)245-6950
23 Tuesday • April 1, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
EVENT MARKETING SALES
Join the Daily Journal Event marketing
team as a Sales and Business Development
Specialist. Duties include sales and
customer service of event sponsorships,
partners, exhibitors and more. Interface
and interact with local businesses to
enlist participants at the Daily Journal’s
ever expanding inventory of community
events such as the Senior Showcase,
Family Resource Fair, Job Fairs, and
more. You will also be part of the project
management process. But first and
foremost, we will rely on you for sales
and business development.
This is one of the fastest areas of the
Daily Journal, and we are looking to grow
the team.
Must have a successful track record of
sales and business development.
TELEMARKETING/INSIDE SALES
We are looking for a telemarketing whiz,
who can cold call without hesitation and
close sales over the phone. Experience
preferred. Must have superior verbal,
phone and written communication skills.
Computer proficiency is also required.
Self-management and strong business
intelligence also a must.
To apply for either position,
please send info to
jerry@smdailyjournal.com or call
650-344-5200.
The Daily Journal seeks
two sales professionals
for the following positions:
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
HELP WANTED
SALES
110 Employment
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
NOW HIRING
Kitchen Staff &
Housekeeping Staff
$9.00 per hr.
Apply in Person at or
email resume to
info@greenhillsretirement.com
Marymount Greenhills
Retirement Center
1201 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)742-9150
No experience necessary
DOJ/FBI Clearance required
127 Elderly Care
FAMILY RESOURCE
GUIDE
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.
Every Tuesday & Weekend
Look for it in today’s paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 526173
AMENDED ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE
FOR CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Michelle E. Castaneda
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Michelle E. Castaneda filed a
petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
a) Present name: Lorenzo Joel Fortino
Castaneda
a) Propsed Name: Lorenzojoel Tino Mar-
tinez
b) Present name: Jannette Estrella Cas-
taneda
b) Propsed Name: Estrella Isabella Marti-
nez
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on April 30,
2014 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room, at 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 02/25/ 2014
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 02/25/2014
(Published, 03/18/14, 03/25/2014,
04/01/2014, 04/08/2014)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259906
The following person is doing business
as: 1) San Francisco Organizing Project,
2) Peninsula Interfaith Action 3215 Cesar
Chavez St., SAN FRANCISCO, CA
94110 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: San Francisco Organizing
Project/Peninsula Interfaith Action, CA.
The business is conducted by a Corpora-
tion. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
01/01/2014.
/s/ Erika Katske /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/06/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/11/14, 03/18/14, 03/25/14, 04/01/14).
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 526915
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Austin Kayser
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Austin Kayser filed a petition
with this court for a decree changing
name as follows:
Present name: Austin Kayser-Hall
Propsed Name: Austin Kayser
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on May 1, 2014
at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room, at 400 County
Center, Redwood City, CA 94063. A
copy of this Order to Show Cause shall
be published at least once each week for
four successive weeks prior to the date
set for hearing on the petition in the fol-
lowing newspaper of general circulation:
Daily Journal
Filed: 03/11/ 2014
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 03/04/2014
(Published, 03/18/14, 03/25/2014,
04/01/2014, 04/08/2014)
CASE# CIV 527017
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Hoami Viet Ngo
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Hoami Viet Ngo filed a petition
with this court for a decree changing
name as follows:
Present name: Hoami Viet Ngo
Propsed Name: Emily Hoami Ngo Chu
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on May 6, 2014
at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room, at 400 County
Center, Redwood City, CA 94063. A
copy of this Order to Show Cause shall
be published at least once each week for
four successive weeks prior to the date
set for hearing on the petition in the fol-
lowing newspaper of general circulation:
Daily Journal
Filed: 03/11/ 2014
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 03/04/2014
(Published, 03/18/14, 03/25/2014,
04/01/2014, 04/08/2014)
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 527019
AMENDED ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE
FOR CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Barbara Marie Compton-Erhard
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Michelle E. Castaneda filed a
petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Barbara Marie Compton-
Erhard
Propsed Name: Barbara Marie Erhard
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on May 1, 2014
at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room, at 400 County
Center, Redwood City, CA 94063. A
copy of this Order to Show Cause shall
be published at least once each week for
four successive weeks prior to the date
set for hearing on the petition in the fol-
lowing newspaper of general circulation:
Daily Journal
Filed: 03/11/ 2014
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 03/10/2014
(Published, 03/18/14, 03/25/2014,
04/01/2014, 04/08/2014)
COUNTY OF
SAN MATEO
DEPARTMENT
OF PUBLIC WORKS
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIV-
EN that the County of San
Mateo, State of California,
is issuing a
REQUEST FOR
QUALIFICATIONS
for
Fire Protection
Engineering Consultant
Services 2014-003
Proposals must be submit-
ted to:
County of San Mateo
DEPARTMENT
OF PUBLIC WORKS
Attn: Douglas R. Koenig
Deputy Director
Public Works
555 County Center
5th Floor
Redwood City, CA 94063
By 4:00 P.M. PDT on
FRIDAY, MAY 2, 2014
PROPOSALS WILL NOT
BE ACCEPTED AFTER
THIS DATE AND TIME
Complete “Request for
Qualifications” documenta-
tion can be found at:
http://www.co.sanmateo.ca.
us/portal/site/publicworks/
under “Projects Out to Bid”
4/1, 4/8/14
CNS-2605612#
SAN MATEO DAILY
JOURNAL
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259920
The following person is doing business
as: Edible Arrangements, 1866 S. Nor-
folk St., San Mateo, CA 94402 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Law-
rence Acquisitions Inc, CA. The business
is conducted by a Corporation. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Jasn Benjamin /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/07/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/11/14, 03/18/14, 03/25/14, 04/01/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259921
The following person is doing business
as: Edible Arrangements, 390 El Camino
Real, #E Belmont, CA 94002 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Law-
rence Acquisitions Inc, CA. The business
is conducted by a Corporation. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Jasn Benjamin /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/07/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/11/14, 03/18/14, 03/25/14, 04/01/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259923
The following person is doing business
as: Pack A Punch, 1404 Vancover Ave.,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Culmini,
Inc., CA. The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Constantia Petrou /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/07/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/11/14, 03/18/14, 03/25/14, 04/01/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259824
The following person is doing business
as: WWNBB, 1042 Grand Ave., SOUTH
SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Sa-
muele Palazzi, Same Address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Samuele Palazzi /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/28/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/11/14, 03/18/14, 03/25/14, 04/01/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259752
The following person is doing business
as: Scandia Restaurant & Bar, 742 Pol-
hemus Rd. SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Preben Mortensen, 2991 Longview Dr.,
San Bruno, CA 94066. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Preben Mortensen/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/24/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/18/14, 03/25/14, 04/01/14, 04/08/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259652
The following person is doing business
as: Good Life Business Management,
2238 Lincoln St., EAST PALO ALTO, CA
94303 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Doris Nash, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on Decem-
ber 6. 2013.
/s/ Doris Nashn/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/14/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/18/14, 03/25/14, 04/01/14, 04/08/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #25908
The following person is doing business
as: Infinite Auto Group, 1327 Marster
Rd., BURLINGAME, CA 94011 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Enri-
que Julio Pelaez, Jr., 22211, Montgom-
ery St., Hayward, CA 94541. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on .
/s/ Enrique Julio Pelaez, Jr./
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/06/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/18/14, 03/25/14, 04/01/14, 04/08/14).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #260063
The following person is doing business
as: Grewalz Limo, 1301 W. Hillsdale
Blvd. #401, SAN MATEO, CA94403 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Harjinder Singh, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on .
/s/ Harjinder Singh /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/17/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/18/14, 03/25/14, 04/01/14, 04/08/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259955
The following person is doing business
as: Karson Wealth Management, 1201
Howard Ave. Ste. 103, BURLINGAME,
CA 94010 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Paul Karson, 605 Burlin-
game Ave., BURLINGAME, CA 94010.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on.
/s/ Paul Karson /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/11/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/25/14, 04/01/14, 04/08/14, 04/15/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #260111
The following person is doing business
as: Eco Green Cleaning Services, 2901
S. El Camino Real #310 SAN MATEO,
CA 94403 is hereby registered by the
following owner: Luz Belen Leyva, same
address. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ Luz Belen Leyva /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/20/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/25/14, 04/01/14, 04/08/14, 04/15/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #260176
The following person is doing business
as: The Gluten Free Wife Bakery, 1293
Rosita Rd., PACIFICA, CA 94044 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Michelle Belanger, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on Aug. 2013.
/s/ Michelle Belanger /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/25/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/01/14, 04/08/14, 04/15/14, 04/22/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #260225
The following person is doing business
as: Primary Apps, 100 Meadowood Dr.,
PORTOLA VALLEY, CA 94028 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Pri-
mary Apps, LLC, CA. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Merijane Lee /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/28/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/01/14, 04/08/14, 04/15/14, 04/22/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259867
The following person is doing business
as: Choice Consulting, 1535 Maddux Dr.,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94061 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Chris-
tine Choi, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Christine Choi /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/04/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/01/14, 04/08/14, 04/15/14, 04/22/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259867
The following person is doing business
as: ABC Hauling and Junk Removal
Company, 2203 Hasting Dr. #5, BEL-
MONT, CA 94002 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Rustam Kholov
same address, and Julian Bradford,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by a General Partnership. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Rustam Kholov /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/31/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/01/14, 04/08/14, 04/15/14, 04/22/14).
24
Tuesday • April 1, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
203 Public Notices
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Alan Chung Cheung Wong
Case Number: 124190
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: Alan Chung Cheung
Wong. A Petition for Probate has been
filed by James Wong & Irene Wong in
the Superior Court of California, County
of San Mateo. The Petition for Probate
requests that James Wong & Irene Wong
be appointed as personal representative
to administer the estate of the decedent.
The petition requests the decedent’s will
and codicils, if any, be admitted to pro-
bate. The will and any codicils are availa-
ble of examination in the file kept by the
court
The petition requests authority to admin-
ister the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This au-
thority will allow the personal representa-
tive to take many actions without obtain-
ing court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an ob-
jection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: April 11, 2014 at
9:00 a.m., Dept. 28, Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo, 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063.
If you object to the granting of the peti-
tion, you should appear at the hearing
and state your objections or file written
objections with the court before the hear-
ing. Your appearance may be in person
or by your attorney.
If you are a creditor or a contingent cred-
itor of the decedent, you must file your
claim with the court and mail a copy to
the personal representative appointed by
the court within the later of either (1) four
months from the date of first issuance of
letters to a general personal representa-
tive, as defined in section 58(b) of the
California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days
from the date of mailing or personal de-
livery to you of a notice under section
9052 of the California Probate Code.
Other California statutes and legal au-
thority may affect your rights as a cred-
itor. You may want to consult with an at-
torney knowledgeable in California law.
You may examine the file kept by the
court. If you are a person interested in
the estate, you may file with the court a
Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
Shawn R. Parr 206616
Parr Law Group
1625 The Alameda, Ste 900
SAN JOSE, CA 95126
(408)267-4500
Dated: Mar. 24, 2014
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on March 26, April 1, 7, 2014.
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF
THE USE OF A FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT #M-256242
The following person is abandoning the
use of the fictitious business name: Town
Motel, 3211 Geneva Ave., DALY CITY,
CA 94014. The fictitious business name
was filed on 06/07/2013 in the county of
San Mateo. The business was conducted
by: Ona Properties, Inc., CA. The busi-
ness was conducted by a Corporation.
/s/ Arthur W. Norkas /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 03/04/2014. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 03/11/2014,
03/18/2014, 03/25/2014, 04/01/2014).
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Marjorie A. Culp
Case Number: 124334
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: Marjorie A. Culp. A Peti-
tion for Probate has been filed by Patricia
A. Culp in the Superior Court of Califor-
nia, County of San Mateo. The Petition
for Probate requests that Patricia A.
Culp be appointed as personal represen-
tative to administer the estate of the de-
cedent.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ister the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This au-
thority will allow the personal representa-
tive to take many actions without obtain-
ing court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
203 Public Notices
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an ob-
jection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: April 30, 2014 at
9:00 a.m., Dept. 28, Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo, 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063.
If you object to the granting of the peti-
tion, you should appear at the hearing
and state your objections or file written
objections with the court before the hear-
ing. Your appearance may be in person
or by your attorney.
If you are a creditor or a contingent cred-
itor of the decedent, you must file your
claim with the court and mail a copy to
the personal representative appointed by
the court within the later of either (1) four
months from the date of first issuance of
letters to a general personal representa-
tive, as defined in section 58(b) of the
California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days
from the date of mailing or personal de-
livery to you of a notice under section
9052 of the California Probate Code.
Other California statutes and legal au-
thority may affect your rights as a cred-
itor. You may want to consult with an at-
torney knowledgeable in California law.
You may examine the file kept by the
court. If you are a person interested in
the estate, you may file with the court a
Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Petitioner:
Patricia A. Culp
8362 Outlook Ave.
OAKLAND, CA 94605
(415)378-6381
Dated: Feb. 20, 2014
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on April 1, 8, 15, 2014.
210 Lost & Found
FOUND: KEYS (3) on ring with 49'ers
belt clip. One is car key to a Honda.
Found in Home Depot parking lot in San
Carlos on Sunday 2/23/14. Call 650 490-
0921 - Leave message if no answer.
FOUND: RING Silver color ring found
on 1/7/2014 in Burlingame. Parking Lot
M (next to Dethrone). Brand inscribed.
Gary @ (650)347-2301
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Cente, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST GOLD WATCH - with brown lizard
strap. Unique design. REWARD! Call
(650)326-2772.
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
210 Lost & Found
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
Books
16 BOOKS on History of WWII Excellent
condition. $95 all obo, (650)345-5502
50 SHADES of Grey Trilogy, Excellent
Condition $25. (650)615-0256
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
RICHARD NORTH Patterson 5 Hard-
back Books @$3 each (650)341-1861
TRAVIS MCGEE (Wikipedia) best mys-
teries 18 classic paperbacks for $25.
Steve (650) 518-6614
295 Art
"AMERICAN GRIZZLEY" limited print by
Michael Coleman. Signed & numbered.
Professionally framed 22x25.. $99. 650-
654-9252
5 prints, nude figures, 14” x 18”, signed
Andrea Medina, 1980s. $40/all. 650-345-
3277
6 CLASSIC landscape art pictures,
28”x38” glass frame. $15 each OBO.
Must see to appreciate. SOLD!
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide, wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
POSTER, LINCOLN, advertising Honest
Ale, old stock, green and black color.
$15. (650)348-5169
296 Appliances
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
DISHWASHER SAMSUNG Good Condi-
tion fairly new $100.00. (650)291-9104
HOOD, G.E. Good condition, clean,
white.. $30. (650)348-5169
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MAYTAG WALL oven, 24”x24”x24”, ex-
cellent condition, $50 obo, SOLD!
MINI-FRIG NEW used i week paid $150.
Sell $75.00 650 697 7862
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
ROTISSERIE GE, IN-door or out door,
Holds large turkey 24” wide, Like new,
$80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
THERMADOR WHITE glass gas cook-
top. 36 inch Good working condition.
$95. 650-322-9598
297 Bicycles
GIRLS BIKE 18” Pink, Looks New, Hard-
ly Used $80 (650)293-7313
SCHWINN 20” Boy’s Bike, Good Condi-
tion $40 (650)756-9516
298 Collectibles
1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 VINTAGE Light Bulbs circa 1905. Edi-
son Mazda Lamps. Both still working -
$50 (650)-762-6048
4 NOLAN RYAN - Uncut Sheets, Rare
Gold Cards $90 (650)365-3987
400 YEARBOOKS - Sports Illustrated
Sports Book 70-90’s $90 all (650)365-
3987
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
BOX OF 2000 Sports Cards, 1997-2004
years, $20 (650)592-2648
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
FRAMED 19X15 BARBIE USPS Post-
mark picture Gallery First Day of issue
1960. Limited edition $85.
FRANKLIN MINT Thimble collection with
display rack. $55. 650-291-4779
HO TRAIN parts including engines, box-
cars, tankers, tracks, transformers, etc.
$75 Call 650-571-6295
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MEMORABILIA CARD COLLECTION,
large collection, Marilyn Monroe, James
Dean, John Wayne and hundreds more.
$3,300/obo.. Over 50% off
(650)319-5334.
SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276
298 Collectibles
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
UNIQUE, FRAMED to display, original
Nevada slot machine glass plate. One of
a kind. $50. 650-762-6048
299 Computers
1982 TEXAS Instruments TI-99/4A com-
puter, new condition, complete accesso-
ries, original box. $99. (650)676-0974
300 Toys
14 HOTWHEELS - Redline, 32
Ford/Mustang/Corv. $90 all (650)365-
3987
‘66 CHEVELLE TOY CAR, Blue collecti-
ble. $12. (415)337-1690
BARBIE DOLLHOUSE 3-Story, $35.
(650)558-8142
PILGRIM DOLLS, 15” boy & girl, new,
from Harvest Festival, adorable $25 650-
345-3277
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
SMALL WOOD dollhouse 4 furnished
rooms. $35 650-558-8142
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
SOLD!
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL table lamps, (2),
shades need to be redone. Free. Call
(650)593-7001
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL/ARCADE Coffee
Grinder. $80. 650-596-0513
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN Olde Brooklyn lan-
terns, battery operated, safe, new in box,
$100, (650)726-1037
ANTIQUE OLD Copper Wash Tub, 30 x
12 x 13 with handles, $65 (650)591-3313
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” x 40” , 3 drawers, Display case, bev-
elled glass, $700. (650)766-3024
OLD VINTAGE Wooden “Sea Captains
Tool Chest” 35 x 16 x 16, $65 (650)591-
3313
STERLING SILVER loving cup 10" circa
with walnut base 1912 $65
(650)520-3425
303 Electronics
27” SONY TRINITRON TV - great condi-
tion, rarely used, includes remote, not flat
screen, $55., (650)357-7484
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
AUTO TOP hoist still in box
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
BATTERY CHARGER for Household
batteries $9, 650-595-3933
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
BLACKBERRY PHONE good condition
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
COMPACT PLAYER - Digital audio DVD
video/CD music never used in box.
$50.00
COMPUTER MONITOR Compaq 18" for
only $18, 650-595-3933
DVD PLAYER, $25. Call (650)558-0206
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
IPHONE GOOD condition $99.00 or best
offer (650)493-9993
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
PANASONIC 36" STEREO color TV re-
mote ex/cond. (650)992-4544
PHILLIPS ENERGY STAR 20” color TV
with remote. Good condition, $20
(650)888-0129
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644
CHAIRS, WITH Chrome Frame, Brown
Vinyl seats $15.00 each. (650)726-5549
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet, 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
304 Furniture
DINETTE SET, round 42" glass table,
with 4 chairs, pick up Foster City. Free.
(650)578-9045
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DISPLAY CABINET 72”x 21” x39 1/2”
High Top Display, 2 shelves in rear $99
(650)591-3313
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
DURALINER ROCKING CHAIR, Maple
Finish, Cream Cushion w matching otto-
man $70 (650)583-4943.
EZ CHAIR, large, $15. Call
(650)558-0206
FLAT TOP DESK, $35.. Call
(650)558-0206
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 metal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
KITCHEN TABLE, tall $65. 3'x3'x3' ex-
tends to 4' long Four chairs $65. 622-
6695
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MIRROR, SOLID OAK. 30" x 19 1/2",
curved edges; beautiful. $85.00 OBO.
Linda 650 366-2135.
MIRRORS, large, $25. Call
(650)558-0206
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OAK BOOKCASE, 30"x30" x12". $25.
(650)726-6429
OUTDOOR WOOD SCREEN - NEW $80
OBO RETAIL $130 (650)873-8167
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41” in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 in-
ches. (650)592-2648.
QUEEN SIZE Mattress Box Spring
$100.00 (650)291-9104
RECLINER CHAIR brown leather exc/
cond. $50. (650)992-4544
RECLINER LA-Z-BOY Dark green print
fabric, medium size. $65. (650)343-8206
ROCKING CHAIR Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden,
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
SEWING TABLE, folding, $20. Call
(650)558-0206
SHELVING UNIT from IKEA interior
metal, glass nice condition $50/obo.
(650)589-8348
SMALL VANITY chair with stool and mir-
ror $99. (650)622-6695
SOFA - excelleNT condition. 8 ft neutral
color $99 OBO (650)345-5644
SOFA SET of two Casual style, Good
condition 62" long. $85.00 Hardly used..
650 697 7862
SOLID WOOD BOOKCASE 33” x 78”
with flip bar ask $75 obo (650)743-4274
SOLID WOOD oak desk $50 (650)622-
6695
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
TABLE 4X4X4. Painted top $40
(650)622-6695
TEA/ UTILITY CART, $15. (650)573-
7035, (650)504-6057
TEAK CABINET 28"x32", used for ster-
eo equipment $25. (650)726-6429
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
WALL CLOCK - 31 day windup, 26 “
long, $99 (650)592-2648
WALNUT CHEST, small (4 drawer with
upper bookcase $50. (650)726-6429
304 Furniture
WALNUT CABINET T/V glass door/
drawers on roller 50"W x58"H ex/co.$60.
(650)992-4544
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
WOOD - wall Unit - 30" long x 6' tall x
17.5" deep. $90. (650)631-9311
WOOD BOOKCASE unit - good condi-
tion $65.00 (650)504-6058
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Three avail-
able, (650)345-5502
BBQ, WEBER, GoAnywhere, unused,
plated steel grates, portable, rust resist-
ant, w/charcoal, $50. (650)578-9208
CALIFORNIA KING WHITE BEDDING,
immaculate, 2 each: Pillow covers,
shams, 1 spread/ cover, washable $25.
(650)578-9208
COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037
COOKING POTS(2) stainless steel, tem-
perature-resistent handles, 21/2 & 4 gal.
$5 for both. (650) 574-3229.
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
MANGLE-SIMPLEX FLOOR model,
Working, $20 (650)344-6565
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good
condition $25., SOLD!
QUEENSIZE BEDSPREAD w/2 Pillow
Shams (print) $30.00 (650)341-1861
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
SINGER ELECTRONIC sewing machine
model #9022. Cord, foot controller
included. $99 O.B.O. (650)274-9601 or
(650)468-6884
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VACUMN EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
307 Jewelry & Clothing
COSTUME JEWELRY Earrings $25.00
Call: 650-368-0748
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
308 Tools
13" SCROLL saw $ 40. (650)573-5269
BLACK & Decker 17" Electric Hedge
Trimmer. Like new. $20. 650-326-2235.
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 1/2" drill press $40.50.
(650)573-5269
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 6" bench grinder $40.
(650)573-5269
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
CRAFTSMAN BELT & disc sander $99.
(650)573-5269
CRAFTSMAN CIRCULAR skill saw7/4
blade heavy duty new in box. $60.
(650)992-4544
CRAFTSMAN10" TABLE saw & stand,
$99. (650)573-5269
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)851-0878
25 Tuesday • April 1, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Bart’s mom
6 Pooch in
whodunits
10 Super-fast fliers,
briefly
14 Multiple choice
options
15 Tater
16 Poi base
17 City on Spain’s
Southwestern
coast
18 School semester
19 Some Neruda
poems
20 Collegian’s
specialty
23 Take home the
trophy
24 ’70s-’80s TV role
for Robin
Williams
25 Bawl out
28 Make illegal
29 “Love __ Madly”:
Doors hit
30 Actor Wallach
31 “I __ sorry”
34 TV athletic award
37 Surgical beam
39 Retire
42 Practical joke
43 Prince William’s
alma mater
44 Chooses, with
“for”
45 Escape
46 Sound system
part
48 Lid for a lad
50 Rio Grande city
52 City north of
Pittsburgh
54 Tank or tee
57 Kitchen
appliance
60 Turn over
62 Reagan
secretary of state
63 Megastars
64 In excess of
65 Footwear insert
66 Former midsize
Pontiac named
for a native
Mexican
67 Cancún cash
68 Tiff
69 Skeptical
DOWN
1 Colorful parrot
2 Counters with
beads
3 Flying ’50s film
monster
4 Graph paper
design
5 Itchy skin
inflammation
6 Up and about
7 Bit of dust
8 Gang land
9 Look up to
10 Casual vodka
order
11 Prepares for the
cattle drive
12 Three, in Turin
13 Distress letters
21 “Water Lilies”
painter Claude
22 Ranks below
marquises
26 Fully attentive
27 Loses energy
28 Timely benefit
29 Source of a shot
31 Orchard tree
32 Work on a wall
33 Cattle drive
concerns
35 Ladder lead-in
36 Greenhouse
container
38 Physics particle
40 Decree in
imperial Russia
41 Practical joke
47 Coffeehouse
orders
49 Old reception aid
51 Last Olds made
52 Writer Jong
53 “Correctomundo!”
54 Govt. security
55 One with an
unsettling look
56 Irritating
58 One may be on a
woodpile
59 Wood-shaping
tool
60 Badge bearer
61 One who
succumbed to a
serpent
By Gail Grabowski and Bruce Venzke
(c)2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
04/01/14
04/01/14
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
308 Tools
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, SOLD!
WHEELBARROW. BRAND new, never
used. Wood handles. $50 or best offer.
(650) 595-4617
309 Office Equipment
CANON ALL in One Photo Printer PIX-
MA MP620 Never used. In original box
$150 (650)477-2177
CANON COPIER, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
PANASONIC FAX machine, works
great, $20. (650-578-9045)
310 Misc. For Sale
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55.
(650)269-3712
CHEESESET 6 small and 1 large plate
Italian design never used Ceramica Cas-
tellania $25. (650)644-9027
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER selectric II
good condition, needs ribbon (type
needed attached) $35 San Bruno
(650)588-1946
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GOURMET SET for cooking on your ta-
ble. European style. $15 (650)644-9027
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
GREEN CERAMIC flower pot w/ 15
Different succulents, $20.(650)952-4354
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HONEYWELL HEPA Filter $99
(650)622-6695
310 Misc. For Sale
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15.,
(650)345-3840
KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute cannon
$30. (650)726-1037
LITTLE PLAYMATE by IGLOO 10"x10",
cooler includes icepak. $20
(650)574-3229
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MERITAGE PICNIC Time Wine and
Cheese Tote - new black $45
(650)644-9027
NALGENE WATER bottle,
$5; new aluminum btl $3 650-595-3933
NATIVITY SET, new, beautiful, ceramic,
gold-trimmed, 11-pc.,.asking: $50.
Call: 650-345-3277 /message
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$35. (650)873-8167
WICKER PICNIC basket, mint condition,
handles, light weight, pale tan color.
$10.00 (650)578-9208
311 Musical Instruments
BALDWIN GRAND PIANO, 6 foot, ex-
cellent condition, $8,500/obo. Call
(510)784-2598
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
311 Musical Instruments
KAMAKA CONCERT sized Ukelele,
w/friction tuners, solid Koa wood body,
made in Hawaii, 2007 great tone, excel-
lent condition, w/ normal wear & tear.
$850. (650)342-5004
WURLITZER PIANO, console, 40” high,
light brown, good condition. $490.
(650)593-7001
312 Pets & Animals
AQUARIUM,” MARINA Cool 10”, 2.65
gallons, new pump. $20. (650)591-1500
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate de-
sign - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
GECKO GLASS case 10 gal.with heat
pad, thermometer, Wheeled stand if
needed $20. (650)591-1500
INDOLENT, AMIABLE Toyger cat,
brown. Good health. Free. Call
(650)-364-3403.
PET TAXI, never used 20 by 14 by 15
inches, medium dog size $20. SOLD!
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
316 Clothes
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LARRY LEVINE Women's Hooded down
jacket. Medium. Scarlet. Good as new.
Asking $40 OBO (650)888-0129
LEATHER JACKET, brown bomber, with
pockets.Sz XL, $88. (415)337-1690
MANS DENIM Jacket, XL HD fabric,
metal buttons only $15 650-595-3933
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
MINK JACKET faux, hip length, satin lin-
ing. Looks feels real. Perfect condition
$99 OBO 650-349-6969
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red, Reg. price $200 sell-
ing for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, magenta, with shawl like new $40
obo (650)349-6059
VELVET DRAPE, 100% cotton, new
beautiful burgundy 82"X52" W/6"hems:
$45 (415)585-3622
VINTAGE 1970’S GRECIAN MADE
DRESS SIZE 6-8, $35 (650)873-8167
WESTERN HAT brown color large size 7
5/8 never worn weatherproof $50 obo
(650)591-6842
WHITE LACE 1880’s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
317 Building Materials
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink: - $65. (650)348-6955
BRAND NEW Millgard window + frame -
$85. (650)348-6955
318 Sports Equipment
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
BAMBOO FLY rod 9 ft 2 piece good
condition South Bend brand. $50
(650)591-6842
BASEBALLS & Softballs, 4 baseballs 2
softballs, only $6 650-595-3933
BASKETBALL HOOP, free standing
$100. New Costco $279. (650)291-9104
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50. (650)637-
0930
BUCKET OF 260 golf balls, $25.
(650)339-3195
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
GOTT 10-GAL beverage cooler $20.
(650)345-3840
KIDS 20" mongoose mountain bike 6
speeds front wheel shock good condition
asking $65 (650)574-7743
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 (650)520-3425
POWER PLUS Exercise Machine $99
(650)368-3037
SCHWINN 26" man's bike with balloon
tires $75 like new SOLD!
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
WOMAN'S BOWLING ball, 12 lbs, "Lin-
da", with size 7 shoes and bag, $15.
(650)578-9045
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955
322 Garage Sales
CAPUCHINO HS
GREAT
GARAGE SALE
APRIL 12, 8 am - 2 pm
1501 Magnolia, San Bruno
Enter Main Parking Lot from
Millwood Avenue to
Performing Arts Courtyard
Great deals for a great
cause, all to benefit student
programs
at Capuchino HS
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $50.,
(650)342-8436
REMINGTON ELECTRIC lawn mower,
$40. (650)355-2996
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
CLASSICAL YASHICA camera
in leather case $25. (650)644-9027
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $79
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
PRIDE MECHANICAL Lift Chair, hardly
used. Paid $950. Asking $350 orb est of-
fer. (650)400-7435
SWIFT ORTHOPEDIC BED, flawless ex-
cellent condition. Queen size. Adjustable.
Originally paid $4,000. Yours for only
$500. (650)343-8206
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WHEEL CHAIR asking $75 OBO
(650)834-2583
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
CIMPLER
REAL ESTATE
Cimpler Real Estate - Reinventing
Home Buying
To Buy Smarter Call Artur Urbanski,
Broker/Owner
(650)401-7278
533 Airport Blvd, 4th Flr, Burlingame
www.cimpler.com
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedrooms, new carpets, new granite
counters, dishwasher, balcony, covered
carports, storage, pool, no pets.
(650)591-4046.
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $40
We’ll run it
‘til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
620 Automobiles
DODGE ‘99 Van, 391 Posi, 200 Hp V-6,
22” Wheels, 2 24’ Ladders, 2015 Tags,
$3,500 OBO (650)481-5296
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
OLDSMOBILE ‘99 Intrigue, green, 4
door sedan, 143K miles. $1,500.
(650)740-6007.
SUBARU ‘98 Outback Limited, 175K
miles, $5,500. Recent work. Mint condiit-
ton. High Car Fax, View at sharpcar.com
#126837 (415)999-4947
VOLVO ‘85 244 Turbo, automatic, very
rare! 74,700 original miles. New muffler,
new starter, new battery, tires have only
200 miles on it. $4,900. (650)726-8623.
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$6,500 /OBO (650)364-1374
VOLVO ‘85 244 Turbo, automatic, very
rare! 74,700 original miles. New muffler,
new starter, new battery, tires have only
200 miles on it. $4,900. (650)726-8623.
630 Trucks & SUV’s
FORD ‘98 EXPLORER 6 cylinder, 167K
miles, excellent condition, good tires,
good brakes, very dependable! $2000 or
best offer. Moving, must sell! Call
(650)274-4337
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $1,950/OBO,
(650)364-1374
DODGE ‘90 RAM PASSENGER VAN,
B-150, V-8, automatic, seats 8, good
condition, $1,700. (650)726-5276.
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $35. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35.,
(650)670-2888
670 Auto Service
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, 1
gray marine diesel manual $40
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
SNOW CHAIN cables made by Shur
Grip - brand new-never used. In the
original case. $25 650-654-9252.
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
680 Autos Wanted
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
26
Tuesday • April 1, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Appliance Repair
Cabinetry
Contractors
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
Concrete, decks, retaining walls,
fences, bricks, roof, gutters,
& drains.
Call David
(650)270-9586
Lic# 9/14544 Bonded & Insured
Cleaning
ANGELICA’S HOUSE
CLEANING & JANITORIAL
SERVICES
• House Cleaning • Move In/Out
Cleaning • Janitorial Services
• Handyman Services
$65 call or email for details
(650)918-0354
MyErrandServicesCA.com
Concrete
PROFESSIONAL
CONCRETE, MASONRY, &
REMODELING SERVICES
• Paving • Landscaping
• Demolition
(650)445-8444
Mobile (907)570-6555
State Lic. #B990810
Construction
Construction
DEVOE
CONSTRUCTION
Kitchen & Bath
Remodeling
Belmont, CA
(650) 318-3993
LEMUS CONSTRUCTION
(650)271-3955
Dry Rot • Decks • Fences
• Handyman • Painting
• Bath Remodels & much more
Based in N. Peninsula
Free Estimates ... Lic# 913461
MARIN CONSTRUCTION
Home Improvement Specialists
* custom decks * Framing * remodel-
ing * foundation Rep.*Dry Rot * Ter-
mite Rep * And Much More
Ask about our 20% signing and
senior discounts
(650)486-1298
O’SULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION
• New Construction,
• Remodeling,
• Kitchen/Bathrooms,
• Decks/ Fences
(650)589-0372
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596
THE VILLAGE HANDYMAN
Remodels • Framing
• Carpentry Stucco • Siding
• Dryrot • Painting
• Int./Ext. & Much More...
(650)701-6072
Call Joe Burich ... Free Estimates
Lic. #979435
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
INSIDE OUT ELECTRIC INC
Service Upgrades
Remodels / Repairs
The tradesman you will
trust and recommend
Lic# 808182
(650)515-1123
Gardening
KEEP YOUR LAWN
LOOKING GREEN
Time to Aerate your lawn
We also do seed/sod of lawns
Spring planting
Sprinklers and irrigation
Pressure washing
Call Robert
STERLING GARDENS
650-703-3831 Lic #751832
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGO’S FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
SLATER FLOORS
. Restore old floors to new
. Dustless Sanding
. Install new custom & refinished
hardwood floors
Licensed. Bonded. Insured
www.slaterfloors.com
(650) 593-3700
Showroom by appointment
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutter, Down Spouts,
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE
Since 1985
Repairs • Maintenance • Painting
Carpentry • Plumbing • Electrical
All Work Guaranteed
(650) 995-4385
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
PAYLESS
HANDYMAN
Kitchen & Bath remodling, Tile
work, Roofing, And Much More!
Free Estimates
(650)771-2432
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Landscaping
NATE LANDSCAPING
• Tree Service
• Pruning & Removal
• New Lawn • All concrete
• Ret. Wall • Pavers
• Yard clean-up & Haul
Free Estimate
(650)353-6554
Lic. #973081
SERVANDO ARRELLIN
The Garden Doctor
Landscaping & Demolition,
Fences, Interlocking Pavers,
Clean-ups, Hauling,
Retaining Walls
(650)771-2276
Lic# 36267
Painting
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
Plumbing
$89 TO CLEAN
ANY CLOGGED DRAIN!
SEWER PIPES
Installation of Trenchless Pipes,
Water Heaters, Faucets,
Toilets, Sinks, & Re-pipes
(650)461-0326
27 Tuesday • April 1, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Screens
DON’T SHARE
YOUR HOUSE
WITH BUGS!
We repair and install all types of
Window & Door Screens
Free Estimates
(650)299-9107
PENINSULA SCREEN SHOP
Mention this ad for 20% OFF!
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
• Entryways • Kitchens
• Decks • Bathrooms
• Tile Repair • Floors
• Grout Repair • Fireplaces
Call Mario Cubias for Free Estimates
(650)784-3079
Lic.# 955492
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
• BANKRUPTCY •
Huge credit card debit?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650-363-2600
This law firm is a debt relife agency
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Clothing
$5 CHARLEY'S
Sporting apparel from your
49ers, Giants & Warriors,
low prices, large selection.
450 W. San Bruno Ave.
San Bruno
(650)771-5614
Dental Services
ALBORZI, DDS, MDS, INC.
$500 OFF INVISALIGN TREATMENT
a clear alternative to braces even for
patients who have
been told that they were not invisalign
candidates
235 N SAN MATEO DR #300,
SAN MATEO
(650)342-4171
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
CROWNE PLAZA
Foster City-San Mateo
Champagne Sunday Brunch
Wedding, Event &
Meeting Facilities
(650) 295-6123
1221 Chess Drive Foster City
Hwy 92 at Foster City Blvd. Exit
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
PRIME STEAKS
SUPERB VALUE
BASHAMICHI
Steak & Seafood
1390 El Camino Real
Millbrae
www.bashamichirestaurant.com
Food
SEAFOOD FOR SALE
FRESH OFF THE BOAT
(650) 726-5727
Pillar Point Harbor:
1 Johnson Pier
Half Moon Bay
Oyster Point Marina
95 Harbor Master Rd..
South San Francisco
Financial
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
San Mateo , Redwood City,
Half Moon Bay
Call (650)579-1500
for simply better banking
unitedamericanbank.com
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WESTERN FURNITURE
Everything Marked Down !
601 El Camino Real
San Bruno, CA
Mon. - Sat. 10AM -7PM
Sunday Noon -6PM
We don't meet our competition,
we beat it !
Guns
PENINSULA GUNS
(650) 588-8886
Handguns.Shotguns.Rifles
Tactical and
Hunting Accessories
Buy.Sell.Trade
360 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
EYE EXAMINATIONS
579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
Insurance
AFFORDABLE
HEALTH INSURANCE
Personal & Professional Service
JOHN LANGRIDGE
(650) 854-8963
Bay Area Health Insurance Marketing
CA License 0C60215
a Diamond Certified Company
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
Jewelers
INTERSTATE
ALL BATTERY CENTER
570 El Camino Real #160
Redwood City
(650)839-6000
Watch batteries $8.99
including installation.
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy Coins, Jewelry, Watches,
Platinum, Diamonds.
Expert fine watch & jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave. Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
$29
ONE HOUR MASSAGE
(650)354-8010
1030 Curtis St #203,
Menlo Park
ACUHEALTH
Best Asian Body Massage
$28/hr
Free Parking
(650)692-1989
1838 El Camino #103, Burlingame
sites.google.com/site/acuhealthSFbay
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$45 per Hour
Present ad for special price
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
HEALING MASSAGE
• Newly remodeled
• New Masseuse
$40/Hr. Special
Expires May 1st
2305-A Carlos St.,
Moss Beach
(Cash Only)
851 Cherry Ave. #29, San Bruno
in Bayhill Shopping Center
Open 7 Days 10:30am- 10:30pm
650. 737. 0788
Foot Massage $19.99/hr
ComboMassage $29.99/hr
Free Sauna (with this Ad)
Body Massage $39.99/hr
Hot StoneMassage $49.99/hr
GRAND OPENING
OSETRA WELLNESS
MASSAGE THERAPY
Prenatal, Reiki, Energy
$20 OFF your First Treatment
(not valid with other promotions)
(650)212-2966
1730 S. Amphlett Blvd. #206
San Mateo
osetrawellness.com
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
Pet Services
CATS, DOGS,
POCKET PETS
Mid-Peninsula Animal Hospital
Free New Client Exam
(650) 325-5671
www.midpen.com
Open Nights & Weekends
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Equity based direct lender
Homes • Multi-family
Mixed-use • Commercial
Good or Bad Credit
Purchase / Refinance/
Cash Out
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Bureau of Real Estate
Retirement
INDEPENDENT LIVING, assisted liv-
ing, and Memory Care. full time R.N.
Please call us at (650)742-9150 to
schedule a tour, to pursue your life-
long dream.
Marymount Greenhills
Retirement Center
1201 Broadway
Millbrae, Ca 94030
www.greenhillsretirement.com
Schools
HILLSIDE CHRISTIAN
ACADEMY
Where every child is a gift from God
K-8
High Academic Standards
Small Class Size
South San Francisco
(650)588-6860
ww.hillsidechristian.com
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living Care
located in Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
Burlingame Villa
Short Term Stays
Dementia & Alzheimers Care
Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
NAZARETH VISTA
Best Kept Secret in Town !
Independent Living, Assisted Living
and Skilled Nursing Care.
Daily Tours/Complimentary Lunch
650.591.2008
900 Sixth Avenue
Belmont, CA 94002
crd@belmontvista.com
www.nazarethhealthcare.com
Travel
FIGONE TRAVEL
GROUP
(650) 595-7750
www.cruisemarketplace.com
Cruises • Land & Family vacations
Personalized & Experienced
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1939
1495 Laurel St. SAN CARLOS
CST#100209-10
28
Tuesday • April 1, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL

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