Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
21Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
What Money Can't Buy; The Moral Limits of Markets

What Money Can't Buy; The Moral Limits of Markets

Ratings:

3.87

(47)
|Views: 1,386 |Likes:
Should we pay children to read books or to get good grades? Should we allow corporations to pay for the right to pollute the atmosphere? Is it ethical to pay people to test risky new drugs or to donate their organs? What about hiring mercenaries to fight our wars? Auctioning admission to elite universities? Selling citizenship to immigrants willing to pay?In What Money Can’t Buy, Michael J. Sandel takes on one of the biggest ethical questions of our time: Is there something wrong with a world in which everything is for sale? If so, how can we prevent market values from reaching into spheres of life where they don’t belong? What are the moral limits of markets?In recent decades, market values have crowded out nonmarket norms in almost every aspect of life—medicine, education, government, law, art, sports, even family life and personal relations. Without quite realizing it, Sandel argues, we have drifted from having a market economy to being a market society. Is this where we want to be?In his New York Times bestseller Justice, Sandel showed himself to be a master at illuminating, with clarity and verve, the hard moral questions we confront in our everyday lives. Now, in What Money Can’t Buy, he provokes an essential discussion that we, in our market-driven age, need to have: What is the proper role of markets in a democratic society—and how can we protect the moral and civic goods that markets don’t honor and that money can’t buy?
Should we pay children to read books or to get good grades? Should we allow corporations to pay for the right to pollute the atmosphere? Is it ethical to pay people to test risky new drugs or to donate their organs? What about hiring mercenaries to fight our wars? Auctioning admission to elite universities? Selling citizenship to immigrants willing to pay?In What Money Can’t Buy, Michael J. Sandel takes on one of the biggest ethical questions of our time: Is there something wrong with a world in which everything is for sale? If so, how can we prevent market values from reaching into spheres of life where they don’t belong? What are the moral limits of markets?In recent decades, market values have crowded out nonmarket norms in almost every aspect of life—medicine, education, government, law, art, sports, even family life and personal relations. Without quite realizing it, Sandel argues, we have drifted from having a market economy to being a market society. Is this where we want to be?In his New York Times bestseller Justice, Sandel showed himself to be a master at illuminating, with clarity and verve, the hard moral questions we confront in our everyday lives. Now, in What Money Can’t Buy, he provokes an essential discussion that we, in our market-driven age, need to have: What is the proper role of markets in a democratic society—and how can we protect the moral and civic goods that markets don’t honor and that money can’t buy?

More info:

Publish date: Apr 24, 2012
Added to Scribd: Apr 20, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
Buy the full version from:Amazon
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

08/21/2013

pdf

text

original

 
 Farrar, Straus and Giroux18 West 18th Street, New York 10011Copyright © 2012 by Michael J. Sandel  All rights reserved Distributed in Canada by D&M Publishers, Inc. Printed in the United States of America First edition, 2012 A portion of the introduction originally appeared, in slightly different form, in
The Atlantic
. Library of Congress Cataloging-in- Publication DataSandel, Michael J.What money can’t buy : the moral limits of markets / Michael J. Sandel. — 1st ed.p. cm.Includes bibliographical references and index.ISBN 978-0-374-20303-0 (alk. paper) 1. Economics— Moral and ethical aspects. 2. Capitalism— Moral and ethical aspects. 3. Wealth— Moral and ethical aspects. 4. Value. I. Title.HB72 .S255 2012174—dc232011052182 Designed by Abby Kagan www.fsgbooks.com 1 3 5 7 9 10 8 6 4 2
 
1
 Jumping the Queue
Nobody likes to wait in line. Sometimes you can pay to jump thequeue. It’s long been known that, in ancy restaurants, a handsometip to the maître d’ can shorten the wait on a busy night. Such tipsare quasi bribes and handled discreetly. No sign in the window an-nounces immediate seating or anyone willing to slip the host a fty-dollar bill. But in recent years, selling the right to cut in line hascome out o the shadows and become a amiliar practice.
FAST TRACK 
Long lines at airport security checkpoints make air travel an ordeal.But not everyone has to wait in the serpentine queues. Those whobuy frst-class or business-class tickets can use priority lanes thattake them to the ront o the line or screening. British Airways callsit Fast Track, a service that also lets high-paying passengers jumpthe queue at passport and immigration control.
1
But most people can’t aord to y frst-class, so the airlines havebegun oering coach passengers the chance to buy line-cutting

Activity (21)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
sullywriter_1 reviewed this
Rated 4/5
There is very little left that money can't buy and the list of things that cannot be bought grows shorter by the day. That is the tragedy. I found myself frequently shaking my head in disgust as I read this book. When everything has a price, there will be nothing of value.
chautauquan reviewed this
Rated 4/5
The book jacket said it so well I'll have to just quote it:"(Sandel) provokes an essential discussion that we, in our market-driven age, need to have: What is the proper role of markets in a democratic society--and how can we protect the moral and civic goods that markets don't honor and that money can't buy?"In this thought-provoking book, Dr. Sandel argues that the U. S. has moved from being a market economy to being a market society and that, in the process, we have allowed many things to be subject to market forces that shouldn't be. He cites two types of reasons, the fairness argument and the corruption argument. He asks: "And so, in the end, the question of markets is really a question about how we want to live together. Do we want a society where everything is up for sale? Or are there certain moral and civic goods that markets do not honor and money cannot buy?"Although at first glance it may not seem likely, the book is very readable. It provides a number of examples of things where it is counterproductive to allow the market in to those where the nature of the good is changed in fundamental ways. I found some of the examples to be interesting but not things that would greatly disturb me and others to be things I would care about, but I agree with the author that these are decisions that require some community thought and discussion.
freelancer_frank reviewed this
Rated 4/5
This is a book about the general form of some arguments that can guide us to determine the proper nature and scope of commercialism in civic society. The book is quite short and about a quarter of it (on Kindle) is footnotes. Sandel uses repeated examples to illustrate how market forces have encroached on different aspects of life and to show how two counter-arguments might point the way for further discourse. His approach is Socratic and Aristotelian: rather than present absolute answers, his aim is to provoke public discourse, and this is entirely in keeping with his views on the integrated nature of public life. The drawback is that the reader may well be left wanting more guidance.
daniel5estes reviewed this
Rated 5/5
As author Michael J. Sandel gives example after example of market value versus moral value, I found myself seeing both sides of his arguments. This dichotomy is maddening, but it is also why I love this book.I believe the whole point of What Money Can't Buy is framed around the following statement: "If we don't assign value ourselves, the markets will." This begs two questions, (1) With what criteria do we presume to assign value apart from market forces? and (2) Which side is better at it, us or the markets? The answers are not easy and constantly debated.On rare occasions the author ventures into "Things were better in my day" territory, but for the most part he makes the compelling case that we're too quick to allow markets to value (and too often, devalue) our lives.
the7ken7petersen reviewed this
Rated 4/5
In this book Michael Sandel explores the belief that money can buy everything. He asks us to confront our acceptance, and also our revulsion, at the control that money and business interests have on our way of life.Sandel takes the reader through a brief history of the insurance business, which began as a system to protect our expensive goods, allowing us to replace our dwelling, should the house burn down; or gain compensation should our ship sink, rather than come in. If you, like me, are ignorant enough to think that this is where the business is today, you are in for a rude surprise: old people are being paid to take out insurance policies, which are taken over by companies who pay the premiums, in the hope that the insured person dies quickly, giving them a decent profit. The banking system has even bought in to this concept and, along with sub prime mortgages, one can buy shares in the death industry.Sandel also investigates the changing policies of the advertising industry. A few years ago advertisements would appear on television, in the press and occasional street posters. Nowadays, even in conservative Britain, adverts pop up in all sorts unlikely places and this book shows where we are likely to be in the future. My football team already plays at the King Power Stadium, which had been known as the Walkers Stadium, until more money was offered for the naming rights. Apparently, a police car, in the metropolis, apprehends miscreants under the sponsorship of Harrods and many town centres have an over-sized television in their square, ostensibly to show major events but in reality, to put a string of banal advertisements in front of the general public. America, so often mocked from this side of the Atlantic for being more extreme, but in reality, simply ahead of we Brits, has taken advertising to another level: schools, in some states, are given televisions and other equipment with the proviso that all the pupils watch a fifteen minute news programme each day: needless to say, the recording is peppered with adverts, probably for the soft drinks company that has purchased exclusive rights to supply the school tuck shop. Mr Sandel even cites the case of one lady, a single mother, who sold her forehead as an advertising site to provide sustenance for her child. At the age of thirty, she was tattooed with an advertising slogan.Some of the examples, in this book, I found to be acceptable, some deeply shocking but, Michael Sandel keeps a very tight control upon his own feelings. Reading the book, one does get some idea of his personnel opinions but, even in the most extreme cases, he does not criticise, but simply reports. It would be easy for a work such as this, to slip into the, 'Things are terrible now, unlike the good old days' attitude: Sandel does not. He does his readership the honour of assuming that, given the facts, they are capable of making up their own minds. This is a book that everybody should read. The more people that are aware of the direction of travel, the better can be our control of the type of society that 'Big Business' builds and, let us be honest, it is business, not politicians, that will shape the twenty first century.
1 hundred reads
1 thousand reads
Baliboola N Ivan liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->