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FEBRUARY 8-14, 2012
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INSIDE THIS ISSUE
Donation to Turfs Up!
Hopewell Physical Therapy
donates $2,500. PAGE 7
P r e - s o r t e d
S t a n d a r d
U S P o s t a g e
P A I D
B e l l m a w r N J
P e r m i t 1 5 0 1
P o s t a l C u s t o m e r
Special to The Sun
Freshman Ian Goldsmith plays in the Hopewell Valley Central High School Orchestra. The
school has been named a Grammy Foundation Signature School semifinalist for excellence in
its music program for the fourth year in a row.
Local wineries are toasting legisla-
tion that will allow them to ship wine
directly to consumers beginning in
May.
The legislation, which was intro-
duced Dec. 11, was signed into law by
Gov. Christie on Jan. 17, and allows
wineries producing fewer than 250,000
gallons of wine a year to ship up to 12
cases of wine per customer directly,
and also allows the smaller wineries to
ship out of state.
A case of wine, according to the leg-
islation, could be no more than 9 liters
or 12 standard-size 750-milliliter bot-
tles.
It was very pleasing to see that we
can keep our outlets, said Violetta
Neri, who has co-owned the Hopewell
Valley Winery with her husband, Ser-
gio, since 2002.
The couple previously had owned a
vineyard and winery in the Brunello
di Montalcino region of Italy.
Neri praised the governor for pass-
ing the legislation, noting that, He has
said that New Jersey is open for busi-
ness, and this will help us a lot.
Retaining Hopewell Valley Winerys
outlets very much affects us in a posi-
tive way, she said. Before, we had to
take our wine to the liquor store, they
had to ship it and consumers had to
pay more than they had to, Violetta
said. This is really good for business.
Its good for restaurants, and its good
for consumers.
We fought very hard for that, and
we are glad it passed, said Gary
Mount, who owns Terhune Orchards
and Winery in Lawrenceville with his
wife, Pamela. What this legislation
also does is allow us to sell to BYOB
places at outlets in New Jersey using
our license.
We had just put so much money
into the vineyard, and then we were
thinking Oh no, Pamela Mount said
of the legislation. Were really very
pleased.
The direct selling, Gary Mount said,
had been prohibited since the estab-
lishment of farm wineries.
We think this will be very helpful
and very beneficial to the wine indus-
try, he said.
New Jersey has about 50 wineries,
he said, and none of these are really
large enough to make it without some-
JIM WRIGHT/The Hopewell Sun
Violetta and Sergio Neri are toasting
the recently passed legislation that
allows them to keep their wine outlets
with BYOB establishments and to
ship directly to customers.
A toast to new legislation
Wineries can ship directly to customers
Grammy in reach for
Hopewell Valley Central High
By JIM WRIGHT
The Hopewell Sun
please see WINERIES, page 4
Hopewell Valley Central High School has
been awarded a Grammy of sorts.
The Grammy Foundation has named the
school one of its Signature School semifinal-
ists for 2012.
The semifinalists, which include 125 public
high schools across the country, were chosen
from thousands of schools that submitted in-
formation to the Grammy Foundation, the
philanthropic arm of the Grammy Awards,
which will be telecast on Feb. 12.
For Hopewell Valley, this marks the fourth
year in a row that our high school music pro-
gram has been recognized as a semifinalist for
its excellence by an independent national or-
ganization and program, said Peter Griffin,
supervisor of visual and performing arts in
the school district. This continued honor is
truly a testament to the talented students and
staff that we have here in Hopewell Valley, as
well as to the support for our parents, our
board of education, our district administra-
tion and high school administration. I am
truly humbled to be a part of this superlative
music program.
The Grammy Signature Schools program
sustains excellence in music education by
granting awards to public high school music
programs in communities across the coun-
try, said Neil Portnow, president and chief
executive officer of the Recording Academy
and the Grammy Foundation in a statement.
Each of these semifinalist schools should be
commended for their commitment to keeping
the arts in their curriculum for the long-term
please see NATIONAL, page 2
By JIM WRIGHT
The Hopewell Sun
2 THE HOPEWELL SUN FEBRUARY 8-14, 2012
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benefits of their students.
Unlike any other community
Ive been in, the Hopewell Valley
advocates for the arts, said Grif-
fin, who is in the middle of his
14th year in the district and on
his third stop in 28 years. In my
time here, there have been four
referendums, and the only one
that didnt pass didnt include an
arts facility. We are very fortunate
in that when the funds are avail-
able, we are a priority. This is a
community that relishes its arts.
After reviewing additional sup-
plemental materials, such as con-
cert audio performances,
concert programs and repertoire
lists, the foundation will an-
nounce its finalists for the awards
in mid-March. Finalists will get
grants ranging from $1,000 to
$10,000 to benefit their music pro-
gram.
A single school is named the
National Grammy Signature
School.
Its very competitive, Griffin
said. Only a handful of New Jer-
sey schools have ever been named
one of the 10 finalists. As honored
as we are to be a semifinalist, we
want to be in the top 10.
The high school, he said, has
been at least a semifinalist for the
past four years in large part be-
cause of the support of the com-
munity and the administration.
There is no stigma with being
in the music program, he said.
Its cool to sing in the choir. Weve
had football players and cheer-
leaders in the choir and wrestlers
in the orchestra. When youre
born with it, youre raised with it
and exposed to it, you tend to
gravitate to it.
The kids are great. It goes
back to the elementary school
level. Their general music classes
are very comprehensive and
there is a mandatory choral
music program. Many of those
kids go on to sing in the high
school choral program.
The fourth- and fifth-grade cho-
rus, he said, has been recognized
as one of the top five in New Jer-
sey.
The success of the district
music program, Griffin ex-
plained, also encourages the best
teachers and directors in the per-
forming arts to come to the
Hopewell Valley.
There are lots of teachers and
directors that want to work here,
he said. We can attract those
quality teachers and directors.
NATIONAL
Continued from page 1
National recognition received
for music program
4 THE HOPEWELL SUN FEBRUARY 8-14, 2012
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thing like this. This allows us to
sell like New Jersey farms sell.
Wineries are much the same.
Theres not thousands of acres or
thousands of cases of wine.
The legislation creates an out-
of-state winery license that can be
issued for out-of-state wineries
that produce a maximum of
250,000 gallons of wine a year. The
bill sets the annual fee for the out-
of-state license at $938, which is
the same as what plenary and
farm wineries pay.
I think this will definitely
allow New Jersey wineries to
continue to thrive, Gary Mount
said.
WINERIES
Continued from page 1
JIM WRIGHT/The Sun
The tasting room at Hopewell Valley Winery is one of the small local
wineries owners say are being positively affected by legislation
allowing direct shipment to consumers and outlets for products at
BYOB restaurants.
Wineries expect to thrive
under new shipping legislation
Send us your Hopewell news
Have a news tip? Want to send us a press release or photos? Shoot an interesting video? Drop us an e- mail
at news@hopewellsun.com. Fax us at 856-427-0934. Call the editor at 856-427-0933.
FEBRUARY 8-14, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 5
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The following are reports from
Hopewell police.
A 23-year-old Pennington man
was charged with receiving
stolen property on Jan. 19 at 11:38
p.m., according to police reports.
Police had responded to a resi-
dence with an arrest warrant on
an unrelated matter. Upon enter-
ing the residence, an officer ob-
served a Hopewell Township
street sign, Hansens Corner, in
the house. The man was taken
into custody on the active arrest
warrant. He was processed at po-
lice headquarters and was later
released after posting bail. The
case will be forwarded to the Mer-
cer County Prosecutors Office for
review.
A 39-year-old Bethlehem, Pa.,
man was charged with drunken
driving, speeding and reckless
driving after being pulled over
Jan. 23 at 11:32 p.m. Police said
the man was stopped along Route
31 after his car was observed trav-
eling at 58 mph in a 40 mph zone.
Police said the driver had the
odor of alcohol on his breath.
After performing field-sobriety
tests, he was placed under arrest
and transported to headquarters
for processing. He was later re-
leased to a relative. The case will
be heard in municipal court.
A 77-year-old Pennington
woman was charged with care-
less driving after she was in-
volved in a one-car crash on Jan.
23.
Police said the woman had
been driving a 2004 Chrysler Se-
bring northbound on Scotch Road
at 5:13 p.m. when she failed to ne-
gotiate a curve in the road. The
car, police said, proceeded off of
the road, crossed through the
grass median at Scotch Road West
and struck a mailbox.
Police said the car then contin-
ued approximately 150 feet on to
the lawn of a private residence
and struck a tree. The woman
was transported by the Penning-
ton First Aid Squad to a local hos-
pital for a minor facial injury, and
was treated and later released.
Sometime between 9:30 a.m.
and 5:15 p.m. on Jan. 24, someone
forced open a first-floor bathroom
window and entered a local home.
Various articles of jewelry and
cash, with a total value of $1,970,
were taken.
Sometime between 11 p.m. Jan.
27 and 9:15 a.m. Jan. 28, someone
damaged a landscape trailer that
was being stored at a private loca-
tion. Damage was estimated at
$500.
A 15-year-old Hopewell town-
ship boy was charged with pos-
session of marijuana (under 50
grams) and possession of drug
paraphernalia, after police
stopped a car driven by a 17-year-
old Hopewell Township boy on
Jan. 25 at 4:15 p.m. Police say they
found the 15-year-old passenger in
possession of a glass pipe con-
taining marijuana residue. Police
say the juvenile passenger was
placed under arrest and trans-
ported to police headquarters for
processing. The 15-year-old was
later released into the custody of
a parent and the case will be
heard in family court.
POLICE REPORT
Trenton residents will try
and take the championship
away from reigning, five-time
Pennington Scrabble champi-
on Dan Robinson in the 12th-
Annual Classics Scrabble Invi-
tational, at noon on Feb. 12 at
Classics Used and Rare Books,
117 South Warren, in Trenton.
Trenton Scrabble
tourney Feb. 12
R
ecent news that Atlantic City
casinos had a better December
2011 than December 2010 is, of
course, good to hear. Given the citys
long losing streak, any step in the
right direction, no matter the reason,
is cause to pat someone on the back.
But, a closer look at the numbers
shows that the city is not anywhere
close to being out of the woods.
The state Division of Gaming En-
forcement recently announced that
total casino win rose 4.2 percent last
December to $246.5 million. It was the
highest monthly percentage increase
since December 2006, officials said.
Thats great, except for the fact that,
first, in December 2010, Old Man Win-
ter already had settled in for what was
to be a brutal stay. Last December, the
weather was great. That, alone, proba-
bly helped the casinos quite a bit.
Oh, and the state also announced
that, for the year, casinos won $3.3 bil-
lion, which is down 6.9 percent from
2010.
But we really dont feel like raining
on ACs parade today. A win is a win is
a win, and well take it.
And there are other reasons for
hope:
The Revel is set to open this sum-
mer. No doubt it will generate a fair
amount of buzz that will attract visi-
tors and create thousands of jobs.
And, John Palmieri is the new exec-
utive director of the Casino Reinvest-
ment Development Authority. He has a
history of success in helping commu-
nities expand. If he can get the city,
the casinos and the various other enti-
ties on board in marketing the city as
a destination point for tourists, some-
thing really good could happen.
The state also is looking into online
gambling, which actually could help
casinos in the long run.
Atlantic City still has a long, diffi-
cult road to recovery. But Decembers
news was good, and there are other,
positive signs.
Maybe theres hope for the city after
all.
Small win is better than a loss
At this point, Atlantic City will cling to any scrap of good news
AC notches a win
There are a few reasons why
Decembers casino win numbers are
up. Not all point to a rapid recovery
for Atlantic City, but, at this point, a
win is a win.
letters to the editor
6 THE HOPEWELL SUN FEBRUARY 8-14, 2012
103 Carnegie Center, Suite 300
Princeton, NJ 08540
609-751-0245
DAN McDONOUGH, JR.
Publisher
ALAN BAUER
General Manager & Editor
STEVE MILLER
Executive Vice President
ED LYNES
Vice President of Sales
JOSEPH EISELE
Advertising Director
TIM RONALDSON
Director of Digital Media
TOM ENGLE
Art Director
JIM WRIGHT
Hopewell Editor
DAN McDONOUGH, JR.
Chief Executive
RUSSELL CANN
Chairman of the Board
MICHAEL LaCOUNT, Ph.D.
Vice Chairman
BARRY RUBENS
Chief Financial Officer
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 103 Carnegie Center, Suite 300,
Princeton, NJ 08540. It is mailed weekly to
select addresses in the 08560, 08525 and
08534 ZIP codes. If you are not on the mail-
ing list, six-month subscriptions are avail-
able for $39.99. PDFs of the publication are
online, free of charge. For information,
please call 609-751-0245.
To submit a news release, please email
news@hopewellsun.com. For advertising
information, call 609-751-0245 or email
advertising@hopewellsun.com. The Sun
welcomes suggestions and comments from
readers including any information about
errors that may call for a correction to be
printed.
SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers.
Brief and to the point is best, so we look for
letters that are 300 words or fewer. Include
your name, address and phone number. We
do not print anonymous letters. Send letters
to news@hopewellsun.com, via fax at 609-
751-0245, or via the mail. Of course, you can
drop them off at our office, too. The
Hopewell Sun reserves the right to reprint
your letter in any medium including elec-
tronically.
in our opinion
As mayor of Hopewell Borough, one of
the frequently cited doughnut-hole mu-
nicipalities of Mercer County, I am com-
pelled to offer a response to the recent
spate of editorial comments suggesting the
borough should consolidate with the town-
ship.
First and foremost, I welcome a thought-
ful and rational resident-generated discus-
sion concerning consolidation. As mayor, I
consider my primary obligation to bor-
ough taxpayers to be a reasonable property
tax rate related to the efficient delivery of
necessary and desired public services. The
council and I have made, and will continue
to make, every good-faith effort to appro-
priately balance this obligation.
For every property tax dollar collected
in the borough, 88 percent is allocated to
shared services, contracted services or
state/county mandates. Only 12 percent is
allocated for services provided by our pro-
fessional administrative and public
works/water utility staff.
Because of our efforts to be efficient
with every tax dollar, borough residents
have been and will continue to be the bene-
ficiaries of the prosperity enveloping
the borough. During the past four years,
the borough has experienced an unprece-
dented growth in its commercial sector
to such an extent that only one commercial
site remains unoccupied. We have residen-
tial properties selling quickly, many
new businesses, numerous sophisticated
yet affordable eateries, and other business-
es and new families coming to the
borough.
The council and I have wisely decided to
invest taxpayer dollars, federal grants and
other funds to major infrastructure repairs
to improve, not ignore, the lasting needs of
our community. Among those improve-
ments is the revitalization of Broad Street,
which now features a historical landscape
through the center of town, furthering our
economic growth.
We partnered with the NJDOT to im-
prove and not simply repair the aged
Greenwood Avenue Bridge, a bridge that
now features historic elements consistent
with our heritage. Weve successfully se-
cured state and federal grants to make an-
nual road and drainage improvements,
and our streets and roads inventory is
safer for vehicles and pedestrians than at
any other point in time. And soon, we will
open an ADA-compliant and publicly ac-
cessible municipal building and court-
room that will serve the needs of our resi-
dents for generations to come.
Through our long-standing efforts and
commitment to shared services, the bor-
ough deserves to be acknowledged as a
model for shared services long before the
self-serving and politically motivated pro-
nouncements of others.
While shared services is the current best
practice for the delivery of government
services, I remain committed to the con-
cept that the future of the borough and
other similarly situated communities best
resides in the formation of not-for-profit,
non-municipal entities free from the
straight-jacketed mindset of state govern-
ment applied regardless of need, utility
and ability to pay.
- Mayor Paul Anzano
Mayor Anzano offers
comments on Hopewell
Borough consolidation
Send us your Hopewell news
Have a news tip? Want to send us a press release or photos? Shoot an interesting video? Drop us an e-mail at
news@themontgomerysun.com. Fax us at (856) 427-0934. Call the editor at (609) 751-0245.
FEBRUARY 8-14, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 7
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Handicapped Accessible
Special to The Sun
Tom Bartolino, left, of Hopewell
Physical Therapy, joined the
growing list of Turfs Up! sup-
porters with a $2,500 donation.
Hes seen with recreation foun-
dation trustee Sheryl Stone
Hopewell as he presents the
check. Physical Therapy is one
of the many local businesses to
support the communitys effort
in building an artificial turf field
at Hopewell Valley Central High
School. For more information on
the Turfs Up! project or to make
a donation, log on to www.hvrec
foundation.org.
Hopewell Physical Therapy donates $2,500
WEDNESDAY
February 8
FOR ALL
New Jersey in the American Revo-
lution : 7 p.m. at Hopewell Branch
Library. The library and Hopewell
Valley Historical Society join to pres-
ent Arthur Lefkowitz lecture and
slide program about the 1776 Ameri-
can retreat across New Jersey, parts
of which took place near Hopewell.
The lecture is based on Lefkowitz
book, The Long Retreat. This pro-
gram is made possible by the Hori-
zon Speakers Bureau of the New
Jersey Council for the Humanities, a
state partner of the National
Endowment for the Humanities.
Please register.
FOR CHILDREN
STORY TIME : Ages 2 to 5
years,siblings welcome. 11 a.m.
These story times introduce chil-
dren to the best age appropriate
stories in childrens literature.
Action rhymes, songs, and felt
board activities are part of the pro-
gram. The content of each story
time centers on a different theme.
An age appropriate craft follows
story time. Each program runs
about 30 minutes. Each theme is
the same all week. Parental supervi-
sion is required.
I LOVE CHOCOLATE PARTY : 4
p.m. Do you love chocolate? We do!
Drop by the community room any-
time between 4 and 5:30 p.m. to
make your own chocolate creation!
Materials will be provided. All ages
are welcome but adult supervision
is required for those younger than 6
years. Registration required.
THURSDAY
February 9
FOR CHILDREN
TODDLER ROCK : Featuring Music
Together. 10 a.m. Join us with your
baby, toddler or preschooler for a
special music and movement story
time with Music Together Director
and Teacher, Sarah Orfe. She'll mix a
few Music Together songs and activ-
ities, including instrument play, with
some favorite stories so you can get
a taste of what Music Together is all
about. Come discover why everyone
you know loves Music Together.
STORY TIME : Ages 2 to 5
years,siblings welcome. 11 a.m.
These story times introduce chil-
dren to the best age appropriate
stories in childrens literature.
Action rhymes, songs, and felt
board activities are part of the pro-
gram. The content of each story
time centers on a different theme.
An age appropriate craft follows
story time. Each program runs
about 30 minutes. Parental supervi-
sion is required.
FRIDAY
February 10
FOR CHILDREN
OPEN PLAY TIME: All ages. Adult
supervsion required. Come to our
Children's Activity Room for Open
Play Time! This is a time for par-
ents/caregivers and children to
socialize. Toys and coloring supplies
will be available for the children.
SATURDAY
February 11
FOR CHILDREN
FAMILY STORY TIME : All ages
welcome. 10:30 a.m. Enjoy stories,
songs, rhymes, and a craft for chil-
dren and their families. Online regis-
tration required.
MONDAY
February 13
FOR CHILDREN
THE ART OF READING: Mercer
County Library System announces
its spring 2012 art show, The Art of
Reading. Children in grades 4
through 8 will be able to submit one
painting or drawing, no bigger than
9x12 to their local Mercer County
Branch Library by Friday, March 23.
The art work will be judged on
adherence to the theme, The Art of
Reading, content, form and texture
and will be displayed in each branch
library for the first two weeks of
April. A panel of local judges from
each community will award local
prizes of first, second and third
place. The first, second and third
place winners from each branch will
then go to the Lawrence Headquar-
ters Branch for a final system-wide
judging. There will be a distribution
of prizes and an art reception on
Sunday, April 29 from 1 to 2 pm.
Refreshments will be served.
TUESDAY
February 14
FOR CHILDREN
BABY TIME: Recommended ages
birth to 2 years. Adult supervision
required. 11 a.m. This program is a
great way to introduce your child to
library story times and reading. Age
appropriate books are shared with
the group. Songs, nursery rhymes,
puppets, and felt board figures cre-
ate a rich audio-visual and social
experience. After 20 minutes of
structured group time, there is time
for play and for socializing.
STORY TIME : Ages 2 to 5
years,siblings welcome. 2 p.m.
These story times introduce chil-
dren to the best age appropriate
stories in childrens literature.
Action rhymes, songs, and felt
board activities are part of the pro-
gram. The content of each story
time centers on a different theme.
An age appropriate craft follows
story time. Each program runs
about 30 minutes. Parental supervi-
sion is required.
calendar PAGE 8 FEBRUARY 8-14, 2012
COMPILED BY ALAN BAUER
Want to be listed?
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Calendar or Meetings, informa-
tion must be received, in writ-
ing, two weeks prior to the
date of the event. Send infor-
mation by mail to: Calendar,
The Hopewell Sun, 103
Carnegie Center, Suite 300,
Princeton, N.J. 08540. Or by
email: calendar@hopewell
sun.com.
Wilson-Apple Funeral Home Wilson-Apple Funeral Home
zaco reiiiicroi rob - reiiiicroi, iJ
rioie coo) vov-+=oe - www.wiLsoi==Le.co:
RobertA.Wilson,ManagerNJ Lic.No.2520 R.AsherWilson,Director,NJLic.No.3823
Shoppes at Pennington 21 Rt 31 North, Suite 7B Pennington (609) 730-1211
COLOR, CUT AND
BLOWDRY
$80
Expires 2/29/12.
Must present at time of service.
FOIL HIGHLIGHTS
25%
OFF
Expires 2/29/12.
Must present at time of service.
Valentine's Day M
akeover
In a Relaxed Atmosphere
for Men, Women and Children
GIFT
CERTIFICATES
AVAILABLE
The Hopewell Township Demo-
cratic County Committee is look-
ing for interested residents to run
for the office of township commit-
teeperson in the fall. It also is
seeking new members for the
Hopewell Township Democratic
County Committee.
Requirements for the township
committee seat are that the per-
son be 18 years of age or older, a
registered Democrat and a resi-
dent of Hopewell Township. A
strong interest in local govern-
ment affairs is desired.
In addition, each voting district
in Hopewell Township has a male
and female voting representative
on the county committee. These
people choose the candidates to
run in the primaries for each elec-
tion and generally support the
party and candidates.
Registered Democrats or those
willing to become registered De-
mocrats may apply.
Please forward your requests
to Democratic County Chair-
woman Carol Kleis at
carol_kleis@msn.com by March
5.
FEBRUARY 8-14, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 9
Shear Madness
Salon
Make your appointment and bring this ad in for
$20 OFF your hair color & cut
$10 OFF your first haircut
609-466-4939
11 Railroad Place, Hopewell Boro, New Jersey 08525
Across from the Railroad Station
Hours by appointment Tuesday through Saturday
New Client Invitation!
PROFESSIONAL WEBSITES.
PEASANT PRICES.
Bttgt//eIuw.It/stuyvesmtBumt
Located a short distance from Albany, NY, Stuyvesant Outdoor Adventures offers custom tailored
packages and accommodations for serious and casual hunters alike. All of our packages include a
full hunting excursion, licensed guide, field dressing, as well as all meals and accommodations at
our newly remodeled lodge - Stuyvesant Manor; the former estate of Hollywood Icon Sidney Poitier -
which is also licensed as a bed and breakfast.
Whether you're looking for a short getaway, a corporate retreat, a camping weekend or even a seminar
with guest speakers and instructors, Stuyvesant Outdoor Adventures is a perfect spot.
Foz InIoznatIon, to nake a zesezvatIon oz to zeach
ouz tzIp-pIannIng concIezge, caII
(888} 690-0041
FALL AND 8PRINO
Turkey, WhitetaiI Deer
(archery, rifIe, muzzIeIoader),
Pheaaant (fieId and tower),
Coyote, Rabbit and WaterfowI
FBOm WHITBTAIL DBBB AND WILD T0BHBY TO
PHBASANTS, WATBBFOWL AND mOBB.
33WestBroadStreetHopewell,NJ08525
Located in Le Chardon Tea Room
ph.609.309.5428fax609.309.5437
Wed-Sat11am-5pmSun12pm-5pm
Mix& MatchCandiesFreshRoastedNuts
DriedFruitGourmetSnacksGiftBaskets
Andmuchmore!
10% OFF
Purchases of
$10 or more
There is still time to place a special order!
Because You Deserve The Best
Bringthiscoupontoreceive
Goodforin-storepurchasesonly.
Members of the Hopewell Val-
ley Leisure Club held their annu-
al Christmas luncheon in Decem-
ber at the Hopewell Valley Coun-
try Club. The club has been bring-
ing together adults 55 and older,
from Hopewell Borough and
Township, Pennington, Ewing,
Titusville and Montgomery, for
more than 30 years.
The club, which meets the first
Tuesday of each month, except in
July and August, is primarily a
social organization, but occasion-
ally invites speakers to address
the group.
Meetings are held in the
Church Hall of St. Alphonse
Church on Princeton Avenue in
Hopewell. Members should bring
their own lunch, but coffee and
dessert are provided by the re-
freshment committee for that
month.
Visitors are always invited.
For more information, call
(609) 466-0657.
Visitors welcome at
Hopewell Valley Leisure Club
Hopewell Twp. Dems seeking candidates
Visit The Hopewell Sun
online at
www.hopewellsun.com
classified
T HE HO P E WE L L S U N
FEBRUARY 8-14, 2012 PAGE 11
BOX A DS
W H A T Y O U N E E D T O K N O W
All ads are based on a 5 line ad, 15-18 characters per line. Additional lines: $9, Bold/Reverse Type: $9 Add color to any box ad for $20. Deadline: Wednesday - 5pm for the following week.
All classified ads must be prepaid. Your Classified ad will run in all 10 of The Sun newspapers each week! Be sure to check your ad the first day it appears.
We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, so call us immediately with any errors in your ad. No refunds are given, only advertising credit.
L I NE ADS
List a text-only ad for your yard sale,
job posting or merchandise.
Only
$
20per week
B US I NE S S
S E RV I C E S
Only
$
80per month Only
$
25per week
H O W T O C O N T A C T U S
Call us: 609-751-0245 or email us: classifieds@elauwitmedia.com
Hopewell Sun Lawrence Sun
Montgomery Sun Princeton Sun
Robbinsville Sun West Windsor Sun
856-356-2775
BOARD YOUR
DOG IN A
LOVING HOME!
NOT A KENNEL!
www.OurHome-DogBoarding.com
FREE ESTIMATES
856-381-0249
NJ License #13VH06184500
CSI Group International
Absolutely all concrete problems solved
Repair and Restoration
Cracks are our specialty.
Residential and Commercial Services
Decorative Concrete
New Concrete
Seal Coating Power Washing
Mudjacking
Concrete Leveling
Stain Removal
Concrete Repair
Dog Boarding Autos
ATTENTION
JUNK CARS WANTED
Sell your junk car for $300 and up. We buy flood cars.
for more info call Mike at 609-820-8643
licensed salvage yard
EIectricaI Services
SDK SERVICES
Let us do your homework.
Gutter Cleaning
& Repairs
Soffitt Fascia
Rotten Wood
Door Installation
Painting
Kitchens
Fully Insured Licensed
609-200-4043
24 hour
Emergency
Service
Lic# NJ 13VH05972600
SNOW REMOVAL
Home Improvement
DOG WALKING/PET CARE
Insured and Bonded
www.kittykissesandpuppypaws.com
732-616-2634
Dog WaIking
Handyman Services
Large or Small Repairs
Dependable, Family-based
Call Buddy Today! 609-468-0585
FREE ESTIMATES!
Fully Insured Lic. #13VH01208100
When you
mention this ad. 10% OFF
CHECK OUT THE SUN CLASSIFIEDS!
Firewood
LET
THE
SUNS
WORK
FOR
YOU!
Call
(856)
427-0933
for
Advertising
info.
SoIar
Tutoring
Has your high water alarm
gone off recently?
J WHALEN & SON
PUMP SERVICE
Sewage and Sump Pumps
Installed and Repaired
Call 609-737-2722
Pump Services
Academic Success :
TUTORNG Certified K-12
Honors Graduate
Over 25 years exp.
Caring, ndividualized
instruction
SAT Reading, Writing,
Math, Subject Tests ACT,
All Standardized Tests H.S.
Eng, Lit. and Writing; Math
to Pre-Calc., History Elem.
Phonics, Reading, Math;
Study Skills; E.S.L.
Excellent Ref.
609-924-2610
Pat Osander
"A Lady of Petigree"
House / Pet-Sitting
Phone: 609-896-0082
E-mail:garfdoggy@aol.com
FIREWOOD
Delivered Dumped
All 14-18 inches long
Split Aged Full Cord
SALE $195
Call: 908-359-3000
I CAN TEACH YOUR
CHILD TO READ!
All Ages. Free Consultation.
Call Today!
908-239-9623
CHRYSLER CIRRUS LXi 00
White/tan Lthr; Sun Roof;
Power assist; one owner;
Good written report; 90K mi;
$3,900
609-883-1774