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1.

1 INTRODUCTION
In todays competitive market companies are aware that their work force must be
properly trained and fully competent over a range of tasks with any given work discipline.
Success of any organization depends largely on its competent employees and the extent to which
the knowledge is shared in that organization. Competency mapping is a process through which
one assesses and determines ones strengths as an individual worker.
Competency Mapping is a way of assessing the strengths and weaknesses of a worker or
organization. It's about identifying a person's job skills and strengths in areas like teamwork,
leadership, and decision-making. Large organizations may use some form of this technique to
understand how to best use each worker or how to combine the strengths of different employees
to produce the highest quality work. Individuals may also find that this type of assessment can
help them prepare for a career change or advance in a specific job field.
Competencies are not "fixed"they can usually be developed with effort and support
(though some are harder to develop than others). Employees and their managers together can
identify which competencies would be most helpful to work on to improve the employees
effectiveness. They can then integrate that into a learning plan that may include on-the-job
experience, classroom training, or other developmental activities.
Any underlying characteristic required for performing a given task, activity or role
successfully can be considered as competency. Competency may take the following forms:
Knowledge: this refers to information and learning resting in a person,
Skill: This refers to a persons ability to perform a certain task.
Other characteristics of an individual including
Motives: Motives are emotions, desires, physiological needs, or similar impulses that
prompt action.
Traits: It is physical characteristics and consistent responses to situations or information.
Self-Concept and Values: This refers to a persons attitudes, values, or self-image. An
example is self-confidence, a persons belief that he or she can be successful in a given
situation.

1.2 AN INTRODUCTION TO THE TERM COMPETENCY:


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Competence means a skill and the standard of performance reached


Competency refers to the behavior by which it is achieved
COMPETENCE
1. Skill based
2. Standard attained
3. What is measured?

COMPETENCY
Behavior based
Manner of behavior
How the standard are achieved

The interface between the competence and competency:


A competence refers to the range of skills which are satisfactorily performed and also
embodies the capacity to transfers skills and abilities from one area to another.
Competencies refer to the behavior adopted in competent performance.
1.3 DEFINITIONS OF COMPETENCY MAPPING
A capacity that exists in a person that leads to behaviour that meets the job demands within
parameters of organizational environment, and that, in turn brings about desired results.
- Boyatzis (1982)
Competencies are generic knowledge, motive, trait, social role or a skill of a person linked to
superior performance on the job.
- Hayes (1979)
Competencies are personal characteristics that contribute to effective managerial performance.
- Albanese (1989)
A competency mapping is a set of skills, related knowledge and attributes that allow an
individual to successfully perform a task or an activity with a specific function or job.
-UNIDO (2002)
Competency mapping is skills and behavior that organization expect their staff to practice in
work.
-RANKIN (2000)
COMPETENCY: A person related concept that refers to the dimensions of behavior lying behind
competent performer.
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COMPETENCE: A work related concept that refers to the areas of work at which the person is
competent
COMPETENCIES: Often referred as the combination of the above two
-WOODRUFFE (1991)
Underlying characteristics of a person that results in effective a superior performance
- MANSFIELD (1997)

1.4 COMPETENCIES IN AN ORGANIZATION:


In order to carry out an organization's business in a superior manner, it needs to identify
the competencies it's managers and all other employees should possess, further improve and
practice to improve their job performance towards achieving its goals.
Competency is not a task statement:
Competency is a combination of an underlying capability, a characteristic or an ability
with knowledge and skills that results in an effective performance. If competencies are
improved, they will give still more effective or superior performance.
Competencies are knowledge and skills statements and not task statements. For example:
conducting the meetings is a task. In order to do so, one needs required competency.
Therefore, in this case the required competency is the combination of skills to make an
agenda, to promote a healthy group process, to resolve conflicts, to manage time etc.
1.5 TYPES OF COMPETENCIES:
There are three types of competencies. They are

Core Competencies: They are organised competencies that all individuals are
expected to process. The goal of core competencies is for individuals to be able to
perform in diverse positions throughout the organisation. For example, guiding
behaviours such as cost effective, service delivery, customer focus, team work,
communication, initiative and so on.

Transferable Competencies: Skills and abilities needed within several roles in


varying degrees like managerial and leadership skills.

Technical or Role Competencies: These are distinctive competencies required for


specific jobs that are specialised know-how or abilities required within a specific role
or job like Marketing Research.

Competencies may be grouped in to various areas. In a classic article published a few decades
ago in Harvard Business Review, Daniel Katz grouped those under three areas, which were later
expanded by Indian Management professors in to the following four categories:
Technical: dealing with the technology or know how associated with the function, role,
task (Also now referred by some as Functional)
Managerial/Organizational: dealing with the managerial aspects, organizing,
planning, mobilizing resources, monitoring, systems use etc.
Human/Behavioural including personal, interpersonal, team related and
Conceptual/Theoretical including visualizations, model building etc.
HR Role in Competency Framework:
HR managers role lies in the following aspects, such as

Identifying competencies required by the organizations.

Developing core competency model.

Designing the Assessment/Development Centre and identifying the assessment tools.

Designing scientific instruments for assessment.

Developing Internal Assessor capabilities.

Facilitating Developmental outcomes/action plans.

Institutionalizing the process in the organization.

1.6 COMPETENCY MAPPING:


Meanwhile Competency Mapping is a way of assessing the strengths and weaknesses of a
worker or organization. It's about identifying a person's job skills and strengths in areas like
teamwork, leadership, and decision-making.

Large organizations may use some form of this technique to understand how to best use
each worker or how to combine the strengths of different employees to produce the highest
quality work.
Individuals may also find that this type of assessment can help them prepare for a career
change or advance in a specific job field.
Competency mapping an important tool:
Finding the right person for the right job is a matter of concern for most organisations. As
for meeting an individual's career aspirations, once the organisation gives an employee the
perspective of what is required from him/her to reach a particular position, it drives the
individual to develop the competencies for it.
Competencies enable individuals to identify and articulate what they offer -regardless of
the job. Competency mapping is a process of identifying key competencies for a particular
position in an organisation, and then using it for job-evaluation, recruitment, training and
development, performance management, succession planning, etc. The introduction of
competency mapping also helps skill appraisal during performance reviews.
The slowing economy around the world has put new and increased pressure on an
organisations capability to get more out of the available resources they have, and this often
translates into pressure on the individual employee. That is where it is important to correlate
performance result with competencies. It is therefore imperative to define a set of core
competencies which corresponds with the organisations key market differentiators.
The current economic downturn has forced companies to scale down various overhead
costs to meet their budgets. Competency mapping identifies the precise set of competencies and
proficiency levels needed for every role in the organisation. This system helps identify specific
areas of training and maps employee growth to strategic business needs. It also helps
organisations to sustain their competitive edge in the industry by investing in learning and
development programs that will empower employees to build on their strategic career objectives.
Many companies have long realised the importance of competency mapping as an
important HR function. This is especially relevant in an environment where human capital is one
of the most important assets of an organisation and needs to be nurtured. For organisations there
is always a need to have the best quality manpower. More and more companies are using
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competency mapping tools to screen and hire people with specific competencies. There might be
a need for a person with excellent writing skills or an excellent creative mind. When individuals
seek new jobs, knowing ones competencies can give one a competitive edge in the market.
1.7 USE OF COMPETENCY MAPPING:
Competency mapping serves a number of purposes. It is done for the following functions:
Gap Analysis.
Role Clarity.
Selection, Potential Identification, Growth Plans.
Succession Planning.
Restructuring.

Inventory of competencies for future planning.

1.8 SIGNIFICANCE OF COMPETENCY MAPPING:


Competency Mapping is excessively used in the organization to determine the crucial elements
and activities. The basic reasons due to which the mapping of the competencies is done are as
follows:
Once the competencies are determined, proper training can be provided to the individuals
to work more efficiently on the processes.
Key performance areas can be improved by understanding the fields where there is a gap
between the actual and the desired results.
If the competencies are determined for the given job, then the person whose career
planning phase is taking place can consider those competencies and can be ready for the
same.
Through competency mapping, the individual is preparing himself for the next set of
responsibilities.
With the help of the competency mapping the individual can alter the style of work where
the gap exists..
Competency mapping leads the individual to understand the actual position and the gap
from the desired status of work.

Competency mapping plays a crucial role in career planning of the individual in the
organization.
1.9 AREAS OF IMPLEMENTATION:
Thecompetencymapping canbe applied totheareasdepictedinthefollowing diagram

a) Recruitment and selection


Competencies can be used to construct a template for use in recruitment and selection.
Information on the level of a competency required for effective performance would be used to
determine the competency levels that new hires should possess. Depending upon the accepted
definition, competency data may take the form of behaviours, skills, abilities and other
characteristics.
Competency based selection can be a way to gain competitive advantage. Some of these
advantages are listed below:
A firm that knows how to assess competencies can effectively hire the best at a
reasonable price, for example hire under-priced but highly entrepreneurial MBA's from
lesser-known business schools.
There is high turnover due to high failure rate among new hires. The organization needs
to identify new hires with the potential to become future managers or leaders.

A gap between the competencies needed and what the organization can hire for indicates
the training new hires will need.
A lengthy training period may transpire before new hires become productive. New hires
with the competencies to do a job become fully productive faster.
b) Training and Development
It involves identifying gaps and helping employees develop in the right direction.
Knowing the competency profile for a position allows individuals to compare their own
competencies to those required by the position or the career path. Training or development plans
could focus on those competencies needing improvement.
If the training programs can be aligned to the development needs emerging out of the
appraisal system and to the market led training needs they can contribute better to both
individual and business objectives. This can be achieved in the following manner:
Firstly determine the competencies for a particular position
Secondly identify the competencies of the person holding that position
By mapping the competencies, identify gaps in terms of the competencies for that role
and the competencies of the person doing that role to diagnose the training and
development needs.
Identify the most appropriate training and development methodology for each trainable
competency
Accordingly, the person can be trained on those competencies only. Competency based training
programs clearly tell what should be the competency level of the person entering the program.
This would drastically reduce the training cost for the organization.
c) Career and succession planning:
It involves assessing employees' readiness or potential to take on new challenges.
Determining a person job fit can be based on matching the competency profile of an individual to
the set of competencies required for excellence within a profession. Individuals would know the
competencies required for a particular position and therefore would have an opportunity to
decide if they have the potential to pursue that position or not.
d) Rewards and Recognition
Various elements are considered for arriving at compensation increase. Enhancement in

To attract more competent than average employees


To reward for results and competencies developed
To motivate employees to maintain and enhance their skills and competencies regularly
By rewarding employees who develop relevant competencies the organization can benefit by
improving its own capability to face the future.
e) Performance Management System
Performance has two dimensions
Achieving business results
Developing individual competencies
These days performance appraisal is seen by managers and employees as a bureaucratic
"paperwork" exercises that they do not take seriously because it has little impact on employee
development. Performance appraisals do not address the employees' questions about skill
development or career advancement. Competency based performance management would:
Focus on "HOW" of performance and not on "WHAT" of performance i.e. not on results
but how the results are achieved
Link to development of the individual and not just rewards
Competency based PMS shift the emphasis of appraisal from organization results to
employee behaviours and competencies demonstrated and hence help identify development gaps
Who Identifies competencies?
Competencies can be identified by one of more of the following category of people:

Experts

HR Specialists

Job analysts

Psychologists

Industrial Engineers etc.


In consultation with: Line Managers, Current & Past Role holders, Supervising Seniors,

Reporting and Reviewing Officers, Internal Customers, Subordinates of the role holders and
other role set members of the role.

1.10 STEPS IN COMPETENCY MAPPING:


The Steps involved in competency mapping with an end result of job evaluation include the
following:
Following is a brief description of each of these steps:
Step 1: Identify departments for competency mapping
Decide and select the departments within the organization which we would like to include
into our study. The departments should be chosen based on their criticality and importance to the
organization.
Step 2: Identifying hierarchy within the organization and selection of levels
Study the organization hierarchy across each of the selected departments.
Step 3: Obtain the job descriptions
For all the levels at every department obtain each role's job description. Job descriptions
are a basic human resources management tool that can help to increase individual and
organizational effectiveness. For each employee, a good, up-to-date job description helps the
incumbent to understand: their duties and responsibilities;the relative importance of the duties;
and, how their position contributes to the mission, goals, and objectives of the organization. For
the organization, good job descriptions contribute to organizational effectiveness by: ensuring
that the work carried out bystaff is aligned with the organizations mission; and, Helping
management clearly identify the most appropriate employee for new duties and realigning
workloads.
Step 4: Preparation of semi structured interview
In structured interviews, carefully planned questions are asked individually of job
incumbents, their managers, or others familiar with the job. Benchmarking interviews with other
organizations are especially useful in achieving a broader view of the job or determining which
competencies are more universally deemed necessary for a particular job. However, it is
important to be cautious in applying the information collected from other organizations as there

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are many variables such as work environment, culture, and differences in job responsibilities that
may limit the relevance of the information.

Step 5: Scheduling of interviews


Obtain a list of employees from respective department heads and accordingly
schedule interviews. A minimum of 5 candidates are to be interviewed at each level in each
department.
Step 6: Recording of interview details
The candidate's answers and opinions have to be recorded in as much detail as possible for
further reference during the project.
Step 7: Preparation of a list of Skills
As per the interview and the details that were generated from the candidate, generate a list of
skills observed for the job. Thereon a list of identified competencies should be drawn for each
interviewed candidate.
Step 8: Repeat for next levels and functions.
The interviews and appropriate recording of answers should be done at all remaining levels and
other departments.
Step 9: Make the list of the competencies required for the department for each level and each
function giving behavioural indicators
For each position at each department a list of competencies observed from both
the job description and the semi structured interview (list of skills) should be drawn up. Each
competency should be given a name and an appropriate definition that clearly indicates its
meaning and essence.
Step 10: Validate identified competencies and proficiency levels with Head of Departments.
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Confirm competency definitions with respective Head of Departments and obtain from
the required proficiency levels of each competency that is ideal for each role. Also locate any
missing competencies.

Step 11: Preparation of competency matrix


Prepare a matrix defining competencies required and corresponding proficiency levels for each
level across all departments.
Step 12: Mapping of competencies
Map the competencies of selected employees against the competency matrix as per their
employee level and department. Here an employee's actual proficiency level of a particular
competency would be mapped against the target proficiency level.
1.11 ADVANTAGES OF COMPETENCY MAPPING:
There are several advantages of competency mapping over traditional job analysis. The
following section analyses each of them in relation to the company, the managers and the
individual employees. The section also gives a comparative view of the competency based
approach and the job analysis approach.
For the company
The advantages of competency mapping for the companies or organizations are as follows:
Establishes expectations for performance excellence.
Improved job satisfaction and better employee retention.
Increase in the effectiveness of training and professional development programs
because of their link to success criteria.
Provides a common understanding of scope and requirements of a specific role.
Provides a common, organization wide standard for career levels that enable
employees to move across business boundaries.
Help companies "raise the bar" of performance expectations.
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Help teams and individuals align their behaviours with key organizational strategies.
For Managers
The competency mapping provides following advantages to the managers:
Identify performance criteria to improve the accuracy and ease of the selection
process.
Provide more objective performance standards.
Easier communication of performance expectations.
Provide a clear foundation for dialogue to occur between the managers and
employees and performance, development and career-oriented issues.
For employees
The employees in an organization get the following advantages by competency mapping:
Identify the behavioural standards of performance excellence.
Provide a more specific and objective assessment of their strengths and the tools
required to enhance their skills.
Enhances clarity on career related issues.

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CHAPTER-II
2.1 INTRODUCTION
Knowledge is added and upgraded continuously therefore we need to refer the existing
knowledge on our area of study; otherwise we may unnecessarily spend time on reinventing the
wheel. Many scholars, researchers and seminal writers have acquired knowledge in almost all the
areas of knowledge. Their guidelines and revealing will help us to understand and investigate
further on our research topic. The researcher has presented some pertinent studies and their
findings in the following pages.
2.2. REVIEW RELATED STUDIES:
Influencing performance improvement using skill charting - Paul Lyons (2013)this paper
serves several purposes. It provides a brief exposition on the general definitions and features of
skills and competence in organizations, presents an overview of skill charting, offers specific
methods to demonstrate training for skill development using constructivist approaches (skill
charting/competency mapping); and then presents the results of a brief study that encompasses
the approaches discussed. The findings of the study indicate that the skill charting methods have
value, promise, and that they require further study.
Revaathy (2011)competencies are the traits and its a personal quality which is needed to a
person to be effective personality. Highly competent person can contribute more than an ordinary
person. The identification the required competency areas and mapping, accordingly, helps in
improving and developing the employees in all aspects both in personal and professional life.
An Assessment model for Intelligence Competencies of Accounting Information Systems
- Mehdi Ghazanfari, MostafaJafari, SaeedRouhani (2011) Accounting Information Systems
(AIS) as computer-based systems that processes financial information and supports decision
tasks have been implemented in most organizations but, but they still encounter a lack of
Intelligence in their decision-making processes. Models and methods to evaluate and assess the
Intelligence-level of Accounting InformationSystems can be useful in deploying suitable
business

intelligence

(BI)

services.

This

paper

discusses

BI

Assessment

criteria,fundamentalstructure and factors used in the Assessment model. Factors and the
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proposed model can assess the intelligence of Accounting Information Systems to achieve
enhanced decision support in organizations. The statistical analysis identified five factors of the
Assessment model. This model helps organizations to design, buy and implement Accounting
Information Systems for better decision support. The study also provides criteria to help
organizations and software vendors implement AIS from decision support perspectives.
Christokper Rowe (2010) has conducted a study on clarifying the use of competence and
competency model in recruitment, assessment and staff development. He considered competence
models, such as the initiative standards in the area of skill assessment, which focus on what
people, can do; require clear, measurable standards; and exclude grading. He also discussed
behavior inventories which focus on how people behave and can be graded in relation to
recruitment and staff development. This study made a distinction between intellectually abased
and normally based behaviors created with hard competencies at the centre, phasing out
through intellectually based behaviors to soft normally based behavior at the periphery.
Moral Competency Inventory Validation: Content, Construct, Convergent and
Discriminant Approaches - Daniel E. Martin, Benjamin Austin (2010)Their research fulfills
three purposes: 1) introduce practitioners to the appropriate use of measures of unethical
behaviour; 2) evaluate the use of integrity related assessments for use in personnel selection; and
3) determine the validity of the MCI instrument using standard validation procedures. Content,
construct, convergent and discriminant approaches are applied to establish the relative validity of
the assessment tool. The results of the MCI purport to align with ones moral values and
behaviours. We establish face validity of the MCI measure, but fail to establish: 1) an appropriate
simple factor structure, 2) convergent validity, 3) discriminant validity, and 4) support for the
lack of impact of demographic factors on the purported measure of Moral intel
Rebecca B. Rubin,(2009) a test of basic communication skills for college students. The
CCAI assesses 19 specific speaking and listening competencies in an educational context,
defined as those skills which high school graduates should possess to be prepared for college
classes. The communication competencies for an educational context are then partitioned into
four main competency areas following the lead of the official SCA endorsed framework (e.g.,
communication codes, oral message evaluation, basic speech communication skills, and human
relations). Each competency area is assessed directly (i.e., without the possible influence of

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reading and/or writing deficiencies). A rating book defines five levels of skill attainment for each
of the 19 assessments. The CCAI requires a total of 30 minutes for each student's assessment.
Wang et al. (2007) has conducted a study on core competency beyond identification. The
purpose of the study was to outline a model that is conceptually and empirically applicable by
practitioners in context extending beyond mere core competency and identification. The findings
also indicated that competencies are central to core competency matters.
Implications for Cultural Competency in Physical Therapy Evaluation - Lori Marie
Walton (2007)This study investigated specific health beliefs of Muslim women and their
decision to access and follow through with physical therapy evaluation and treatment. A survey
of health beliefs constructed from Purnell's cultural competence model was randomly distributed
to twenty Muslim women in three cluster groups across the USA. Fourteen (n=14) were
completed for analysis. Results suggest that Muslim women perceive specific health beliefs as
important and may affect their participation in physical therapy evaluation and treatment. Health
beliefs of Muslim women should be considered and future research explored in physical therapy
practice.
Competency based management: a review of systems and approaches - FotisDraganidis,
GregorisMentzas,(2006) Aims to review the key concepts of competency management (CM)
and to propose method for developing competency method.Examines the CM features of 22 CM
systems and 18 learning management systems.Finds that the areas of open standard (XML, web
services, RDF), semantic technologies (ontologies and the semantic web) and portals with selfservice technologies are going to play a significant part in the evolution of CM
systems.Emphasizes the beneficial attributes of CM for private and public organizations
Thomas G ReioJr, Faye C Sutton (2006) has conducted an explanatory study on employer
assessment of work-related competencies and work place adaptation mainly concentrated on
engineering graduates. This analysis suggested a strong positive magnitude of effect between
interpersonal and technical competencies and each measure of work place adaptation. HRD
professionals could have a powerful influence on work place assimilation and performance by
facilitating interpersonal and technical competency improvement through training and
development activities.
Maurice, M. Grzeda (2005)has conducted a study on the competency framework continues
to be clogged by unresolved conceptual ambiguity. Shukla and Sethi 2004 have conducted a
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study on an approach on studying the knowledge workers competencies in the software


development. They proposed that the workforce can no longer be understood only as a factor of
production, must be projected as a strategic core competency of any organization.
Mapping the Route of Leadership Education: Caution Ahead - Reed, George,
Bullis(2004) one of the hardest things for a successful organization to do is question the
assumptions on which its success is attributed. The U.S. military reached its pre-eminence on the
battlefield, in part, due to a highly systematic approach to training and leadership development.
This article critically examines the control-oriented approach to leadership development
exemplified in the use of list-based techniques such as competency mapping. The authors
recommend instead an organizational learning-based process enabled by vastly expanded
assessment and educational network components. Their recommended framework uses contextrelevant study to justify continuous curriculum adjustment facilitated by a network of the various
elements of the professional military education system. A networked approach to joint leadership
development can lead to multiple perspectives of leadership more appropriate to a rapidly
changing environment and one more worthy of the military profession.
McAda, (2003) the effectiveness of the competency mapping reflects everyday in the
working procedure of the nurses and can be formulated through the initiative of the nurses to
provide the concept on their work. The health care leaders believe that through the competent
nursing care, the people can maintain and enhance the knowledge skills, attitudes, and their
judgement in the healthcare procedure. It actually became part of the guideline for the nursing
school to improve the curriculum and produce qualified nurses.
Bassicheney and van Buren, (2002) conducted a survey in 2002 for the American society for
training and development (ASTD). The findings show that trainers will play major part in the
performance improvement if they abreast of technology advances and new delivery approach.
Robinson and Robinson (2000)in their study identified new competencies and roles HRD
practitioners must play and these are: being accomplished consultants and posses the budgeting,
contracting and entrepreneur skills required for a consultant.
Caroline Wachtler, Margareta Troein(1999)this study was performed in order to evaluate
the current status of cultural competency training at a medical school in southern Sweden.
Cultural competency is a present but mostly hidden part of the curriculum. We found learning
objectives about cultural competency. Teachers reported a total of 25 instances of teaching that
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had culture or cultural competency as the main theme or 1 of many themes. Students reported
few specific learning instances where cultural competency was the main theme. Students and
teachers considered cultural competency training to be integrated into the medical programme.
Cultural competency was not assessed. This evaluation showed places in the curriculum where
cultural competency is a present, absent or hidden part of the curriculum. The differences
between the 3 perspectives on the curriculum lead us to propose curriculum changes. This study
illustrates how triangulation with a multifactorial methodology leads to understanding of the
current curriculum and changes for the future.
American

Compensation

Association

(1996)thestudy

focusing

on

competency

applicationin Human Resource Organization are using competency to interpret selection,


training, appraisal and compensation. In staffing competency it is used to select and promote
employees. In human resource development competencies are used to identify and close the gap
individuals capabilities. In performance management competency results are appraised to
connect how a job was done be more of a debated in the long terms to the results achieved. In
compensation pay can be based on the certified skills and competency used on the job.
Competency will also help their organization to communicate desired behaviours and improve
efficiency and control costs.
Williamson (1994) found the competency standards are set out the knowledge, skills and
their application required for effective performance in employment. Competency standards
provide clear benchmarks for the training system in developing and delivery courses relevant to
workplace requirements. This paper describes that a new competency based system of vocational
education and training. The aim of competency based training to ensure that the end result of
training meets the required standards of industry.
Allen, Brockenbrough (1993)this article describes the results of a three-month experiment
in the use of computer-based semantic networks for curriculum development. A team of doctoral
and master's degree students developed a 1200-item computer database representing a tentative
"domain of competency" for a proposed MA degree in Workforce Education and Lifelong
Learning (WELL). The team gathered descriptions of knowledge that might be relevant to the
proposed degree from state and national reports, existing course syllabi, textbooks, and
interviews with subject matter experts. Using SemNet, a Macintosh-based program for
constructing and analyzing semantic networks, they explored methods for organizing these
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decisions as a "map" of related skills and ideas that would in turn serve as a framework for a
WELL curriculum. The team explored various methods for using domain maps to define course
content, to recommend learning activities, and to provide academic counseling to prospective
WELL students. Among the innovative methods for conducting this experiment in curriculum
development was the use of computer software for synchronous conferencing, which allowed
team members to collaborate in evaluating and integrating domain maps.

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2.2 COMPANY PROFILE


RAMCO GROUP is one of the leading, highly reputed industrial groups in South India.
The total employee is about 8500 and the turnover of this group is about 3500 Crores. Madras
Cements Limited (MCL) is one of the reputed cement companies of Ramco Groups in India. The
cement production is about 12 MTPA from its existing plants in South India.
MCL is producing Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC), Portland Pozzolanaa Cement (PPC)
and Portland Slag Cement (PSC). The cement produced by MCL is marketed in the brand name
of Ramco Cements. The brand name Ramco super Grade is very popular PPC and Ramco Super
Steel is the PSC type. The market centers are mainly in Tamil Nadu, AndraPradhesh, Kerala, and
Karnataka states.
MCL has been constantly upgrading the technology and has been the trend setter for the
rest of the industry in the country. MCL which has always been striving for total quality
possesses international certificate ISO 9001, ISO 14001, and ISO 18001. Madras Cements was
established in 1957, is part of Ramco Group, a well-known business group of South India. It is
based at Chennai. The company is the fifth largest cement producer in the country. Ramco Super
Grade is the most popular cement brand in South India.
The first plant of MCL at Ramasamy Raja Nagar, Virudhunagar, Tamilnadu commenced
its production in 1962 with a capacity of 200 tons, using wet process. In 70s, the plant switched
over to more efficient dry process. The second venture of MCL is its Jayanthipuam plant at
Vijayawada in A.P. set up in 1987. Ariyalur plant is established in the year 1997 with a capacity
of 0.9 MTPA. The present capacity is 3 MTPA. Ariyalur plant Govindapuram, commissioned on
2008 with a capacity of 5.5 MTPA.
Ramco Group
Madras Cements Limited
Ramco Systems Limited
Sri Ramco Lanka Private Limited
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Sri Ramco Roofing Lanka Private Limited


Textiles
Rajapalayam Mills Limited
The Ramaraju Surgical Cotton Mills Limited
Sudarsanam Spinning Mills Limited
Sri Vishnu Shankar Mill Limited
RajapalaiyamSpintext
Sri Ramco Spinners
Sandhya Spinning Mills Limited
Rajapalaiyam Textiles
Thanjavur Spinning Mills Limited
Sri Ramco Biotech Limited

Management
Madras Cements Ltd is managed by a Board of Directors comprising of eminent
personalities as its members. The Chairman of the board is Shri P. R.
RamasubrahmaneyaRajha, under whose dynamic leadership the company has grown into
a massive organization.
The company board brings together a team of business, administrative, financial and
cement technology professionals who provide guidance and direction to the company's
operations in a competitive business environment. Madras CementsLtd has been a
pioneer in adopting corporate governance practices comparable to the best in the country.

21

22

UnitsofMadrasCementsLimited
IntegratedCementPlants
Ramasamy Raja Nagar, Virudhunagar, Tamil Nadu
Alathiyur, Ariyalur District, Tamil Nadu
Ariyalur, Govindapuram, Ariyalur District, Tamil Nadu
Jayanthipuram, Andhra Pradesh
Mathodu, Chitradurga District, Karnataka
Grinding Units
Uthiramerur,KanchipuramDistrict,TamilNadu
Valapady,SalemDistrict,TamilNadu

Kolaghat,PurbaMedinipurDistrict,WestBengal
Packing Terminals
Nagercoil Packing Unit, Kumarapuram, Aralvaimozhi, Kanyakumari District, Tamil
Nadu
Hyderabad Packing Plant, Pochampally Road, Malkapur, Nalgonda District, Andhra
Pradesh
Operational Highlights:
Cement Capacity

10.49 MTPA Enhanced to 12.49 MTPA

Sales & Other Income :

Rs.3288 Crores

Profit for the Year

Rs.385.11 Crores

Cement Plants

:5

Grinding Plants

:3

Packing Plants

:2

Ready Mix Concrete Plant

:1

Dry Mortar Plant

:1

Wind Farm Capacity

: 159.19 MW

No of Employees

: 2626

Pioneer in Cement technology


23

Fifth largest Cement Producer in India


Single largest Cement Brand in South
Sophisticated R&D Centre in Chennai
Awards:
ThecompanyhasachievedvariousawardsforbestperformanceintheCement
IndustryandalsoGreenRatingProjectawards4levelsfromtheCentreforScience
andEnvironmentalfortheyear2005.
WonNationalAwardforEnergyconservationfromConfederationofIndian Industries.
AwardedasBestenergyefficientunit

fromNationalCouncilfromcementand

buildingMaterials.
ReceivedCorporateAwardfromEconomicTimes.
HonouredbyTheAnalystAwardfromInternationalCongressonChemistryof Cement.
BestallRoundIndustrialPerformancegivenbyFederationofAPChambersof Commerce
Industries.
VisvesvariahIndustrialAwardbyAllIndiaManufacturers Organization.
Business ExcellenceAwardbyIndustrialEconomist.
State Safety Award and Good Industrial Relations Award by Tamil Nadu Government.
Ariyalur Plant - Govindapuram, Ariyalur District, Tamil Nadu (4.0 MTPA)
The Line 1 capacity of the plant is 2 MTPA which was commissioned in 2008.
Currently Line 2 of the plant with a capacity of another 2 MTPA was commissioned.
Salient features
Ultra-modern Plant which incorporates the latest technologies in cement manufacture.
Locational advantage of being situated in the suburban of Ariyalur, where the countrys
best quality limestone is available.
Employs two bulk solid analyzers at the crusher site itself for quality control at the raw
material stage itself.
Blending of the limestone available in different mines, to achieve the desired quality of
raw mix. Only a small quantity of fire clay is being used as an additive.
24

Large raw material and additive storage sheds to store and run the Plant without

interruption.
Modern X-Ray Analyser and online quality control of raw mix and XRD.
Wagon tippler arrangement for quickly unloading the coal receipts.
The largest VRM for raw mix and cement grinding quality.
Four large Packing Plants for quick packing and uninterrupted cement supply to the
dealers & customers.

2.3 CONCLUSION
In this chapter, the researcher collected information about the previous studies related to his
research topic. It helps him to know more about the topic. It also enables the researcher to have
more clarity of the concept. It gives the researcher wider knowledge about the topic.

CHAPTER III
RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
3.1 INTRODUCTION:

25

Research is a careful investigation or it is a search of new facts in any branch of


knowledge. Research is the systematic process of collecting and analyzing information to
increase our understanding of the phenomenon under study. It is the function of the researcher to
contribute to the understanding of the phenomenon and to communicate that understanding to
others. This chapter explains what research is and what it is not.
3.2 FORMULATION AND STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM:
The research problem is the situation that causes the researcher to feel apprehensive,
confused and ill at ease. It is the demarcation of the problem area within a context involving the
WHO or WHAT, the WHERE, the WHEN and the WAY of the problem situation.
An activity aimed at identifying a problem by specifying the
a. The undesirable and the problematic state currently occupied
b. The resources currently available to move away from that problematic state particularly
the available courses of action the combinational constraints on using them etc
c. The criterion that need to be satisfied to say that a problem no longer exists or is solved.
This activity defines the cognitive gap between what is desirable and delineates the
resources for closing it. Problem formulation is the creative and probably the more
important step towards overcoming a problematic state than problem solving. A good
definition of what the problem is believed to be more than half of the way towards its
eventual elimination.
To avoid confusion and subjectivity and promote classification and objectivity, it is
necessary to keep the research within managerial limit. Since, the area of a competency is
to vast, the problem has been narrowed down.

3.3 OBJECTIVE OF THE STUDY


PRIMARY OBJECTIVE:
To analyze the behavioral related competency level of the employees in Madras Cements
Limited, Ariyalur
SECONDARY OBJECTIVE
26

To identify the job description of the organization.


To identify required competencies, to hire right kind of people for right job by
establishing standards.
To identify of existingcompetencies of the employee.
To identify the competency gap that exists between the employees.
To offer the suggestions to the organization for the betterment of the employees &
Organization.

3.4 HYPOTHESIS OF STUDY


According to George A. Lundberg, A hypothesis is a tentative generalization the validity
of which remains to be tested. In its most elementary stage the hypothesis guess, imaginative
data, this becomes the basis for action or investigation.
A hypothesis is a preliminary or tentative explanation or postulate by the researcher of
what the researcher considers the outcome of an investigation will be. It is an informed /
educated guess.
The study is based on the following hypotheses:
27

1. There is a significant relationship between age of the respondents and their behavior
competency mapping
2. There is a significant relationship between experience of the respondents and their
competency mapping

3.5 SCOPE OF THE STUDY:


To understand Competency mapping and its impact on productivity of organization, the
need to understand Competency mapping per se is indispensable.
A detailed study of Competency mapping has been made by studying various literatures
on competency mapping and by referring various articles on the same.
The effort is made to understand various measurements, importance and application
precisely.

28

The process of designing a Competency Model and its proper implementation in an


Organization is also studied and understood with the help of articles and various
literatures.

3.6 RESEARCH DESIGN


The first step after formulating the problem is to design a suitable research procedure.
Research design is a comprehensive plan for research consisting of a series of sequential
steps. Each step involves a decision or a set of decisions, this decisions call for a capacity to
foresee situations that might emerge at emerge at different stages during the course of the
research.

29

The researcher should be able to foresee what kind of study would suit the problem
formulated. What kind of data one may need to understand the subject and what kind of
technicians are needed to collect the kind of data on looks for etc.
The researcher here used descriptive research design to carry out the study.
3.7 SAMPLING TECHNIQUE:
convenience sampling
The convenience sampling method is used for the survey. Convenience is the crudest type
of non- random sampling. This involves selecting the most convenient group available.
3.8 SAMPLE SIZE:
66 respondents
The universe is 416 employees
3.9 SECONDARY DATA:
Books
Web site
The secondary data are those data which have already been collected through others
sources like news paper, magazine, books & internet. Secondary data are collected to find
out the level of their needs, wants, and their taste.
3.10PRIMARY DATA COLLECTION METHOD:
Behavioral Event Interview:
BEIs can be one of the most reliable tools in predicting an applicants future onthe-job performance. The theory of behavior event interviewing (BEI) is simple. It
considers the best way for an organization to predict an individuals future behavior and
performance is to have the individual talk about their past competencies, behavior and
performance. There are additional benefits to both the organization and the individual as
well.
Primary data collection target audience:
workmen
Staff
30

Officer
Head of the Departments
Unit head
3.11LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY

The study is confined only to The Madras Cements Limited, Ariyalur


Some of the respondents are unwillingly to respond the question
The study is limited to 66 respondents
The response given by the selected employee may be subject bias

3.12STATISTICAL TEST USED


One way ANOVA test

CHAPTER 1V
DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION
Analyzing and interpretation of data collected is a vital aspect of any research. In this
chapter the data collected from the employees of MADRAS CEMENTS LIMITED, ARIYALUR
are analyzed and interrelated in the form of tables and charts.
The received data were tabulated, collated and analyzed using the SPSS package. Getting
the expertise of the statistical analyst the data were analyzed for interpretation. The following
31

statistical tools were used for analysis of data keeping in view of the purpose and scope of the
research; chi-square test to assess the significance of the difference between the observed
frequencies and the expected obtained from hypothetical measure. A statistical measure for
finding out the degree or strength of association between the two or more variables

4.1 TABLE
AGE OF THE RESPONDENTS

PARTICULARS
BELOW 24
25-30
31-35
36-40
ABOVE 40
Total

NO OF RESPONDENTS
10
20
18
12
6
66

PERCENT
15.2
30.3
27.3
18.2
9.1
100.0
32

INTERPRETATION: The above table shows that the majority of 30.3 percentages of the
respondents belong to the age group of 25 to 30 years, 9.1 percentages of respondents belong to
the age of above 40 years. 15.2 percentages of peoples belong to the below 24 years and 27.3
percentages are 31-35 years.

4.1 CHART
AGE OF THE RESPONDENTS

33

35
30
25
20

20

18

15
10

NO OF RESPONDENTS
PERCENT

12
10
6

5
0
BELOW 24

25-30

31-35

36-40

ABOVE 40

4.2 TABLE
EXPERIENCE OF THE RESPONDENTS
34

PARTICULARS
0-4
5-10
11-15
16-20
Above 20
Total

NO OF RESPONDENTS
20
24
16
5
1
66

PERCENT
30.3
36.4
24.2
7.6
1.5
100.0

INTERPRETATION: The above table indicates that majority of respondents have 5-10 years
experience. And 1.5 percentages of respondents have above 20 years.11-15 years respondents are
24.2 percentages. 30.3 percentages people are belong to the 0-4 years.

4.2 CHART
EXPERIENCE OF THE RESPONDENTS

35

40
35
30
25
NO OF RESPONDENTS

20

PERCENT
15
10
5
0
0-4

5 to 10

11 to 15

16 to 20

above 20

4.3 TABLE
DESIGNATION- CADREWISE

36

PARTICULARS
HOD
OFFICER
STAFF
WORKMEN
Total

NO OF RESPONDENTS
3
11
14
38
66

PERCENT
4.5
16.7
21.2
57.6
100.0

INTERPRETATION: The above table shows that 57.6 percentages respondents belong to the
cadre of workmen. And it also indicates the 21.2 percentages are staff, 16.7 percentages are
officer and 4.5 percentage respondents are belong to the category of HOD

4.3 CHART
DESIGNATION- CADREWISE

37

70
60
50
40
NO OF RESPONDENTS
Percent

30
20
10
0
Hod

officer

staf

workmen

4.4 TABLE
DEPARTMENTS OF THE RESPONDENTS

38

DEPARTMENTS
ELECTRICALS
INSTRUMENTATION
MECHANICAL
MINES
PRODUCTION
Total

NO OF RESPONDENTS
14
11
13
15
13
66

PERCENT
21.2
16.7
19.7
22.7
19.7
100.0

INTERPRETATION: The above table shows that 22.7 percentage respondents are mines, 19.7
percentages are mechanical, 16.7 percentages are instrumentation, and 19.7 percentages are
production respectively.

4.4 CHART
DEPARTMENT OF THE RESPONDENTS

39

25
20
15
10
NO OF RESPONDENTS
PERCENT

5
0

4.5 TABLE
MARITAL STATUS OF THE RESPONDENTS
40

PARTICULARS
1.00

NO OF RESPONDENTS

Percent

50

75.8

2.00

16

24.2

Total

66

100.0

INTERPRETATION: The above table indicates that 75.8 percentages of respondents are married
and the remaining 24.2 percentages are unmarried.

4.5 CHART
MARITAL STATUS OF THE RESPONDENTS
41

80
70
60
50
No of Respondents

40

percent
30
20
10
0
MARRIED

UNMARRIED

4.6 TABLE
COMMUNICATION
42

NO OF
PARTICULARS
VERY POOR
POOR
AVERAGE
GOOD
EXCELLENT
Total

RESPONDENTS
6
9
20
19
12
66

PERCENT
9.1
13.6
30.3
28.8
18.2
100.0

INTERPRETATION: The above table indicates that 30.3 percentages respondents are average in
communicating, 9.1 percentages are very poor, 28.8 percentages are good and 18.2 percentages
are excellent in communication.

4.6 CHART
COMMUNICATION

43

35
30
25
20
NO OF RESPONDENTS
Percent

15
10
5
0
VERY POOR

POOR

AVERAGE

GOOD

EXCELLENT

4.7 TABLE
INTERPERSONAL SKILL
44

PARTICULARS
VERY POOR
POOR
AVERAGE
GOOD
EXCELLENT
Total

NO OF RESPONDENTS
2
9
25
24
6
66

PERCENT
3.0
13.6
37.9
36.4
9.1
100.0

INTERPRETATION: The above table indicates that majority 37.9 respondents are average in
interpersonal skill, 36.4 respondents are good in interpersonal and 9.1 percentages respondents
are excellent in interpersonal. And 13.6 percentages are poor in interpersonal skill.

4.7 CHART
INTERPERSONAL SKILL

45

40
35
30
25
NO OF RESPONDENTS

20

Percent
15
10
5
0
VERY POOR

POOR

AVERAGE

GOOD

EXCELLENT

4.8TABLE
DECISION MAKING
46

PARTICULARS
VERY POOR
POOR
AVERAGE
GOOD
EXCELLENT
Total

NO OF RESPONDETNS
7
8
23
24
4
66

PERCENT
10.6
12.1
34.8
36.4
6.1
100.0

INTERPRETATION: The table indicates that 36.4 percentages respondents are good in decision
making, 34.8 percentages are average in decision making and 10.6 percentages of very poor in
decision making.

4.8 CHART
DECISION MAKING

47

40
35
30
25
NO OF RESPONDETNS

20

Percent
15
10
5
0
VERY POOR

POOR

AVERAGE

GOOD

EXCELLENT

4.9 TABLE
TEAM WORK
48

PARTICULARS
VERY POOR

NO OF RESPONDENTS
16

PERCENT
24.2

POOR

15

22.7

AVERAGE

16

24.2

GOOD

15

22.7

EXCELLENT

4
66

6.1
100.0

Total

INTERPRETATION: The above table shows that majority of people average in team work, 22.7
respondents are good in team work, 22.7 percentages are poor and 24.2 percentages respondents
are very poor in team work.

4.9 CHART
TEAM WORK

49

30
25
20
NO OF RESPONDENTS

15

Percent
10
5
0
VERY POOR

POOR

AVERAGE

GOOD

EXCELLENT

4.10 TABLE
LEADERSHIP

50

PARTICULARS
AVERAGE
GOOD
EXCELLENT
Total

NO OF RESPONDENTS
3
8
7
18

PERCENT
16.7
44.4
38.88
99.99

INTERPRETATION: The above table indicates that 44.4 percentages respondents are good in
leadership, 38.88 percentages are excellent in leadership and 16.7 percentages are respondents
are average in leadership.

4.10 CHART
LEADERSHIP

51

14
12
10
8
NO OF RESPONDENTS
Percent

6
4
2
0
AVERAGE

GOOD

EXCELLENT

4.11 TABLE
STRESS MANAGEMENT

52

PARTICULARS
VERY POOR
POOR
AVERAGE
GOOD
EXCELLENT
Total

NO OF RESPONDENTS
4
10
31
18
3
66

PERCENT
6.1
15.2
47.0
27.3
4.5
100.0

INTERPRETATION: The table indicates that 47 percentage respondents are average in stress
management, 27.3 percentages are good, 15.2 percentages are poor and 4.5 percentages are
excellent in stress management.

4.11 CHART
STRESS MANAGEMENT

53

50
45
40
35
30
NO OF RESPONDENTS

25

Percent

20
15
10
5
0
VERY POOR

POOR

AVERAGE

GOOD

EXCELLENT

4.12 TABLE
ADAPTABILITY
54

PARTICULARS
VERY POOR
POOR
AVERAGE
GOOD
EXCELLENT
Total

NO OF RESPONDENTS
3
7
33
14
9
66

PERCENT
4.5
10.6
50.0
21.2
13.6
100.0

INTERPRETATION: The table shows that 50 percentages are average in adapting the personal
and organizational changes, 21.2 percentages are good, and 4.5 percentages are very poor in
adapting skill.

4.12 CHART
ADAPTABILITY

55

60
50
40
30
NO OF RESPONDENTS
20

Percent

10
0

ONE WAY ANOVA DIFFERENCE BETWEEN AGE OF THE RESPONDENTS AND


THEIR COMPETENCY MAPPING
Descriptive

Mean

Std.
Deviation

Std. Error

95% Confidence
Interval for Mean
Lower
Upper

Minimu
m

Maxim
um

56

1.00
2.00
3.00
4.00
5.00
Total

7
8
23
24
4
66

1.7143
2.6250
2.9130
2.9583
2.7500
2.7576

.75593
1.30247
1.16436
1.23285
.95743
1.19048

Bound
1.0152
1.5361
2.4095
2.4377
1.2265
2.4649

.28571
.46049
.24279
.25166
.47871
.14654

Bound
2.4134
3.7139
3.4165
3.4789
4.2735
3.0502

1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
2.00
1.00

3.00
4.00
5.00
5.00
4.00
5.00

ANOVA

Sum of
Squares

Df

Mean Square

Between Groups
Within Groups
Total

9.283

2.321

82.838
92.121

61
65

1.358

1.709

Statistical
inference
.160>0.05
Not
significant

H1: There is a significance relationship between age and decision making


H0: there is no significance relationship between age and decision making
Findings
The above table there is a significant difference between age and decision making of the
respondents. Hence, the calculated value greater than the table value. So the research
hypothesis is accepted and the null hypothesis is rejected.

ONE WAY ANOVA DIFFERENCE BETWEEN EXPERIENCE OF THE RESPONDENTS


AND THEIR COMPETENCY MAPPING
Descriptive

1.00
2.00

Mean

Std.
Deviation

16
15

1.6875
1.8000

.70415
.67612

Std.
Error

.17604
.17457

95% Confidence
Interval for Mean
Lower
Upper
Bound
Bound
1.3123
2.0627
1.4256
2.1744

Minimum

Maximum

1.00
1.00

3.00
3.00
57

3.00
4.00
5.00
Total

16
15
4
66

2.0625
2.8667
2.7500
2.1364

1.18145
.91548
.95743
.99051

.29536
.23637
.47871
.12192

1.4329
2.3597
1.2265
1.8929

2.6921
3.3736
4.2735
2.3799

1.00
1.00
2.00
1.00

5.00
4.00
4.00
5.00

ANOVA

Sum of
Squares
Between Groups
Within Groups
Total

Df

Mean Square

14.514

3.629

49.258
63.773

61
65

.808

F
4.494

Statistical
inference
.003<0.05
significant

HA: There is a significant difference between the age of respondent and team work
H0: there is no significant difference between the experience of the respondent and team work
Findings
The above table shows that there is a significant difference between age of the respondents and
the team work. Hence, the calculated value is less than the table value. So the research
hypothesis is rejected and the null hypothesis is accepted.

CHAPTER V
FINDINGS, SUGGESTIONS AND CONCLUSIONS
5.1 FINDINGS:
From the analyze and calculation we can identify that the most of respondents age group
was 25-30 years.
From the analyze and calculation the most of respondents having 0-4 year experience
From the analyze and calculation 57.6 percentages respondents are workmen
From the analyze and calculation 22.7 percentage respondents are belong to mines
department
From the analyze and calculation 75.8 percentage respondents are married
From the analyze and calculation 30.3 respondents communication level is average and
28.8 percentages are good in communication.

58

From the analyze and calculation 37.9 percentages are average and 36.4 percentages are
having good level in interpersonal skill
From the analyze and calculation 36.4 percentages respondents are good in decision
making and 34.8 percentage respondents are having average level in decision making.
From the analyze and calculation the majority of respondents are average in team work
and 22.7 percentage respondents are good in team work.
From the analyze and calculation 44.4 percentage respondents are good in leadership and
38.88 percentage are excellent in leadership.
From the analyze and calculation 47 percentage respondents are average in managing
stress and 27.3 percentage respondents are good in stress management.
From the analyze and calculation 50 percentage respondents are average and 21.2
percentage respondents are good in adopting personal as well as changes in organization.

2.2 SUGGESTIONS
The company management should provide the soft skill training program to the every
employee in the organization to enlarge their competency related skills.
The company management should regularly monitor the behavior related performance of
the employee during before and after commencement of training program.
The company should makes awareness of employee own behavior related competency
like stress, adaptability, leadership, communication, decision making, team work,
interpersonal etc.
The organization should continuously encourage and ask the employees to participate
decision making, leadership etc.
Managing stress, adapting changes are important behavior related competency which
affecting the performance of employees. So the organization should train the employee to
managing stress and adapting changes.
2.3 CONCLUSION
If the organization conduct the competency mapping means they may get good feedback
from the employees. The competency mapping which is useful to the management to know
the current level of competency what they have.Otherwise they cannot know the employees
behavior related competency. With the help of competency mapping the management can allot
59

the right person to the right job. Andthe organization needs to provide various training
programs to improve the various behavior related competency.

BIBLIOGRAPHY
1. Anderson, A.H[2000] Training in Practice, New Delhi: Infinity Books.p.19-32.
2. Boyatzis, R.E [1989] The Competent Manager, A model for effective performance,
New York, Wiley.
3. Dubosis, D [1993] Competency Based Improvement. A strategy for organization
change. Sultan Chand and Sons, New Delhi.
4. Jaideep Sharma [2001] Professional Competencies in Modern Libraries Delhi: Authors
Press p6-71.
5. Gangani, N, Mc Lean, G and Braden, R.[2004] A Competency Based Human Resource
Development Strategy, Wiley Eastern Limited, New Delhi,19[1],127-139.
6. James,R [2000]Competency Assesment and Human Resource Management,
performance of country extension chairs, American University, Texas from Tamil
education/42,html.
7. Lynton,R.P and PareekUdai [2000], Training for Organization Transformation,
Oxford University Press.
8. Sanghi, Seema, 2004, The Handbook of Competency Mapping. A division of Sage
publication private Limited. New Delhi: p3-33.
9. Rao, T.V.2003. Mapping a Clear Path. Human Capital, Vol.6, pp:42-44
10. Sharma Radha,2002, Competency Mapping and Assesment Centers, Tata McGrawhill,
Kogan Press
11. Spencer, L.M and Spencer, S.M, 1993, Competency at work, New York, Wiley.

60

E-SOURCES OF REFERENCES

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

http://mmgindia.com/competencymapping.html
http://www.hrfolks.com/workshop/compass.html
http://www.amazon.com/Handbook-competency-mapping.html
Ebookbrowse.com/search/guide-competency-mapping
www.ramcocement.in/

A STUDY ON BEHAVIORAL ASPECTS OF COMPETENCY MAPPING AT MADRAS


CEMENTS LIMITED, ARIYALUR
MADRAS CEMENTS LIMITED, GOVIDAPURAM WORKS, ARIYALUR
EMPLOYEE COMEPETENCY ASSESMENT FORM - WORKMEN
61

AGE

EXPERIENCE

DESIGNATION

DEPARTMENT

EXPERIENCE

MARITAL STATUS

EMP. NO

BEHAVIOUR PARAMETER:
SCALE:
EXCELLENT: 5
VERY POOR: 1

COMMUNICATION
INTERPERSONAL
SKILL
DECISION MAKING
TEAM WORK
STRESS
MANAGEMENT
ADAPTABILITY

GOOD: 4

BENCHMARK
ED LEVEL
LEVEL 1
LEVEL 1

EX

AVERAGE: 3 POOR: 2

GOO
D

AVG

POOR

V.POOR

LEVEL 1
LEVEL 1
LEVEL 1
LEVEL 1

FEEDBACK

A STUDY ON BEHAVIORAL ASPECTS OF COMPETENCY MAPPING AT MADRAS


CEMENTS LIMITED, ARIYALUR
MADRAS CEMENTS LIMITED, GOVIDAPURAM WORKS, ARIYALUR

62

EMPLOYEE COMEPETENCY ASSESMENT FORM - STAFF


AGE

EXPERIENCE

DESIGNATION

DEPARTMENT

EXPERIENCE

MARITAL STATUS

EMP. NO

BEHAVIOUR PARAMETER:
SCALE:
EXCELLENT: 5
VERY POOR: 1

COMMUNICATION
INTERPERSONAL
SKILL
DECISION MAKING
TEAM WORK
STRESS
MANAGEMENT
ADAPTABILITY

GOOD: 4

BENCHMARK
ED LEVEL
LEVEL 2
LEVEL 2

EX

AVERAGE: 3 POOR: 2

GOOD

AVG

POOR

V.POOR

LEVEL 2
LEVEL 2
LEVEL 2
LEVEL 2

FEEDBACK

A STUDY ON BEHAVIORAL ASPECTS OF COMPETENCY MAPPING AT MADRAS


CEMENTS LIMITED, ARIYALUR

63

MADRAS CEMENTS LIMITED, GOVIDAPURAM WORKS, ARIYALUR


EMPLOYEE COMEPETENCY ASSESMENT FORM OFFICER
AGE

EXPERIENCE

DESIGNATION

DEPARTMENT

EXPERIENCE

MARITAL STATUS

EMP. NO

BEHAVIOUR PARAMETER:
SCALE:
EXCELLENT: 5
VERY POOR: 1

COMMUNICATION
INTERPERSONAL
SKILL
DECISION MAKING
TEAM WORK
LEADERSHIP
STRESS
MANAGEMENT
ADAPTABILITY

GOOD: 4

BENCHMARK
ED LEVEL
LEVEL 3
LEVEL 3
LEVEL
LEVEL
LEVEL
LEVEL

EX

AVERAGE: 3 POOR: 2

GOOD

AVG

POOR

V.POOR

3
3
1
3

LEVEL 3

FEEDBACK

64

A STUDY ON BEHAVIORAL ASPECTS OF COMPETENCY MAPPING AT MADRAS


CEMENTS LIMITED, ARIYALUR
MADRAS CEMENTS LIMITED, GOVIDAPURAM WORKS, ARIYALUR
EMPLOYEE COMEPETENCY ASSESMENT FORM - HOD
AGE

EXPERIENCE

DESIGNATION

DEPARTMENT

EXPERIENCE

MARITAL STATUS

EMP. NO

BEHAVIOUR PARAMETER:
SCALE:
EXCELLENT: 5
VERY POOR: 1

COMMUNICATION
INTERPERSONAL
SKILL
DECISION MAKING
TEAM WORK
LEADERSHIP
STRESS
MANAGEMENT
ADAPTABILITY

GOOD: 4

BENCHMARK
ED LEVEL
LEVEL 4
LEVEL 4
LEVEL
LEVEL
LEVEL
LEVEL

EX

AVERAGE: 3 POOR: 2

GOOD

AVG

POOR

V.POOR

4
4
2
4

LEVEL 4

FEEDBACK

65

A STUDY ON BEHAVIORAL ASPECTS OF COMPETENCY MAPPING AT MADRAS


CEMENTS LIMITED, ARIYALUR
MADRAS CEMENTS LIMITED, GOVIDAPURAM WORKS, ARIYALUR
EMPLOYEE COMEPETENCY ASSESMENT FORM UNIT HEAD
AGE

EXPERIENCE

DESIGNATION

DEPARTMENT

EXPERIENCE

MARITAL STATUS

EMP. NO

BEHAVIOUR PARAMETER:
SCALE:
EXCELLENT: 5
VERY POOR: 1

COMMUNICATION
INTERPERSONAL
SKILL
DECISION MAKING
TEAM WORK
LEADERSHIP
STRESS
MANAGEMENT
ADAPTABILITY

GOOD: 4

BENCHMARK
ED LEVEL
LEVEL 5
LEVEL 5
LEVEL
LEVEL
LEVEL
LEVEL

EX

AVERAGE: 3 POOR: 2

GOOD

AVG

POOR

V.POOR

5
5
3
5

LEVEL 5

FEEDBACK

66

Behaviour Competency dictionary


Levels of Assessment
Level 1: Novice
A person is able to do the job and meeting the standards and requires total supervision. (Needs
total help to do the job)
Level 2: Learner
A person is able to do the job though not yet consistently to the required standards and needs
frequent supervision. This indicates the person needs minimal help to do his job. (Minimal help
needed)
Level 3: Proficient
A person is able to do the job to the required standards consistently, on a routine basis with
occasional supervision. This indicates the person can do without much help to do the job.
Level 4: Professional
An experienced person, able to do the job consistently without any supervision.
Level 5: Expertise
A person who is recognized as an authority for his ability to do the job independently and one
who is also able to coach others.
Parameters:Communication: Conveys accurate information effectively using the most appropriate
methods to reflect the needs of the audience and ensure mutual understanding
Level 1: Novice
Receives information clearly.
Listens actively and objectively without interrupting.
Passing information in clear in both orally and sometimes in written.
Level 2: Learner
Receives information clearly and sharing feeling.
Having consistent communication with others.
And provide feedback (decisions or recommendations) to higher officials.
Level 3: Proficient
Receives information clearly.
Communicates the Information to others in understandable format.
Anticipates reactions to messages and adapts communications accordingly.
Level 4: Professional
Handles complex messages and issues.
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Communicates complex issues clearly.


Communicates in different communication styles.
Level 5: Expertise
Communicates strategically to achieve specific objectives.
Communicates business oriented information.
Interpersonal Skill: Extent to which an individual gets along and interacts positively with
co-workers. Degree and style of understanding and relating to others.
Level 1: Novice
Interacts with co-workers in a tactful manner.
Responds to co-workers inquiries.
Level 2: Learner
Shows employees empathy and respect.
Welcomes new employees into organization by explaining mission and agency goals.
Level 3: Proficient
Makes self-accessible to employees at all levels.
Corrects employee mistakes in a courteous manner.
Level 4: Professional
Treats individuals from all levels of the agency with courtesy and sensitivity.
Meets with staff and listens to their perspective on organizational policies and procedures.
Level 5: Expertise
Builds effective relationships with others and presents ideas persuasively and confidently.
Interacts with public interest groups with opposing viewpoints while conducting the
organization's work.
Seeks feedback from and gives feedback to others. Actively facilitates the acquisition and
sharing of knowledge and skills throughout the organization.
Decision Making: Committing to a timely course of action which considers alternatives,
risks and consequences in light of organizational goals, values, resources and constraints.
Level 1: Novice
Makes decisions only using on rules.
Majorly no need for decision making.
Makes decisions involving little or no consequence of error.
Level 2: Learner
Makes decisions by interpreting rules.
Seeks guidance as needed when the situation is unclear.
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Makes straight - forward decisions based on information.


Level 3: Proficient
Makes decision by interpretation of the rules.
If needed seeks the guidance of right people.
Develops solutions that address the root cause of the problem and prevent recurrence.
Level 4: Professional
Makes complex decisions for which there are no set procedures.
Simplifies complex information from multiple sources to resolve issues.
Recommends solutions in an environment of risk and ambiguity.
Level 5: Expertise
Makes high risk decisions in complex and ambiguous situations.
Uses principles, values and sound business sense to make decisions.
Teamwork: Team working is about working co-operatively, across cultures and
organisational boundaries to achieve shared goals.
Level 1: Novice
Working in the team by the initiative others.
Accepts and completes team assignments.
Supports team decisions.
Sometimes does not participate in group activities.
Level 2: Learner
Working in the team by voluntarily.
Speaks of team members in positive terms.
Keeps others informed about what is happening in the team..
Encourages and empowers others, making them feel strong and important in team to achieve
the goal of the organization.
Acknowledges the work of others.
Actively provides information and suggestions.
Level 3: Proficient
Creating the team spirit.
Discuss the issues to get the better result of work.
Strengthening the team and capitalizing it.
Builds the team relationship.
Balances own needs and those of the team with a willingness to learn from others.
Level 4: Professional
Ensures that everyones views are considered.
Encourages and/or facilitates a beneficial resolution to conflict.
69

Builds good morale or cooperation within the team.


Works to build the commitment in the team.
Level 5: Expertise
Conducts team building exercise.
Building strong relationship among the teams.
Cultivates unity and commitment among team members.
Break down barriers among team.
Leadership: Develops and uses effective strategies and interpersonal styles to influence and
guide others towards the accomplishment of identified objectives and goals.
Level 1: Proficient
Recognizes conflicts and acts accordingly.
Encourages the employee to get the better result.
Level 2: Professional
Suggests and asks for others ideas to improve quality, efficiency, and effectiveness.
Sees the potential in others and takes opportunities to apply and develop that potential.
Assigns responsibility to different people according to their capability and sets deadlines for
the same.
Obtains the staff, resources, and information that the group needs.
Level 3: Expertise
Links mission, vision, values, goals, and strategies to everyday work.
Serves as role model to others, demonstrating commitment to achieving challenging
objectives.
Stress Management: Maintaining stable performance under pressure or opposition (such as
time pressure or job ambiguity); relieving stress in a manner that is acceptable to the
organization and those directly impacted.
Level 1: Novice
Basically work in low stress situations.
If going through the stress in work and in personal life, they are going after the guidance of
superiors.
Level 2: Learner
Works in moderate stress level.
Able to vanish the stress themselves, if not going after the guidance of the superiors.
Sometimes affect the working condition.

70

Level 3: Proficient
Having mental stamina to handle the prolonged stresses.
Able to work effectively in the condition.
Level 4: Professional
Manages one owns stress and others too.
Develops stress less situation and adjusts the stressful situations.
Level 5: Expertise
Identifies and consistently models ways of releasing or limiting stress within the organization.
Adaptability: The ability to work effectively in varying environments and with different
tasks, responsibilities and various individuals or groups
Level 1: Novice
Afraid to adapt the changes in work.
Taking more time to adapt the situation.
Always need assistance to adapt.
Not willing to fight the setbacks.
Level 2: Learner
Adapts only when told to do so.
Waits until told to adapt rather than taking proactive steps.
Accepts changes reluctantly.
Assisting others to get adapt the changes.
Level 3: Proficient
Adapts changes in job requirements, schedules, or work environments as part of job.
Recovers quickly from setbacks, and finds alternative ways to reach goals or targets.
Makes changes based on new credible information.
Level 4: Professional
Adjusts schedules and timelines to accomplish goals and objectives in response to change.
Maintains composure and shows self-control in the face of challenges and change.
Level 5: Expertise
Proactively adapts to new opportunities or risks.
Adapts approach, goals, and methods to achieve solutions and results in dynamic situations.

71