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High Brightness LED Driver Solutions

for General Lighting

Created by Bernie Weir


World of Lighting
• ~ 20-22% of electrical energy is used for lighting of
which 40% is for incandescent lighting, this represents
2000 TWh/year
Residential
28%

Industrial 16%
Restaurants,
Retail and
Streetlighting Services 48%
8%

>70% of the Energy Usage is


Outside of the Residential Market

Source: OSRAM

2
LED Technology Forecast and Impact

US DOE January 2009

3
LED Optical Characteristics
• Chromaticity
• Some defined “box” in the white area
on or near the Black Body Locus
• Bin sizes (x, y coordinates) varies by
supplier

• Brightness (luminus flux)


– All the “light” output into a
sphere
– Factors in human sensitivity to
light of different wavelengths

4
Challenges of Driving LEDs

All are
White LEDs
Nichia Rigel
NJSW036AT

– Forward voltage varies by color, current & temperature


– “Color point” shifts with current and temperature, more pronounced with Red and Amber

5
Operating Relationship
Electrical, Optical & Thermal

1 2

OSRAM Platinum
Luxeon Rebel Dragon
White

3) Higher
power raises Tj,
1) Increasing drive 3
current, increases flux
reduces flux (light out)

Seoul
Semiconductor
Z1
2) Higher
current,
increases Vf & power

6
Thermal Path is Critical to LED Lifetime
5mm LED Lighting-class LED

No Thermal
path
Thermal path

• 5mm lamps have almost no • Lighting-class LEDs are designed for


thermal path high temp operation
• Rth >350 ºC/W typical • Rth <10 ºC/W typical
• Chip (TJ) and phosphor can • Lamp can stay within data sheet
essentially cook themselves parameters with good thermal design

7
LED Lifetime
110%

100%
Lumen Output (%)

90% 100 W Incandescent


5mm LED
80% 42W CFL
50 W Tungsten Halide
70% 400 W Metal Halide
25 W T8 Fluorescent
Lighting-class LED
60%

50%

40%
0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100
Operating Time (k hrs)
Courtesy LRC, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

• All conventional light sources dim over time, even LEDs


• Standard light sources fail (open filament etc)
• Properly designed LEDs dim gracefully
• End of life is based on Lumen Maintenance (L70) which is a function of
operating temperature

8
Application Drives LED Selection
• What is the area/pattern to be lit?
– Linear strip or path
– Spot
– Area

Lens
• Optics considerations (narrow or wide beam)
Reflector
– Diffuser
– Reflector
– Lens

• Thermal density and heat removal

• Size and lit appearance


9
LED Packaging Trends
• Smaller size
• Multi-high power chips
• Multi-small chips
• Phosphor coatings methods
• Higher wattage packages
• Deposited silicone primary lens systems

10
Arrangement of LEDs
• Driving single strings of LEDs is highly preferred as it
provides ideal current matching independent of forward
voltage variation, Vout “floats”

• Users do configure LEDs in Parallel/Series combinations


– Requires “matched” LED forward voltages
– If an LED fails open, the other LEDs may be overdriven
– Cross connecting and multiple parallel techniques try to Series
mitigate the risk of a fault

If a LED fails open,


only 1 LED will be
have 2x the drive
current

Parallel
Series-Parallel Cross connect

11
Example of a Low Current Driver
Features New family of simple 2 terminal
•Constant current as AC voltage increases Constant Current Regulators (CCR)
•No delay in turn on after LED threshold • 20, 25, and 35 mA current
voltage is reached • SOT123 and SOT223 packages
•Bright LEDs at low voltages • 45 V maximum operation
•LEDs protected from voltage surge

NSI45025 110 V RMS, TP1 - 156 V P-P

115 Vac
25 mA 100 Ω

30 LEDs

TP2 - LEDs 108 V, 52% On

Current probe 25 mA

12
LED Driver Basics

AC Non-Isolated or
Mains Isolated Power Driver
Conversion

LED(s)

• The main function of a driver is to limit the current regardless of input and output
conditions across a range of operating conditions

• Ac-Dc power conversion and driver regulation can be merged together into a single driver
or separated into two stages

• The arrangement of LEDs and the luminaire specifications dictate the fundamental driver
requirements

• Isolated solutions means there is no physical electrical connection between the AC line
voltage and the LEDs

13
Driver Operation
Constant Voltage
• Constant Voltage and Constant Current
Regions

Constant Current
• Range of current and/or voltage regulation
is driver/design specific

• Driver “constant” current behavior may not


have a textbook relationship

• Some drivers are designed for constant


power so LED forward voltage determines
current
•Output can be
Output is voltage designed to have tight
Regulated or clamped current limited
across a range of
current •The output voltage
depends on the LED
forward voltage

14
Basic Configurations
• In a integral configuration, the power • In a distributed configuration, the ac-dc
conversion and constant current driver power conversion is separate from driver (s)
are all within the light fixture
– Modular applications like track and cove
– Tight coupling of LED light source to the lighting
driver – Simplifies safety considerations
– Optimum efficiency – Increases flexibility
– Simplifies installation

15
Offline LED Applications by Power Level
Based on Today’s LED Performance

• Under-cabinet lighting
• Desk Lamps
• Low Power • Accent
– 1-12 W • Appliances
• A lamp Bulb Replacement

• Down Lighting
• Spot Light (PAR38) Equivalent
• Medium Power • Decorative Light Fixtures
– 8-40 W • Bollards
• Ceiling Fans
• Freezer and Refrigerator Lights
• High Efficiency LED Supplies (ballasts) (24 V/ 48 V)

• Area Lighting
– Street Lights
• High Power – Fluorescent Lights
– >40 W – HID Replacement
• High Efficiency LED Supplies (ballasts) (24 V/ 48 V)

16
Factors to Consider
• Output Power
• Additional Requirements
– Range of LED forward voltage
– Efficiency
– Current – target, maximum
– Power Factor
– LED arrangement
– Size
– Cost
• Power Source – Fault handling (short circuit, open
– 115 Vac, Universal (US/EU), circuit, overload, over temperature
Industrial – 208/277 Vac or other – Standards – Safety (UL,CSA,VDE)
– Low Voltage Lighting (landscape, – Energy Star
track etc)
– Reliability
– Solar / Battery

• Other Considerations
• Functional Requirements
– Mechanical connections
– Dimming – PWM, 0 - 10 V, Triac,
Wireless, DALI, Proprietary, Other – Installation
– Analog, Digital, or multi-level – Repair / Replacement
dimming – Lifecycle
– Lighting Control – occupancy, – Logistics
motion, timer

17
Isolated Topology by Power Range

sity
e n
r D
w e
P o
e r&
o w LLC HB resonant topology
p
ng
i
as
c re
In
Flyback is the best choice for
Low power and LLC is best
choice for highest efficiency

flyback

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Offline LED Specific Standards
• ENERGYSTAR™ SSL Specification (Version 1.1 -2/2009)
– Luminaire based limits, product specific requirements including power factor
– No “off state” power requirement rules out standard wall plug adapters, exception are
devices with smart controls, standby < 0.5 W in those cases Electromagnetic & RFI
per FCC 47 CFR Part 15/18

• IEC 61347-2-13 (5/2006) - Requirements for DC or AC supplied


electronic control gear for LED Modules include:
– Maximum SELV operating output voltage <= 25V rms (35.3 Vdc)
– “Proper” /Safe operation under various fault conditions:
• No LEDs testing and 2x the rated LEDs or modules
• Output short circuited
– No smoke emission or flammability under malfunction

• ANSI C82.xxx LED Driver specification in development

• Safety – UL, CSA etc - UL1310 (Class 2) / UL 60950 / UL1012


– See appendix for more information

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Basic Offline Topology

Discrete or
Analog (NCP4300A)
implementation

Flyback Controller
or converter
depending on
power

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20 W+ Universal NCP1351 Controllers
Simple
Secondary
Control
Discrete
Regulator

Variable
Frequency
PWM Controller

External
HV FET

•Example based on NCP1351 20 W Universal input (DN06040)


•Can support 350 mA to 1 A, design set for 700 mA, 33 Vdc

21
NCP1351 LED Demo Board Performance
Efficiency across Vf and Line (Iout = 700 mA nom)
90%

80%

70%

60%
Efficiency (%)

50%

40%

30%

115 Vac
20%
230 Vac
125 x 37 x 35 mm
10%

0%
0 5 10 15 20 25 30
LED Voltage (Vdc)

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Range of Low Power LED Driver Demo Boards
Pout based on 90-265 Vac input range
25 Integrated
HV FET

20
Pout (W)

15

10

0
NCP1013LED NCP1014LEDGT NCP1028LED NCP1351LED

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Non-isolated Offline Buck Configuration
• Peak current controlled topology
operating in deep continuous conduction

• Why:
– Option to eliminate need for large electrolytic
output capacitor
– Simple control scheme with “good” current
regulation
– Can take advantage of the ON Semiconductor
DSS capability to power driver directly from
the line

• Circuit should be optimized for the


number of LEDs

24
Inverted Peak Current Control Buck

25
Regulate Peak – Control Valley

• Continuous Conduction Mode


– Current is always flowing through the inductor

• L = (VIN,MAX – VOUT) * (VOUT / VIN,MAX) * (1/fs) *(1/ (%Ripple * Iout))

• Must respect minimum on-time (LEB + Tpd + MOSFET turn-off time)

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Example: NCP1216 PCC Buck Circuit

115 Vac

Iout = 500 mA (nom)

• NCP1216 is directly powered from the ac mains simplifying startup and operation
• Efficiency is a function of output power (current, # LEDs), external component
selection (FET, inductor, rectifier) and switching frequency
• Dimmable through opto-coupler for safety isolation
• DN06050 Design Note available demonstrates performance including EMI filtering

27
Considerations for 230 Vac Applications
• Driving small strings of LEDs at high voltages results in extremely narrow duty cycles
• Switching controllers have leading edge blank circuit of 200-400 ns before current is sensed
• Switching frequency must be reduced for proper operation and input voltage is kept to a
minimum with a half wave rectified input circuit
D1
Q1
AC1 MRA4003T3G STD1NK60 R5 L1

C2 1uF D2 2R2 1mH


C1 100nF 400Vdc MMSD4148T1 1/4W
230Vac
R4
R1
10k
AC2 1/2W
1R C5
1W 1 8
2.2uF
0.4 2 400Vdc
3 6

4 5
LED
0.35 NCP1200
U1 C4 10uF
R2 NCP1200 - 40kHz 25Vdc
LED Current (A)

C3 1uF
16Vdc 18k
0.3 1/4W

0.25 R3 2k D3
1/4W MURA160T3

0.2
195 205 215 225 235 245 255 265
Input Voltage (Vac)

28
Tapped Inductor Approach
Extends Duty Ratio, Increase Iout

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Power Factor Requirements for
Offline LED Drivers
• IEC (EU) requirements dictate THD performance for Lighting (over 25 W),
other international standards apply depending on the region

• US DOE ENERGY STAR™ includes mandatory PFC for Solid State


Lighting regardless of the power level. This is a voluntary standard and
applies to a specific set of products such as down lights, under cabinet
lights and desk lamps for example
– >0.7 for residential applications
– >0.9 for commercial applications

• While not absolutely mandated in the for lighting in all countries, it may be
required based on the application:
– Utilities drive major commercial uses to have high PF at the facility level
– Moreover when utilities owns/service the streetlight it is in their interest to have
good power factor, typically > 0.95+

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Class C Limits

This class applies to lighting equipment exceeding 25 W

Maximum Value expressed


Harmonic Order n as a percentage of the fundamental input current
2 2
3 30*λ
5 10
7 7
9 5
11 < n <= 39 3
λ is the circuit power factor

The standard equates to a THD<35% (PF around 0.94).


In practice, lighting equipment suppliers may target THD<20%.

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Improving Power Factor for Flyback Circuits
• Traditional Flyback converters have a PF of ~0.5-0.55

• Improving this to > 0.7 for low power applications does not require new
topologies, just circuit optimization
1u C2

– Passive technique (Valley-Fill) D6


VF := 0

D4
VF := 0

D1 VF := 0

– ONSEMI “haversine” flyback optimization 1 VF := 0 VF := 0 D2


VF := 0 VF := 0
D3
1k

– Critical Conduction Mode Flyback D7 D5 R2

1u
C1

• For high power applications like street lights, a dedicated PFC boost
stage is normally used

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NCP1014GTG Demo Board
J1-1
R1 4R7
1

Line
D1 D2 L1 2.7mH

C1 MRA4007 MRA4007 + TESTPOINT


100nF D3 D4 C3 R2 E1

1
1.5nF 47K
MRA4007 MRA4007 C2
J1-2
220nF
1 D7 MURS320T3 J2-1
R6 1R8
1
Neutral
LED Anode
D5 1 R7 1R8 J2-2
MURA160 1
+ C9
T1A 1
FL1 1000uF R8 10R

4 R10 C10
Reduce bulk D6
T1B
Fly Leads
C8 +
R9 10R 10K 10nF
J2-5
3 FL2 1
cap to improve MMBD914LT1
1000uF

power factor T1C


2
J2-6
LED Cathode

1
E2 - TESTPOINT
- TESTPOINT
R11

Reduce cap to Output Q1


BC857
100

increase dynamic capacitance


self supply Increased D8
24V
R12
1K

frequency for R3
1
U1
3
VCC DRAIN

improved EMI 3.3K FB


2

4
GND

NCP1014 R4 R13
10K
200

Off board
Q2
BC846
R5
2.2K
4

1
C4 C5 C6 U2
R14 R15
100nF 2.2uF 47uF D9
3

2
820 1K
5.1V
C7 2.2nF

Optional dimming components

Slow loop response


to improve power factor 8mm Primary-Secondary
Boundary

33
Performance of “Haversine” Flyback

•DN06051 design note illustrates how to modifying the NCP1014 for higher PF >
0.8 using the “haversine” flyback optimization which easily meets US Residential
Energystar Requirements

34
Demo: NCP1014GTG Portable Desk Lamp

Desk Lamp 35 W Halogen Magnetic Transformer

Light Pin (W) Illuminance Power


Source @ 120 Vac (Lux)* Factor

Halogen
41.7 W 744 0.961
(35 W bulb)

Quad LED 10.9 W 795 0.857

NCP1014 LED Driver 4 LED Cree MC-E Summary of Results


* Illuminance measures at 0.5 m
with PF Correction Multichip Array

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Achieving High Power Factor and
Low Distortion
High voltage dc node

NCP1652
PFC
Controller

Secondary side control


is not draw for simplicity

36
Area Lighting Considerations
Dimming
Control

NCP1652 PWM
LED
Power Supply Module
w/ CCR
DC
AC
PFC Isolated Output
DC-DC
PWM
LED
Lamp
w/CCR

PWM
LED
Lamp
Two Stage Modular Approach w/CCR

AC-DC + Constant Current Stages


• Light output varies significantly
– Poll Height and Spacing
– Type of Traffic Flow (residential, city center)

• Significant range of power and light levels required for


area lighting

• One basic design can be scaled up or down in light


output by adding LED light bars

• With a modular approach light bars are field


upgradeable

37
NCP1652 48 V Fixed Output Schematic
F1
2.5A
Ideal for Fixed Voltage Area Lighting
D1 - D4
L1 L2 1N5406 x 4
C1 C2
AC MRA4007T
R1
In 0.47 0.47 D5 R2 R3 T1 L3

1.5KE440A
1M "X" Z1 560K C7
"X" 36K (6:1) 3.3uH
0.5W 0.5W 680uF,
C3 3W 100nF 2 8 63V x 3
0.1uF
400V
D10 R4 D11 D6 400V
R24 C19 C20 C21 C22
+
C4
22uF 5 C24 48V
100 MMSD 100, 1/2W 1nF

MRA4007T
400V MURS120T
C5 4148T C6 6 C23 0.1 2A
R7 R6 100uF 470uF D7
D8 _
35v 35V 1 11 100,
365K 365K MURS MUR860
R5 63V
R9 R10 R11 R8 160T
2K 100
30.1K 332K 365K 1/2W

NCP1652
C8
1 16 R31
0.1
2 15 Q1 SPP11N80C3
3.3K
3 14 NC R26
R23 1/4W
4 U1
13 2.7K
3.3 ohm Z4 (24V)
5 12 R25 SFH615A-4 MMSZ5252B
U2
6 11 0 ohm
R22 4 1
R27
7 10 10K 1K
R12
8 9
27K R15 3 2
MMSD R29
C26
2.2K

D9 R28 102K
R14 Z2 4148T R21
C9 R13
C10 + R18 24K
MMSZ
8.6K
7.32K

R16 R19 10 1uF


680pF

C15 C16 C17 C18


49.9K

1nF C11 5245B R20


100K

U3

76.8K
4.7uF C12 C13 R17 0.10 C25 R30
0.1uF
33nF C14 0.1 0.1 1nF TL431A
25V 470pF 39K Z3 ohm 5.6K
10nF
0.5W 0.1
MMSZ C27
5248B
Notes: 2.2nF "Y"

1. Crossed schematic lines are not connected.


2. Heavy lines indicate power traces/planes.
3. Z2/D9 is for optional OVP (not used).
4. L1 is Coilcraft BU10-1012R2B or equivalent.
5. L2 is Coilcraft P3221-AL or equivalent.
6. L3 is Coilcraft RFB0807-3R3L or equivalent. NCP1652 90 Watt LED Supply
7. Q1 and Q2 will require small heatsinks. 48V, 2A Out, 90-265VAC Input

38
NCP1652 Efficiency Results
Configuration: 48 V / 2 A
94

92

90

88
Efficiency (%)

86

115 V ac
230 V ac
84

82

80
10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100%
% of Full Load

39
Modifying Secondary Side for
CC/CV Operation Efficiency

Vf = 45 Vdc

40
NCL30000 CRM Isolated Flyback
• Low Power (5-20 W) also need high power factor
– LED Drivers/Ballasts
– Downlights / Spot Lights / Outdoor Lighting

• Key Objectives
– Directly drive LEDs with tight constant current output regulation
– High Power Factor >0.9, IEC Class C Harmonic Content
– Greater than 80% efficiency at low power levels 5-15 W Pout, 83% typical
– Scale-able to handle a range of power LEDs and current levels
– Can support existing dimming solutions (TRIAC and Trailing Edge)

• Design approach to achieve high power factor in a single stage uses a


critical conduction mode (CrM) fixed on-time flyback topology

41
NCL30000 Basic Application Diagram
AC Dout
EMI
Line
FILTER
Input

RSU Ra
Cin

D1
Rx
Cv Rb

8
VCC
RL IN2+ 5
OUT2 +

R1 RZCD 7 IN2- 6
-
Rt
NCL30000 NCS1002
1 Vcc 8 IN1- 2
MFP Q1 -
OUT1
C1
1 IN1+ 3
2 COMP DRV 7 +
R2
Ccomp
GND
3 CT GND 6
4 Ry
Cc
4 CS ZCD 5
Ctim

COUT
Rc RLED
RCS

42
Theory of Operation
• Fixed on-time control
results in sinusoidal
input current in phase

• Key Requirements
– Input capacitance
must be very low
– Control bandwidth
must be low (<20 Hz)
to maintain constant
on-time over a line
cycle

• Secondary feedback
controls on-time based
on line and load

43
NCL30000 Demo Requirements
• Intended to supply 350 mA and drive a wide range of LEDs (4-15) LED
driver applications. Component selections to support 700 mA or higher
output current

• Reference design is targeting <20 W with this transformer, board can


also support larger transformer for higher power

• Scalable solution for different power levels


– 115 Vac Version - 90-130 Vac
– 230 Vac Version 180-265 Vac
– 90 – 305 Vac – Extended universal included 277 Vac - no Triac control

• For Triac Dimming, on time has to be adjusted for a specific number of


LEDs to achieve best dimming performance. Default is 12 LEDs

• Robust Protection
– Open LED, Shorted Output, Overload

44
NCL30000 Demo Board

Dual transformer footprints for 15 W / 30 W Designs


45
Efficiency and Current Regulation versus Load
NCL30000 115 Vac Demo Board
370 86%

360 84%
Efficiency ->

350 82%
LED Current (mA)

Efficiency (%)
340 80%

330 78%

320 76%

310 74%

300 72%
0 10 20 30 40 50 60
LED Forward Voltage (Vdc)

46
Power Factor and Harmonic Distortion
14
NCL30000 115 Vac Demo Board 1

13 0.99

12 0.98

11 0.97
Input Current THD (%)

10 0.96

Power Factor (PF)


9 0.95

8 0.94

7 0.93

THD
6 0.92
Power Factor

5 0.91

4 0.9
90 95 100 105 110 115 120 125 130 135
Input Voltage (Vac)

47
Line Dimmable LED Drivers
• Triac dimmers (leading edge, phase cut) are
intended for resistive loads and tend to behave
badly when connected to an electronic
transformer

• Some manufacturers have “specialized”


dimmers –for electronic transformers such as
low voltage track lighting

• Moreover for commercial applications there are


also transistor based dimmers that have falling
edge control (three wire connection)

• Triac dimming is common in residential a nd


retail application

48
Matching LED Driver to Dimmer

•A typical switch mode power supply feedback system will attempt to


maintain constant output over a wide range of input voltage by increasing
duty cycle or in this case on time

•For line dimming, LED current should reduce proportionately to reduction


of the RMS input voltage

•The maximum on time is set to limit the power at the nominal LED string
power

•During dimming, the controller will not be able to increase on time, so


natural dimming of the LED occurs in a predictable manner

49
Efficiency and Current Regulation versus Load
60
NCL30000 115 Vac Demo Board
Constant
50
Power
Region

40
LED Power
LED Voltage (Vdc)

Dimming Point
Constant
30
Current
Region

20

10

Short Protection
Region
0
0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800
LED Current (mA)

50
NCL30000 350 mA Isolated Flyback
115 Vac / 12 LED / Triac Dimming Version
400 90%

350 80%

300 70%

250 60%
LED Current (mA)

Efficiency
200 50%

150 40%

100 30%

50 20%

0 10%
20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 120 130 140
Input Voltage (Vac)

51
NCL30000 350 mA Isolated Flyback
115 Vac Line Dimming Control - 12 LEDs in Series
400

350

300

250
LED Current (mA)

200

Leviton Sureslide
150 Leviton Electronic
Cooper Aspire
Lutron Skylark
Leviton Illumittech
100
Lutron Digital Fade
Leviton Rotary
GE DI 61
50
Lutron Toggler

0
0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180
Conduction Angles (degrees)

52
Comments on Triac and Transistor Dimming
• As illustrated, dimming range is highly dependent on the
characteristics of the wall dimmer

• Triac dimmers were originally designed for incandescent


lamps and presented a much higher load (4-5x higher) than
a LED replacement down-light

• Unfortunately each manufacturer has different dimmer


characteristics

• As LED lighting enters the mainstream we would expect


dimmer manufacturers to start optimizing their products to
LEDs

53
Power Factor and Harmonic Distortion
NCL30000 90-305 Vac Demo Board
14 1.00

13 0.99

12 0.98

11 0.97
Input Current THD

Power Factor
10 0.96

9 0.95

8 0.94
THD
Power Factor

7 0.93

6 0.92
90 115 140 165 190 215 240 265 290 315
Input Voltage (Vac)

54
Efficiency and Current Regulation versus Load
NCL30000 90-305 Vac Demo Board (Vout = 12 LEDs, 37 Vdc)
400 86%

84%

375 Efficiency -> 82%

80%

Efficiency (%)
Iout (mA)

350 78%

76%

325 74%

72%

300 70%
90 110 130 150 170 190 210 230 250 270 290 310
Input Line Voltage (V ac)

55
EMI Performance
NCL30000 Demo Board (90-305 Vac Version)

56
Isolated High PF Efficiency/Solutions

90% CRM + Resonant Half Bridge

CCM single stage


Efficiency

NCP1652/NCL30001* (PWM dimmable)


85%
NCL30000

CRM Output Current


Flyback 0.3-3 A
Universal Input
80%

25 50 75 100
Output Power * Available Dec 2009

57
100-200 W CRM/LLC High Power
Streetlight Supply

NCP1397

58
50k hours of LED life is great but ….

Occasionally there can be failures


Caused by. . . Some Application Are. . .
9LED infant mortality 9 Mission Critical
9Assembly Partial Defects 9 Safety Dependent
9Transients 9 Difficult Access

59
NUD4700 LED Shunt Protection
Current
Source

•Protects operation in the event of an open LED fault

•Supports up to 1 A with proper heat sinking

NUD4700 in
PowerMite Package

60
LED Lighting Must be Approached as a System

61
Conclusion
• Offline LED power solutions continue to evolve in a rapid
manner as new LEDs are introduced

• Variety of offline solutions depending on power level,


features, and performance

• ON Semiconductor has a complete portfolio of PFC and


PWM controllers and converters to address range of LED
power applications

• Visit the ON Semiconductor website to see what new


reference designs are being introduced optimized for
specific AC line powered LED applications

62
For More Information

• View the extensive portfolio of power management products from ON


Semiconductor at www.onsemi.com

• View reference designs, design notes, and other material supporting


the design of highly efficient power supplies at
www.onsemi.com/powersupplies

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