You are on page 1of 22

Energy Efficient Buildings 

Furnaces and Boilers 
 
More than 85% of homes in the U.S. are heated with furnaces or hot water boilers.  
Furnaces burn fuel to heat air which blown by fans though ducts into the conditioned 
space.  Boilers burn fuel to heat water which is pumped through radiators, heat 
exchanges or through the floor of the conditioned space.   
 

   
Residential furnace  Atmospheric hot‐water boiler  
Source: www.nyserda.ny.gov   
 
Furnace/Boiler Fuel 
Most furnaces and boilers burn natural gas, fuel oil or liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) as 
fuel.  Natural gas is composed of about 89% methane, 8% ethane and 3% propane.  Fuel 
oil is diesel fuel #2.  Liquefied petroleum gas is primarily propane.  Properties of these 
fuels are shown below. 
 
  Natural Gas  Fuel Oil  Propane  (LPG)  
3 3
Density  0.042 lb/   53 lb/   4.2 lb/gal 
Lower Heating Value  21,500 Btu/lb  18,500 Btu/lb  84,300 Btu/gal 
Higher  Heating Value  23,900 Btu/lb  19,700 Btu/lb  91,600 Btu/gal 
 
During the combustion process, fuel molecules combine with oxygen and reform as 
water and carbon dioxide.  The heat of reaction is the heat transferred from the 
combustion chamber during the combustion reaction.  The heat of reaction depends on 
phase of water in the products of combustion.   

  1
 
If the H2O in the combustion gasses leaves as vapor, it carries latent energy with it.  In 
this case, the energy transferred from the fuel is lower, and is given by the Lower 
Heating Value (LHV).  
 
If the H2O in the combustion gasses leaves as a liquid, then the latent energy in the H20 
was removed from the combustion chamber. In this case, the energy transferred from 
the fuel is higher, and is given by the Higher Heating Value (HHV).   
 
The dew‐point temperature of H2O vapor in the products of natural gas combustion is 
about 140⁰F. Thus, if exhaust temperature is greater than 140⁰F, exhaust leaves as 
vapor and heat of reaction is the LHV. If exhaust temperature is less than 140⁰F, H2O 
condenses to liquid giving up heat, and heat of reaction is the HHV. For this reason, high 
efficiency furnaces and boilers use large heat exchangers to reduce the temperature of 
the exhaust below 140 F to u lize the en re HHV of the fuel.  This step change from LHV 
to HHV increases the efficiency of these devices. 
 
 
Combustion Efficiency 
Combustion is a chemical reaction in which energy is released when oxygen reacts with 
fuel molecules to produce carbon dioxide and water.   Understanding combustion is 
important for understanding how to maximize the efficiency of fuel burning furnaces 
and boilers. 
 
Excess Air 
Assuming that natural gas is made up of 100% methane, the equa on for combus on of 
natural gas with atmospheric air is:   
 
CH4 + 2 (O2 + 3.76 N2)  CO2 + 2 H2O +7.52 N2                    
 
In this equation, just enough oxygen is supplied to break apart the fuel molecules (CH4) 
and create CO2 and H20.  The nitrogen in air does not react.  The minimum amount of air 
required  for  complete  combustion  is  called  the  “stoichiometric”  air.    In  this  equation, 
“stoichiometric”  air  is  achieved  when  2  moles  of  atmospheric  air  combine  with  one 
mole  of  methane.    Combining  3  moles  of  atmospheric  air  with  one  mole  of  methane 
would result in “excess” air.       
 
The ratio of the mass of air required to completely combust a given mass of fuel is called 
the  stoichiometric  air  to  fuel  ratio,  AFs.    AFs  can  be  calculated  for  the  combustion 
equation shown above using the molecular weights of the fuel and air.   
 
AFs = mass air / mass fuel = [ 2 (16 x 2 + 3.76 x 14 x 2) ] / [ 12 + 1 x 4 ] = 17.2 
 
Thus, for combustion of methane (natural gas), AFs is about 17.2 lb‐air/lb‐ng. 

  2
 
The  quantity of air supplied in excess of stoichiometric air  is called excess combustion 
air,  EA.    The  fraction  of  excess  combustion  air  can  be  written  in  terms  of  the 
stoichiometric air to fuel ratio, AFs, the combustion air mass flow rate, mca, and natural 
gas mass flow rate, mng. 
 
EA = [(mca / mng) / AFs] – 1                                    
 
Excess combustion air dilutes the combustion gasses and lowers the temperature of the 
gasses,  which  results  in  decreased  efficiency.    However,  insufficient  combustion  air  is 
even  more  problematic  since  insufficient  combustion  air  results  in  unburned 
hydrocarbons  escaping  in  the  exhaust.    Unburned  hydrocarbons  in  the  exhaust  waste 
fuel energy, are a safety hazard, and result in smog formation.  Thus, it is much better to 
error  on  the  side  of  excess  air  than  insufficient  air.    The  recommended  quantity  of 
excess  combustion  air  for  furnaces  and  boilers  is  10%.    This  ensures  sufficient 
combustion air so that all hydrocarbon molecules are combusted, while minimizing the 
reduction in combustion efficiency. 
 
Temperature of Combustion 
The temperature of combustion (Tc) is the temperature of the products of combustion if 
all energy from the reaction enters the products.  An energy balance on the combustion 
of natural gas gives:  
 
mca hca + mng hng – mp hp = 0 
(mca Cpa Tca) + mng (Cp,ng Tng + hr,ng) – mp Cpp Tc = 0 
 
where m is mass, h is enthalpy, Cp is specific heat, T is temperature, the subscript ca is 
combustion air, the subscript ng is natural gas, and the subscript p is product.  The 
specific heats of air, natural gas, carbon dioxide and water are about: 
 
Cpa ≈ Cpng ≈ Cpp ≈ .26 (Btu/lb F) = Cpp 
 
After substituting Cpp, the temperature of combustion can be approximated as: 
 
Tc = (mca Cpp Tca + mng Cpp Tng + mng hrng) / (mp Cpp) 
 
Where hrng is the heat of reaction of natural gas. 
 
Further, Tca = Tng and mca + mng = mp. Substituting these relations gives: 
 
Tc = Tca [(mca + mng) / mp] + [(mng hrng) / (mp Cpp)] 
 
Tc =  Tca + hR,NG / [ {1 + (mca/mng)} Cpp ] 
 

  3
Tc = Tca + LHV / [ (1 + (1 + EA) AFs) Cpp ]                     
 
Thus,  the  temperature of  combustion, Tc,  can be  approximated from  inlet  combustion 
air temperature, Tca, lower heating value, LHV, excess combustion air, EA, stoichiometric 
air fuel ratio, AFs, and specific heat of combustion gasses, and Cpp (~ 0.30 Btu/lbm‐F).   
 
Example 
 
Calculate the effective temperature of combustion, Tc, for combustion of natural gas if 
the temperature of the combustion air, Tca, is 72⁰F and 10% excess combustion air is 
supplied to the burner. 
 
Tc = Tca + LHV / [ (1 + (1 + EA) AFs)  Cpp ] 
Tc =  72 F + 21,500 Btu/lb / [ (1 + (1 + .10) (17.2)) (0.30) Btu/lb‐F ] = 3,670 F 
 
 
Combustion Efficiency 
The  combustion  efficiency,    is  the  ratio  of  useful  energy  extracted  from  the 
combustion gasses, Qu, to the total fuel energy supplied, Qfuel.   
 
= (Qu / Qfuel) 
 
When the exhaust temperature, Tex, is greater than 140 F, the water formed during 
combustion equation remains in the vapor state.  Thus, the energy extracted from 
combustion gasses as the temperature drops from Tc to Tex is sensible energy.  The 
change in sensible energy is the product of the specific heat and the temperature 
change.  In this case, combustion efficiency can be written as:  

= [mp Cpp (Tc‐Tex)] / mng HHVng 
 
= [(mca + mng) Cpp (Tc‐Tex)] / mng HHVng 
 
= [ 1 + (mca/mng) ] [Cpp(Tc‐Tex) / HHVng] 
 
= [ 1+ (1+EA) AFs ] Cpp (Tc‐Tex)/ HHVng 
 
= [ 1+ (1+EA) AFs ] Cpp (Tc‐Tex)/ HHVng 
 
When  the  exhaust  temperature,  Tex,  falls  below  140  F,  the  water  formed  during 
combustion condenses from vapor to liquid and releases heat in the process.  The heat 
released during phase change is called latent heat.  The latent heat released is: 
 
Qlat = 0     (when Tex > 140 F)     Qlat = HHV ‐ LHV   (when Tex < 140 F) 

  4
 
This formulation of Qlat assumes a step change from liquid to vapor at precisely 140 F.  
In  practice,  the  temperatures  of  individual  water  molecules  vary  and  the  measured 
temperature  of  the  gas  is  the  average  of  the  individual  molecules.    Thus,  when  the 
average  temperature  of  the  gas  is  140  F,  the  temperatures  of  some  molecules  are 
greater than 140 F and the water will be in the vapor state; similarly, the temperatures 
of some molecules are less than 140 F and the water will be in the liquid state.  Thus, 
the latent energy is released over a range of about 10 F, and the formulation above is a 
step‐change simplification of a continuous process.  Using this definition of latent heat, 
a more general equation for combustion efficiency is: 
 
 = [ {1 + (1 + EA) AFs}  Cpp (Tc – Tex) + Qlat ] / HHV  
 
In summary, the three required input values for computing combustion efficiency are: 
 
 entering combustion air temperature Tca 
 exhaust gas temperature, Tex 
 excess combustion air, EA 
 
These three values are measured by a combustion analyzer.   
 
Example  
 
Calculate the combustion efficiency of natural gas furnace if the temperature of the 
combus on air, Tca, is 72⁰F, the temperature of the exhaust, Tex, is 350 F, and 10% 
excess combustion air is supplied to the burner. 
 
From previous example: 
Tc = Tca + LHV / [ (1 + (1 + EA) AFs)  Cpp ] 
Tc =  72 F + 21,500 Btu/lb / [ (1 + (1 + .10) (17.2)) (0.30) Btu/lb‐F ] = 3,670 F 
 
Qlat = 0  (since Tex > 140 F) 

 = [ {1 + (1 + EA) AFs}  Cpp (Tc – Tex) + Qlat ] / HHV  
 = [ {1+ (1+0.5) (17.2)} 0.30 Btu/lb‐F (3,670 ‐ 350) F + 0 ] / 23,900 (Btu/lb) = 83.0 % 
 
 

  5
Example  
 
Calculate the combustion efficiency of natural gas furnace if the temperature of the 
combus on air, Tca, is 72⁰F, the temperature of the exhaust, Tex, is 120 F, and 10% 
excess combustion air is supplied to the burner. 
 
Tc = Tca + LHV / [ (1 + (1 + EA) AFs)  Cpp ] 
Tc =  72 F + 21,500 Btu/lb / [ (1 + (1 + .10) (17.2)) (0.30) Btu/lb‐F ] = 3,670 F 
 
Qlat = HHV – LHV = (23,900 – 21,500) Btu/lb = 2,400 Btu/lb  (since Tex < 140 F) 

 = [ {1 + (1 + EA) AFs}  Cpp (Tc – Tex) + Qlat ] / HHV  
 = [ {1+ (1+0.5) (17.2)} 0.30 Btu/lb‐F (3,670 ‐ 120) F + 2,400 Btu/lb ] / 23,900 (Btu/lb) 
 = 98.8 % 
 
 
 
Efficiency Improvement from Reducing Excess Combustion Air 
As  discussed  earlier,  the  minimum amount  of air  required  for  complete  combustion  is 
called the “stoichiometric” air.  Combustion efficiency is maximized when stoichiometric 
air is supplied to the fuel.  Supplying less than stoichiometric air causes some fuel to be 
exhausted without combusting, which increases fuel use, air pollution and the danger of 
uncontrolled combustion in the exhaust stack.  Supplying more than stoichiometric air 
dilutes  the  combustion  gasses,  lowers  combustion  temperature  and  reduces 
combustion  efficiency.    Thus,  best  practice  is  to  supply  only  slightly  more  oxygen 
(combustion air) than the stoichiometric minimum, so that unburned fuel is avoided and 
the efficiency penalty from excess combustion air is minimized.  The common target of 
excess combus on air to guarantee complete combus on is about 10%.   
 
The quantity of excess air in the combustion gasses is sometimes expressed as fraction 
oxygen.    For  methane  (natural  gas)  the  conversion  between  fraction  oxygen,  FO2,  and 
excess combustion air, ECA, are: 
 
FO2 = 2 ECA / (10.52 + 9.52 ECA)         ECA = 10.52 FO2 / (2 – 9.52 FO2) 
 
Thus, 10% excess air produces combus on gasses with about 1.7% O2 content.   
 
Example 
 
A household furnace burns 50,000 Btu/hr of natural gas.  Combustion air enters the 
burner at 70 F.  A combus on analysis of exhaust gasses shows that the flue 
temperature is 350 F and the quantity of excess air is 50%.  Calculate the current 

  6
combus on efficiency, the combus on efficiency if the excess air were reduced to 10%, 
and the resulting fuel savings. 
 
Tc1 = Tca + LHV / [{1 + (1 + EA) AFs} Cpp] 
Tc1 = 70 F + 21,500 Btu/lb / [{1 + (1 + .50) 17.2} 0.30 Btu/lb‐F] = 2,744 F 
 
Qlat = 0 since Tex > 140 F 
 
 = [{1 + (1 + EA) AFs} Cpp (Tc – Tex) + Qlat] / HHV    
 = [ {1 + (1 + .50) 17.2} 0.30 Btu/lb‐F (2,744 – 350 F) + 0 ] / 23,900 Btu/lbm 
 = 80.5% 
 
The heat delivered to the system, Qout, would be: 
 
Qout = Qf1   = 50,000 Btu/hr x 80.5% = 40,269 Btu/hr 
  
If excess air were reduced to 10%, the combus on efficiency would increase to: 
 
Tc2 = Tca + LHV / [{1 + (1 + EA) AFs} Cpp] 
Tc2 = 70 F + 21,500 Btu/lb / [{1 + (1 + 0.10) 17.2} 0.30 Btu/lb‐F] = 3,668 F 
 
 = [{1 + (1 + ECA) AFs} Cpg (Tc – Tex) + Qlat] / HHV    
 = [{1 + (1 + 0.10) 17.2} 0.30 Btu/lb‐F (3,668 – 350 F) + 0] / 23,900 Btu/lbm 
 = 83.0% 
 
The fuel energy input, Qf2, would be: 
 
Qf2 = Qout /  = 40.269 Btu/hr / 83.0% = 48,543 Btu/hr 
 
The fuel energy savings, Es, from reducing excess combustion air would be:  
 
Es = Qf1 – Qf2  = 50,000 Btu/hr – 48,543 Btu/hr = 1,457 Btu/hr 
 
Thus, this measure would reduce fuel use by 2.9%  
 
 
Heat Exchanger Effectiveness 
Combustion efficiency is determined by the amount of heat extracted from the 
combustion gasses by the heat exchanger.  Thus, an understanding of heat exchanger 
effectiveness increases understanding of furnace and boiler efficiency. 
 
Heat exchangers transfer heat from a hot stream with entering and exiting 
temperatures of Th1 and Th2 to a cold stream with entering and exi ng temperatures of 

  7
Tc1 and Tc2.  The product of the mass flow rate and specific heat of the hot and cold 
streams are called the mass capacitances, mcph and mcpc.  A schematic of a 
counterflow heat exchanger with these temperatures is shown below. 
  

 
 
Heat exchanger effectiveness, e, is the ratio of the actual heat transfer, Qact, to 
maximum heat transfer, Qmax. 
 
e = Qact / Qmax 
 
The actual heat transfer is the product of the mass capacitance and the temperature 
rise of either the hot or cold stream.  The mass capacitance, mcp, is the product of the 
mass flow rate, m, and the specific heat, cp. 
 
Qact = mcph (Th1 – Th2) = mcpc (Tc2 – Tc1) 
 
In an infinitely long heat exchanger, the exit temperature of the hot stream would reach 
the entering temperature of the cold stream.  Similarly, the exit temperature of the cold 
stream would reach the entering temperature of the hot stream.  The maximum heat 
transfer would be limited only by the capacity of the each stream to absorb the heat.  
Thus, the maximum heat transfer would be: 
 
Qmax = mcp,min (Th1 – Tc1)  
 
Thus, the heat exchanger effectiveness, e, is: 
 
e = Qact / Qmax = Qact / mcp,min (Th1 – Tc1) 
 
If the heat exchanger effectiveness, mass capacitances and entering temperatures are 
known, this equation can be solved to determine the actual heat transfer, Qact, and exit 
temperatures of each stream. 
 
Qact  = e mcp,min (Th1 – Tc1) 
 
Tc2 = Tc1 + e mcp,min (Th1 – Tc1) / mcpc 
Th2 = Th1 ‐ e mcp,min (Th1 – Tc1) / mcph 
 

  8
Example 
 
Calculate the heat exchanger effectiveness for a furnace in which the combustion gasses 
enter the heat exchanger at Th1 = 3,100 F and leave at Th2 = 300 F, and the room air 
enters the heat exchanger at Tc1 = 70 F and leaves at Tc2 = 140 F. 
 
e = Qact / Qmax = mch,h (Th1 – Th2) / mcp,min (Th1 – Tc1) 
 
The temperature of the combustion gasses falls by 2,800 F while the temperature of the 
room air rises by only 70 F.  This means that the mass capacitance of the room air is 40 
times larger than the mass capacitance of the combustion gasses.  Hence, mcp,min = 
mcp,h and  
 
e =  (Th1 – Th2) / (Th1 – Tc1) = (3,100 – 300) / (3,100 – 70) = 92.4% 
 
 
Heat exchanger effectiveness is a function of heat exchanger configuration, surface 
area, material and the flow rate and specific heat of the fluids.  The most effective 
configuration is counter flow, followed by cross flow, followed by parallel flow.  With 
improved heat transfer effectiveness, the same quantity of heat can be transferred with 
smaller flow rates or smaller temperature differences.  Alternately, with improved heat 
transfer effectiveness more heat can be transferred without increasing flow rates or 
incoming temperature differences. Equations for heat exchanger effectiveness are: 
 
Parallel flow:   e = [1‐exp( ‐NTU (1+Cr) )] / (1+Cr) 
Counter flow:  e = [1 ‐ exp(‐NTU (1‐Cr))]  /  [1 – Cr*exp(‐NTU (1 ‐ Cr))] (use Cr = 0.999 
when Cr = 1.0) 
Cross flow:     e = 1‐exp[(1/Cr)*(NTU0.22)*{exp((‐Cr)*(NTU0.78))‐1}] 
 
where: 
 
Ch = mh * cph  
Cc = mc * cpc  
Cmin = min(Ch, Cc) 
Cmax = max(Ch, Cc) 
Cr = Cmin / Cmax 
NTU = UA/Cmin 
 
These equations indicate that heat exchanger effectiveness increases: 
 in counter‐flow configurations 
 as heat transfer surface area increases 
 as the minimum mass capacitance decreases 
 as the maximum mass capacitance increases 

  9
 
Older furnaces utilized parallel flow heat exchange, while modern high efficiency 
furnaces use employ counter flow heat exchange. 
 
Example  
 
Consider a furnace burning 88,000 Btu/hr of fuel with 10% excess air and supplying 
1,200 cfm of warm air to a house.  The supply and combustion air enter the furnace at 
70 F.  The heat exchanger is comprised of four 2   x 4 ft plates with combustion gas 
flowing downward through channels in the plate and room supply air flowing upward 
between the plates.  Thermal resistance is dominated by the convection coefficients 
(1.719 Btu/hr‐ft2‐F) on each side of the plates.  The density and specific heat of room air 
are 0.075 lb/ 2 and 0.26 Btu/lb‐F.  Using the heat exchanger effectiveness method, 
determine the heat supplied to the house and the combustion efficiency of the furnace.  
Compare your result with the combustion efficiency calculated using the combustion 
method.       
  
The temperature of combustion, Tc, is: 
 
INPUTS
EA = excess air (0=stoch, 0.1 = op mum) 0.10
Tca = temperature combustion air before burner (F) 70

CONSTANTS (FOR NATURAL GAS)
LHV = lower heating value (Btu/lb) 21,500
HHV = higher heating value (Btu/lb) 23,900
cpp = specific heat of products of exhaust (Btu/lb‐F) 0.300
AFs = air/fuel mass ratio at stochiometric conditions 17.20

CALCULATIONS
Tc = temp combus on (F) = Tca+LHV/[(1+(1+EA)(Afs))cpp 3,668  
 
The mass flow rate of the combustion gasses is: 
 

  10
INPUTS
Qburner (Btu/hr)                  88,000
HHVng (Btu/lb)                  23,900
AFRstoch (lba/lbng) 17.2
EA 0.1
p (at 68 F) (lb/ 3) 0.075

CALCULATIONS
Ma = Qb AFRs (1+EA) / HHV (lb/hr)                    69.66
Mng = Qb / HHVng (lb/hr)                       3.68
Mtot (lb/hr)                    73.35
Vtot = Mtot / p (scfm)                    15.48  
 
The conductance of the heat exchanger is: 
 
U = 1 / (1/h1 + 1/h2) = 1 / (1/1.719 Btu/hr‐ft2‐F + 1/1.719 Btu/hr‐ft2‐F)  
U = 0.8596 Btu/hr‐ft2‐F 
 
The area of the heat exchanger is: 
 
A = 8 sides x (2   x 4  )/side = 64  2 
 
The rate of heat transfer is: 
 

  11
INPUTS
Th1 (F) 3,668
mh (lb/min)                       1.22
cph (Btu/lb‐F) 0.300
Tc1 (F) 70
mc (lb/min)                       90.0
cpc (Btu/lb‐F) 0.26
U (Btu/hr‐ 2‐F)                  0.8596
A ( 2) 64

CALCULATIONS
Ch = mh * cph (Btu/min‐F)                    0.367
Cc = mc * cpc (Btu/min‐F)                  23.400
Cmin (Btu/min‐F)                    0.367
Cmax (Btu/min‐F)                  23.400
Cr = Cmin / Cmax 0.016
N = UA/Cmin 2.500
e = [1‐exp(N(1‐Cr))]/[1‐Cr*exp(‐N(1‐Cr))] 0.916
Q = e*Cmin*(Th1‐Tc1) (Btu/min)                    1,208
Th2 = Th1‐Q/Ch (F)                        373
Tc2 = Tc1 + Q/Cc (F)                        122
Q (Btu/hr)                  72,505  
 
The combustion efficiency calculated using the heat exchanger effectiveness method is: 
 
eff = Q / Qfuel 82.4%  
 
The heat exchanger method predicted that the temperature of the combustion exhaust 
would be 373 F.  Using, this value, the combustion efficiency calculated using the 
combustion method is: 
 

  12
INPUTS
EA = excess air (0=stoch, 0.1 = op mum) 0.10
Tca = temperature combustion air before burner (F) 70
Tex = temperature exhaust gasses (F) 373

CONSTANTS (FOR NATURAL GAS)
LHV = lower heating value (Btu/lb) 21,500
HHV = higher heating value (Btu/lb) 23,900
cpp = specific heat of products of exhaust (Btu/lb‐F) 0.300
Tdpp = dew point temp of H20 in exhaust (F) 140
AFs = air/fuel mass ratio at stochiometric conditions 17.20

CALCULATIONS
Tc = temp combus on (F) = Tca+LHV/[(1+(1+EA)(Afs))cpp] 3,668
hfg = water vapor latent energy (Btu/lb) = (if Tex<140 then h 0
Effi ciency = {hfg+[1 + (1+EA)(AFs)]*cpp*(Tc‐Tex)}/HHV 82.4%  
 
 
 
Cycling Losses 
When furnaces cycle on and off to meet the load, part of the energy supplied by the 
natural gas remains in the heat exchanger.  Thus, cycling reduces the energy supplied to 
the conditioned space and average efficiency.  Consider the diagram below.  When 
room air temperature falls to the thermostat setpoint temperature, the combustion 
begins and the heat exchanger begins to warm.  After the heat exchanger is sufficiently 
warm, the supply air fan starts running and heat is delivered to the room.  When the 
room air temperature warms to the upper setpoint temperature, combustion ends.  The 
supply air fan continues to run for a few seconds; however, the supply air fan stops 
before the heat exchanger temperature falls to about 100 F.  The heat exchanger 
continues to cool; however, this heat is lost to the room with the furnace.  If this room is 
not in the conditioned space, then this energy is lost.   
 

  13
 
Source: Energy Engineering, John Mitchell, Wiley Interscience, 1983. 
 
Example 
 
Calculate heat storage losses due to cycling for a furnace controlled by thermostat with 
on/off control.  The total heat supplied to the house by the furnace, Qf, is 100 x 106 Btu/ 
5 month hea ng season.  The furnace is rated at Qr = 100,000 Btu/hr.  Average on time 
during each cycle is 5 minutes.  The heat exchanger weights 100 lb.  The temperature of 
the heat exchanger is 72 F at the start of each cycle and 100 F when the supply air fan 
turns off.   
 
Run time hours= Qf / Qr = 100 x 106 Btu/season / 100,000 Btu/hr = 1,000 hrs/season 
Heating season hours = 5 months x 30 days/month x 24 hours/day = 3,600 hrs/season  
Fraction furnace on time = 1,000 / 3,600 = 28% of  me 
 
Number Cycles = Run time hours / Run time per cycle  
Number Cycles = 1,000 hours / (5/60) hours/cycle =  12,000 cycles  
 
Qcycling loss = Number Cycles x mhx x cphx x ∆Thx  
Qstorage = 12,000 x 100 (lb) x 0.11 (Btu/F‐lbm) (100‐72) F = 3.70 x 106 Btu = 3.70%  
 
 

  14
Pilot Light Losses  
Natural gas consump on by pilot lights is about 1  3/hour. 
 
Example 
 
Calculate pilot light gas use for the furnace in the previous example. 
 
If furnace is on 28% of  me, it is off 72% of the time.  Thus, pilot energy use is: 
  
Qpilot light = .72 (3,600) (hours/season) x 1 ft3/hr x 1,000 Btu/ 3 = 2.6 x 106 Btu/season  
Qpilot light = 2.6% loss during winter 
 
If it is also on during summer then  
 
Qpilot light = [(.72)3600 + (8,760‐3,600)] x 1 ( 3/hr) x 1000 Btu/ 3 = 7.8 x 106 Btu/year 
Qpilot light = 7.8% loss  
 
 
Furnace Efficiency 
The preceding sections discuss energy losses in the exhaust gasses, from cycling and 
from continuous pilot lights.  Combustion efficiency only takes into account the energy 
lost in exhaust gasses during steady‐state operation.  To account for other losses, the 
efficiency of residential‐size furnaces is characterized using Annual Fuel Utilization 
Efficiency, AFUE.  AFUE is always less than the steady‐state combustion efficiency. 
  
The Path to Energy Efficiency 
Over the years, the efficiency of furnaces has improved dramatically. Schematics of mid‐
efficiency and high‐efficiency furnaces are shown below.   
 

  15
    
         Traditional Furnace     Condensing Furnace 
 
Furnaces from 1970s had AFUEs between 68%–72%.  These low efficiency furnaces were 
typically constructed with: 
 Natural draft configurations that increased excess air above 10% and enabled a 
continuous draft of air to be drawn through the exhaust flue, increasing 
infiltration into the house. 
 Continuous pilot lights  
 Heavy heat exchangers that increased cycling losses  
 
In the 1980s, mid‐efficiency furnaces became available with 80%–83% AFUE.  Mid‐
efficiency furnaces are typically constructed with: 
 Induced combustion air fans that reduced excess air and eliminated the 
continuous draft of air through the exhaust pipe. 
 Electronic ignition (no pilot light)  
 Lighter heat exchangers to reduce cycling losses  
 
In the 1990s, high‐efficiency furnaces became available with 90%–97% AFUE.  High‐
efficiency furnaces typically have: 
 Counter‐flow heat exchangers 
 A second heat exchanger for condensing flue gases 
 Sealed combustion using outdoor air to reduce corrosion due to bleach and 
other fumes from indoor air. 
 A highly efficient Electronically Commutated Motor (ECM) blower motor 
 

  16
These changes have been so effective that the exhaust temperature of high‐efficiency 
furnaces is typically less than 140 F and water is condensed from the combus on gasses.  
To accommodate the condensation, condensing furnaces have a condensate drain to 
remove the condensate, and aluminum or steel secondary heat exchangers and pvc 
exhaust piping to avoid corrosion.  In addition, most high‐efficiency furnaces use outside 
air for combustion to reduce corrosion from indoor air contaminants and eliminate 
combustion‐driven infiltration.    
 
The increased heat exchanger area and the addition of a combustion air supply duct 
increases friction losses on both sides of the heat exchanger. Thus, high‐efficiency 
furnaces have bigger blowers and bigger induced draft fans than standard‐efficiency 
furnaces.  A study of high‐efficiency furnaces in Madison Wisconsin found that furnace 
electricity use increased by about 400 kWh per hea ng season due to these larger fans. 
 
Recent developments include multi‐speed and variable‐speed burner fans and blowers.  
In these furnaces, the amount and temperature of the air delivered to the house is 
varied according to the load.  At low loads, the decreased air flow through the heat 
exchangers increases heat exchanger effectiveness and efficiency.  Multi‐speed blower 
motors use about the same power at all speeds.  However, variable‐speed blower 
motors substan ally reduce fan power at low loads.  For example, a fan drawing 400 W 
at full speed may draw as li le as 65 W at low speed.  
 
 
Furnace Efficiency Standards 
In 2005, the minimum AFUE for non‐condensing fossil‐fueled, warm‐air furnaces was set 
at 78%.   
 
In 2007, DOE revised the energy conservation standards for non‐weatherized gas 
furnaces to 80 % AFUE for residen al furnaces manufactured on or a er November 19, 
2015. 
 
In 2015, DOE proposed raising the minimum AFUE for non‐weatherized gas furnaces to 
92% for all furnaces manufactured 5 years a er the publica on of the final rule. 
 
These minimum standards are important, since many manufacturers make furnaces that 
barely meet the minimum standards, since many consumers purchase the lowest first‐
cost furnace available, without regard to cost of fuel over the lifetime of the furnace or 
time of residence.  However, virtually all manufacturers also make more efficient gas 
furnaces.  The US EPA gives “Energy Star” ra ngs to products in top 15% of energy 
efficiency.  In addition, federal and utility incentives are sometimes offered for  
furnaces with AFUE >= 95%. 
 
 

  17
Hot Water Boilers 
Residential and small commercial hot‐water boilers heat water that is supplied to the 
building for heating.     
 
Schematics of non‐condensing atmospheric and forced‐air boilers are shown below.  In 
both types of boiler, hot combustion gasses transfer heat to the water as the gasses 
move upward then out the exhaust flue.  These boilers typically employ on/off control, 
in which the burner fires whenever the water temperature drops to the low‐
temperature set point and turns off when the water temperature rises to the high‐
temperature set point.   
 

 
 
Source: 2008 ASHRAE Handbook HVAC Systems and Equipment. 
 
The cross‐flow heat‐exchange designs shown above limit combustion efficiency, since 
the combustion gasses must leave the boiler at a higher temperature than the boiler 
set‐point (hot water supply) temperature. 
 
In addition, when open atmospheric boilers are not firing, air is drawn upward through 
the interior of the boiler as it warms and becomes more buoyant.  This air pulls heat out 
of the water and reduces the overall efficiency of the boiler.  To reduce this chimney 
effect loss, the exhaust flue can be equipped with a stack damper that closes when the 
burners are not firing.  To be completely effective, the stack damper must be located 
below the exhaust flue hood.   
 
Closed forced‐draft boilers minimize the chimney effect by sealing the combustion area 
with a fan that stops inlet air flow when the burner is not firing.  However, as in 
furnaces, burner on/off cycling in forced‐draft boilers reduces average efficiency.  In the 
case of forced‐draft boilers, the loss occurs because the combustion air fan is powered 
on a few seconds before the fuel is ignited to purge the boiler of residual gas which 
might explode upon combustion.  These purge gasses carry heat out of the boiler.  Thus, 

  18
overall boiler efficiency declines as cycling increases.  Cycling can be reduced by avoiding 
oversizing.    Cycling losses can be minimized by the use of modulating burners instead 
of on/off burners.  Modulating burners control boiler water temperature by modulating 
the burner firing rate rather than cycling on and off.  As the firing rate decreases, heat 
transfer effectiveness increases due to increased contact time between the hot exhaust 
gasses and the boiler walls.  This reduces exhaust temperature and increases 
combustion efficiency.  Thus, modulating boilers operate at a higher efficiency at low 
loads than at full load. 
 
Condensing Hot Water Boilers 
As with furnaces, efficiency increases significantly when water vapor condenses out of 
the exhaust gasses.  Modern condensing boilers use many of the same techniques used 
in condensing furnaces to lower exhaust gas temperature below about 180 F to cause 
condensation and improve energy efficiency.  As shown below, these furnaces typically 
use a combus on fan rather than open air to fix excess air at about 10%.  Hot 
combustion gasses move in a counter flow direction to the water to increase heat 
exchanger effectiveness.  The heat exchange are between the combustion gasses and 
hot water is larger to increase heat transfer and the heat exchanger is constructed of 
aluminum or stainless steel to avoid corrosion. 
 

 
Need to redraw this figure. 
 
In most boilers, to condense water vapor, the temperature of water returning from the 
building and entering the boiler must be 125 F or less.  The graph below shows, how 
combustion efficiency increases with decreasing inlet water temperature.  
 

  19
 
Source: 2008 ASHRAE Handbook HVAC Systems and Equipment. 
 
Traditional non‐condensing boilers often operate at a hot‐water supply temperature of 
180 F.   The heat exchange equipment is then typically sized with a 20 F temperature 
drop so the design return water temperature is 160 F.  Reducing return water 
temperature requires that the hot water radiators, fan coil unit and/or the radiant 
flooring system be sized to handle these low supply and return water temperatures.   
 
Moreover, supply, and hence return, temperature can also be reduced at low load 
conditions.  The easiest way to this is with “outdoor air reset”, in which the supply 
temperature is highest during very cold weather and peak loads and is reduced during 
moderate weather and low loads. A typical outdoor air reset” schedule is shown below. 
In addition, outdoor air reset systems typically shut the boiler off during warm weather 
about 75 F. Depending on climate, reducing supply (and hence return) water 
temperature can increase average boiler efficiency by more than 5%. 
 

 
 

  20
Supply temperature reset ranges typically depend on the type of heat delivery system.   
Lower supply and return temperatures drive higher boiler efficiency. Typical ranges are 
shown below: 
 
Fan Coil: 140 F to 180 F 
Finned‐tube baseboard: 120 F to 180 F 
Cast‐iron baseboard: 100 F to 170 F 
Radiators: 120 F to 170 F 
Low‐mass radiant: 80 F to 140 F 
High‐mass radiant: 80 F to 120 F 
 
 
Hot Water Boiler Efficiency Ratings 
Residential Boilers 
Residential hot‐water boilers are rated using annual fuel utilization efficiency (AFUE).  In 
the 2005 Na onal Energy Security Act, the minimum allowed AFUE rating for a fossil‐
fueled boiler was set at 80%.  However, this efficiency rating dramatically overestimates 
actual average efficiency because the reported efficiency value is measured with inlet 
water temperature of 80 F.  The low inlet water temperature inflates the efficiency 
rating, since nearly all non‐condensing furnaces come with a warning that operation 
with inlet water temperature below 140 F will void the warranty.  In addi on, this ra ng 
is typically determined during full load operation and does not include cycling losses or 
heat loss from the boiler when not in firing.  Thus, the actual combustion efficiency of 
non‐condensing furnaces is typically about 10% less than reported. 
 
The US EPA gives “Energy Star” ra ngs to products in top 15% of energy efficiency.  
ENERGY STAR qualified boilers have an AFUE ra ng of 85% or greater.   The Federal 
government and utilities often offer incentives for hot water boilers with AFUEs of 90% 
or greater. 
 
Small Commercial Hot Water Boiler Systems 
A typical small commercial hot water heating system is shown below. Hot water boilers 
typically operate at about 180 F and the hot water is returned from the space at about 
160 F.  The supply water reset control valve can be used to reduce the hot water supply 
temperature during warm weather.   
 

  21
 
 

  22