You are on page 1of 1

4/20/2019 Rationale: S9A1 - Google Docs

Rationale for Standard 9: Reflection and Continous Growth 
Artifact name:  ATE Clinical Fellow Symposium Conference  

Standard:  
The teacher is a reflective practitioner who uses evidence to continually evaluate his/her 
practice, particularly the effects of his/her choices and actions on others (students, families, 
and other professionals in the learning community), and adapts practice to meet the needs of 
each learner. 
What the Standard means to me: 
In order for an educator to grow it is their responsibility to get involved in as many experiences 
that are going to help them in their career and then continuously reflect on these experiences 
and how they made them a better educator.  

Indicator: 
9 (n) Sees him/herself as a learner, continuously seeking opportunities to draw upon current 
education policy and research as sources of analysis and reflection to improve practice. 

Description of the artifact:  
This is a presentation that I presented in Atlanta, Georgia at the ATE Clinical Fellows 
Symposium. This was a conference made up of about 120 professors from around the United 
States. I presented on the differences between mentorship and supervision and my experiences 
with both. I had the opportunity of presenting with another colleague, Emily Hartford, and a 
professor at the University of Maine at Farmington, Kathryn Will­Dubyak. The presentation 
touches on the benefits and challenges of mentorship and how supervision isn’t enough. At the 
end of this artifact is a picture of the certificate I received for becoming a clinical fellow and 
attending the conference. I also had the opportunity to present this at the symposium as a 
Wilson Scholar.  

Rationale: 
As a pre­service teacher, I have been very fortunate to have had many different professional 
development opportunities, but I believe this opportunity is where I grew the most as an 
educator. Being able to do in field research, working with other pre­service teachers and 
mentoring them through a literacy clinic was very eye­opening. I realized how my mentorship 
impacted them and the children we were working with, but also how they were mentoring me 
at the same time and I didn’t even realize it. It was very beneficial to reflect on all of my 
experiences and talk about the true differences between supervision and mentorship. This 
research taught me that it is so important to not just supervise your students, but that you also 
need to be there to mentor them. Having professors around the United States value my 
research and opinions on mentorship and supervision was also an extraordinary experience. I 
am proficient on this standard and indicator because I sought out this opportunity to educate 
myself more on education in order to improve my practice.  
 
 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1IfRtzpCE-KsY27LufPGOJDQAo3OAT55ViMbRlScOflA/edit   1/1