Unit 1

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Steps on How to invent an argument and presentation, by analyzing an artifact.
There are a few basic topics, one must understand before creating an argument. The topics are: y What is an artifact? y How does one analyze an artifact? y What is an argument? y How does one form an argument? y How does one present a powerful, yet persuasive and creative argument? By answering these questions you will be able to create a Rhetorical analysis of an artifact. Rhetorical analysis is when one breaks down an object into the specific parts. One does this through analyzing the audience in which the artifact is targeting, what is the artifact, what was the artist or writer trying to achieve with the artifact, when was the artifact created, where is the artifact found, why was the artifact created, why was it created in that manner, and how is the artist or writer achieving the message they are trying to do an artifact.

Rhetorical Analysis: y Formula: WHOLE -----------> PARTS Example: o Audience: Oblivious o What did I do: I held up a sign on the side of the road that said, War is not the answer o From this I did a Rhetorical Analysis. I figured out why holding a sign with simple writing got different emotional response, than holding up a sign with a disturbing photo on it. Because of this emotional response difference. It allowed me to understand why the organization held up War is not the answer signs, trying to speak to the oblivious. My presentation: I created a diorama because I felt that I could fully fit all the complicated aspects of my Rhetorical Analysis into one simple yet complex masterpiece.

Parts: With this project I decided to depict the two different ways in which the oblivious would react to the two different signs, both in hope of revealing the same message. That message being war is bad. The two signs looked very different. This was on purpose. I wanted to reveal the emotions of the oblivious. This is why there are people with emotional faces on the walls facing the signs. It is important to understand that in order to persuade, one must connect with the audience. This is why the two signs have different emotions. The signs are getting a different reaction from the same type of audience. It is just one sign is more up front while the other is just there, being the constant reminder. This is the goal of the FCNL, which is the organization that creates the signs, which say, War is not the Answer. They do not believe in war, they want to spread awareness and support for their cause. They do not want to create a ruckus on the streets with shocking photos of war. They just want to be the constant reminder on the side of the road each weekend, just there to calmly and quietly let the oblivious pass by a familiar sign. Eventually the hope is that this sign will become so familiar that it causes someone to think about the topic at hand The signs are the source of news. The source that allows those who are oblivious within the perfect towns to have a source of what is going on the outside world. I built a war torn country on the outsides of these two perfect towns. This was to depict how both signs were bringing knowledge of this outer war town world into the peaceful oblivious towns. The goal of a sign is to teach or to suggest an idea. Without signs there would be no knowledge of the outside world, reaching the oblivious. Nor would there be a constant reminder that such awful events do take place even though the events are not taking place within the little oblivious perfect towns.

I wanted to make sure that my audience is aware of what they were missing when they live their daily lives, and how they too will react as the people in my perfect towns do to the different signs. It is time to stop ignoring the constant signs that every weekend remind us that there are others out there suffering. We should go out and help, and stop being oblivious. As a whole my project 1 teaches the following: Knowledge is taught through the familiar. Signs are familiar objects. The oblivious look at signs. Thus the signs, which the oblivious look at, teach them. And depending on how a sign is depicted, the oblivious express emotion. Emotion ignites reaction within the oblivious minds. Ultimately causing the oblivious minds to embed the knowledge of the sign and emotion within them. Thus they learn.

This is the goal of today s lesson to understand how to create a Rhetorical Analysis and Presentation. Here we go, were going to explore everything that goes into The Process .

THE PROCESS:
Step 1: What is an artifact? y An artifact is a humanly created object. o Example:  Manicured Lawn  Pottery There are two other types of Artifacts: o Cultural Artifacts are objects which tend to communicate and have meaning  Examples: y Speeches y Books y Movies o Rhetorical Artifacts seek to persuade the audience  Examples: y Poem y Play y Novel y Movie

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Step 2: How does one analyze an artifact? One analyzes an artifact by observing the strange, unusual qualities of the object. The goal is to make the familiar, seem strange. Try to find the aspects of the artifact that are obvious and look at it differently. From a different perspective perhaps. A favorite perspective to try is, look at the world through the eyes of a child. o Find out the Who, What, When, Where o Then create an argument from the How and Why Step 3: What is an Argument? y An argument is a presentation of one s opinion, which differs from others. y Imagine you are in a science fair competition or in a sports tournament and you end up getting second place, to a person who you have proof that he cheated. And you think it totally unfair; if you were given a chance to speak with the judges what would you say? How would you prove your case? Why are you going to bring this matter up with the judges? What justifies you in bringing it up with the judges? Step 4: How does one Argue? y y One argues by presenting both sides of an argument, in order to create an original argument. By doing this one is proving their opinion through explanation of how they have came to their conclusions. Imagine you are arguing with your parents, about letting you go to a midnight premier of the new Twilight movie. Think about what you say in order to persuade them into letting you go. Body posture? Language? Attitude? How do you use persuasion to get your way? o The formula for this is: A + B = C Opinion+ opinion = original argument

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IN CLASS PRACTICE

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Get into small groups- 3 to 4 people in each group Examine the Artifact below. Do a Rhetorical Analysis of this Painting o Ask:  Who?  Where  What?

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When?  Where?  Why?  How? Then Create an ORIGINAL argument Prove your Group s Argument.

Step 5: How does one present a powerful, yet persuasive and creative argument? y Make sure you appeal to your audience. It is your goal to target your audience s interests within your presentation. This allows you to pull them into your argument and forces them to listen to what you are saying. Make your audience listen. o Example:  The audience loves ice cream, so make your presentation include pictures and facts about ice cream. It is crucial when presenting anything to use Pathos, Ethos and logos. This is because this will allow your audience to connect with the information in which you are presenting. o Pathos: persuading the audience by targeting emotion o Ethos: persuading the audience by targeting ethics o Logos: persuading the audience by using logic Use bright colors within the presentation (if you are using PowerPoint or handouts) you want your audience to be pulled into everything you are telling them Use fonts that are legible. It causes the audience to loose interest in what you are telling them, if it is impossible to read your slides or if your slides are sloppy or disorganized. Organization is key! Make the presentation interesting and innovative o Example:  Include the audience, such as asking them questions, ask for there participation, have someone help you with parts of your presentation.

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IN CLASSPRACTICE
y Here are some links to websites, Watch at least:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n9SSb1XOLU&f eature=related  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pgDJ_H-BzFo  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hopNAI8Pefg  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XbOXUza9ZeE  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yJ-FMsxNLkE  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7GsJHz1whoA& feature=related After watching 2 of the short clips from the prior page of notes, answer these questions: Is the video convincing? Why? Why not? How are the speakers using pathos ethos, and logos? How? How does using pathos, ethos, and logos, create a persuasive argument? What would you do to make these arguments more effective? If you do not finish this in class email me the answers by next Class. The goal of this in class assignment is to allow you the opportunity to fully understand pathos, ethos, and logos. And how they are used in presentations to connect with the audience. Because of this connection it allows for the speaker to give a strong and convincingargument. These will be the examples of presentations, which you will later use to assist you with your future Writing Assignment, for this unit.

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ASSIGNMENT
It is always important to practice the steps, which you have just learned. Let s see how well you can work your way through the steps, to create your own Original Argument and Presentation. y Part A: o Do a Rhetorical Analyze of an artifact. Any artifact in the city, that appeals to you. o Create an original argument! o Typed up.As long as need be Email me your ideas by Monday, May 2 (aka Next Monday) y Part B: o Present your Argument. o There are no directions as to what you need to include in your presentation or about how long it needs to be. o Make sure that it is a presentation of your original argumentand includes every thing from Step 6, in the outline. Presentations will be Due May 22, 2010, IN CLASS

BREAKDOWN OF THE UNIT:

Simple Guidelines in making a Rhetorical Analysis: 1) Rhetorical Analysis Formula: WHOLE ----- Specific Parts 2) Start by asking yourself these following questions: a. What is an artifact? i. What is my artifact? b. How does one analyze an artifact? i. What am I analyzing? c. What is an argument? i. What is my argument? d. How does one argue? i. How am I going to formulate this argument? e. How does one present a powerful, yet persuasive and creative argument? i. How am I going to target my audience? Using Pathos, Ethos, and Logos?

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