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Lighthouse Point

M A G A Z I N E
M A G A Z I N E

www.LHPmag.com

May 2010

Lighthouse Point M A G A Z I N E www.LHPmag.com May 2010 Soroptimist Awards Ceremony
Lighthouse Point M A G A Z I N E www.LHPmag.com May 2010 Soroptimist Awards Ceremony

Soroptimist Awards Ceremony PAGE 15

www.LHPmag.com May 2010 Soroptimist Awards Ceremony PAGE 15 The Dog Whisperer PAGE 40 Lighthouse Point Art

The Dog Whisperer PAGE 40

Lighthouse Point Art Expo PAGE 10

Dog Whisperer PAGE 40 Lighthouse Point Art Expo PAGE 10 The McLaughlin “Crawfish Boil” PAGE 67

The McLaughlin “Crawfish Boil” PAGE 67

Point

A r o u n d t h e Around the Point is a column
A r o u n d t h e
Around the Point is a column that includes news items relevant to the residents of LHP.
We reserve the right to reject material that may not be in the best interest of the community.
REEL LOCO MARINE SALES & SERVICE
RECEIVES 2010 BEST OF
POMPANO BEACH AWARD
MARY RYAN CAMPBELL
Mary Ryan Campbell passed away peacefully on March
11 at the age of 95. She was born in New York to Irish
For the second consecutive year, Reel Loco Marine Sales &
Service has been selected for the 2010 Best of Pompano Beach
Award in the Outboard Motors category by the U.S. Commerce
Association (USCA).
The USCA “Best of Local Business” Award Program
recognizes outstanding local businesses throughout the
country. Each year, the USCA identifies companies that they
believe have achieved exceptional marketing success in their
local community and business category. These are local
companies that enhance the positive image of small business
through service to their customers and community.
Nationwide, only 1 in 70 (1.4%) 2009 Award recipients
qualified as two-time Award Winners. Various sources of
information were gathered and analyzed to choose the winners
in each category.The 2010 USCA Award Program focuses on
quality, not quantity. Winners are determined based on the
information gathered both internally by the USCA and data
provided by third parties.
2010 ANNUAL CAR SHOW
immigrants Thomas Ryan and Della Gleeson.
Mary Rita Ryan married William B.Campbell in 1934.Mary
was quite the entrepreneur. In New York City, she owned
several card shops along with a few restaurants she managed
with Bill. In 1953 the family moved to South Florida.
Once settled, Mary became the proud owner of the first
ever record store in Pompano Beach. Soon thereafter, the
couple founded Campbell Property Management and Real
Estate. Mary and Bill were just shy of their 50th wedding
anniversary when Bill passed away suddenly. In later
year's, Mary’s passion was to stay involved with her
extended “business family” as well as the community at
large. She had an exceptional talent to make everybody
feel special.
She is survived by her three children and 11 grand-
children. She is also survived by her 26 great grandchildren.
Donations may be made to the St Coleman Education
Foundation,2250 SE 12 Street,Pompano Beach,FL 33062 in
Mary’s Honor.
The Shoppes at Beacon Light, located at 2400 N. Federal
Hwy., Lighthouse Point, is proud to present its 2nd Annual
Classic Car Show and promises to be bigger and better than its
Inaugural Year. Last year’s event was a huge success with
over 85 Classic Autos displayed in the center of the mall.
Lighthouse Point and Pompano Beach residents turned out in
droves. Car lovers as far as Palm Beach had their classics viewed.
The 2010 version of the 2nd Annual Car Show has added a
few new wrinkles to delight the attendees: The Malls Clothing
and Jewelry Shoppes will be sponsoring a Ladies Fashion Show.
There will be Face Painting by “Mother Goose” which will be
a real treat for the kids, while their dads will be shopping
for moms’ special day.
Talented Country Singer Ally Loren along with Country Rock
Artist Robbie Hilliard and his newly formed band will take stage
at noon. The Exchange Club of Pompano Beach, who is
presenting this event as a Fundraiser for their Local Children’s
Charities, will be supplying the Showmobile Stage.
There will be lots of parking, restaurants, shopping, live
entertainment and a great day out for families and all in the
surrounding communities. Monies collected by The Exchange
Club Grill and 25% of all entry
fees go directly to the children
in Pompano Beach and Broward
County. Donations are made
through The Exchange Club of
Pompano Beach.
85 YEARS OLD
AND
STILL SERVING
Mr. Frank J. Liburdy turned
85 yesterday, March 30, 2010.
As one of the most senior and
respected members of the
Exchange Club of Pompano
Beach, Frank has served his
community as a member since
January, 1974.
Frank has always been a
leader, involving himself with
the club’s various fund raising
activities and events and has
been an inspiration to all of the members.
The Exchange Club of Pompano Beach salutes Frank
and wishes to recognize and publically thank him for his
years of loyal service.

F eatures

10

Lighthouse Point Annual Art Show

15

Soroptimist Awards

19

Lighthouse Point Chamber of Commerce

20

Hillsboro Sailing

30

Nova Scotia Part 2

37

Lighthouse Point Library Annual Luncheon

40

Dog Whisperer

42

Presbyterian Food Pantry

The complete May issue and back issues of

Lighthouse Point Magazine

can be seen on our great website at www.LHPmag.com

Advertising Rates & Information

The Lighthouse Point Magazine is published monthly by City News Group and delivered by mail, free of charge each month to residents of Lighthouse Point, Deerfield Cove, businesses and the surrounding communities. Check our website for advertising rates and specials for new clients, or call 954-486-3820.

DEADLINES FOR CAMERA-READY ART AND PREPAYMENT OF ADS ARE DUE ON THE 1ST DAY OF THE PRECEDING MONTH OF PUBLICATION. ALL ON-GOING ADS MUST BE CANCELLED BY THE 1ST DAY OF THE PRECEDING MONTH OF PUBLICATION.

Editor

F r o m t h e

Your Child In School Only Four Days A Week?

Schools across the country are said to be cutting back to a four-day week. Perfect. Now children can spend more time on cell phones, texting, tweeting and whatever other dad- blasted contrivance comes on the market. And this is happening when our country’s education system continues to fall behind many other countries in the world. In China, Schoolchildren attend school 41 days a year more than most young American, the Wall Street Journal reports. In Korea and other Asian countries, children attend school on Saturdays. This could be the reason that youngsters from Asian countries routinely out-score their American counterparts, says the newspaper. Also reported was the enormous amount of time spent in most American schools on gym,recess,lunch,assembly, changing classes,home room,lining up to go to the art room, looking at movies, writing down homework assignments, quieting and controlling the classroom, celebrating too many holidays, and other pursuits.

Eighty charter schools around the country have decided to use the cele- brated Knowledge is Power Program (KIPP) that subjects its middle- schoolers to 60% more instructional time than typical public schools which includes eight to ten hours a day, Saturday morning classes and abbre- viated summer breaks.Isn’t it a wonder that America, the the greatest country in the world, cannot produce the greatest students in the world. Education is only one area in which our country is falling behind, if you count the rising obesity rate,birth rate deaths, disastrous health care, and the list goes on.America rates 33 in infant mortality at 6.3 deaths per thousand children born. How is it that 32 countries rate better than the greatest country in the world? But hold the phone; hurrah, we do have a number one rating: the most obese children in the world at 30.6 percent! Okay, so we and some of our slower politicians got sidetracked.But time is of the essence, so now is the time to start catching up.And in good time we will.You know why? Because America is the greatest country in the world!

Lighthouse Point M A G A Z I N E
Lighthouse Point
M A G A Z I N E

3467 N.W. 17 Terrace, Oakland Park, FL 33309

OFFICE

954-486-3820 • CELL

954-608-3820 • FAX

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Email: LHPnews@bellsouth.net Website: www.LHPmag.com

© 2010 Lighthouse Point Magazine

JonFrangipane – Founder/Publisher/Editor

BabsKall, Kall Graphics – Magazine Design & Layout

BohPhillips – Ad & Website Design WendellAbern – Staff Writer

LindaKaufman – Staff Writer AlanWilliamson – Staff Writer

Contributing Writers

Doreen Gauthier, Sheriff Al Lamberti, Dr. Steve Wigdor, Donna Torrey, Dr. Gary Goberville, Erica and Jan Davey, Barbara Silkstone, Rev. Jack Noble, Mary Griffin, Karen Hammett, Denise Richardson, Al Siefert, John Offerdahl, Catherine Favitta, Kim Sherman and Commissioner Ken Keetchl

C ontents

Al’s Corner

72

Around the Point

 

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As I Was Saying

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Beauty Spot of the Month

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Broward Mayor

72

Cantankerously Yours

 

56

Cookin’ with the Community. 62

Editorial

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Eyes Have

 

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Garden Lady

 

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Green Harriet

 

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Happy Birthday

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Hot Off the Grill

 

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Identity Theft

 

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I Love My Pet

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Legal Matters

 

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Library

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Lighthouse Point Chamber . 19

Mortgage News

 

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On Religion

 

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Out & About

 

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Pet Birthday Gallery

 

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Sheriff Lamberti Reports

 

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Skin

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Strange, But True

 

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NOTICE

Past issues of

Lighthouse Point Magazine

can be viewed online at www.LHPmag.com

To accommodate the many requests we get for our publication, copies of the Lighthouse Point Magazine are now available during the first week of each month at:

LHP Library, Police Station, Red Fox Diner, LHP Yacht & Racquet Club, J. Marks, Yahoo’s, Rita’s Ice, Bonefish Mac’s, Duffy’s Diner, Federal Grill, European Eden Buffet and Offerdahl’s Cafe. Call for other locations.

I Love My Pet

Offerdahl’s Cafe. Call for other locations. I Love My Pet Meeka Klein My name is Meeka

Meeka Klein

My name is Meeka Klein. I am a Maltese. I just turned five years old on March 9th and I weigh five pounds. Everybody tells me that I am adorable. It’s so obvious that I believe it myself. When my parents go out of town, I have Dot and Joanne to look after me. I love them, too! Why don’t you cut out my adorable photo and put it on your refrigerator, or why not buy a nice frame.

Meeka

Please send us a favorite photo of your pet. Also, include 75 words, or less why you love your pet, your name, address, phone and the name of your pet. Send photos by regular mail, or by email as a PDF or jpeg file to LHPnews@bellsouth.net. No photos will be returned.

MAY QUOTE “I was recently on a tour of Latin America, and the only regret I have was that I didn’t study Latin harder in school so I could converse with those people ” – Dan Quayle

CORRECTION: Please note that in the April issue on page 67 that 99 year old Lucy McKie was born in Brooklyn and first married to Salvatore Perniciaro, not Salvatore Marra. Her temporary residence is in Stoneybrook, Long Island.

16th Annual Lighthouse Point Arts Exhibition

16th Annual Lighthouse Point Arts Exhibition Photos by Jon Frangipane 1 2 3 4 7 9

Photos by Jon Frangipane

1 2 3 4 7 9 8 13 12 14 15
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9
8
13
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Sunday, March 28th 6 5 11 10
Sunday, March 28th
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The Artists:

1.

Rebecca Cerino-Days, event organizer with her Dad, Dr. Larry Cerino

2.

The Art of Celex – Alex Benitez

3.

Sonja’s Treasures – Sonja Serini

4.

Watercolor Artist – Bill Borough

5.

Murals – Johanne Gravel

6.

Artist – Reba Brenner

7.

Watercolor – JoAnn Culligan

8.

Paintings by Diana – Diana Marcinka (her father John, shown here)

9.

Artist – Barbara Doumar

10.

Artist – Edel Ritter

11.

Fin McNeal, Bead & Art Store & Studio with husband Matt

12.

Trevisol Guitars & Wood Turning – Dean Trevisol

13.

Anne Marie Brown

14.

Jewelry – Jean Cummins

15.

Fused Glass Artist – Babs Kall

16.

Caribbean Creations – Sandy Comstock

17.

G & K Design Center – Glen Doyle

17 16
17
16

Continued on page 36

Please take a moment to listen to Yvonne Brown sing a song dedicated to the
Please take a moment to listen to Yvonne Brown sing a song dedicated to the
Please take a moment to listen to Yvonne Brown sing a song dedicated to the
Please take a moment to listen to Yvonne Brown sing a song dedicated to the
Please take a moment to listen to Yvonne Brown sing a song dedicated to the
Please take a moment to listen to
Yvonne Brown sing a song dedicated
to the plight of poor and starving children.
Go to www.YouTube.com
Click “Videos” and type in “Yvonne Brown”
And listen to “So They May Live”
Words & Music by Jon Frangipane
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Soroptimist International Holds Awards Ceremony

By Patty Petrone

Soroptimist of Pompano Beach held its annual Awards Ceremony on March 24th at Galuppi’s Restaurant. Each year, the Pompano Beach Chapter honors local women who have made a significant difference in their own lives and in the lives of others. Recipient of the year’s The Woman of Distinction Award was Hazel Ambrister, who was honored for her professional or personal efforts, and making extraordinary differences in her community. This honoree is a woman whose work has had a significant impact in our community, and has also inspired and encouraged others. Ms. Ambrister has been a

resident of Pompano Beach since 1958 and graduated from the University of South Florida. She was an educator in Broward County for 33 years while raising her own 6 children. She is an active member of St Nicholas Episcopal Church and also volunteers at St Lawrence Chapel. She is the Vice Chair of Broward County Historical Commission, the Community Advisor for North Broward Hospital and is on the Advisory Board at Ely High School. Ms. Ambrister has done extensive work for the elderly. She is on the Advisory Council for Area Aging and Disability, works at the Angel-Senior feeding site at

E Pat Larkins Center, and was appointed to the Statewide Advisory Council to the Department of Elder Affairs. She is also on the Pompano Beach Historic Preservation Committee and the Air Park Advisory Board. Ms.Ambrister is an active member of the Pompano Beach Women’s Club and is their Second Vice Chair. The Women’s Opportunity Award recipients were Diane Absoli-Atis and Shaunal Sinclair. This Program is the primary Service Project for Soroptimist International. Each year, the Pompano Beach chapter awards $1,500 scholarships to motivated women who are the primary financial supporters of their families and are seeking to improve their lives by gaining additional skills, training, and education. They must be enrolled in or accepted to an undergraduate degree program or a vocational/skills training program and must demonstrate financial need. Diane is enrolled at Broward College and is pursuing an Associate of Arts degree in Psychology. She plans to continue her education at Florida

Psychology. She plans to continue her education at Florida Award winners Sofia Gonella, Diane Absoli-Atis, Hazel

Award winners Sofia Gonella, Diane Absoli-Atis,

Hazel Ambrister and Shaunal Sinclair .

Diane Absoli-Atis, Hazel Ambrister and Shaunal Sinclair . Taryn Palo, president of Soroptimist of Pompano Beach.

Taryn Palo, president of Soroptimist of Pompano Beach.

Judy Sullivan, Linda Woodhouse and recipient of the year’s The Woman of Distinction Award, Hazel

Judy Sullivan, Linda Woodhouse and recipient of the year’s The Woman

of Distinction Award, Hazel Ambrister.

International University for her Bachelors, adding on a minor in Behavioral Science. She then hopes to get some practical experience working for local government agencies involved in helping children. Her ultimate goal is to attain her “Director Credential” from the State of Florida in order to own and operate a 24-hour childcare facility. Diane has observed how difficult child care is for parents whose work schedule does not fall into the 9-5 time frame. She sees a need in our community and hopes some day to fill it! Shaunal is a student at Broward College pursuing an Associate of Arts degree in Pre-Med/Dental. Upon graduation, she plans to transfer to a 4-year university and get her Bachelors and perhaps, her Masters. Even as a young teen, Shaunal knew her path was in the health care industry. In high school, she was an active member of HOSA (Health Occupations Students of America) and at graduation, she received a special two-year diploma in Health Science through HOSA. She also received the “Silver Cord” award for over 310 service hours volunteering at hospitals and schools for unstable children, and was named a “Student with Great Character” by the Sun-Sentinel. At Broward College, she is a member of the Pre-Med Club, the Honors Student Committee, and Phi Theta Kappa (an honor society for 2-year college students). She is doing all the right things to reach her ultimate goal of becoming a Pediatrician! Recipient of the The Violet Richardson Award was Sofia Gonella, in a program that recognizes young women, ages 14-17, engaged in volunteer action within their

communities, or schools. This award is based solely on the applicant’s volunteer work and is an opportunity to honor a girl who has shown initiative in identifying a problem and trying to solve it, and has had significant and noteworthy accomplishments as a volunteer. Each year, Soroptimist of Pompano Beach presents a $500 award to each honoree. Sofia is a senior at Monarch High School in Coconut Creek. In 2007, Sophia and a friend started a small group at their high school called “Thoughtful Students Organization.” The goal of this organization is to collect items that are needed by local charities and help those suffering through harsh times. One of the major ideas they initiated was the neighborhood “paper bag drive” which includes several areas around their school and homes. The student volunteers place paper bags on their neighbors’ doorsteps along with a flyer explaining who

they are, what they are trying to collect and for whom. They ask that donations be placed in the bags and left back at the doorstep a few days later for the students to collect. Sophia and her group have organized over 15 “paper bag drives” and most recently, they collected over 60 bags of clothing and baby supplies for the earthquake victims in Haiti. Soroptimist of Pompano Beach is most proud of their outstanding Awards’ recipients this year and wishes them the very best in all their future endeavors.

Founded in 1921, Soroptimist is an international organization of business and professional women, consisting of almost 95,000 members in about 120 countries and territories. Soroptimists contribute time and financial support to community-based and international projects that benefit women and girls.

and international projects that benefit women and girls. Patty Blankenheim, scholarship chairperson. 16 Lighthouse

Patty Blankenheim, scholarship chairperson.

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Lighthouse Point Magazine

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18 Lighthouse Point Magazine • www.lhpmag.com
18 Lighthouse Point Magazine • www.lhpmag.com
18 Lighthouse Point Magazine • www.lhpmag.com

LHP Chamber Distributes “Taste” Proceeds

On March 16th, approximately 60 members of the Lighthouse Point Chamber of Commerce met at the Hedglon Chiropractic Center for the March Social and Networking Meeting. Dr. Paula Hedglon and her friendly staff gave tours of their impressive facility; and offered spinal “adjustments” and thermal imaging to the members. The main topic of the evening was the announcement concerning the dispersement of funds raised as a result of the popular “Taste of Lighthouse Point.” Donations include:

• $1,600 – LHP Fire Department to purchase a new device for Cardio Detection in an emergency situation

• $5,000 – Establish five College Scholarships in the amount of $1,000 each to be given to high school seniors who are residents of LHP

• $2,500 – Norcrest Elementary School for much needed educational supplies in their “Adopt a Classroom” program

• $1,500 – Lighthouse Point Mom’s Club for their Playground 2010 project for sun covering over the play areas & playground equipment

• $2,600 – Open Your Hearts to Haiti to build a home in the Lighthouse Point Village (in conjunction with Food for the Poor)

• $2,600 – to Rachel’s Village to build a home in Haiti by Food for the Poor

• $1,200 – Holiday gift cards for the needy In addition, $12,000 to support the marketing and advertising efforts of the Chamber including the On-line directory and the publication “The Navigator.”

Right, LHP Treasurer Lou Petrone announces disbursements of the 6th annual Taste of LHP Left,
Right, LHP
Treasurer Lou
Petrone
announces
disbursements of
the 6th annual
Taste of LHP
Left, Dr. Paula
Hedglon, Tai Scelfo
and Michael
Hedglon of
Hedglon
Chiropractic
Tai Scelfo and Michael Hedglon of Hedglon Chiropractic Dr. Natalie Stadler and Lisa Zepeda www.lhpmag.com •

Dr. Natalie Stadler and Lisa Zepeda

Hedglon of Hedglon Chiropractic Dr. Natalie Stadler and Lisa Zepeda www.lhpmag.com • Lighthouse Point Magazine 19

HISC Circle Raft Up 2010

By Maureen Leonard

HISC Circle Raft Up 2010 By Maureen Leonard On Saturday, March 6, the Hillsboro Inlet Sailing

On Saturday, March 6, the Hillsboro Inlet Sailing Club had its sixth annual circle raft up in Lake Boca.The participation in this event has grown from a circle of nineteen boats to more than seventy at one point in the last six years.This year, forty five boats from the HISC, the Gulfstream Sailing Club and the Single Sailors Club of S.E. Florida. braved the chilly weather. There is a great deal of planning and preparation for an event like this. For the last six years under the guidance of Hal Steward, Commodore HISC 2006 and Manager of the West Marine Store in Deerfield Beach this was accomplished.The process starts with the positioning of point vessels, usually the largest. This year Captains dealt with chilly temperatures and blustery breezes.The “hearty” bunch that they are, guided by Raft Master, a.k.a. Hal Steward, the 2010 circle was safely closed in three and a half hours.A cacophony of air horns and conch shells filled the air and the fun continued.

Following the circle closure the Flag ceremony began. Last years flag officers lowered their flags and the 2010 officers raised theirs. Commodore Jeff Kunkel, then introduced the 2010 Cruising Chairpersons, Larry and Eileen Winchell with George and Catherine Pyrpiris. Cocktail hour within the protection of the Circle began in the water as a “dink, drift and drink.” It was a lovely sunset, an evening of great camaraderie, and another wonderful social event. Circle Raft up 2010 is a fait accompli. Aerial photographs are courtesy of the Goodyear Blimp Air Field and Captain Marty Chandler.

HISC Changing of the Guard Outgoing Commodore Sully Sullivan and 2010 Commander Jeff Kunkel Marylou
HISC Changing of the Guard
Outgoing Commodore Sully Sullivan and
2010 Commander Jeff Kunkel
Marylou Woods and Art Campbell

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Email: sfldco@bellsouth.net Website: www.sfldco.com 954-781-1855 22 Lighthouse Point Magazine • www.lhpmag.com

Library’s Annual Volunteer Luncheon

Library Director Doreen Gauthier welcomed all the guests to their 31st Annual Volunteer Luncheon at St. Paul’s on an unusually brisk afternoon in March. Doreen thanked the St. Paul’s Church Women, who so graciously assisted with set-up and serving the food. “I happily present a check to Kathy DeJean and her wonderful crew as a token of our affection,” she said. Doreen also thanked Msgr. Brice, “whose invocation always sets the tone for our gathering, and to Charlene Conner whose soothing harp music is such a bonus.” Introductions were then made to Mayor and Mrs. Fred Schorr, Commission President Mike Long, Commission VP and Chairman of the Friends of the Library Susie Gordon, Commis- sioners Tom Hasis, Sandy Johnson and Chip LaMarca. Also attending were City Attorney Mike Cirullo, City Administrator John Lavisky, Fire Chief David Donzella, Public Works Director Art Graham, City Clerk Carol Landau, Police Chief Ross Licata,Finance Director Terry Sharp and Recreation Director John Trudel. The Library Staff included Administrative Secretary,Technology guru and teacher Cathy Anthony, Library Associate and newest staff member Patty Eng, Readers’ Advisor, circulation supervisor and volunteer coordinator Rosemary Wilson, and evening and Saturday supervisor Barbara Stiles.

Mayor Schorr then praised the library’s accom- plishments. “The Lighthouse Point Library is the Cultural Nerve Center of our community,it is the heartbeat of LHP,” said the mayor. “Best of all, it's locally controlled — not a state or county library — it’s OUR library,” he added. In July 1965 the Lighthouse Point Library opened the doors for the first time in a rented storefront facing 24th Street in the Beacon Light Shopping Center. “We’ve come a long way, baby, since that day!” exclaimed Doreen. Changes in the library system were noted when computers and the

in the library system were noted when computers and the Seated Joe DeBuvitz, Lenore DeBuvitz, Olga

Seated Joe DeBuvitz, Lenore DeBuvitz, Olga Sher; standing Barbara Kezer, Barbara Murtha, Penny Hilston, Marcia Crismond, Arlene Loesel, Tina Furey, Judy Carson, Janice Clermont

Arlene Loesel, Tina Furey, Judy Carson, Janice Clermont Left to right: Dr. Nicholas Louis, Tori Anderson,

Left to right: Dr. Nicholas Louis, Tori Anderson, Ruth Ann Fleming (board chair), Doreen Gauthier, Linda Hinkle, Mary Ann Platt

been documented and retold often enough; suffice it to say that one element has remained a constant through these 45 years – YOU THE VOLUNTEERS. In 1965 the library had no employees only volunteers. Today we have nearly 100 volunteers who in one capacity or another enrich the lives of the residents of this City. In these more austere budget times the role of the volunteer becomes even more magnified.” In closing, Doreen declared, “We must not, in trying to think about how we can make a big difference, ignore the small daily differences we can make, which over time, add up to big difference that we often cannot foresee.That sums up what you give each and every day to our library.Thank you!” And our community thanks Doreen Gauthier for all that she does from her heart!

Doreen Gauthier for all that she does from her heart! ◆ Monsignor Brice children’s department were

Monsignor Brice

children’s department were non- existent. “Much of that exploding communication world has left many of us sorely behind — Wikis, Tweets, Facebook, Blogs — some have even suggested that we vote by using our touchtone SmartFone, so If I am a Luddite,so be it,because the library is still the only place where the world of print is still king,” she added. Doreen was filled with praise for the volunteers.“Our history has

AS I WAS SAYING Secrets of Serving Spring Breakers By Alan Williamson A college student,

AS I WAS SAYING

Secrets of Serving Spring Breakers

By Alan Williamson

A college student, athlete, and all- round popular guy on campus, my

Even though we knew that approximately half of our overnight guests would not have a real bed or comfortable alternative, we discovered something irresistibly endearing about college students: they value adventure and new experiences much more than old-fashioned luxury. Drive 25 hours non-stop in an overcrowded van from Nebraska to Fort Lauderdale? Sign me up! Go without a shower for two days and suffer the toxic hygiene of people who hadn’t showered in four days? Count me in! Sleep on the floor in a strange house with my head on a musty duffle bag? Not a problem! Though their flexibility is undeniably impressive, there is one thing that traveling spring breakers are adamant about having and will not tolerate any excuse in its absence. Secrets of Serving Spring Breakers # 3 “Do you have any more power outlets?” one of my nephew’s buddies asked despondently. That question had never come up before in 16 years of living in our home. Before answering, I took a quick look around and saw that every available plug was stuffed with some form of recharging technology — from cell phones and Blackberries to iPods, electronic notebooks and laptops. “I’ve got a socket open in the laundry room,” I advised helpfully. “I hope this won’t affect our customer satisfaction ranking.” “I’ll let it go this time,” he sighed. If we got points taken off for insufficient connectivity, we made most of them back by answering “yes” to the one question spring breakers always ask their adult guardians when there’s no hope of doing it behind their backs. Secrets of Serving Spring Breakers # 4 “Is it okay if we have a couple of beers on your patio?” my nephew politely asked as the evening wound down. “As long as everyone’s done driving for the night and you

keep the noise down to a dull roar it’s fine with me,” I specified.

I wasn’t sure if I came across as “the cool uncle” or a crotchety

old-fart with a crossword puzzle waiting for him. “Thanks UncleAl,” Eric mumbled gratefully,implicitly accepting my terms and conditions. “And by the way, I just thought you might like to know, some of the guys were talking and they said that for

an older guy you look like you’re in pretty good shape.” Pretty good shape for an older guy. I let the words sink in for

a few narcissistic seconds. “Thanks for passing that along, Eric,”

I chuckled nonchalantly. As I said my goodnights, I thought about what a fine, right- minded group of Nebraska kids they were and how they deserved the very best in spring break accommodations and conveniences. Next year, the economy willing, I’m adding extra beds and electrical outlets.And just to make sure our welcome message is no secret, there will be a banner out on the patio that reads:

SPRINGBRASKA 2011:

Your Low-Budget Bed and Beer Break Before the Bahamas

nephew Eric has a lot on his plate. I’m not talking about his daily to-do list. I’m literally talking about his plate. At any given moment day or night that plate can be piled high with the high-density food required to fuel the relentless growth and development of a blossoming beefcake. It was that frightening vision of an insatiable eating machine in our kitchen that first popped into my head when my brother and sister-in-law told us that Eric and nine of his friends would be passing through Fort Lauderdale on their way from Nebraska to the Bahamas for a spring break cruise. “Of course they can stay with us the day before the cruise,” I assured them. “We wouldn’t have it any other way.” No sooner had I hung up the phone when I immediately began torturing myself with graphic images of the massive amounts of chow their care and feeding would demand. “What do you think about pizzas?” I asked my wife, going for the obvious no-effort crowd-pleaser. “We would have to get seven or eight pies,” Sherry pointed out. She reminded me that my parents and aunt and uncle were also joining us. “That’s going to get expensive and not everyone likes pizza.” “Then how about subs?” I proposed,cranking out menu ideas like Jay Leno cranks out jokes. “Same downside,” Sherry countered. “Getting enough to go around will get pricy and not everyone will want a sandwich.” “So what’s your bright idea?” I shrugged, adopting the taunting tone of voice I use when Sherry rejects two of my ideas in a row. Secrets of Serving Spring Breakers # 1 “I say we buy a bunch of hamburgers and hot dogs at Costco, throw them on the grill, and make a big pasta salad to go with them,” Sherry announced with an air of sensibility that was unassailable. “You must have read my mind,” I said in mock wonder. “I was just about to say that.” Secrets of Serving Spring Breakers # 2 With the food crisis averted, we started doing the math on our sleeping options for 10 college students. The accommo- dations we came up with went like this:

• 1 queen-size guest bed for 2 (“The Honeymooner Special”)

• 1 queen-size fold-out sofa for 2 (“The BFF”)

• 1 non-fold-out sofa for 1 (“The Rejected Romeo”)

• 1 family room love seat for 1 (“The Salute to Tiny Asian Woman”)

• 1 living room love seat for 1 (“The Mini-Me Night of Misery”)

• 1 air-bed on loan for 1 (“The Blowhard”)

• 1 carpeted floor for the last 2 out of the bathroom (“The Rug-Sucker”)

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New Location on the Water
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on the Water 3100 E. OAKLAND PARK BLVD. • FT LAUDERDALE, FL 33308 www.lhpmag.com • Lighthouse
The Garden Lady Says… WHAT’S IN A NEEM? By Donna Torrey A while ago, the

The Garden Lady Says…

WHAT’S IN A NEEM?

By Donna Torrey

The Garden Lady Says… WHAT’S IN A NEEM? By Donna Torrey A while ago, the chemical

A while ago, the chemical pesticide Dursban was taken off the market; it has finally been deemed too toxic. For many years, this compound had been used to indiscriminately kill insects in everything from cities to living rooms. Thanks to skillful marketing campaigns, Dursban became a household name much like Kleenex. Unfortunately, many people had to suffer before it was acknowledged to cause illness. Now, thanks in part to the internet, we can be informed, powerful consumers, and we should demand that any product we use, especially in our homes and on food, be safe for us and the environment. There are actually many effective, safe alternatives to choose from, but as with drugs, if they are naturally occurring, there’s not much incentive to market them, because much less money can be made. So, don’t expect them to be advertised on TV, or highlighted in big box flyers. Neem, a botanical product that is derived from the Neem tree, (Azadiracta indica) is your one stop shop. All parts of the tree are used, but especially the oil extracted from the seeds. For centuries, it was used in its homeland of India not only to control insects, but also to cure many sicknesses, including

malaria. Only recently, has there been a resurgence of this plant’s importance. In fact the United Nations has declared Neem to be the tree of the 21st century. In a nutshell, Neem’s chemical constituents, when ingested by the insect, create hormonal disruptions which prevent the insect from feeding, breeding or metamorphosing. Unlike artificial chemical insecticides, it does not lead to resistant strains. Entomologists have isolated at least 390 different insect species that are controlled by the bio-activity of the Neem tree. As a bonus, it also is effective in killing fungus, bacteria, and virus. It is totally safe to use on food plants, is pleasant smelling and inexpensive. This is a product that every gardener should have in her arsenal. Aphids, scale, mealybug, chinch bugs, leaf miner, moth larvae, beetles and thrips, watch out! Neem to the rescue. Garden gate Nursery is located in the Pompano Citi Centre. Donna can be reached at 954-783-GATE, or at www.donnas gardengate.com

Beauty Beauty Spot Spot of of the the Month Month
Beauty Beauty Spot Spot of of the the Month Month

Congratulations to Mary and Kevin Cavaioli of 2300 NE 49th Street, winners of the Lighthouse Point Community’s Beauty Spot of the Month Award for April, chosen by the LHP Beautification Committee.

you’ve always had it in you! Get your ‘groove’ back! now that 2010 is here
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www.lhpmag.com • Lighthouse Point Magazine 29
www.lhpmag.com • Lighthouse Point Magazine 29
www.lhpmag.com • Lighthouse Point Magazine 29

On The Road Again:

2685 Kilometers Around

On The Road Again: 2685 Kilometers Around Across Nova Scotia Part II By Judy Sullivan, Photos

Across Nova Scotia

Part II
Part II

By Judy Sullivan, Photos By Bill Sullivan

Bras d’or Lake Scenic Drive And Fleur-De-Lis Trails

F rom Baddeck, we traveled west around the huge Bras'd

Or Lake, then east to historic Ft. Louisbourgh. The lake region is the traditional home of Nova Scotia’s native Mi'kmaq (commonly pronounced Mik Mack) Indians.They have occupied the Northumberland Shore for centuries. The Fortress of Louisbourg is a step thru time into a fortified French colonial town of the 18th century. It is the largest historic reconstruction in North America, meticulously rebuilt on the foundations of the original fortress. The French came to the site in 1713, and due to the thriving fishing industry it quickly became a French stronghold. The need for fish was great and it was plentiful in the waters of Nova Scotia. The Roman Catholic King of France saw the promise of great profit from the Cod, so its primary function was to protect the cod fishing industry rather than as a strategic military base. Twice taken by the English, the walls were completely destroyed, and the citizens sent back to France the second time. Since the fortress was of little strategic use, it fell into complete disuse and disrepair. Thankfully, careful records were kept allow- ing for the exact recon- struction of the site today. The year is 1744 as you pass thru the gates to streets filled with soldiers, fishermen, musicians and vendors who appear to be going about their daily business. Guides are available for a 45 minute trip thru time. One still needs time to explore on his own to visit the sod- roofed fisherman’s cottage where the cod is dried, and the bakery where bread is made daily “the old fashioned way.” There is a small museum showing the history of the Mi’kmaq people of Cape Breton. We had lunch at a tavern where we were served 18th century style; offered only a large napkin plate, and pewter spoon. Leaving Fort Louisbourg, a short drive took us to Lighthouse Point and the historic Louisbourg Lighthouse. It is the site of the first lighthouse in Canada, built by the

is the site of the first lighthouse in Canada, built by the French in 1733. Another

French in 1733. Another was built in the 1820s and the present one in 1920, on the site of the ruins of the first two. Following the Sunrise Trail (the Northumberland Shore region), we arrived in Antigonish. The renowned Highland Games have been held here every July since 1861, the largest and oldest held outside of Scotland. Following the St George’s Bay, we continued to Pictou, our destination for the night.

Pictou is a harbor town dating back to September 15, 1773, when the first boatload of Scottish Highlanders arrived on the ship Hector, beginning a wave of Scottish migration. On the waterfront, a full scale replica of the Hector sits in the Quay. We were in Pictou during the celebration when 200 direct descendants of the original settlers all boarded the Hector; reliving the feeling of the original six week crossing. We had dinner at a waterfront restaurant with a view of the sunset on one side and the Hector on the other. Our B&B in Pictou was the Evening Sail B&B, owned and operated by Gail and Michelle LeBlanc, a mother and daughter, again Toronto transplants (seems to be a trend!). They have owned the Inn for five years and were a wealth of information. We enjoyed long conversations with Michelle who must have been a stand up comedienne in a previous life! Breakfast was served family style and we met and chatted with the other eight guests over robust coffee, homemade muffins, croissants, fresh juice and egg casserole. She supplied each guest with a zip lock bag to take muffins with them “for the road.”

a zip lock bag to take muffins with them “for the road.” THE SUNRISE TRAIL The
a zip lock bag to take muffins with them “for the road.” THE SUNRISE TRAIL The

THE SUNRISE TRAIL

The Sunrise Trail begins with rolling farmlands and the waters of the Northumberland Strait. We could see red bluffs as we continued northwest toward New Brunswick.

The communities along this route offer a fascinating array of names. We first arrived in Tagamagouche, then Pugwash which sits on a harbor at the mouth of the Pugwash River. Most noticeable were the street signs in both Gaelic and English, reflecting the town's strong Scottish heritage. It is a producer of some of the finest pewter, and a major mine that produces over a million tons of the purest salt annually. Pugwash is the host of the Gathering of the Clans each July 1 with festivals of traditional music, dance and highland games.

NEW BRUNSWICK

New Brunswick is Canada’s only official bilingual province. We entered New Brunswick on the eastern end at Sackville, a small town on a marsh with a bronze statue to the man who loved the city so much he swept the streets every day. The eastern seaboard, along the shores of the Bay of Fundy, is considered one of the Marine Wonders of the World. Called Ocean Tidal Exploration Site, the Hopewell Rocks are the site of the highest tides in the world;reach- ing the height of a four-story building. You can walk on the ocean floor and six hours later be 14 metres (45 feet) above it. Called flower pots, towering rock formations, sculpted by the powerful Bay of Fundy’s tidal power, are tufted on top with shrubbery. A 10- to 15-minute gravel walking trail from the Inter- pretive Center takes you to the site. Shuttle service is also provided for a fee. The rocks are reached by a series of 122 metal steps. The top of the stairs bears a clock and a cautionary sign indicating the time visitors must be on the stairs in order the get safely to the top before the high tide. Yo u can walk the ocean floor for about 1.5 km from three hours before low tide to three hours after. (9) Taking Canada Highways 1 and 2, we travelled a more inland route, passing near the farming town of Sussex. Sussex is known as the covered bridge Capital of Atlantic Canada, and is host to the Atlantic International Balloon Festival, an event we missed by a few days! The route then took us south, into historic St. John, the “anchor” of the Bay of Fundy. This large city with maritime charm contains beautiful “old port architecture,” but is also the site of huge cruise ships and ferries. St John is the oldest city in Canada. It is a cosmopolitan city with parks, theatres and museums, as well as historic forts and cemeteries. One must take heed in this area to refer to St. John (New Brunswick), as opposed to St. John’s (Newfoundland) in order to avoid confusion (or looking uneducated!).

in order to avoid confusion (or looking uneducated!). Our first big city on the trip came

Our first big city on the trip came as a bit of a cultural shock. Our GPS carefully guided us to the Homeport Historic B&B, but we found ourselves in what appeared to be a declining area of the city. The house sat atop a grassy bluff, surrounded by other homes that appeared to be hoping for a rejuvenation of the area! Homeport is owned by Ralph Holyoke and his wife. It is actually two historic homes, originally belonging to two brothers, joined together in the middle with an addition. The grounds are sloped and grassy and contain flower gardens with whimsical sculpture. Close by is New Brunswick Square. On three levels it contains shops, restaurants and services and the pedway to the uptown attractions. Our dinner was at The Boilerworks which looked as if it had just stepped out of South Beach. Breakfast was served in the old dining room with a small serving kitchen adjacent. The house was “managed” by two dogs, Digby, a Duck Trolling Retriever and Nova a 2- year-old Chow/Lab mix. St John is also home to Reversing Falls.Although we did not have an opportunity to visit, it is said to be an experience that should be witnessed 3 times: at all times of the tides. Halfway between high and low tide is Slack Tide. Lasting approximately 20 minutes, it is the only time that boats can pass thru the falls. It is the time when the Bay of Fundy and the St John River are equal.The bay drops too low and the river flow is allowed to come crashing thru the gorge and out to sea.When the ocean climbs to high tide, the river reverses and flows backwards with rapids running upriver; thus its name. We arrived at the Ferry terminal at 8 the next morning for our 9AM departure. Reservations had been made in May, so check in was fast and easy. Since the ferry schedules vary by the time of the year, the day of the week and the direction (St. John to Digby or vice versa), it is very important to check the schedules before going. Prices vary as to season, car size and ages of occupants as well. Boarding is organized and fast, and the ships are clean. The Princess of Acadia had a gift shop, news stand, library and several “restaurants,” as well as a large lounge with computer ports and wifi. The crossing to Digby took about three hours.

and wifi. The crossing to Digby took about three hours. Continued on page 32 www.lhpmag.com •

Continued on page 32

FUNDY SHORE AND ANNAPOLIS VALLEY

Digby is the gateway to some of Nova Scotia's most spectacular regions. It was founded in 1783 by Loyalists from New England, led by Admiral Digby. It overlooks the Annapolis Basin which opens into the Bay of Fundy.World Famous Digby scallops are harvested here and colorful scallop draggers sit in the harbor. The boats sit almost on dry land during the low tide, but float at dock level 9 metres higher when the tide is high. The boardwalk along the harbor is lined with shops and restaurants. The scallop dragger, Lady Vanessa, restored into a fishing and scallop museum, sits at the end. Off the main street is Trinity Anglican Church. Built in 1878, it is thought to be the only one in Canada built entirely by shipwrights. The interior handiwork shows this influence.

by shipwrights. The interior handiwork shows this influence. Our B&B,The Thistle Down Country Inn, was on

Our B&B,The Thistle Down Country Inn, was on the wharf overlooking the famous scallop fleet. It is a small house on the Bay with a two story “motel style unit” in the back. It is owned by a tall,rather humorless gentleman,with an unfortunate resemblance to Lurch of Adams Family TV fame! The units in the back were clean and close to the water. Though not “antique,” they did afford us a beautiful sunset! After lunch, a stroll along the wharf took us out onto the docks to watch the scallop draggers. In speaking to some of the fishermen, we learned that there are numerous “salmon farms” in the bay. Actually caged, the salmon are fed twice daily by discharging food thru large hoses on the side of the boat. The drag “nets” that scoop up the scallops are made from recycled tires!

For the rest of the afternoon, we took a short side-trip to Annapolis Royal. Annapolis Royal is located along the Evangeline Trail. It contains over 150 heritage buildings including the oldest wooden house in Canada. This is also the home of the Annapolis Historic Gardens and the Ft. Anne National Historic Site. ‘The fort features earthwork fortifications, a museum, officer’s quarters and

a magazine. It is the fifth fort built on this location. Located at the Annapolis River Causeway, the Annapolis Tidal Power Project is the first of its kind in North America. It generates hydroelectric power using the force of the Fundy tides. The Digby Neck and islands are famous for the whale watching experiences. The Bay of Fundy is home to at least 15 species of whales. They migrate to the Bay of Fundy in the summer and fall then to the warmer waters of the Caribbean and Mexico for mating and eating in the winter and spring. Most commonly sighted are the Humpback, Fin and Minke whales. It is also home to Atlantic White-sided Dolphin and Porpoise. Brier Island is reached by two ferries. Each runs 24/7, at

a cost of $5.00 round trip. The two ferries are timed so that by leaving one you arrive in time for the second. Payment is made on the way over, no charge to return. The first leaves East Ferry for Tiverton on Long Island.

The first leaves East Ferry for Tiverton on Long Island. Tiverton is a small fishing village

Tiverton is a small fishing village with Boar’s Head Lighthouse. There is also a trail to Balancing Rock, a much photo- graphed column of Basalt rock, balanced precariously on the edge of the shore. Try as we might, we never found the trail to see the rock! From Freeport at the end of the island, the second ferry takes you to Brier Island. The Brier Island Lodge is pretty much “the only game in town.” It is a motel- style lodge with a farm and a resident goat named Ruby, two dogs Harley and Rascal, a pot bellied pig,several roosters,a couple of sheep and a horse. The restaurant serves dinner and a complimentary continental breakfast.

Continues on page 46

Become Familiar with Wealth-transfer Strategies To retire comfortably, you need to save and invest regularly.
Become Familiar with
Wealth-transfer Strategies
To retire comfortably, you need to save and invest regularly.
But once you retire, you may need to think less about
accumulating wealth and more about distributing it.
To distribute your wealth effectively, you’ll need to make
the right moves. For example, you’ll need to create a will.And
you’ll need the right beneficiary designations on your
insurance policies, your 401(k) and your IRA.
To accomplish more complex goals, such as leaving money
to a charity while still receiving an income stream for life,
you may need to create other legal arrangements, such as a
charitable remainder trust. Of course, you’ll need to consult
with your tax and legal advisors before establishing any type
of trust arrangement.
Don’t wait until you’re retired before planning your
wealth-transfer techniques. Time has a way of sneaking up on
all of us — but it’s especially sneaky when we’re unprepared.
954-783-6694
www.edwardjones.com
Robert Friedman, AAMS
1827 NE 24th Street
Lighthouse Point
FL 33064
MEMBER SIPC
robert.friedman@edwardjones.com
Point FL 33064 MEMBER SIPC robert.friedman@edwardjones.com 34 Lighthouse Point Magazine • www.lhpmag.com
Point FL 33064 MEMBER SIPC robert.friedman@edwardjones.com 34 Lighthouse Point Magazine • www.lhpmag.com
www.lhpmag.com • Lighthouse Point Magazine 35
www.lhpmag.com • Lighthouse Point Magazine 35
www.lhpmag.com • Lighthouse Point Magazine 35
www.lhpmag.com • Lighthouse Point Magazine 35

16th Annual Lighthouse Point Arts Exhibition

Continued from page 11 20 21 19 18 27 26 25 28 32 33 34
Continued from page 11
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The Artists:

18.

Portraits – Marcia irschy

19.

Artist – Peggy inaekian

 

20.

Art – Jerry Smietanka

21.

Water Colors & Mixed Media – Marilyn G.(oung

22.

Jim Leary

 

23.

Kinky Bikini – Deborah Lettieri

24.

&alerie Lecklikner

 

25.

Artist – Jake Evan Janis

26.

Scul8tures – Lee Ann Cummins

27.

Artist – Francine Maille

 

28.

Stegman’s Studio – Roger Stegman

29.

Wildlife Art – by arley

 

30.

Watercolors by Diann – Diann Brassard

31.

Joni

Designs – Joni

. Purkiss

32.

Treasures From the Sea – Norma Lettieri

33.

Jewelry – Shirley Kelley

 

34.

Mixed Media – Monica elue Kajatt

35.

Art & Design – Tammy Seymore

36.

"uilts – Regina Whalen

 

37.

PlexSea Art – Peg Renard

38.

Watercolorist – George Thom8son

37.

Wildlife and Nature Photogra8her – Joanne Williams

39
39
38
38
PINE CREST
PINE CREST

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atch the cam) video get more information

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DAY CAMP

DAY CAMP “This is the perfect program for the kids in our community. Come join us
DAY CAMP “This is the perfect program for the kids in our community. Come join us

“This is the perfect program for the kids in our community. Come join us for our 52nd action-packed summer.”

Karen Dunne, Camp Director and Lighthouse Point resident for over 25 years.

Director and Lighthouse Point resident for over 25 years. Over 40 on-campus activities for kids ages
Director and Lighthouse Point resident for over 25 years. Over 40 on-campus activities for kids ages
Director and Lighthouse Point resident for over 25 years. Over 40 on-campus activities for kids ages

Over 40 on-campus activities for kids ages 5-11.

25 years. Over 40 on-campus activities for kids ages 5-11. Conveniently situated 5 miles south of

Conveniently situated 5 miles south of Lighthouse Point, located between Federal and Dixie Highways and only an 11 minute car ride away. Door-to-door bus service available.

SAMPLE RD. 1 95 ATLANTIC BLVD. PINE CREST DAY CAMP N.E. 62 STREET COMMERCIAL BLVD.
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DAY CAMP
N.E. 62 STREET
COMMERCIAL BLVD.
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FEDERAL HWY.
A1A

1501 NE 62 Street • Ft. Lauderdale

The Dog Whisperer Jay Meranchik Story and Photos by Marla Schwartz
The
Dog Whisperer
Jay Meranchik
Story and Photos by Marla Schwartz

were allowed were fish and birds. No cats, no dogs,” Jay said. “But the fish and the birds were all I had when I had got sick and they meant everything to me.” “I realized something was wrong right away, but it wasn’t until I fell down in school and couldn’t get up anymore that other people noticed,” Jay said. Today Jay looks like the pillar of health and one would never know he has a disability. He suffers deep pain, but it’s nothing that’s visible to the eye. He has what medical professionals refer to as an invisible illness. “That’s a problem because people think there is no problem when there is one. “I fight it all the time.” Therefore, Max is more than merely a pet, although his joy at having her in his company is self-evident, but she’s his working dog. Max is always ready to work and enjoys demonstrating her skills. Jay gives a command from the couch, ‘Max, go open the refrigerator and get me the water.’ She does. ‘Good girl. You didn’t close the refrigerator (she’s young, she’s learning), go close that door.’ He makes two clicking noises and she closes the door and returns to Jay. “She also gets the newspaper every morning and she starts the vacuum cleaner up for me.” Max has a training area in the backyard where the

for me.” Max has a training area in the backyard where the J ay Meranchik, Lighthouse

J ay Meranchik, Lighthouse Point resident, and well- respected dog whisperer, discovered a key element

to the anti-aging process when he was still a kid. It’s

his ability to value, understand and literally commu-

nicate with dogs that makes him unique. He’s not only a superlative dog trainer, teaching individuals how to build relationships with their dogs, but is one of the first pioneers in the field of pet therapy in this country. “I helped create the laws that allow pets into nursing homes, hospitals and institutions,” Jay explained. “I’ve been recognized with a Jefferson Award, appeared in a Walt Disney educational film with my own dog, and was honored in proclamation by local commissioners.” Jay’s natural ability to bring out the best in people by introducing his dogs to them in such settings has turned into something that many of us take for granted. Always naming his dogs after superheroes, he’s currently the proud owner of Maxine (nicknamed Max), named after Jessica Alba’s character {Max Guevara,a secret government supersoldier} in Dark Angel, and it’s clear, by watching them together, that their relationship is a very special one. Although Max looks like a German Shepherd, she’s actually a Belgian Malinois,and at a tender-age of 16-months, attends to Jay’s every need, and he does the same for her. Jay suffers from a rare form of polio that is characterized by progressive symmetrical paralysis and loss of reflexes, usually beginning in the legs. “I got polio from the polio shot when I was fourteen,” Jay explained. ‘A small percentage of people contract the disease this way.” “I didn’t get polio until I was fourteen. It happened when they switched from the vaccine to the sugar pills,” he said. His body obviously didn’t have a good reaction to it. And growing up in the projects of Brooklyn, NY, he already had a rough start in life. “I grew up in Sheepshead Bay, Coney Island and in the projects the only pets you

90-years-old.”
90-years-old.”

climbs the ladder, walks on the balance beam and more. She’s even learning how to push a grocery cart. Jay’s fondness of animals was unmistakable as a young child because he used to run away to the local pet shop for solace. One day the owner hired him to come and work after school and feed the animals. Jay was in his element. Later on he worked as an animal handler in a biological lab that sold rat, monkey and dog cells. “They were taking dogs and killing them and selling their cells. I ended up quitting because I couldn’t take it any longer,” said Jay. Before quitting, he saved a liter and adopted one of the dogs. This dog became his first working dog, named Natasha. It was at the lab when he ran across research papers written by psychiatrists about using dogs as a catalyst for response in patients. “I’m a different individual than most,” he said. Meaning, he realized that this research suggested there was a need to train dogs to help therapists reach through the emotional conflicts that existed between them and their patients. Jay originally moved to Florida to help take care of his mother, but he also had other plans, as well. In September 1974 he created his first organization, the Feeling Heart Foundation, based in Miami Beach. “Animals, up to this point, weren’t allowed in institutions,” he said. His mother had a lot to do with opening up his eyes and teaching him to pursue his gift. “My mother was a woman full of faith

and she took care of me when I got polio, and every time I’d reach a goal and she’d see somebody who was less fortunate than I was, whether the person suffered from polio or some other form of a crippling disease, and say, ‘there by the grace of God.’ She knew I had a gift with animals and for years I didn’t know what to do with it and she’d tell me that when God is knocking at your door you just have to listen and you’ll figure it out. Finally one day I put it all together and I said I can help.” He tries to hold back tears when speaking about his mother. “My mother raised me, and I was born and raised Jewish, and one of the things she always impressed upon me was how to make the world a better place,” Jay said. “She said that’s our job. She’s gone now. She passed away a couple of years ago from old age, she was almost

These days Jay is busy creating a new foundation called The National K-9 Working Dog, Inc, that will create a national database registry for all working dogs (Police, Search & Rescue and Service), so they can be given critical equipment needed to protect their lives and well being while doing their jobs serving and protecting the public. “I just started it at the beginning of the month and this is the evolution of what I’ve been doing all my life. In talking with the Florida state police I found out that there isn’t a retirement program for these dogs,and without any police officers they are taking on a financial burden they may not be able to handle. The dogs don’t live much longer after retirement, so the state should at least continue its financial responsibility for these dogs for their last couple of years. Otherwise, and it’s unfortunate, that a few dogs are euthanized. Working dogs deserve much more respect than what currently exists,” said Jay. And here’s Jay’s advice: whenever you see a working dog helping someone who is disabled, please don’t bother the dog. “When we enter a grocery store or a restaurant the public is really not aware of how to proceed and react to a service dog, so I’m trying to raise awareness in order to teach people what is not appropriate. Dogs can be easily distracted and they’re supposed to be paying attention to the person they’re servicing, so if you pet it, that’s a distraction and it’s harmful to the disabled person.” Jay has been invited by the Broward county library system to come in and speak to the children about service dogs and how to take care of and understand their pets. There’s a difference between someone who loves animals and someone who is a dog whisperer, and Jay is certainly both!

SANCTUARY GUILD HOLDS FASHION SHOW

The Sanctuary Guild of The First Presbyterian Church in Pompano Beach held its Annual Luncheon/Fashion Show at Lighthouse Point Yacht and Racquet Club on March 20. The theme for the Luncheon was to support the food pantry of The First Presbyterian Church that is operated under the leadership of Dwayne Black, Pastor of Children’s Youth and The Reverend W. Jack Noble. The Sanctuary Guild wanted to assist the Youth Group in their mission of distributing food to our neighbors in need. The Sanctuary Guild offered for its raffle prizes, beautiful baskets donated by merchants from Lighthouse Point, Pompano Beach, Deerfield Beach, Boca Raton and West Palm Beach. Elsa Hoffmann was the star of the fashion show. At 102 years young, she modeled three different styles from Patchington located in Pompano Beach and Sondro located at the Cove Shopping Center. The table decorations were unusual. Cans of food in Publix brown bags with pink fillers were the centerpieces for the tables. The food was donated to the food pantry at First Presbyterian Church to help those in need. The guests expressed their approval of the theme.

need. The guests expressed their approval of the theme. ◆ Annie Miller, Donna Lyon, (co-presidents) Elsa

Annie Miller, Donna Lyon, (co-presidents) Elsa Hoffmann, Doug Hurst, Carolyn Buonomo

(co-presidents) Elsa Hoffmann, Doug Hurst, Carolyn Buonomo Marti Miles, Phyllis Phelps ,Jeane Russick, Connie Johnson,

Marti Miles, Phyllis Phelps ,Jeane Russick, Connie Johnson, Georgette Fitzpatrick, Dwyane Black, Becky Concato, Annie Miller, Carolyn Buonomo, Donna Lyon. Kneeling: Marcy Sloan and Ingrid Bowman

Buonomo, Donna Lyon. Kneeling: Marcy Sloan and Ingrid Bowman Elsa Brehm Hoffman, 102 year-old fashion model.
Buonomo, Donna Lyon. Kneeling: Marcy Sloan and Ingrid Bowman Elsa Brehm Hoffman, 102 year-old fashion model.

Elsa Brehm Hoffman, 102 year-old fashion model.

44 Lighthouse Point Magazine • www.lhpmag.com
44 Lighthouse Point Magazine • www.lhpmag.com
Restaurant And Marina A landmark for the past 33 years! Enjoy a beau Enjoy a
Restaurant And Marina
A landmark for the past 33 years!
Enjoy a beau
Enjoy a beautiful atmosphere and breathtaking view of the intracoastal
utiful atmosphe ere and breathta aking
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while dining at The Cove Restaurant and Marina. Celebrating 33 years
while
dining at The Cove Re estaurant and M
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of fine family dining, this beautiful experience is not to be missed!
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Phone: 95 54-421-9272
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aurant.com
Cove Yacht Basin, Hillsboro Blvd. at the Intracoastal
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Deerfield Beach, Florida 33441
Deerfield Beach, Florida 33441

On The Road Again:

On The Road Again: 2685 Kilometers Around Nova Scotia Continued from page 32 Our Whale watching

2685 Kilometers Around

Nova Scotia

Continued from page 32
Continued from page 32

Our Whale watching cruise began from the general store in Westport, the only village on the island, where we found sandwiches and soft drinks and picked up our tickets. The morning rain cleared and by push off we had beautiful sunny weather. We encountered only several Dolphin and porpoise early, but our patience was rewarded later when we found two Humpbacks who swam close to the boat as we followed. There is no wildlife encounter in the world that compares with the greeting of a whale! We watched them “blow” and dive, showing us that great “tail shot” and cameras clicked constantly for over an hour. A short hike to Seal Cove, home to a small seal colony, offered views of the Island’s two lighthouses, the Northern Light and the Western Light.

two lighthouses, the Northern Light and the Western Light. YARMOUTH AND ACADIAN SHORES ROUTE Back on

YARMOUTH AND ACADIAN SHORES ROUTE

Back on the “mainland,” we began a southern route following alongside St. Mary’s Bay. This route also encompasses part of the Evangeline Trail, Glooscap Trail and Annapolis Valley Routes, passing through Acadian villages enroute to Yarmouth. The history here goes back 400 years when Louis XIII sat on the throne of France. It passes through 16 picturesque French speaking villages, all bilingual descendants of the first European settlers from France in the 1600s. Most of these depend on the sea for their livelihood. Fishermen collect rockweed, seaweed used as fertilizer, and Irish moss, an additive used in foods such as ice cream and gelatin.

an additive used in foods such as ice cream and gelatin. It is home to several

It is home to several massive Acadian churches. St. Bernard is an awe inspiring granite church which seats 1000, and was constructed between 1910 and 1942 by local residents. St. Mary’s is located on the campus of Universite Sainte- Anne, Canada’s only French language university. Located

at Church Point, St Mary’s is considered an engineering marvel;constructed between 1903 and 1905 in the form of

a cross 135 feet wide with

the steeple rising 185 feet. It

is

the largest wooden church

in

North America.

It is the largest wooden church in North America. Standing just outside of Yarmouth, the Cape

Standing just outside of Yarmouth, the Cape Forchu Lightstation is one of Nova Scotia’s most historically significant lighthouses. The original of 1839 has been replaced with the current one, built in the 1960s. It can be seen over 30 nautical miles out at sea. Yarmouth was settled in 1761. Its lucrative trade with the West Indies brought prosperity still seen in the architecture today. A great shipping heritage, it has been the arrival point for visitors since the early days. It is home to over 400 sea captain’s homes built between 1850 and 1900.

SOUTH SHORE/ THE LIGHTHOUSE ROUTE

Long known as Sentinels of the sea, Nova Scotia is probably known as much for its lighthouses as it is for the scallops. From weathered octagons to cupola topped towers, replicas and originals, they come in all shapes and sizes. Our destination of Liverpool took us by many, as well as several historic villages. Birchwood, first settled by about 1,500 blacks who came with the loyalist migration in 1783, was the largest black settlement in North America. Lockport has a

registered Streetscape made up of five houses built by descendants of John Locke, offering an

registered Streetscape made up of five houses built by descendants of John Locke, offering an interesting cross- section of historical architecture. From here there are views of both Gull Rock and Carter’s Lighthouses. Shelburne was settled by United Empire loyalists in 1783 that remained loyal to the crown during the American Revolution. Liverpool, “Port of the Privateers,” was the privateering capital of North America between 1760 and 1812. It is located at

of North America between 1760 and 1812. It is located at the mouth of the Mersey

the mouth of the Mersey River, and hosts Privateer Days each summer. We stayed at the beautiful Morton House Inn here. Probably the most beautiful of our B&B's, it was lovingly restored to its present state by the owners over a period of two years. There was a scrapbook in the salon, showing the before and after photos of the restorations. Breakfast was served in the formal dining room on porcelain bearing the Nova Scotia coat of arms, crystal glasses, and heavy antique silverware. The South Shore is by far the most "traveled" of the routes. We traveled slightly inland, through lake and farm country to Bridgewater, then to Lunenburg one of Nova Scotia’s oldest and most historic towns. In the town of Mahone Bay, home of marvelous architecture, three waterfront churches make up one of the most photographed scenes in Nova Scotia. A stop by the road will afford this view.

Peggy’s Cove has been called “timeless magic.” Crossing a rocky headland, the landscape is barren granite bluffs,all carved from the sea. Peggy’s Cove Lighthouse sits high up on smooth worn granite. Visitors are welcome, with due caution, to walk up to the lighthouse steps. From here, with a tiny harbor below surrounded by colorful fishing boats, weathered fish sheds and drying nets, it is a photo- grapher’s and artist’s dream. It is among the most photo- graphed places in Canada. Looking out to sea, we spotted whale and Dolphin. It is also home to Canada’s only lighthouse- housed post office.

It offers restaurants,

shops and accom- modations, and is literally teeming with tourist busses and cars. This was the only place that we encountered crowds, and the crowds were large. Just west of Peggy’s Cove, a

short trail leads to

a stone monument

at the Swiss Air Memorial Site, erected in memory of lives lost in the plane crash of 1998. From here, we returned to Halifax and our hotel home near the airport. Was it a wonderful trip? You bet! Did we “see it all?” NO way! Would we return to see the rest of the provinces? Absolutely!

Would we return to see the rest of the provinces? Absolutely! ◆ www.lhpmag.com • Lighthouse Point
Would we return to see the rest of the provinces? Absolutely! ◆ www.lhpmag.com • Lighthouse Point
Would we return to see the rest of the provinces? Absolutely! ◆ www.lhpmag.com • Lighthouse Point
MORTGAGE NEWS Do Your HOMEWORK!!!! By Karen Hammett Many parents scream these words into their

MORTGAGE NEWS

Do Your HOMEWORK!!!!

By Karen Hammett

Many parents scream these words into their children’s rooms nightly. But do they take their own advice?? Think about some of your recent purchases. If you had done a bit more shopping (homework) could have you avoided some headaches or additional unforeseen expenses??? For many of us, our homes are our biggest investment and where we spend most of our time. Doesn’t it make sense to spend a little extra time choosing theMortgage Professional to handle the transaction? One who has the experience and wisdom to help you avoid potential hurdles and costly mistakes? So, what should you look for? 1) The length of time the person and or organization has been in established and their years of experience. They may have just entered the business,but were successful in a prior industry that offered them experience and knowledge that is valuable. 2) Ask for references, names and phone number s of satisfied clients. Call the people and ask detailed questions regarding the level of service and integrity of the Broker. Don’t be shy! 3) Do they enjoy a strong referral base? Most successful profes- sionals obtain most of their business through referrals. Ask your friends and neighbors who handles their last Mortgage and if they were happy with the quality of service they received and why. 4) Always ask for a Good Faith Estimate (GFE). The bank is required by law to provide you with the GFE within three business days of submitting the application. If the GFE is not offered and you

have to ask for one, be cautious.

5) Correspond via e-mail and file all of them regarding the particular transaction in a folder on your computer. If there are any differences in “recollection” you have the documentation handy

to clarify the facts.

6) Don’t be afraid to ask as many questions as you feel necessary. Borrowers are sometimes embarrassed to ask too many questions because they are afraid they might appear inexperienced and therefore vulnerable. Actually, the more questions you ask, the more knowledgeable you seem. 7) If the Broker recommends a Realtor,Title Company, or Insurance Company make sure they offer you more than one referral. The extra time you spend comparing quotes will be well worth it. The Mortgage Professional should be asking you lots of questions. The slightest detail can make a difference in the loan to value guidelines, pricing and/or ultimately approval. In addition, don’t withhold information from them. Most likely what you are trying to hide will eventually surface.All parties are better off if all the cards are on the table from the beginning. Communication from both sides is key. Please contact us if you are shopping for a home or thinking of shopping for one. We would be delighted to work with you.

Karen Hammett is a licensed Mortgage Broker and owner of Howard Grace Mortgage located in the Duval Court Professional Centre, 625 SE 10th Street, Deerfield Beach. Please call her at 954-421-3010 or e-mail her at Karen@HowardGraceMortgage.com.

954-421-3010 or e-mail her at Karen@HowardGraceMortgage.com. LEGAL MATTERS Power of Positive Role Models for Our Kids

LEGAL MATTERS

Power of Positive Role Models for Our Kids

By Catherine Iaconis Favitta

A grandmother (“Marge”) recently wanted to set an appointment for her adult son, who felt stuck in a bad marriage. Marge was concerned that her son’s daily disagreements with his wife had become so disruptive to the family of four that her grandchildren were being negatively affected. She felt that neither parent was at their best, since both were constantly upset and distracted with their many problems. One solution I suggested:

provide positive role models for the kids outside the home. Research shows that children in all types of family situations, intact or not, have benefitted from positive role models, who characteristically do the following: Share good values, Demonstrate confidence and self-esteem, Encourage healthy habits for the body and mind, Provide motivation and encouragement, Offer solutions to stressful situations, and Give tips on how to remain free from negative peer pressure. It is not an easy task to find positive role models for our kids, as we know from the disturbing headlines in our local newspapers.Those to whom we have entrusted our children, including teachers, coaches, and religious groups, have a few bad apples amongst them that have caused us all to be more vigilant about where we leave our kids. That is one reason why parents,now more than ever before,have turned to dance, hockey, and martial arts programs offered for youth

in their communities. In addition to providing some of the best role models, ballet, ice-skating, and karate classes help kids of all ages become better listeners, develop self confidence and self control that will lead to making good decisions, and increase their physical fitness, strength, and coordination. My own son, Chris (16), is fortunate to have a karate instructor, Sensei Craig Haley with LaValle’s in LHP, as his positive role model for the past five years, based on a recommendation from one of our

neighbors. Chris will be achieving the rank of “black belt” very soon, and our family is very proud of Chris’ accomplishment with the mentorship he received. We are not alone in our praise of Sensei, since he has received a “Most Inspiring Instructor” award.

I have heard similar success stories from neighbors whose

children have greatly benefitted from the positive role models and training provided at Glacier Ice & Snow Arena in LHP, and there are many others.The parents I have talked with over the years are very grateful their kids have developed a non-quitting spirit to overcome obstacles and have become successful achievers, in part, as a result of the positive role models in our community.

Catherine is a Family Law Attorney and Florida Supreme Court Certified Family Law Mediator, who has been serving South Florida for over twenty-seven years. Catherine’s parents, Ike and Dorothy Iaconis also live in Lighthouse Point.

Sands Chiropractic Clinic “ Your Center for Natural Healing” • Acupuncture • Skin Care •
Sands Chiropractic Clinic “ Your Center for Natural Healing” • Acupuncture • Skin Care •
Sands Chiropractic Clinic
“ Your Center for Natural Healing”
• Acupuncture
• Skin Care
• Weight Loss
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• Auto Accidents
• Whole Body Wellness
• Massage Therapy
• Pain Relief
• AcidReflux
• Sports Injuries
• Nutritional Consulting
• TMJ Dysfunction
Located in Northeast Pompano between Copans and Sample Road.
Dr. Tracy Sands
Dr. Kim
Sands-Kahn
954.942.8402
1701 NE 28 Street • Pompano Beach, Florida 33064
sandschiropractic.com
Balkan & Patterson proudly supports Deer eld Beach/Lighthouse Point Relay for Life. TEAM PINK POWER
Balkan & Patterson proudly supports
Deer eld Beach/Lighthouse Point
Relay for Life.
TEAM PINK POWER
B
Balkan & Patterson, LLP
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is pr
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be sponsor
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“PINK POWER” team for Relay for Life in
“PINK POWER
“PINK POWER
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D
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each
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on May 1, 2010.
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In August of 2009, Pink Power was the rst team to reach the Gold Level of 10,000 dollars in donations
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addition, it is the rst y
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thouse P
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for Life achieved over $100,000 in donations. Balkan & Patterson was proud to be a contributor to this
ed o
ed o
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tions
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. Balk
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tt
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as pr
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outstanding achievement. t .
outstanding achiev
outstanding achiev
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If you would like to join the Balkan & Patterson team
I
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PINK
P
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POWER,
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, or lear
or learn more about sponsoring
n mor
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about sponsor
about sponsor
ing
or participating in any fundraising events, please contact Amy, who is serving as the Lighthouse Point
or par
ticipa
ting in an
ting in an
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fundr
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en
ts ts
, please c
on
tac
t A
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, who is ser
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thouse Point
Liason for the Relay at (561) 750-9191.
Liason for the R
ela
ela
y a
t
(561) 750-9191.
“We
W
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live, work and play in this community” ”
e, w
, w
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in this c
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.REL
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FORLIFE
.or
.or
g/dblp
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o lear
n mor
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about R
about R
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BALKAN
BALKAN
PATTERSON
P TTERS
A
SON
,
,
LLP
LLP
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
AT T O R N E Y S
T T O R N E Y S
S
S
AT L A W
AT L A W
www.balkanpatterson.com
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.balk anpatterson.com
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Adam Balkan, Attorney
ney
John Patterson, Attorney
Personal Injury Auto Accidents Product Liability Insurance Litigation Consumer Fraud
Personal Injury Auto Accidents Product Liability Insurance Litigation Consumer Fraud

M ain O c

Main O ce: Boca Raton, Florida 561-750-9191 Broward O ce 954-767-9190

ce: B oca R aton, Flor ida 561-750-9191 Broward O ce 954-767-9190

954-767-9190

ida

Br

Kosta (right) serving his loyal customers. The Meat Turners
Kosta (right) serving his loyal customers.
The Meat Turners

Family Portrait

An Easter Tradition At Kosta’s Greek Eatery

Each year it’s great tradition at Kosta’s Greek Eatery to invite all their loyal customers to a glorious Easter Feast. More tha 300 people passed through the doors to enjoy the servings of their famous Greek Salads, Pita Bread, Hummus and slow-cooked beef from a huge charcoal pit, serviced by five volunteer “meat turners.” “Oopa! was the word of the day, shouted out by owner Kosta, as he delivered the mouth-watering food with the speed of five chefs. If you have not yet met Kosta, or tasted his great food, you’re in for a treat!

Kosta, or tasted his great food, you’re in for a treat! 52 Lighthouse Point Magazine •
Kosta, or tasted his great food, you’re in for a treat! 52 Lighthouse Point Magazine •

52 Lighthouse Point Magazine

www.lhpmag.com

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