Manitoba Provincial

Report Card
Presented to
Presentation Goals
• Provide background, purpose, report
card template
Background
• 2010 - Premier Selinger announcement
included the following points:
• development of a parent-friendly
report card
• goal was to have parents receive
the information they need to be full
partners in their children‟s education
• written in plain language, while
allowing teachers to enrich the
reporting with personalized
information about each student.
The Manitoba Report
Card
• Primary Purpose - formally
communicate to parents, at certain
points in time their children‟s growth
and achievement as learners.
Manitoba‟s Mission
• To ensure that all Manitoba‟s children
and youth have access to an array of
educational opportunities such that every
learner experiences success through
relevant, engaging and high quality
education that prepares them for
Lifelong Learning and Citizenship in a
democratic, socially just and sustainable
society.
Manitoba‟s Vision
• ...every learner will complete a high
school education with a profound sense
of accomplishment, hope and
optimism.
The Big Picture
Provincial Report Card Categories
Movement
Fitness
Management
Healthy
Lifestyles
How are the GLO‟s and Report Card
Categories related??
Report Card
Category
Movement
Report Card
Category Fitness
Management
Report Card
Category Healthy
Lifestyles
GLO‟s 1 + 3
(Strand A)
GLO‟s 2 + 3
(Strand A)
GLO‟s 3 (Strand B)
+ 4 + 5
Movement
Safety (A)
Fit. Mgmt
Safety (A)
Safety (B)
P&S
Mgmt
HL Prac.
Report Card Category Movement
• “Student acquires movement concepts and skills for safe and
functional use in a variety of physical activities and environments.”
Knowledge
Strands
Skill Strands
A. Basic Movement
B. Movement
Development
C. Activity Specific
Movement
A. Acquisition of
Mov‟t Skills
B. Application to
Sports/Games
C. Application to
Alternate Pursuits
D. Application to
Rhythmics/Gymnastics
GLO1
Movement
GLO 3 Safety
(A)
A. Physical Activity
Risk Management
A.
Acquisition/Application
of Safe Practices
Report Card
Category
Movement
Report Card Category Fitness Management
• “Student acquires fitness concepts and skills that contribute to
personal fitness development through a variety of physical activities
and fitness development experiences.”
Knowledge
Strands
Skill Strands
A. Fitness
Components
B. Fitness Benefits
C. Fitness
Development
A.
Acquisition/Application
of Fitness
Management Skills
GLO2 Fitness
Management
GLO 3 Safety
(A)
A. Physical Activity
Risk Management
A.
Acquisition/Application
of Safe Practices
Report Card
Category
Fitness
Management
Report Card Category Healthy Lifestyles
• “Student acquires concepts and applicable personal and interpersonal
skills in developing well-being, healthy lifestyle practices, and healthy
relationships.
Knowledge
Strands
Skill Strands
GLO3 Safety
(B)
GLO 4 Personal
& Social Mgmt
A. Personal Health
Practices
B. Active Living
C. Nutrition
D. Substance Use
and Abuse
E. Human Sexuality
A. Application of
Decision-
Making/Problem-
Solving Skills
Report Card
Category
Healthy
Lifestyles
GLO 5 Healthy
Lifestyle
Practices
B. Safety of Self and
Others
1. Community Safety
2. Environmental Safety
3. Prevention and Care
of Injuries
4. Community Support
and Services
5. Violence Prevention
6. Personal Safety

A. Personal
Development
B. Social Development
C. Mental-Emotional
Development
A. Acquisition of
Personal and Social
Management Skills
What are some of the benefits of implementing the
Manitoba report card?
• Positive school-parent relationships
• Improved learning
• Consistency across the Province
Provincial
Assessment
Policy
www.edu.gov.mb.ca/k12/assess/docs/
policy_k12/assess_policyk12.pdf
Informed by:
www.edu.gov.mb.ca/k12/assess/
wncp/rethinking_assess_mb.pdf

www.edu.gov.mb.ca/k12/a
ssess/docs/csl/csl_doc.pdf

Also, report card specific:
-Support Document (guidelines and policy)
-Business Requirements Document
-Parent Brochures (multiple languages)
Report Card Support Document
(Draft)
Full document available
for download at:
www.edu.gov.mb.ca/k12/assess/docs/report_card/index.html
Timelines
• Voluntary implementation 2012-13
school year.
• Full implementation 2013-14 school
year.
Preparation and Distribution
• Preparation - separate report card formats for 1-6, 7 and 8,
and 9-12. ( www.edu.gov.mb.ca/k12/assess/report_card.html )
• Delivery and Return - to be decided upon by schools
or divisions.
• Reporting Frequency -
• Grades 1- 8 (and non-semestered high schools) - 3 reporting
periods, 2 „term‟ periods and a final report.
• Semestered high schools - 2 reporting periods, 1 mid-term, 1 final
per term
• Local option for grades 9-12 - may be 4 reporting periods for non-
semestered courses in an otherwise semestered school so that
reporting periods align.
What do the report
cards look like?
Report Card Templates
•Division/School logo
•School Name
•Attendance
•Grades 1-6, and 7-8
•Grade scales
•Student Programming Definitions
First Page
All formats can be downloaded as pdf‟s at
www.edu.gov.mb.ca/k12/assess/report_card.html
First Page (Grades 1-6, 7&8)
Grade


Report Card
Student: Provincial Student #:
Homeroom Teacher: Date Issued:
Attendance Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Total
Days Absent:
Times Late:
Student Programming (Grades 1-8)
• - critical to accurate and meaningful reporting
• - unless otherwise indicated, the report card provides information
about a student‟s achievement relative to grade-level curricula.
• -One of the following codes is used if the expectations for a student
are different from the grade-level curriculum in a subject.
✦ EAL (English as an Additional Language): Achievement is based
on expectations that focus on English language learning.
✦ L (Litteratie francaise, Francais Program): Achievement is based
on expectations that focus on French language learning.
✦ IEP (Individual Education Plan): Achievement is based on
expectations that reflect special learning needs. (Due to, for
example, transiency, gaps in learning, or a cognitive disability)
Determining Marks
• Manitoba Report Card Support
Document:
• Partners for Learning, Grades 1 to 12
• http://www.edu.gov.mb.ca/k12/assess/docs/report_card/full_doc.pdf

1.2 Foundational Principles for
Grading
• Academic grades are based on curricular learning outcomes,
and reported separately from learning behaviours
• Grades should reflect a student‟s most recent and consistent
learning
• Greater consideration of evidence collected in the final term
shows the cumulative nature of learning
• Grades are based on individual student achievement, not
group achievement
• Evidence of achievement (e.g., documentation system, work
samples) is used to help determine a grade for academic
learning and some processes might provide evidence for
learning behaviours
Academic Achievement Scales - Numerical and Percentage
Grades
How Learning is Reported
1 to 6
A 1-4 numerical scale is used to report on achievement in each
within-subject category. There are no overall subject grades.
7 to 8
A 1-4 numerical scale is used to report on achievement in each
subject category. The percentage scale is used to report overall
subject grades.
9 to 12
The percentage scale is used to report overall subject grades for
each subject. There is no reporting of achievement for subject area
categories.
Reporting Academic Achievement of
Provincial Curriculum Expectations
Academic Achievement of Provincial Curriculum Expectations
Academic Grade Scale
Description
Numerical
(Gr. 1-6, 7-8)
Percentage
(Gr. 7-8, 9-12)
4
80% to 100%
Thorough understanding and in-depth application of concepts and
skills.
3
70% to 79%
Very good understanding and application of concepts and skills.
2
60% to 69%
Basic understanding and some application of concepts and skills.
1
50% to 59%
Limited understanding and minimal application of concepts and
skills; see teacher comments
ND
Less than
50%
Grades 1-8: Does Not yet Demonstrate the required understanding and
application of concepts and skills; see teacher comments

Grades 9-12: Does Not yet Demonstrate the required understanding
and application of concepts and skills; students with a final grade of less
than 50% are not granted course credit; see teacher comments

Further Descriptions for Academic
Achievement
Academic Achievement of Provincial Curriculum Expectations
Academic Grade Scale
Description
Numerical
(Gr. 1-6, 7-8)
Percentage
(Gr. 7-8, 9-12)
4
80% to 100%
Thorough understanding and in-depth application of concepts and
skills.
•Understands all or nearly all concepts and/or skills
•Routinely makes connections to similar concepts and skills
•Applies creativity to own life and to support new learning
Further Descriptions for Academic
Achievement
Academic Achievement of Provincial Curriculum Expectations
Academic Grade Scale
Description
Numerical
(Gr. 1-6, 7-8)
Percentage
(Gr. 7-8, 9-12)
3
70% to 79%
Very good understanding and application of concepts and skills.
•Understands most concepts and skills
•Often makes connections to similar concepts and skills
•Sometimes applies to own life and to support new learning
Further Descriptions for Academic
Achievement
Academic Achievement of Provincial Curriculum Expectations
Academic Grade Scale
Description
Numerical
(Gr. 1-6, 7-8)
Percentage
(Gr. 7-8, 9-12)
2
60% to 69%
Basic understanding and some application of concepts and skills.
•Understands most concepts and skills
•Occasionally makes connections to similar concepts and skills

Further Descriptions for Academic
Achievement
Academic Achievement of Provincial Curriculum Expectations
Academic Grade Scale
Description
Numerical
(Gr. 1-6, 7-8)
Percentage
(Gr. 7-8, 9-12)
1
50% to 59%
Limited understanding and minimal application of concepts and
skills; see teacher comments
•Understands some key concepts and skills
•Rarely makes connections to similar concepts and skills

Further Descriptions for Academic
Achievement
Academic Achievement of Provincial Curriculum Expectations
Academic Grade Scale
Description
Numerical
(Gr. 1-6, 7-8)
Percentage
(Gr. 7-8, 9-12)
ND
Less than
50%
Grades 1-8: Does Not yet Demonstrate the required understanding and
application of concepts and skills; see teacher comments

Grades 9-12: Does Not yet Demonstrate the required understanding and
application of concepts and skills; student with a final grade of less than
50% are not granted course credit; see teacher comments

Codes used in Grades 1-6 and Grades 7 - 8
Course Complete: Final grade showing sufficient evidence of learning
for Grade 11 and 12 Physical Education/Health Education only.
CO
Course Incomplete: Final grade showing insufficient evidence of
learning for Grade 11 and 12 Physical Education/Health Education. May
also be used in other courses but not as a final grade.
IN
No exam applies
NE
No mark for the school-based final exam or provincial test, where
applicable
NM
NA Not applicable
IN Incomplete; not enough evidence available to determine a grade at this time
Codes used in Grades 9 to 12
Codes (cont.)
• - In the rare cases when an IN or NA is used, such
as those identified below, it must be approved by
the principal and a comment should explain its use
• - the code „NA‟ (not applicable) may be used...
✦ when a student‟s programming is coded as „EAL‟, „IEP‟, or „L‟
(Francais only) and the student is not addressing certain content
as a result of their individual programming.
✦ when certain aspects of a subject have not yet been addressed
- The code „IN‟, „Incomplete‟, may be used...
✦ if a student‟s level of achievement cannot be assessed (e.g.,
extended absence or being new to the school with no information
from the previous school available)
Assigning Grades
• To determine grades, the teacher analyzes the
evidence, noting the most recent and consistent
learning aligned with the subject area categories,
as appropriate, and makes a judgement to
summarize the current level of achievement.
• Term grades reflect a student‟s achievement as
demonstrated from the beginning of the course.
Greater consideration should be given to learning
demonstrated later in the course, as appropriate
for the nature of the particular course and teaching
approach.
Physical Education/Health Education Grading Example
Student: ____Lenny___________ Grade: _____7_____ Report Period: ____Fall 2012___________
Grading Scale
4 = Thorough
3 = Very Good
2 = Basic
1 = Limited
ND = Does Not yet Demonstrate
Summative Achievement Evidence - Movement
Assessment Method Maximum Points Score (%)
Basic Movement Skills (Self-assess BMS - Coop Game G)
Movement Development (Biomech of throwing Quiz G)
Activity-Specific Movement (see activity groups)
Physical Activity Risk Mgmt. General Safety Rules Test / 15 15 11 73
Water Safety Role Play / 20 20 18 90
Team Work and Fair Play 4 x Bi-weekly Observation / 4 16 12 75
Create a Game - Grp assess / 10 10 9 90
Sports and Games Functional use (throw) in softball / 4
4
Observatio
n / 4
3 75
Invasion - use of space - Peer
assess. / 7
7 6 86
Performance Task - run and pass / 4 4 4 100
Alternative Pursuits X-Country Ski Perf. Task / 4 4 3 75
Rhythmic & Gymnastic Activ. Gymnastic skills - peer assess. / 8 8 5 63
Pyramids - Grp assess / 4 4 3 75
Floor Exercise Routine / 4 4 3 75
Total - Points 96 77 80
Numerical score (4-1) 4
Overall % Score 80
G: Growth (formative assessment activity) - Not scored for grade
Comments
Strengths:
Challenges:
Next Steps:
Physical Education/Health Education Grading Example
Student: ____Lenny___________ Grade: _____7_____ Report Period: ____Fall 2012___________
Grading Scale
4 = Thorough
3 = Very Good
2 = Basic
1 = Limited
ND = Does Not yet Demonstrate
Summative Achievement Evidence - Fitness Management
Assessment Method Maximum Points Score (%)
Fitness Components Lead Class Warm-up (pairs) 10 9 90
Fitness Benefits
Fitness Development Fitness Circuit-Single Station 4 4 100
Body‟s Muscles Test 20 19 95
Active Fitness Biweekly assess 4 4 100
HR Monitor Target Zone 4 4 100
Fitness Management Skills Charting Fitness Results (G)
Personal Fitness Plan 25 22 88
Charting Fitness Results 4 4 100
Total - Points 71 66 93
Numerical score (4-1) 4
Overall % Score 93
G: Growth (formative assessment activity) - Not scored for grade
Comments
Strengths:
Challenges:
Next Steps:
Physical Education/Health Education Grading Example
Student: ____Lenny___________ Grade: _____7_____ Report Period: ____Fall 2012___________
Grading Scale
4 = Thorough
3 = Very Good
2 = Basic
1 = Limited
ND = Does Not yet Demonstrate
Summative Achievement Evidence - Healthy Lifestyles
Assessment Method Maximum Points Score (%)
Safety of Self and Others Avoidance Case Study Questions 8 6 75
First Aid Emer. Call Role Play-Peer (G)
Personal Hygiene No Outcomes
Nutrition No Outcomes
Substance Use and Abuse Prevention Drug Research Presentation 25 18 72
MAAW Poster 15 13 87
Human Sexuality Puberty Changes Discussion (G)
Human Reproductive System Test 20 16 80
Gender and Diversity - Journal (G)
STI Assignment 4 4 100
Personal Development Decide Scenario (G)
Personal Health Goals 4 3 75
Social Development Interpersonal Skills Self-Assess (G)
Mock Mediation 4 2 50
Mental-Emotional Dev. Performance Task - Yoga asanas 4 4 100
Personal/Social Mgmt Skills Interpersonal Skills Self-Assess (G)
Total - Points 88 69 78
Numerical score (4-1) 3
Overall % Score 78
G: Growth (formative assessment activity) - Not scored for grade
Comments
Strengths:
Challenges:
Next Steps:
4.5 Learning Behaviours
• At Grades 1 to 6, learning behaviours
are reported once on the report card,
along with a teacher comment.
• At Grades 7 to 12, the learning
behaviours are reported for each
subject.
• The reporting of learning behaviours
appearing on a report card apply to the
current reporting term only.
Learning Behaviours
Scale

C: Consistently - almost all or all of the time U: Usually - more than half of the time

S: Sometimes - less than half of the time R: Rarely - almost never or never
Personal
Management
Skills
Uses class time effectively; works independently; completes
homework and assignments on time
Active
Participation in
Learning
Participates in class activities; self assesses; sets learning goals
Social
Responsibility
Works well with others; resolves conflicts appropriately; respects
self, others and the environment; contributes in a positive way to
communities
Learning Behaviours
Behaviour Sample Indicators
Personal Management Skills
The student self-monitors own behaviours
and personal growth, organizes for learning,
contributes positively to the learning
process, and takes responsibility for work
completion.
• organizes materials (e.g., study
notes)
• uses class time productively
• works independently
• completes homework and
assignments on time
• persists when faced with challenges
• seeks help when needed
• demonstrates a strong work ethic
• shows patience
• makes a consistent effort
• demonstrates on-task behaviours
• sets personal management goals
and monitors growth
Learning Behaviours
Behaviour Sample Indicators
Active Participation in
Learning
The student participates actively in learning,
is curious, sets learning goals, self-
assesses, provides feedback, and uses
feedback for improvement.
• shows interest; asks questions
• takes initiative
• is curious - investigates questions,
hypothesizes, estimates, analyzes
• self-assesses work quality based on
quality criteria
• uses descriptive feedback to
improve learning
• uses criteria to provide descriptive
feedback
• explores themes and enriches topics
through interest-based learning.
• uses a variety of media for
communications
Learning Behaviours
Behaviour Sample Indicators
Social Responsibility
The student demonstrates citizenship
and social skills that contribute to
making the classroom, school, and
larger community a positive, safe and
caring environment.
• works and interacts well with others
• is welcoming and positive
• shares resources, materials, and equipment
with others
• respects classroom and school values and
routines
• responds positively to the values and
traditions of others
• respects self, others, and the environment
• shows empathy and compassion
• contributes to making the community a
better place
• takes initiative and leadership in community
service
• works for a sustainable planet
• takes an equitable share of work in a group
• is courteous
• respects the need for safety for self and
others - physical and emotional
Teacher Comments
• Meaningful comments identify student strengths, pinpoint areas
needing improvement, and provide suggestions as to how the student
can improve. (strengths, challenges and next steps)
• Teachers are encouraged to personalize the comments for each
student so that they are specific to the student‟s levels of academic
achievement and learning behaviour ratings.
• Other considerations:
• Language: - jargon-free, - respectful and constructive, - brief and
concise, - free of superlatives and absolutes such as „best‟,
„always‟, „never‟, or vague words such as „appears to,‟ „but‟,
„however‟, - is congruent with the grading scale.
• Strengths and Learning Goals: - unique to the learner, - specific to
the level of achievement relative to the report card and categories,
- evidence-based, using evidence from a wide variety of
assessment sources.
Teacher Comments
• IF a child receives a grade of 1 or ND
in any subject category, comments
are REQUIRED.
• Don‟t‟s - include summaries of material taught during the term.
(This can be communicated in other ways since space is limited)
Quality Criteria
i.
Comments follow the framework of addressing “strengths”,
“challenges”, and “next steps” (practical, doable, timely) as
appropriate.
ii.
Comments are personalized for the student so that they are specific
to the student‟s levels of academic achievement and learning
behaviour ratings.
iii.
Comments consider the use of “Language” as outlined in Section 4.6
of the Report Card Support Document.
iv.
Comments include “Strengths and Learning goals” for the student as
outlined in Section 4.6 of the Report Card Support Document
v.
Comments do not include summaries of material taught during the
term, or scores/results from other kinds of measures such as non-
prov. standardized assessments.
Comment Activity
• Student A (Desiree) Grade 2
Physical Education/Health Education Teacher:
EAL IEP Term 1 Term 2 Final
Physical Education
Movement
4
Fitness Management
3
Health Education Healthy Lifestyles
3
Comments:
Strengths: Desiree demonstrates a good understanding of safety rules in the gym. She
is doing an excellent job in mastering her assigned basic motor skills for changing
direction while running and underhand throwing, both during specific learning tasks and
in games where they apply.
Challenges: Sustaining effort without stopping to rest during fitness activities.
Next Steps: Desiree could improve her overall fitness by participating more in physical
activities during recess or after school.
Comment Activity
• Student B (Luke) Grade: 8
Physical Education/Health Education PE Teacher:
EAL IEP IEP
Academic Achievement Term1 Term 2 Final Learning Behaviours Term 1 Term 2 Term 3
Physical
Education
Movement 4 Personal management skills R
Fitness
Management
4 Active participation in learning C
Health Education Healthy Lifestyles Social responsibility S
Overall Grade 78% % % Local Option
Local Option

Comments:
Luke has recently completed a basketball unit and is now currently learning
concepts and skills for badminton. Luke always brings his gym clothing and
material for health classes. He shows good effort during fitness activities but still
has room for improvement.
Comment Activity
• Student C (Janice) Grade 10
Attendance and Achievement Learning Behaviours
Term 1 Term 2 Final Term 1 Term 2
Semester: 1

Teacher:

Credit Value:

Credits Earned:
Course: PE/HE 10G
0 6 88% 2 2 78% NE 78% C C C
Comments:

Janice is a very highly motivated student who has shown excellent
achievements in all the sports played in class.
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Comment Activity
• Student D (Diego) Grade 3 - Learning
Behaviours
Learning Behaviour Examples Term 1 Term 2 Term 3
Personal
Management Skills
Uses class time effectively; works
independently; completes homework and
assignments on time
C C
Active Participation
in Learning
Participates in class activities; self-
assesses; sets learning goals
U U
Social Responsibility
Works well with others; resolves conflicts
appropriately; respects self, others and the
environment
U U
Comments:
Diego is a sensitive and soft spoken student who is becoming independent and who
assumes responsibility for his learning. During daily routines and instructions, he is able
to organize himself. As for using his time well, he does still require reminders to stay on
task, especially during Physical Education classes. Diego is able to listen and at times
ask clarifying questions. During group work, he is also able to work cooperatively by
listening to others, by responding to the needs of others and by resolving conflicts in
socially appropriate ways.