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Why must the words be arranged orderly in a structure?

SENTENCE
Components /Parts Classification
By Purpose By Structure Orders

Basic Patterns

Sentence makes sense!


In the field of linguistics, a sentence is an expression in natural language.

It is often defined as a grammatical unit consisting of one or more words that bear syntactic relation to the words that precede or follow it.

Components of SENTENCE
is a group of words that has a subject and predicate, and it expresses a complete thought.
The professor teaches English.

Components of SENTENCE
The professor teaches English.
SUBJECT word/s about which a description is made. It is doer/ agent of action.

Components of SENTENCE
The professor teaches English.
PREDICATE verb that expresses the subjects action or state of being.

Components of SENTENCE
SIMPLE SUBJECT & SIMPLE PREDICATE
Simple subject
main or one-word subject

Simple Predicate
main predicate (verb)

Components of SENTENCE
The dynamic professor teaches English.
The noun professor is the simple subject (one-word subject) The verb teaches is the simple predicate (main verb)

Components of SENTENCE
COMPOUND SUBJECTS & COMPOUND PREDICATES Compound Subjects
Two or more subjects

Compounds Predicates
Two or more verbs

Components of SENTENCE
Sir Aldwin and Ms. Ysa teach English.
The nouns Sir Aldwin and Ms. Ysa are the compound subjects. The verb teach is the simple predicate.

Components of SENTENCE
Sir Aldwin teaches and speaks English.
The noun Sir Aldwin is the simple subject. The verbs teaches and speaks are the compound predicates.

Components of SENTENCE
Sir Aldwin and Ms. Ysa teach and speak English.
The nouns Sir Aldwin and Ms. Ysa are the compound subjects. The verbs teaches and speaks are the compound predicates.

Components of SENTENCE
COMPLETE SUBJECT & COMPLETE PREDICATE

Complete subject
Main subject (noun) and other modifying words

Complete Predicate
Main predicate (verb) and other modifiers

Components of SENTENCE
The dynamic professor teaches English.
The noun phrase the dynamic professor is the complete subject. The phrase teaches English is the complete predicate.

TRY ME!

Components of SENTENCE
A simple complete sentence is consists of a single clause. An incomplete sentence is called as sentence fragment, either subject or predicate alone; thus, it express incomplete thought.

Components of SENTENCE
The dynamic professor
This is a group of words that does NOT express a complete thought, so it is a sentence fragment.

Components of SENTENCE
teaches English.
This is a group of words that does NOT express a complete thought, so it is a sentence fragment.

Orders of SENTENCE
Sometimes, sentences are not in subject + verb form. There are some sentences which are effectively stated in verb + subject form. These sentences are in INVERTED ORDER.

Orders of SENTENCE
INVERTED ORDER (V S) Here comes the bride. Attached here is my letter.
NATURAL ORDER (S V) The bride comes here. My letter is attached here.

Classification of SENTENCE
BY PURPOSE
Declarative Sentence Interrogative Sentence Exclamatory Sentence Imperative Sentence

Classification of SENTENCE
DECLARATIVE SENTENCE
the most common type, commonly makes a statement: English is fun to learn.

Classification of SENTENCE
INTERROGATIVE SENTENCE
Asks question/permission or interrogate Is English fun to learn? Could you speak English?

Classification of SENTENCE
EXCLAMATORY SENTENCE
More emphatic form of expression of strong feeling or emotion Yes! English is more fun! Wow! I can speak English!

Classification of SENTENCE
IMPERATIVE SENTENCE
Expresses command or request Speak in English. Please talk to me in English.

Classification of SENTENCE
BY STRUCTURE
Simple Sentence Compound Sentence Complex Sentence Compound-complex Sentence

Structure of SENTENCE
CLAUSE
typically contains at least a subject noun phrase and a finite verb. This may express complete or incomplete sentence. INDEPENDENT complete DEPENDENT incomplete

Structure of SENTENCE
INDEPENDENT CLAUSE
An independent clause demonstrates a complete thought. It can stand alone as complete sentence. Also called as main clause

Structure of SENTENCE
The students study English.

Structure of SENTENCE
DEPENDENT CLAUSE
It is NOT a complete sentence. It CANNOT stand alone by itself. It needs the dependent clause to be complete. As called as subordinating clause.

Structure of SENTENCE
because they find it fun.

Structure of SENTENCE
The students study English because they find it fun.
INDEPENDENT CLAUSE DEPENDENT CLAUSE

Basic SENTENCE
Patterns

Basic Patterns of SENTENCES


I NEED TO KNOW
What is a sentence? What is a pattern?

Basic Patterns of SENTENCES


A sentence pattern is the arrangement of words in a structure.

Basic Patterns of SENTENCES


A sentence pattern is the arrangement of words in a structure.

Basic Patterns of SENTENCE


TERMS TO REMEMBER!
S- subject TV- transitive verb IV- intransitive verb LV- linking verb DO- direct object OC- object complement C - complement

Basic Patterns of SENTENCE


S IV S LV C S TV DO S TV DO - OC S TV IO DO

Basic Patterns of SENTENCES

S LV - C
Subject Linking Verb Complement
Subject is the doer of the action Linking Verb connects the subject and the complement Complement renames, describes and modifies the subject

Basic Patterns of SENTENCES

S LV - C
Subject Linking Verb Complement
Linking Verb connects the subject and the complement
EXAMPLES: verb be ( am, is are, was, were, will be ) sense verbs (appear, become, feel, grow, smell, sound, taste, look and seem

Basic Patterns of SENTENCES

S LV - C
Subject Linking Verb Complement
Complement - renaming or describing word A. Complement Noun - renames subject or tells what it is B. Complement Adjective describes or modifies the subject

Basic Patterns of SENTENCES

S LV - C
Subject Linking Verb Complement
The English professor is an artist. English becomes easy to learn. The Accountancy students are active. The class feels happy and excited.

Practice makes perfect!


DIRECTIONS Make a table having three columns. For each sentence, write the subject in the 1st column, the linking verb in the 2nd column, and the complement in the 3rd column.

Practice makes perfect!


1. 2. 3. 4. The Earth is one of Gods great creations. It becomes the best place for life. Life is His most precious gift. Human beings must be the responsible care takers. 5. We are the inhabitants of this planet.

Practice makes perfect!


6. Other people seem very careless 7. The plants and animals grow lesser and weaker. 8. Every year, the climate appears more unpleasant and worse. 9. The face of Mother Earth looks more terrible. 10. With all these, God feels terribly sad.

Basic Patterns of SENTENCES

S IV
Subject Intransitive Verb
Subject is the doer of the action Intransitive Verb is a kind of verb that does NOT have an object.
Only an adverb, adverbial and prepositional phrase follow the intransitive verb.

Basic Patterns of SENTENCES

S IV
Subject Intransitive Verb
Intransitive Verb is a kind of verb that does NOT have an object. Examples:

Basic Patterns of SENTENCES

S IV
Subject Intransitive Verb
The student talks. The noisy student talks. The noisy student talks aloud. The noisy student talks aloud during class discussion.

Basic Patterns of SENTENCES

S IV
Subject Intransitive Verb
The girl cries. The brokenhearted girl cries. The brokenhearted girl cries loudly. The brokenhearted girl cries loudly after her boyfriends death.

Basic Patterns of SENTENCES

S IV
Subject Intransitive Verb
The theater performers dance energetically. The young princess lives happily with him. The grand orchestra performs on stage. Marlon, my best friend, has been working in call center for almost three years.

Write and tell!

Basic Patterns of SENTENCES

S TV - DO
Subject Transitive Verb Direct Object
Subject is the doer of the action (noun or pronoun) Transitive Verb a kind of verb that always require an object. It answers the questions WHO or WHAT. Direct Object person, thing or idea.

Basic Patterns of SENTENCES

S TV - DO
Subject Transitive Verb Direct Object
Transitive Verb a kind of verb that always require an object. It answers the questions WHO or WHAT.

Examples:

Basic Patterns of SENTENCES

S TV - DO
Subject Transitive Verb Direct Object
The rock band play musical instruments. My friends watched the latest movie. All college freshmen will attend the much-awaited acquaintance party. My excited classmates have bought outfits for the event.

Write and tell!

S TV DO - OC

Basic Patterns of SENTENCES

Subject Transitive Verb Direct Object Object Complement

Subject is the doer of the action (noun or pronoun) Transitive Verb a kind of verb that always require an object. It answers the questions WHO or WHAT. Direct Object person, thing or idea. Object Complement renames or describes the DO

S TV DO - OC

Basic Patterns of SENTENCES

Subject Transitive Verb Direct Object Object Complement

My dad cooks spicy fried salmon, my favorite dish. I have read The Notebook, the best romantic novel. Teenagers always watch Pinoy Big Brother, a popular reality show. The players really idolize Azkal, a Pinoy soccer team. The mother named her twin James and Phil.

Write and tell!

S TV IO - DO

Basic Patterns of SENTENCES

Subject Transitive Verb Indirect Object - Direct Object

Subject is the doer of the action (noun or pronoun) Indirect Object refers to whom or to what the the action is done Transitive Verb a kind of verb that always require an object. It answers the questions WHO or WHAT. Direct Object person, thing or idea.

S TV IO - DO

Basic Patterns of SENTENCES

Subject Transitive Verb Indirect Object - Direct Object

The romantic guy gave his girlfriend a ring. My crazy best friend tells me her dirty secrets. My rich suitor offers my family a house and lot. Romeo sent Juliet a love letter. He showed her the true meaning of love.

Write and tell!

Practice makes perfect!


DIRECTIONS: Write one sentence for each of the sentence patterns.

Practice makes perfect!


1. S IV 2. S LV C 3. S TV DO 4. S TV IO DO 5. S TV DO - OC

Practice makes perfect!


6. S IV -Adverb 7. S LV C 8. S TV - DO 9. S TV IO DO 10. S TV DO OC