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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Monday • Aug. 5, 2013 • Vol XII, Edition 302
HIT-AND-RUN
STATE PAGE 5
RARE PHOTOS
UP FOR BID
FOR THE RECORD PAGE 2
ALL-STARS
WIN AGAIN
SPORTS PAGE 11
DRIVER PLOWS INTO CROWD AT
BOARDWALK
Stubborn Fat?
Dr. Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Dr. Carie Chui, M.D.
ALLURA SKIN & LASER CENTER
280 Baldwin Ave. Downtown San Mateo
(650)344-1121
Family Owned & Operated
Established: 1949
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Governor
Jerry Brown has averted a strike of
San Francisco’s Bay Area Rapid
Transit system, promising riders a
normal commute Monday morn-
i ng.
Late Sunday night Brown issued
an order for a seven-day inquiry
into the contract dispute that
threatened to shut down one of the
region’s major train lines.
The transit system has been at
odds with two unions over a new
contract.
The unions issued a 72-hour
strike notice early Friday that
would have fouled Monday’s com-
mute.
BART, the nation’s fifth-largest
rail system, serves more than
400,000 commuters each week-
day.
The unions went on strike last
month, shutting down BARTserv-
ice for four days. They later agreed
to extend their contracts until
Sunday and continue negotia-
tions.
Key sticking points in the labor
dispute included pensions and
health care costs.
Representatives from BART
management and the agency’s two
largest employee unions negotiat-
ed for about 14 hours Saturday and
resumed bargaining Sunday morn-
ing as a midnight deadline
loomed.
Big differences remain on key
issues including wages, pensions,
worker safety and health care
BART strike averted for now
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
County officials might take a
swipe at its ballooning unfunded
pension liability by cutting a $50
million check from extra property
taxes and reserves followed by
$10 million in
each of the next
nine years.
Doing so
would speed up
the county pay-
ing down its
unfunded actuar-
ial accrued lia-
bility which, as
of June 30,
2012, stood at
$962 million and is 72 percent
funded with annual costs of
approximately $150 million.
Under the proposed plan coming
before the Board of Supervisors
Tuesday, the county would achieve
90 percent funding in seven years
and 100 percent by fiscal year
2023-24.
By that point, the recommended
option would slash the county’s
annual required contribution by
$13 million and continue to
approximately $16 million by fis-
cal year 2041-2042, according to
calculations by County Manager
John Maltbie.
The county’s pension costs have
long been a concern for officials,
residents and even the civil grand
jury which in April contended the
unfunded liability was probably
closer to $2 billion. The jury also
claimed the pension plan has
failed to achieve assumed rates and
County could
pour $140M
into pensions
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Paper towels are out and elec-
tric vehicle charging stations
are in at some county offices
under part of the proposals to
address deferred maintenance
and improve infrastructure
using Measure Ahalf-cent sales
tax revenue.
The two presentations sched-
uled for Tuesday’s Board of
Supervisors include some big
ticket items — $6 million to
upgrade wired and wireless net-
works, $16.25 million to build
a new emergency dispatch cen-
ter, $6 million for a new
Pescadero fire station and
$460,000 to improve govern-
ment transparency and
accountability.
Measure A was approved by
voters last fall and the half-
cent sales tax is estimated to
bring in approximately $60
million annually for the next
10 years. County supervisors
have spent the past several
months hearing presentations
on possible uses and, after
making tentative decisions on
the requests, will take a final
vote this fall.
Sales tax money
may upgrade
county IT, build
new facilities
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Redwood City’s Fair Oaks
Branch Library will present three
sessions of printmaking work-
shops for children ages 6 to 12 for
free, but they are currently full due
to space limitations. The instruc-
tor, Kathryn Kain, will lead the
sessions on Mondays, starting
today and running on Aug. 12 and
19 from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.
Master printer and artist Kain
will teach children the basics of
monoprinting in this workshop,
which was made possible by a
$1,350 grant provided by the San
Francisco Foundation.
“As a master printer, you work
with artists, and in a way, I got
used to working with people,”
Kain said. “I have the skill to
teach, and it’s a lot of fun to work
with kids.”
Printmaking is a term covering
etching, lithography, silkscreen
and monotype — all methods for
making fine art multiples. Kain
will be guiding the kids through
inking Plexiglas plates and print-
ing on damp paper through a small
format etching press.
Kain notes printing presses are
Library hosts master printer
PHOTO COURTESY OF CHARLES HOUSTON
A student of Kathryn Kain, above, spins the press during a class.Below, Kain, a master printer, works with a
student during a printing session.
John Maltbie
See PENSIONS, Page 20 See PRINTER, Page 19
See TAX, Page 20
Workshops to focus on a variety of printmaking for children
See BART, Page 19
Photos of Marilyn Monroe’s
last sitting for sale
PHILADELPHIA— Arare portfolio of
photographs from Marilyn Monroe’s
last sitting is up for grabs to the high-
est bidder.
Freeman’s auction house in
Philadelphia estimates the limited-edi-
tion portfolio of 10 photos, made from
fashion photographer Bert Stern’s
original negatives from his June 1962
assignment for Vogue, could fetch
$10,000 to $15,000 when it goes on
the block Sept. 10.
The photos will be on view to the
public starting Sept. 6, said Aimee
Pflieger, head of the century-old auction
house’s photography division.
Stern, who died in June at age 83,
took more than 2,500 photos of the
Hollywood icon over three days at the
Hotel Bel-Air in Los Angeles. The 20-
by-20-inch portfolio photos are from
the first day, when Stern and Monroe
were alone before the arrival of a cadre
of Vogue staffers, and project a feeling
of spontaneity and playfulness that
stands out from the others.
“He brought a turntable and speakers
and three cases of champagne,” Pflieger
said. “The feeling you get from the
photos is they’re having a great time.”
Six weeks after her session with
Stern, the 36-year-old screen siren was
found dead in her home Aug. 5 of an
apparent drug overdose. Ahalf-century
later, she remains one of the 20th-cen-
tury’s most enduring sex symbols.
Stern’s photos were a sensation,
partly because they were taken right
before Monroe’s death and partly
because they included the first nude
photos of Monroe since 1949. Many
of the nudes show the star posing with
diaphanous scarves, paper flowers and
pearls in bright but diffuse natural light
that gives the photos a dreamlike qual-
ity.
“She was beautiful and untouched,”
Stern said. “It was as though she were
just beginning.”
Monroe is often described in the
photos as projecting an aura of damage
and desperation, but Pflieger disagrees.
“We project our own thoughts onto
them when we look at them,” she
said. “To me, they’re soft, beauti-
ful, clutter-free images just
filled with light ... they give
you a real sense of her person-
ality and playfulness.”
Other Monroe photos are
being auctioned the same day,
including more from the per-
sonal collection of the
portfolio owner,
who the auction
house said
wishes to
r e m a i n
a n o n y -
mous.
A l s o
g o i n g
on the
auction block are nearly 100 photo-
graphs from the corporate collection
of cosmetics giant Avon’s headquarters
in New York City. The photographs are
all by female artists from the 1910s to
the 1990s — from the little known to
the prominent Cindy Sherman and
Louise Dahl-Wolfe — and focus on
themes of beauty through the eyes of
women.
Part of the proceeds from Avon’s auc-
tion will benefit the Avon Foundation,
which advances efforts related to
breast cancer research and combating
domestic vio-
lence.
FOR THE RECORD 2 Monday • Aug. 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
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Actress Tawney
Kitaen is 52.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1953
Operation Big Switch began as
remaining prisoners taken during the
Korean War were exchanged at
Panmunjom.
“What worries you, masters you.”
— John Locke, English philosopher (1632-1704).
Actress Loni
Anderson is 68.
Actor Jonathan
Silverman is 47.
Birthdays
BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL
Kate MacKay,Esther Picazo and Casimiro Hernandez prepare signs to protest Ross Foti and a group of pro-lifers in South San
Francisco on Grand Avenue Saturday morning. MacKay had considered traveling to Foti’s Belmont home to protest his use
of photographs of stillborns which MacKay finds offensive. She never made it to Foti’s house, however.
Monday: Cloudy. Patchy fog and drizzle
in the morning. Highs in the lower 60s.
Southwest winds 5 to 10 mph.
Monday ni ght: Cloudy. Patchy fog and
drizzle after midnight. Lows in the lower
50s. West winds 5 to 10 mph.
Tuesday: Cloudy. Patchy fog and drizzle
in the morning. Highs in the lower 60s. West winds 5 to 10
mph.
Tuesday night: Cloudy. Patchy fog after midnight. Lows
in the lower 50s. West winds 5 to 15 mph.
Wednesday: Mostly cloudy. Patchy fog. Highs in the
lower 60s.
Wednesday night through Sunday: Mostly cloudy.
Patchy fog. Lows in the lower 50s. Highs near 60.
Local Weather Forecast
On this date:
I n 1864, during the Civil War, Union Adm. David G.
Farragut led his fleet to victory in the Battle of Mobile Bay,
Ala.
I n 1884, the cornerstone for the Statue of Liberty’s
pedestal was laid on Bedloe’s Island in New York Harbor.
I n 1912, the Progressive Party, also known as the “Bull
Moose Party,” convened in Chicago. (The party was formed
by former President Theodore Roosevelt following a split in
the Republican Party. )
I n 1921, a baseball game was broadcast for the first time as
KDKA radio announcer Harold Arlin described the action
between the Pittsburgh Pirates and the Philadelphia Phillies
from Forbes Field. (The Pirates won, 8-5.)
I n 1924, the comic strip “Little Orphan Annie” by Harold
Gray made its debut.
I n 1936, Jesse Owens of the United States won the 200-
meter dash at the Berlin Olympics, collecting the third of
his four gold medals.
I n 1962, actress Marilyn Monroe, 36, was found dead in
her Los Angeles home; her death was ruled a probable suicide
from “acute barbiturate poisoning.” South African anti-
apartheid activist Nelson Mandela was arrested; it was the
beginning of 27 years of imprisonment.
I n 1963, the United States, Britain and the Soviet Union
signed a treaty in Moscow banning nuclear tests in the
atmosphere, in space and underwater.
I n 1969, the U.S. space probe Mariner 7 flew by Mars,
sending back photographs and scientific data.
I n 1981, the federal government began firing air traffic
controllers who had gone out on strike.
Ten years ago: Episcopal leaders in Minneapolis voted to
approve the election of the Reverend V. Gene Robinson, an
openly gay clergyman, as bishop of the Diocese of New
Hampshire.
Actor John Saxon is 77. College Football Hall of Famer and
former NFL player Roman Gabriel is 73. Country songwriter
Bobby Braddock is 73. Actress Erika Slezak is 67. Rock
singer Rick Derringer is 66. Actress Holly Palance is 63.
Singer Samantha Sang is 60. Actress-singer Maureen
McCormick is 57. Rock musician Pat Smear is 54. Author
David Baldacci is 53. Actress Janet McTeer is 52. Basketball
Hall-of-Famer Patrick Ewing is 51. Country singer Terri Clark
is 45. Former MLB player John Olerud is 45. Actor Brendon
Ryan Barrett is 27.
In other news ...
(Answers tomorrow)
SORRY BRAVO BICKER PERMIT
Saturday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: He was struggling to find a new guitar
because he was – TOO PICKY
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
SPITY
LIPTO
SERDYS
CIERFE
©2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
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Ans.
here:
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Winning Spirit,
No.9,in first place; Eureka,No.7,in second place;
and Lucky Star,No.2,in third place.The race time
was clocked at 1:48.21.
5 7 6
8 21 23 25 39 4
Mega number
Aug. 2 Mega Millions
21 24 36 42 45 15
Powerball
Aug. 3 Powerball
10 12 17 24 25
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
0 0 6 5
Daily Four
5 7 8
Daily three evening
12 32 39 46 47 5
Mega number
Aug. 3 Super Lotto Plus
3
Monday • Aug. 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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FEET, LEGS, HANDS
Prickling orTingling of Feet/Hands
I
n a foray for converts around Bolinas
Bay, a number of children, males, were
found and taken from their families to
the Mission Dolores. Most were around 5
years old, but one named Lupugeym was a
couple of years older. He was a bright child,
clear-minded, determined and quick to per-
ceive instruction given to him. He was bap-
tized along with the rest at the mission and
given the Christian names of Jose and
Pomponio: thus he was named Jose
Pomponio Lupugeym. Most had been given
names of saints, but the names had been so
overused since baptisms at the mission, that
the fathers, groping for names, called on
their classical teachings and came up with”
Pomponio.” He was a quick learner, as the
fathers found out, but a little headstrong at
times. Pomponio was a born leader and the
other Indians went to him for advice concern-
ing their lives.
Things went well at the mission and,
because of his leadership abilities, he was
given responsible duties that which other
Indians were not entrusted. One day, a father
in charge of the mission accused him of steal-
ing a piece of gold from the altar after a mass.
Pomponio was only 9 at this time and every-
one knew he did not take it. But he had been
accused and so the father whipped him with a
stick to drive out the devil in him. The father
relished this duty and the whipping was very
severe. Pomponio pleaded his innocence, but
to no avail. Days later, the gold was found
behind the altar by Indians cleaning the
church. No matter, Pomponio had been beat-
en and had been given extra duty to punish
him.
Pomponio was transferred to Mission San
Rafael in 1916 in Marin County and given
charge of numerous Indians. These Indians
were not supervised strictly and life was
pleasant. Padre Father Amoros was put in
charge at San Rafael. He was a firm adminis-
trator and this must have been an abrupt
change from the relative independence that
the young men had enjoyed. Word began
leaking out, however, that Pomponio was
abusing the women, taking some for himself
for his pleasure and bullying the men who
objected. Even so, he had a magical quality
about him and, in spite of this activity, many
Indians looked up to him. Later, however, he
had demanded tribute for certain jobs and beat
up one of the Indians. This was too much for
the fathers and one attempted to punish him
with a whip. Pomponio was almost 20 years
old now and a full-grown man. Pomponio ran
away and headed for the hills.
After this event, he began raiding the
Indian villages. At first he took only food,
but in time he began taking some of the
women as well. A number of other unruly
Indians joined him and he drifted down onto
the Peninsula. His path was marked by
killing, raping and stealing from the Indians.
At one time, the soldiers captured him by
Mission San Miguel and, after tying him up,
beat him. Rumor was that Pomponio escaped
that night by cutting off his heels to free his
legs from the shackles. He got away but was
captured later and taken to Mission Soledad.
There, he killed a Spanish soldier and then
escaped. Later, he was seen near Santa Cruz.
Alpine Creek became his hideout for a
time. When soldiers came looking for him,
he escaped again and headed north. When
General Vallejo heard he was plundering
Indian villages along the Petaluma River on
General Vallejo’s property, he sent his sol-
diers after him. After chasing him, the sol-
diers captured Pomponio near Novato. He was
taken to Monterey at once for punishment.
Pomponio was convicted by the Mexican
court in Monterey of killing the Spanish sol-
dier. He was executed by a firing squad in
1824.
Much of the information in this article was
taken from the book San Francisco Peninsula
— Giants on the Land by Darold Fredricks.
(Available at Amazon.com ISBN # 1-59330-
086-7)
Rediscovering the Peninsula by Darold Fredricks
appears in the Monday edition of the Daily
Journal.
Jose Pomponio — good or bad?
PHOTO COURTESY OF MICHAEL HARNEY FROM THE OHLONE WAY, 1978, BY MALCOLM MARGOLIN
The tranquil life of the native Indians was disrupted by the Spanish.
BELMONT
Hit and run. Asuspect left the scene after hit-
ting a car on Ralston and Villa avenues before
10:12 a.m. Wednesday, July 24.
Suspicious circumstances. A woman
reported she believed someone was poisoning
cats in the neighborhood on Mezes Avenue
before 9:13 a.m. Wednesday, July 24.
Arres t . Aman was arrested for public intoxi-
cation after he vomited on himself while stag-
gering on El Camino Real before 8:07 p.m.
Tuesday, July 23.
Disturbance. A man refused to leave a 7-
Eleven after bothering customers on El
Camino Real before 10 p.m. Monday, July 22.
Vandalism. Graffiti was found on a mailbox
on Ralston Avenue before 6:48 p.m. Monday,
July 22.
FOSTER CITY
Assault. Three people were booked, cited,
and released for being involved in a physical
fight on Edgewater Boulevard before 3:02 p.m.
Monday, July 29.
Suspicious circumstances. Someone
reported seeing a black Suburban plugged into
the light pole on Shell Boulevard before 12:36
p.m. Monday, July 29.
Grand theft. A60-inch television delivered
by Federal Express on Tuesday, July 23 to an
address on Bowfin Street was never received.
Police reports
Coin crook
Aman was caught trying to break into a
coin operated laundry machine on the
600 block of Rollins Road in
Burlingame before 11:20 a.m.
Wednesday, July 24.
4
Monday • Aug. 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Hazmat team responds to smell of ammonia
ASan Mateo County hazardous materials team respond-
ed to a business in Burlingame Sunday morning, a fire
department dispatcher said.
A smell of ammonia was reported at a business on
Burlway Road near Highway 101 just before noon, the dis-
patcher saidNo injuries were reported, and the scene was
cleared by 1:30 p.m., the dispatcher said.
The incident remains under investigation, she said.
Suspect sought in robbery at Wells Fargo
A Wells Fargo bank in Burlingame was robbed Saturday
afternoon, according to police.The bank robbery occurred
around 2 p.m. at 1435 Burlingame Ave., according to police.
The suspect is described as a white male, approximately
35 to 45 years old, standing 6 feet tall and weighing 175
pounds.Anyone with information on this suspect or inci-
dent should contact police at (650) 777-4100.
Flight makes emergency landing at SFO
AUnited Airlines flight bound for Sydney, Australia was
forced to make an emergency landing at San Francisco
International Airport Saturday night, a Federal Aviation
Administration spokesman said. Pilots aboard United
Flight 863 declared an emergency a short time after taking
off from SFO at 10:45 p.m. One of four engines powering
the Boeing 747-400 apparently failed.
Local briefs
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A South San Francisco business is
suing the city and its police department
to stop the destruction of 30 seized
computers alleged to have used as gam-
bling slot machines.
On June 26, police came to Computer
Time, at 221 Gellert Blvd., and seized
30 computers with built-in screens,
two desktop computers and one Q-See
DVR machine. Police allege the
devices were being used as slot
machines through a sweepstakes give-
away program.
This is similar to a case back in April
in which “The Hub” had computers
taken by San Bruno police as part of a
suspected illegal online gambling
bust. “The Hub” filed a lawsuit against
police and the city to bar the destruc-
tion of property as well.
Ryker Amusements, Inc., the corpo-
rate owners who ran Computer Time,
shut down the business following the
seizure of the materials, according to
Ryker’s attorney John Weston. Weston
said the business served clients who
didn’t have computers and wanted to
temporarily pay to use their computers.
“The seizures are very inappropri-
ate,” Weston said. “Our client is a law-
abiding, good citizen. Two critical
things are wrong — they weren’t run-
ning an illegal lottery and they didn’t
have illegal slot materials.”
To define a machine as an illegal slot
machine, Weston said, it needs to have
something of value put into it and have
some element of chance that allows for
random winners. Weston said none of
these things fit the bill for what
Computer Time was doing and that
companies like McDonald’s run sweep-
stakes programs.
South San Francisco police Sgt.
Bruce McPhillips said gambling cases
are still rare for their department but
they have seen more Internet cafes in
recent years.
“As the Internet and government try
to come to a median on what’s
legal/illegal, people are trying to push
the envelope,” McPhillips said . “Until
there’s a bright line drawn, people will
continue to push the envelope. We just
started seeing these Internet cafes in
the last two to three years.”
In “The Hub” case, two patrons were
arrested for outstanding warrants, two
patrons were arrested for possession of
narcotics and one was arrested for pos-
session of a dangerous weapon (non
firearm), according to San Bruno
police.
According to San Bruno City
Attorney Marc Zafferano, “The Hub”
computer seizure complaint is pending
since the criminal case is still under-
way and the computers were seized as
part of a search warrant in the case.
South San Francisco police gave
Ryker notice it will destroy the devices
30 days from the date of notice, July 26.
Company sues over seized property
South City’s Computer Time accused of running gambling service
5
Monday • Aug. 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
STATE
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5an Matea
By Tami Abdollah
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES— The driver
parked outside a hotel and sur-
veyed the leisurely summer scene
at the Venice Beach boardwalk:
Hundreds of people were sitting at
cafes, walking along the seashore
or shopping at vendors selling
jewelry or art.
Then, according to surveillance
video, the man got into a large
black car, steered around a vehicle
barrier and accelerated mercilessly
through the crowd, hitting one
person after another as bystanders
tried desperately to get out of the
way.
Saturday’s hit-and-run killed an
Italian woman on her honeymoon
and hurt 11 others who only a
moment earlier had been enjoying
an afternoon near the beach at the
height of vacation season.
Acouple of hours later, authori-
ties arrested a man on suspicion of
murder after he walked into a
police station in neighboring
Santa Monica and said he was
involved.
Nathan Louis Campbell, 38, of
Los Angeles, remained jailed
Sunday on $1 million bail.
Police declined to discuss a
motive but Deputy Chief Kirk
Albanese said there was no indica-
tion that the attack was a terrorist
act or that anyone else was
involved.
By the time it was over, the driv-
er had covered about a quarter of a
mile along the boardwalk before
fleeing. The entire incident was
over in minutes.
Witnesses reported a horrifying
aftermath.
People were “ stumbling around,
blood dripping down their legs,
looking confused not knowing
what had happened, people
screaming,” said Louisa Hodge,
who described “blocks and blocks
of people just strewn across the
sidewalk.”
The Italian woman was identified
as Alice Gruppioni, 32. Her family
in Bologna told the Italian news
agency LaPresse that she had been
on her honeymoon after a July 20
wedding.Gruppioni worked as a
manager for the family business
Sira group, which makes radiators.
Hit-and-run driver accelerated onto boardwalk
Nathan Louis Campbell was arrested for plowing his car into a crowd at
Venice Beach Saturday.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
FIVE POINTS — As a giant har-
vesting machine uprooted and
sucked in hundreds of tomato
plants a row at a time, Dan
Errotabere contemplated massive
strips of bare land on his farm.
“Everything we have in our
operation is under duress,” he said,
looking at a stretch of fallow acres
once covered in garlic, onions and
other crops.
Errotabere and hundreds of oth-
ers who run massive farms in
California’s Central Valley have
left tens of thousands of acres bar-
ren this year after seeing their
water supplies severely curtailed.
He and the other members of the
nation’s largest federal irrigation
district say the restrictions are
hindering their growth and jeop-
ardizing their future.
As a result, the powerful
Westlands Water District, which
comprises 700 large-scale opera-
tions spanning 600,000 acres in
western Fresno and Kings counties,
has become one of the loudest pro-
ponents and top financiers of a twin
tunnel project that would provide a
new avenue for shipping water
from the Sacramento-San Joaquin
Delta south to farms and cities.
Westlands has fought for years
to get more resources from the
delta for the farms it represents,
making its presence known in the
state’s water wars with numerous
lawsuits against environmental
regulations that have cut into their
supplies.
District famers see the interven-
tion as critical for their survival,
particularly the latest push for the
tunnel system. While other agri-
cultural and urban water districts in
California have also faced reduc-
tions, Westlands’ members see
their situation as more precarious,
because their district has junior
water rights and faces the sharpest
cuts when supplies are tight.
Water district backs tunnel plan
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
EUREKA — Eureka authorities
say a 2-year-old boy was badly
burned and his parents were arrest-
ed following an explosion in an
apartment where hash was being
produced.
The Eureka Times-Standard
(http://bit.ly/13doEN7) reports
the explosion happened Friday
night at an apartment where offi-
cers found equipment used to
extract hash from marijuana
plants. The apartment was badly
damaged but did not spread to
other units.
Officials said Saturday the tod-
dler had first- and second-degree
burns on his face, front, back,
arms and legs. He was airlifted to a
hospital in Sacramento.
Police say the parents, 21-year-
old Logan Danny O’Neal Hughes
and 19-year-old Andrea Marie
Ruiz-Guerrero, suffered less seri-
ous burns.
They were arrested on suspicion
of child endangerment and taken
to county jail following treatment
at a Eureka hospital. Bail was set
at $50,000 each.
Toddler burned badly in
Eureka hash explosion
6
Monday • Aug. 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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SAN DIEGO — Therapists say
admitting one has a problem is the
first step toward recovery. For San
Diego Mayor Bob Filner that
could be tricky.
The first-term mayor and former
congressman starts two weeks of
intensive therapy Monday while
facing a sexual harassment lawsuit
and calls for his resignation amid
a flurry of allegations that he
groped women for years.
Even as he undergoes treatment,
Filner is set to be grilled by lawyers
under oath this week in a lawsuit
brought by his former communica-
tions director that claims he asked
her to work without panties, told
her he wanted to see her naked and
dragged her around in a headlock
while whispering in her ear.
Neither Filner nor his office has
released details about his therapy or
its location.
Filner is pick-
ing up the tab
for the treat-
ment.
Filner’s accus-
ers, his one-
time supporters
and voters have
expressed skep-
ticism that any
two-week program is an appropriate
remedy for what Filner himself has
described as years of inappropriate
behavior toward women. Longtime
therapists also questioned how
much progress could be made.
“It is pie-in-the-sky to think that
in two weeks anyone could be a
new man,” said Helen Friedman, a
St. Louis psychologist who has
treated compulsive sexual behavior
for 30 years, though she said it was
a good start.
Success will depend on how far
the 70-year-old Filner goes in
acknowledging his problems,
experts said.
“Typically in the first few ses-
sions you have to find someone
you really trust,” said Lilli
Friedland, a Beverly Hills psychol-
ogist who advises business execu-
tives on sexual harassment. “‘Can I
open up with all my dirty laundry,
and is this person expert enough?’
It takes a number of sessions and
visits to establish that trust.”
Some voters wondered whether
the therapy stint was simply an
effort to buy time amid extraordi-
nary pressure to resign.
“He needs to save face,” said
Christina Imhoof, 72, who voted
for Filner in November but then quit
the Democratic Party over the alle-
gations. She said she suspects
Filner will return after the time-out
and say his therapist has encouraged
him to resign for medical reasons.
Filner announced his plans on
July 26 to enter a behavioral coun-
seling clinic to “begin the process
of addressing my behavior.” He
called it the first step in a continu-
ing program that would involve
ongoing counseling.
“I must become a better person ...
I must demonstrate that my behav-
ior has changed,” Filner said then,
while offering apologies and an
acknowledgement that his “failure
to respect women, and the intimi-
dating contact, is inexcusable.”
The mayor’s office did not
respond to interview requests.
Nine women, including a univer-
sity dean and a retired Navy rear
admiral, have gone public in the
past month with accusations that
Filner cornered them and made
unwanted sexual advances that
included groping and slobbering
kisses. At least five renewed their
calls for Filner to resign after he
pledged to begin therapy.
“It is highly doubtful that two
weeks of therapy will correct for
decades of reprehensible behavior,”
said Laura Fink, who alleges that
Filner patted her buttocks at a 2005
fundraiser when she was deputy cam-
paign manager to the then-con-
gressman.
One accuser, former Filner com-
munications director Irene
McCormack Jackson, has filed a
harassment lawsuit against him.
Her lawyer, Filner’s attorney and
city lawyers will depose him Friday.
Filner, the city’s first
Democratic leader in 20 years, will
keep full powers while in therapy
and said he would be briefed twice-
daily on city business. Filner also
has delegated significant authori-
t y, including the ability to sign
contracts, to an interim chief
operating officer, Walt Ekard, a
former county administrator.
San Diego mayor heads to therapy
Bob Filner
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MOUNT HOOD, Ore. — Adozen rescuers
armed with chain saws and other tools
chipped away at tons of ice and snow
Sunday to the recover the body of a 25-year-
old snowboarder killed when an ice tunnel
collapsed on Oregon’s Mount Hood.
The snowboarder, Collin Backowski, of
Colorado, was traveling with five compan-
ions when the collapse hit Saturday after-
noon. The others tried to dig him out but
could not break through the ice and snow,
which an official described as being as thick
as concrete.
Rescuers quickly responded but halted
efforts about 11 p.m. Saturday, then resumed
early Sunday morning.
Hood River Sheriff’s Office spokeswoman
Tiffany Peterson said that after removing
tons of debris by hand, searchers found
Backowski where he had been buried by 8 to
10 feet of snow and ice.
None of the searchers or other snowboard-
ers was injured, Peterson said.
The ice tunnel was on the White River
Glacier, which begins about 6,000 feet up
the south side of the mountain.
An airplane was dispatched to survey the
area, along with crews from local sheriff’s
offices.
Seven rescuers, including five members of
an all-volunteer group called the CragRats,
were on the mountain on Saturday night.
Companions took pictures of the area just
before the tunnel collapsed, giving
searchers a better idea of where to look.
Warm temperatures made snow on the
mountain slushier and more easily
sloughed off the surface, adding to the
challenge of attempting to reach the snow-
boarder.
Rescuers find body of
Mt. Hood snowboarder
NATION 7
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By Michael J. Mishak
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MIAMI — This wasn’t the revo-
lution the tea party had in mind.
Four years ago, the movement
and its potent mix of anger and
populism persuaded thousands of
costumed and sign-waving conser-
vatives to protest the ballooning
deficit and President Obama’s
health care law. It swept a crop of
no-compromise lawmakers into
Congress and governor’s offices
and transformed political up-and-
comers, including Florida Sen.
Marco Rubio, into household
names.
But as many tea party stars seek
re-election next year and Rubio
considers a 2016 presidential run,
conservative activists are finding
themselves at a crossroads. Many
of their standard-bearers have
embraced more moderate posi-
tions on bedrock issues such as
immigration and health care,
b r o a d e n i n g
their appeal in
swing states
but dampening
g r a s s - r o o t s
passion.
“They keep
sticking their
finger in the
eyes of the
guys who got
them elected,” said Ralph King, a
co-founder of the Cleveland Tea
Party Patriots. “Alot of people are
feeling betrayed.”
The tea party is a loosely knit
web of activists, and some are
hoping to rekindle the fire with
2014 primary challenges to way-
ward Republicans. But many more
say they plan to sit out high-pro-
file races in some important swing
states next year, a move that GOP
leaders fear could imperil the re-
election prospects of former tea
party luminaries, including the
governors of Florida and Ohio.
“It changes the playing field for
us,” said Tom Gaitens, former
Florida director of FreedomWorks,
a political action committee that
has spent millions of dollars to
help tea party candidates. “The
most powerful thing we have as a
movement is our feet and our
vote.”
In the summer of 2009, tea party
supporters stormed congressional
town hall meetings, shouting
down lawmakers who had voted for
the bank bailout and the stimulus
package.
The movement’s voice grew
louder after Democrats passed the
health care overhaul, and voters
took their outrage to the polls in
2010. The tea party wave stunned
Democrats and many moderate
Republicans, sweeping the GOP
into control of the House and
changing the balance of power in
many statehouses.
But not long after some tea
party stars took office, political
analysts said, they were forced to
adapt to a changing landscape,
particularly in states Obama won
in 2012, and to the realities of
governing.
The tea party also fell out of
favor with many people. At its
height after the 2010 elections, a
CBS News poll found that 31 per-
cent of those surveyed considered
themselves tea party supporters. A
May survey found just 24 percent
identified with the movement.
Facing sagging approval rat-
ings, tea party Republicans, some
of whom were elected by slim mar-
gins, shifted tactics.
Fla. Gov. Rick Scott, a former
health care company executive
who won office by attacking the
health law and calling for deep
cuts to state spending, later
endorsed the health law and signed
one of the largest budgets in state
history, complete with pay raises
for teachers.
Similarly, Gov. John Kasich, R-
Ohio, and Rick Snyder, R-Mich.,
are battling their GOP-dominated
legislatures to expand Medicaid, a
big part of the health law.
Tea party supporters were most
struck by Rubio, the son of Cuban
immigrants.
His personal story and unlikely
rise to power made him perhaps
the most prominent figure in the
movement.
As a Senate candidate in 2010,
he denounced as “amnesty” any
plan that would offer a path to cit-
izenship for those who were in the
country illegally.
Yet in recent months, he has
emerged as a leader of a bipartisan
Senate group that developed a plan
that includes such a provision.
The plan has been panned by con-
servatives but ultimately could
bolster Rubio’s standing with
Hispanics, a growing demograph-
ic group that has voted over-
whelmingly Democratic in recent
years.
Tea party plans to abandon GOP stars
Marco Rubio
By Jonathan Lemire
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Why doesn’t
Anthony Weiner just quit?
It’s a question angry voters,
pundits and fellow politicians
have been asking almost nonstop
in the nearly two weeks since the
New York City mayoral candidate’s
latest sexting bombshell, which
has sent his poll numbers plum-
meting and turned his campaign
into a chaotic sideshow.
Weiner insists he’s staying in
the race no matter what. And
experts say that beyond the former
congressman’s well-known ego
and combativeness, his stance
may just be rooted in political cal-
culation.
A leading theory: Weiner takes
his hits on the campaign trail,
gives the media a chance to ask
every sexting question and essen-
tially punch themselves out on the
issue. And even if he loses, he
emerges with the scandal mostly
behind him and his political career
refreshed to run for higher office
again.
“All along, there has been a
school of thought that Weiner
was running in part to rehabili-
tate his image,” said Wendy
Schiller, a Brown University
political scientist. “That, even if
he didn’t win, a strong showing
would set him up for another run
down the road.”
“Even now, he stays in the race,
takes his lumps and shows some
character,” Schiller said. “That
might resonate with New Yorkers.
And if he does better than people
think he should, that helps for the
future, too.”
With fewer than 40 days until
the Democratic primary, Weiner
has been doing his best to push
past the horde of reporters and
photographers and make his case
directly to voters. In recent days,
he has been leaving events with
more applause than when he
entered.
When a man at a Bronx cam-
paign stop last week questioned
the viability of Weiner’s cam-
paign, asking, “When do you say
‘Enough is enough?”’ the candi-
date’s hoarse voice roared to life.
“If you become the mayor of the
City of New York, you’ve got to
put up with this every single day, ”
Weiner told the crowd.
Why won’t Weiner leave race?
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CLEVELAND — A man con-
demned to death for fatally stab-
bing a neighbor during a
Cleveland burglary was found
hanged in his cell Sunday just
days before his Wednesday execu-
tion.
Billy Slagle, 44, was found at
about 5 a.m. at the Chillicothe
Correctional Institution south of
Columbus and was declared dead
within the hour, prison spokes-
woman JoEllen Smith said.
“He was in his cell alone. No
other inmates suspected to be
involved,” Smith said in an email.
“It does appear to be a suicide.”
Under regular prison policy, he
was scheduled to be placed under
pre-execution watch Sunday morn-
ing but “was not yet placed under
constant watch,” Smith said.
Slagle’s defense team was
shocked and saddened at the news
and had no clue he might commit
suicide, attorney Vicki Werneke
said.
“We were still litigating in court
and had hoped that the execution
would have been stopped. There
was oral argument scheduled for
Monday afternoon,” she told The
Associated Press in an email.
An autopsy will be conducted
Monday, according to Mike
Ratliff, chief investigator for the
Ross County coroner. He said the
case was under investigation and
no initial findings could be pro-
vided.
Killer set for execution
found dead in Ohio cell
WORLD 8
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By Alicia A. Caldwell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — U.S. diplo-
matic posts in 19 cities in the
Muslim world will be closed at
least through the end of this week,
the State Department said Sunday,
citing “an abundance of caution.”
State Department spokeswoman
Jen Psaki said the decision to keep
the embassies and consulates
closed is “not an indication of a
new threat.”
She said the continued closures
are “merely an indication of our
commitment to exercise caution
and take appropriate steps to pro-
tect our employees, including
local employees, and visitors to
our facilities.”
Diplomatic facilities will
remain closed in Egypt, Jordan,
Libya, Yemen, Saudi Arabia and
Kuwait, among other countries,
through Saturday, Aug. 10. The
State Department announcement
Sunday added closures of four
African sites, in Madagascar,
Burundi, Rwanda and Mauritius.
The U.S. has also decided to
reopen some posts on Monday,
including those in Kabul,
Afghanistan, and Baghdad.
The Obama administration
announced Friday that the posts
would be closed over the weekend
and the State Department
announced a global travel alert,
warning that al-Qaida or its allies
might target either U.S. govern-
ment or private American inter-
ests.
The weekend closure of nearly
two dozen U.S. diplomatic posts
resulted from the gravest terrorist
threat seen in years, the top
Republican on the Senate
Intelligence Committee said
Sunday.
Sen. Saxby Chambliss said “the
chatter” intercepted by U.S. intel-
ligence agencies led the Obama
administration to shutter the
embassies and consulates and
issue a global travel warning to
Americans.
“Chatter means conversation
among terrorists about the plan-
ning that’s going on — very rem-
iniscent of what we saw pre-9/11,”
Chambliss, R-Ga., told NBC’s
“Meet the Press.”
“This is the most serious threat
that I’ve seen in the last several
years,” he said.
Rep. C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger
of Maryland, the top Democrat on
the House Intelligence
Committee, told ABC’s “This
Week” that the threat intercepted
from “high-level people in al-
Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula”
was about a “major attack.”
Yemen is home to al-Qaida’s
most dangerous affiliate, blamed
for several notable terrorist plots
on the United States.
They include the foiled
Christmas Day 2009 effort to
bomb an airliner over Detroit and
the explosives-laden parcels
intercepted the following year
aboard cargo flights.
Rep. Peter King, who leads the
House Homeland Security subcom-
mittee on counterterrorism and
intelligence, said the threat
included dates but not locations of
possible attacks.
Diplomatic posts in Muslim world closed
By Bassem Mroue
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BEIRUT — Iran’s new president
expressed his country’s support to
Syria’s embattled leader Bashar
Assad’s regime Sunday, saying no
force in the world will be able to shake
their decades-old alliance.
Hasan Rouhani’s comments came as
Syrian troops and rebels fought some
of the fiercest battles in the mountains
of the coastal province of Latakia, an
Assad stronghold.
Rouhani made the comments during
a meeting in the Iranian capital of
Tehran on Sunday with Syrian Prime
Minister Wael al-Halqi, Syria’s state
news agency SANA
said.
Syria has been
Tehran’s strongest
ally in the Arab
world since Iran’s
1979 Islamic
Revolution.
Iran has been one
of Assad’s
staunchest backers
since Syria’s crisis began. Tehran is
believed to have supplied Assad’s gov-
ernment with billions of dollars since
the country’s crisis began in March
2011. Iran-supported Hezbollah also
has sent fighters into Syria to bolster
an offensive by Assad forces.
“The Islamic Republic of Iran aims to
strengthen its relations with Syria and
will stand by it in facing all chal-
lenges,” SANA quoted Rouhani as say-
ing in a report from Tehran. “The deep,
strategic and historic relations between
the people of Syria and Iran ... will not
be shaken by any force in the world.”
Rouhani was elected in June and was
endorsed by the country’s supreme
leader on Saturday, allowing him to
begin acting as president. He was
sworn in Sunday.
Assad vowed Sunday evening to
crush the rebels trying to overthrow
him, saying Syria is between two
choices: “a state of the law or a state
run by thieves and bandits.”
New Iranian president vows support for Assad
Egypt says clock ticking on sit-in standoff
CAIRO — Egypt’s highest security body warned Sunday
that the clock is ticking for a peaceful end to the standoff
over sit-ins by supporters of ousted President Mohammed
Morsi, suggesting that authorities will break up the
protests unless mediation efforts produce results soon.
More than a month after the military overthrew Morsi,
thousands of the Islamist leader’s supporters remain
camped out in two main crossroads in Cairo demanding his
reinstatement. Egypt’s military-backed interim leadership
has issued a string of warnings for them to disperse.
World brief
Hasan Rouhani
OPINION 9
Monday • Aug. 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Donald Trump
Editor,
I see that Harry Roussard’s letter
“Medical insurance: ‘The Donald’
Trump explains this well” in the Aug.
2 edition of the Daily Journal is quot-
ing Donald Trump, of all people,
“explaining” the problems with
Obamacare. With all due respects to
Mr. Roussard, I would advise him to
find another advice guru were he to
aspire to influence any decision on
this matter. Perhaps the failed Trump
Airlines debacle of 1988 has faded
into memory. Perhaps one remembers
the failed Trump Vodka brand from
2006. Perhaps it is the numerous
times he’s flirted with bankruptcy,
like in 1990 when the bank that
backed his real estate investments
had to bail him out to the tune of $65
million. Not enough though, nine
months later he was $4 billion in
debt.
In 2004, Trump Hotels and Resorts
filed for bankruptcies.
In 2009, the same company filed
for bankruptcy again.
Unfortunately, there was no one
there with the authority to say
“You’re fired.” Yes, Mr. Roussard is
backing a real winner and someone
with the track record to be taken seri-
ously. Too bad about that con-
tentious, now proven hilariously
false accusation about Obama’s birth-
place that was yet another in a
string of laughable failures by Mr
Trump. At least that combover looks
mahvelous, eh Harry?
John Dillon
San Bruno
Jews support Israel
Editor,
The letter by Patrick Field (“Israeli
immigration” in the Aug. 2 edition of
the Daily Journal) is one of the most
insulting I have ever read in this pub-
lication. His insinuations that Jews
have had an easier time immigrating
to the United States are patently
false. There used to be quotas for the
Jews, as for many other groups,
which prevented many from escaping
the pogroms of Europe. Once here,
Jews faced enormous social pressure.
I won’t say that our experience was
any worse than that of the Irish, say,
but it was bad.
That is why most Jews support the
state of Israel. Not because of some
wish to dominate, and not because of
some vast conspiracy to trick the
U.S. government (which itself is an
anti-Semitic accusation). We support
Israel because it is the world’s only
country where Jews have been able to
live free of persecution, if not attack.
Steve Fisher
Atherton
Senator Leno’s LGBT advocacy
Editor,
Awhile ago, you published Senator
Mark Leno’s opinion-editorial “A
tipping point for LGBT equality” in
the June 8 edition of the Daily
Journal. Senator Leno listed the great
strides made by the LGBT in advanc-
ing the interests of that emerging
group. He mentioned the difficulties
which they have faced while pursuing
their goals.
Mr. Leno also listed challenges fac-
ing the LGBT as they further pursue
their admirable successes. It seems
that Leno, our hardworking senator,
must be well aware of a candidate who
can lead this program to its increas-
ingly important victories.
In a pleasantly conjured code, here
is the way the name of our proven
political planner and leader should
appear:
In the present: Mark Leno
In the future, reflecting on his
accomplishments and expected con-
tinuing accomplishments, that name
should appear in our thoughts as:
Mark Leno!!! (Symbols speak loud-
er than words at times).
Arthur B. Bush
San Carlos
Letters to the editor
Orange County Register
A
erial surveillance, in one
form or another, has become
a fact of life for many, from
the first reconnaissance balloon used
in 1794 at the Battle of Fleurus during
the Napoleonic Wars, to the traffic-
reporting helicopters that provide
much-valued insight on our com-
mutes.
But, when the Register reported last
week that the Orange County Sheriff’s
Department was exploring the use of
unmanned drones, it gave us pause.
Because, while manned aerial surveil-
lance has become commonplace, the
small, cheap and portable unmanned
vehicle is a new frontier in our sur-
veillance state - and, we feel, a deserv-
ing cause for concern.
Sheriff’s representatives were quick
to stress to us that the department’s
exploration of drones is in its earliest
stages and that thorough reports first
would have to be completed before
their use would even be considered by
the department.
We are glad the Sheriff’s
Department is giving the topic its due
diligence and, as we have said here
before, we are not opposed to any and
every domestic use of drones. Our
concern simply is over the nature of
unmanned drones and how easily they
lend themselves to more-expansive
uses.
For example, manned aerial surveil-
lance has always been hampered by
its expense. Helicopters cost $1,000
to $1,200 for every hour they are in
the air, the Register reported, and, as
such, are typically reserved for situa-
tions where there is an immediate and
ongoing threat.
But, the Register reported, drones
are required by the Federal Aviation
Administration Modernization and
Reform Act of 2012 to weigh less
than 4.4 pounds, are allowed to fly as
low as 400 feet and, as Colorado’s
Mesa County Sheriff’s Department
has shown, can be run as cheaply as
$25 an hour.
It is a concern shared by Sen. Rand
Paul, the Kentucky Republican, in a
back and forth with FBI Director
Robert Mueller over the FBI’s drone
program. Sen. Paul recently received a
letter from the director, admitting to
the use of drones 10 times since
2006, all without a warrant, because
“there has been no need for the FBI to
seek a search warrant or judicial order
in any of the few cases where UAVs
have been used.”
“Given that, first, the FBI will only
seek a warrant if a reasonable expecta-
tion of privacy is assumed and, sec-
ond, that the FBI has not felt it neces-
sary to seek a warrant during past
drone operations, it is important that
you clarify your interpretation of
when an individual is assumed to have
a reasonable expectation of privacy, ”
Sen. Paul said in a letter of reply.
We agree and, therefore, feel it is
imperative, in the absence of legisla-
tive decree, that the Sheriff’s
Department, FBI or any agency that is
looking to operate drones, so, too,
look into forming clear and transpar-
ent operational guidelines that pro-
tect the Fourth Amendment rights of
Americans against warrantless search-
es.
Time for some drone guidelines
Maltbie
versus the
grand jury
T
his is a tale of good accounting practices versus pub-
lic relations. San Mateo County Manager John
Maltbie stirred up an outpouring of editorials, letters
to the editor and chatter
when he attacked the civil
grand jury for a lack of trans-
parency. He also didn’t like
the grand jury’s recommen-
dations regarding the coun-
ty’s fiscal accountability.
Maltbie is not one to be
taken lightly. He was called
back from retirement to lead
the county once again and
supervisors have renewed
his contract. They wish he
would never leave because
the county has been in
excellent shape in his
hands. The core of his objec-
tion to the grand jury’s criticism makes sense. It is danger-
ous for any governmental entity to use one-time or irregular
sources of revenue for ongoing expenses. The cities and
school districts who did this in times of financial crisis are
still suffering the consequences. The grand jury felt that the
Educational Revenue Augmentation Funds, money left over
after schools reach their funding requirements, was reliable
enough to be shown as revenue in the operating budget. The
county has received ERAF money since 2004. But Maltbie
and the board have calculated this revenue separately from
the regular budget because they are not guaranteed.
The problem, according to the grand jury, was that the
county successfully went to the voters for a sales tax increase
and did not reveal that these ERAF money made the actual
amount on hand more than the advertised budget deficit. It’s
smart accounting, but bad for public confidence in local gov-
ernment. Meanwhile, the county has achieved a half-cent
sales tax increase for the next 10 years by telling voters
there would be drastic cuts unless the measure passed. There
is no guarantee that ERAF money will be coming into coun-
ty coffers regularly for the next 10 years. And the county, as
a provider of indigent care, needs the funds. However, it’s bad
news for future tax or bond measures.
The usually political savvy Maltbie made a big mistake in
going after the grand jury. The grand jury, whose rules are
governed by state law, is an investigative, not a governing
body. Investigative bodies need to meet and question people
in private. In contrast, we expect our elected officials to do
their business in public. It’s not atypical for savvy politicos
to go after the grand jury if they don’t like their recommenda-
tions. When a former grand jury advised that the county was
going to lose its shirt if BARTto SFO was approved, former
state senator Quentin Kopp (the father of the BARTexten-
sion) went ballistic. Grand juries perform a useful public
service. We need to support them. And if local governments
don’t like their recommendations, there is no law which says
they have to carry them out. Some think that’s too bad.
***
There are many unanswered questions about Mills High
School versus the College Board, administrator of advanced
placement tests. We know that the College Board has can-
celed the scores of Mills students taking the last series
before graduating because of irregularities in seating. The
College Board requires that there be a perimeter of 5 feet
around each student and all must be facing in the same direc-
tion to deter copying. At the testing in question, because of
lack of classroom space, some students sat around tables.
Both Mills and the College Board say this has nothing to do
with cheating. But potential cheating is the issue. The Mills
student who reported the irregularity must have been con-
cerned about the possibility, or else why would he/she have
contacted the College Board? In any event, that student has
to retake the exams too.
***
The San Mateo Union High School District has asked the
College Board to see if there were irregularities in the test
results but the College Board seems set on invalidating the
tests no matter what. Even though it seems unjust and
painful, the College Board will probably stick to its guns
despite a lawsuit to be filed by the district and pleas from
local political officials.
There has been too much cheating nationwide on AP and
other tough exams to allow a challenge to its strict seating
requirements. Meanwhile, 95 Mills students will be retaking
the AP tests later in August at the Mills gym with a represen-
tative of the College Board monitoring the proceedings. The
students and their parents are furious and frustrated that the
system seems to have failed them. For the idealist graduating
seniors, it’s a bitter lesson to learn that sometimes life isn’t
fair.
Sue Lempert is the former mayor of San Mateo. Her column
runs every Monday. She can be reached at sue@smdailyjour-
nal.com.
Other voices
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — When Detroit became the
biggest city in U.S. history to file for bank-
ruptcy last month, it turned public attention
to the municipal-bond market, where cities
and states go to borrow money. Was this
sleepy, often-overlooked area of the finan-
cial world actually dangerous?
Like other cities, Detroit borrowed from
investors to pay for roads, sewer lines and
an array of other projects. Now Detroit says
it can’t afford to pay bond investors all of
their money back.
Even if you don’t own any muni bonds,
it’s important to understand what they are
and how they work. They’re what your city
uses to keep itself running, but it can be
tough to cut through the jargon and heated
claims surrounding Detroit’s bankruptcy.
To help, here’s a look at the nuts and bolts
of what finance types call munis: who owns
them, how they work and just what they are,
anyway.
What are municipal bonds, exactly?
Cities, states, towns and other local gov-
ernments sell municipal bonds to raise
money for school renovations, sports sta-
diums or other projects. Afire district might
need a few hundred thousand dollars for a
new truck; a state might need a few billion
to build highways and hospitals.
When investors buy a muni bond, they’re
lending to a local government. In return,
they get a regular interest payment and the
promise of all their money back at the end
of the bond’s life. That could be one year
later or as many as three decades later.
Have local governments borrowed a lot?
The total amount of municipal debt out-
standing is $3.72 trillion, according to the
Federal Reserve’s latest report. That may
sound enormous, but it’s less than a fifth of
the total $21.7 trillion U.S. bond market.
Corporations have borrowed more money,
owing $5.9 trillion to bondholders. And the
federal government has more publicly trad-
ed debt than both groups put together:
$11.9 trillion.
For the sake of comparison, the value of
the entire U.S. stock market is $18.7 tril-
lion, according to S&P Dow Jones Indices.
What’s the appeal?
It’s mainly the tax-free income. The feder-
al government taxes interest payments
from savings accounts, corporate bonds and
other investments, but doesn’t touch
income from muni bonds. To somebody in
the top tax bracket, a New York State bond
paying 3 percent is equal to a corporate
bond paying 4.97 percent.
Who owns them?
They’re mainly held by individuals, who
buy them outright or through mutual funds.
Individuals hold 44 percent of all munis,
and mutual funds have another 25 percent,
according to the Fed. Banks and insurance
companies own much of the rest.
Buying municipal bonds directly tends to
be the province of wealthy people who have
the most to gain from the tax exemption.
“Tax-free bonds have been the best game
in town for people who are well off and
don’t want to pay taxes,” said Mark
Schwartz, a former bond lawyer and invest-
ment banker who has a law practice in Bryn
Mawr, Pa.
How can I buy them?
You can usually buy munis through your
online brokerage account, but it’s not
exactly like buying stocks. They’re traded
“over the counter.” That means there is no
formal, centralized exchange with one
agreed-upon price for a security. Instead,
you have to buy them through a dealer, and
the prices may vary.
“You can call up five dealers and get five
different prices,” said Daniel Berger, senior
market strategist at Thomson Reuters,
“although the prices would be closer than
you think.”
Dealers are supposed to offer “fair and rea-
sonable” prices. They make money from
the difference between what they paid and
what they get from a sale.
What kind of return can you expect?
When there’s little risk, there’s little
reward. Thanks to their solid credit history,
municipalities pay very low rates to borrow
money.
A type of muni called a “general obliga-
tion” bond is considered especially safe.
They’re backed by a city’s full faith and
credit, which essentially means a city will
take extreme steps to repay them — even if
it has to cut police and fire protection for its
citizens or raise taxes.
The average yield on a top-rated, 10-year
general-obligation muni bond is 2.71 per-
cent, according to Thomson Reuters data.
For a 30-year muni, it’s 4.22 percent.
That’s a bit more than the payout on U.S.
government debt, and the tax break makes
the benefit bigger for investors. The 10-
year Treasury note yields 2.62 percent. The
30-year bond yields 3.70 percent.
What’s going on in Detroit?
Detroit owes billions to bondholders and
billions more in pensions to retired city
workers. In its bankruptcy filing, the city
proposed trimming pension benefits and
paying bondholders a fraction of what
they’re owed. It also wants to treat retired
city workers and bond investors as equals.
Both groups plan to fight the city’s pro-
posal, for very different reasons. The
retirees argue that Michigan’s state consti-
tution protects their pensions. Investors
who hold the city’s general-obligation
bonds expect not only to rank first in the
lineup of creditors but also to be paid in
full. Laws often require local governments
to pay bondholders before they pay any-
body else.
Government borrowers generally stick to
their promised interest payments as long as
residents keep paying taxes. Even when
trouble strikes, bondholders usually get all
their money back. In 1994, for example,
the bankruptcy of Orange County, Calif.,
shook financial markets, raising fears that
bond investors would spurn local govern-
ment borrowers. But Orange County’s
bondholders eventually got all of their
money back, according to the rating agency
Moody’s .
Navigating municipal bonds after Detroit
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — CBS and Time Warner
Cable can’t work out their differences,
so they want viewers to help settle the
fight .
Three million Time Warner Cable
customers in New York, Los Angeles,
Dallas and other cities remained with-
out access to CBS for a third day on
Sunday, after the cable provider
dropped the network in a spat over
fees.
The blackout meant affected cus-
tomers weren’t able to watch Tiger
Woods win the Bridgestone
Invitational on their home screens, or
shows including “60 Minutes.” Also at
stake was preseason National Football
League coverage starting next week.
The two sides couldn’t agree on the
status of their talks either, with CBS
saying on Sunday that no negotiations
were taking place. ATime Warner rep-
resentative, Maureen Huff, maintained
that, “Talks continue.”
In the meantime, the two New York-
based companies have been taking
their cases to the public, with full-
page print ads.
A CBS ad on Sunday, for example,
showed a TV screen with shots of the
shows people wouldn’t be able to
watch, including “The Big Bang
Theory” and “Big Brother.”
“Call Time Warner Cable now,” the
ad urged. “Tell them you want your
CBS 2 back!”
Time Warner Cable customers who
turned to CBS this weekend were greet-
ed by a message on white screen say-
ing the network had made “outrageous
demands” for fees. It advised viewers
that they could still see their favorite
shows through several ways, including
“using an antenna to get CBS free over
the air. ”
Although CBS sends its signal out
over the airwaves for free to anyone
with an antenna, about 85 percent of
CBS viewers watch TV through a pay
TV provider.
Time Warner cut off CBS for viewers
in select markets on Friday, saying the
network is demanding retransmission
fees that are out of line with what it
pays other broadcasters.
Time Warner, CBS draw viewers into fee spat
New jobs disproportionately low-pay or part-time
WASHINGTON — The 162,000 jobs the economy added
in July were a disappointment. The quality of the jobs was
even worse.A disproportionate number of the added jobs
were part-time or low-paying — or both.
Part-time work accounted for more than 65 percent of the
positions employers added in July. Low-paying retailers,
restaurants and bars supplied more than half July’s job gain.
“You’re getting jobs added, but they might not be the
best-quality job,” says John Canally, an economist with
LPL Financial in Boston.
So far this year, low-paying industries have provided 61
percent of the nation’s job growth, even though these
industries represent just 39 percent of overall U.S. jobs,
according to Labor Department numbers analyzed by
Moody’s Analytics.
Business brief
<< Missy Franklin wins sixth gold in pool, page 13
• Football returns in Hall of Fame game, page 16
Monday, Aug. 5, 2013
ALEX RODRIGUEZ: YANKEE CAN PLAY WHILE HE APPEALS SUSPENSION >> PAGE 14
Editor’s note: This article was
written after watching the ESPN 3
Internet feed from the Little
League Western Regional tourna-
ment in San Bernardino
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The Belmont-Redwood Shores
11-12 Little League All-Stars
moved to 2-0 in pool play at the
Western Regional tournament in
San Bernardino with a 3-0 win
over the Hawaii entry Sunday
morning.
BRS is the first team with two
wins and remains atop of the six-
team standings in the tournament.
It has yet to allow a run.
BRS used a familiar script to
beat Hawaii: it got another out-
standing pitching performance
from Nicolas Lopez and, after
watching the upper half of the
lineup do the damage in its win
over Arizona on Friday, it was the
lower portion of the BRS batting
order that supplied much of the
offense. Zach Wong, Taylor
Douglis and Daniel Friis, who bat-
ted in the No. 7 and No. 9 spots,
had three of BRS’ four hits on the
game. Wong scored twice and
Bugbee added the third.
Lopez, who pitched a no-hitter
in an elimination game during the
Division 2 tournament, took a no-
no into the sixth inning against
Hawaii, but a leadoff, opposite-
field bloop single to right ended
his bid.
He did, however, finish the game
out in style, getting a double play
to end the game. Shortstop Sean
Lee gobbled up a smash right to
him and raced to second for a force
out. He then threw on to first,
barely getting the runner for the
game-ending double play.
Lopez gem was BRS’ second
complete game of the tournament.
He struck out nine and walked
three, allowing only one Hawaii
baserunner as far as second base,
which came in the first inning.
The BRS offense had a difficult
time against Hawaii’s starting
pitcher, managing only four hits
and striking out eight times. For
the longest time, it appeared Zach
Wong’s run off a Hawaii passed
ball in the second inning would be
all the offense Lopez would get,
but BRS gave its pitcher some
breathing room by scoring two
runs in bottom of the fifth.
Taylor Douglis led off the bot-
tom of the fifth inning with an
infield hit. He cued a pitch off the
Little League All-Stars advance
Belmont-Redwood Shores stays on top of six-team standings
See BRS, Page 12
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — After
the San Francisco Giants let
another one-run game get away to
Tampa Bay, manager Bruce Bochy
decided it’s time for a new batting
order.
“We’re going to have to change
this up,” Bochy said Sunday after a
4-3 loss to the Rays that conclud-
ed a 3-3 road trip. “We’re not get-
ting any production from our lead-
off hitters. We’re definitely going
through a tough time and we’re
going to change things up here a a
little bit.”
The changes will start Monday
with either Marco Scutaro or
Hunter Pence leading off against
the Milwaukee Brewers at AT&T
Park.
Wil Myers homered and four
relievers allowed one hit over 4 1-
3 scoreless innings to help the
Rays hand the Giants their 10th
loss in 14 games. The Giants had a
chance for a successful trip before
losing two one-run games against
the Rays in less than 24 hours.
“It is (disappointing) to come in
here and lose two tough ones like
this, especially with the little
things that got us,” Bochy said.
“We had a chance to add on runs a
couple times. We couldn’t do it,
and those things usually come
back to haunt you.”
Guillermo Moscoso gave up
three runs in 4 2-3 innings in his
first start for the Giants. Mososco
recovered well from Myers’ two-
run home run, but he walked four.
“I had two leadoff walks and they
scored two runs,” he noted.
A third leadoff walk was issued
by reliever Jose Mijares in the
sixth inning, and this one was the
Giants’ undoing. Mijares (0-3)
walked Yunel Escobar, who moved
up on a ground ball and scored the
winning run on Sam Fuld’s two-out
Bullpen keys
Rays’ victory
against Giants
By Rick Eymer
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — Oakland manager
Bob Melvin has seen his team’s
lead in the AL West Division
shrink by 3 1-2 games the past
week. Nothing to worry about, he
says. The Athletics were in a worse
position at this time last year.
“When you’re in first place, the
last thing you want to do is play to
hold onto the lead,” Melvin said.
“We have to play like we are five
games behind and not get caught
up in the standings.”
The A’s lost another game off
their lead Sunday when Derek
Holland threw eight shutout
innings and the Texas Rangers
took the series with a 4-0 victory.
The A’s have been in first place
since July 1, and held a six-game
lead a week ago. That lead is down
to 2 1-2 games entering Monday’s
off day.
“We’re having a tough time put-
ting two games together in a row, ”
Melvin said. “We’ve been in a lit-
tle bit of a rut, whether it’s our
defense, whether it’s our pitching
at times, or we haven’t been time-
ly as far as that goes.”
The A’s committed two errors and
were limited to five hits on
Sunday. A.J. Griffin pitched a solid
game, but allowed two more home
runs, giving him a major-league
leading 28. The A’s are hitting
.214 over their last 21 games.
“We do have the guys with the
ability to take care of that,”
A’s offense struggles
in 4-0 loss to Rangers
By Rusty Miller
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
AKRON, Ohio — They say par is
a good score in a major.
If that’s true next week at the
PGA Championship, then Tiger
Woods has already done his share
of preparation.
Woods played safe and smart
with a big lead, parring 16 holes
in an even-par 70 Sunday to coast
to a seven-shot victory at the
Bridgestone Invitational for his
eighth win at the event — match-
ing the PGATour record he already
shared for victories in a single
tournament.
“As blustery as it was, it was
going to be really hard for some-
one to shoot 62 or 63,” Woods
said. “If I didn’t give any shots
away and played my game and shot
even par or better, I’d force these
guys to go and shoot something
super low on a golf course that
wasn’t going to give it up under
these conditions.”
As he walked to the scorer’s
trailer to finalize his score, he
scooped up 4-year-old son
Charlie, who hugged him tightly
as his father strode past the large
gallery wildly cheering his land-
slide victory.
“This is the first win he’s ever
been at,” Woods said. “That’s what
makes it special for both of us.”
Daughter Sam was on hand when
Woods, won the U.S. Open in
2008, before his personal life
imploded. Now Charlie will have
some memories of dad in the win-
ner’s circle.
“They always say, ‘Daddy, when
are you going to win the tourna-
Woods coasts to win at Bridgestone
REUTERS
Tiger Woods waves to the gallery on the 18th hole after winning the WGC-Bridgestone Invitational golf tournament
in Akron, Ohio Sunday.
See TIGER, Page 12
See GIANTS, Page 14
See A’S, Page 14
SPORTS 12
Monday • Aug. 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
S.A.M S A M
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end of the bat that trickled up the third-base
line. The ball started foul, but spun back fair
for a hit. With Wong pinch running for
Douglis, Luke Bugbee came to the plate and
hit what could have been a double-play
grounder to shortstop, but the throw to sec-
ond sailed into right field, enabling Wong
to go to third and Bugbee to second. That
brought Daniel Friis to the plate for his
only at-bat of the day and he drilled an
opposite-field single to right to drive in
Wong and send Bugbee to third to put BRS
up 2-0. Leadoff hitter Noah Marcelo added a
second insurance run with a sacrifice fly to
center which plated Bugbee.
Belmont-Redwood Shores took a 1-0 lead
in the bottom of the second inning. Wi t h
one out, Wong got the first hit of the day, a
single right up the middle into center field.
Wong took second on a passed ball and went
to third on Josh Fong’s groundout. Wi t h
Ryan Anderson at the plate, a pitch got past
the Hawaii catcher. Wong broke for the
plate with the pitcher covering home and
taking a throw from the catcher. In a bang-
bang play at the plate, Wong was ruled safe,
although replays on the ESPN 3 Internet
feed suggested the pitcher got the tag down
before Wong’s foot crossed the plate.
But he was safe and BRS had a 1-0 lead.
Belmont-Redwood Shores will be back in
action today at 11:45 a.m., taking on Utah,
which is 0-2 and has been outscored 22-2 in
two games.
Yanks SS Jeter has strained
calf, return uncertain.
SAN DIEGO — The New York Yankees
could be losing shortstop Derek Jeter again
— to yet another leg injury.
An MRI exam revealed that Jeter has a
strained right calf, the latest setback in a
year already full of injuries for the team cap-
tain. The Yankees hope to know more about
his condition before Monday night’s game
at the Chicago White Sox.
“Who knows?” Jeter said when asked if
he’d be shut down again. “I’m tired of trying
to speculate. It’s frustrating, so we’ll see
what happens tomorrow.
“It’s been terrible, like a nightmare,” he
added after the Yankees’ 6-3 loss to San
Diego on Sunday. “The whole season’s been
a nightmare, so I really don’t know what to
tell you. I wish that wasn’t the case, we were
sitting here talking about something other
than injuries. We’ll see what happens. I
have no idea.”
Jeter, 38, didn’t play Saturday or Sunday
against the Padres.
“The odd thing is there was no play where
it happened,” Jeter said. “Usually, you feel
it in a particular play, but I didn’t feel it in
any particular play. ”
Continued from page 11
BRS
ment?’ It was a few years there, or a couple
years, I hadn’t won anything,” Woods said,
smiling. “‘Are you leading or not? That’s a
stock question. ‘Not leading.’ ‘Well, are you
going to start leading?’ ‘Well, I’m trying.”’
After a second-round 61 in which he flirt-
ed with 59, Woods ended up at 15-under 265
to easily beat defending champ Keegan
Bradley and Henrik Stenson.
Bradley, a huge fan of Tiger’s when he was a
youngster, was asked if he liked to see Woods
dominate like he did a decade or so ago.
“When I was younger, I did,” Bradley said.
“You know, I hate to sit here and go on and
on about how good he is, but he is. It’s dif-
ficult because I really want to get up there
and contend with him. But he’s just ... this
week he’s playing really well.”
Woods’ mastery at Firestone Country
Club allowed him to again match Sam
Snead’s PGA Tour record for wins in an
event. Snead won the Greater Greensboro
Open eight times. Earlier this year, Woods
won at Bay Hill for the eighth time.
As if he weren’t already the favorite next
week in the PGAChampionship at Oak Hill,
the lopsided victory reinforced it.
No one ever got within six shots all day
of the world’s No. 1.
When he had a good shot at a pin, he took
it. Otherwise, he took few, if any, risks.
He birdied the 10th hole, then offset that
with a three-putt bogey at the 14th hole.
But by then most of the field was thinking
about catching flights to Rochester instead
of catching Woods.
Bradley, who won a year ago when Jim
Furyk double-bogeyed the 72nd hole, shot a
67 to get to 8 under along with Stenson,
who had a 70 while playing with Woods.
“He kind of punctured this tournament on
Friday,” Stenson said. “He did what he need-
ed to do today. ”
Tied for fourth were Cleveland-born Jason
Dufner (71), Miguel Angel Jimenez (69) and
Zach Johnson (67) at 6 under. Bill Haas and
Chris Wood each shot a 71 and were at 5
under, with Martin Kaymer, who matched the
day’s best round with a 66, at 4 under along
with Furyk, Richard Sterne and Luke Donald.
For those betting Woods won’t win next
week at Oak Hill, keep in mind that he has
already won both the Bridgestone and the
PGA Championship in the same year three
times in his career (2000, 2006, 2007).
Still, the odds do not favor him coming
right back with another win. In the 19 times
in which he has won his last start before a
major, he’s only followed up with a win four
times: 2000 U.S. Open (after winning The
Memorial), 2001 Masters (Players), 2006
PGA(Buick) and 2007 PGA(Bridgestone).
The victory was Woods’ 79th on the PGA
Tour, drawing him within three of Snead’s
record 82 triumphs.
“The total body of work is pretty good,”
Woods said. “One of the things I’m proud
of, obviously, is how many times I’ve won,
plus won World Golf Championships and
how many years I’ve won five or more tour-
naments in a season.”
Continued from page 11
TIGER
Sports brief
SPORTS 13
Monday • Aug. 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Paul Newberry
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BARCELONA, Spain — Missy
Franklin climbed to the top of the
podium one more time in Spain
before heading off to college.
With that step, the 18-year-old
joined a very exclusive club.
Missy, we’d like to introduce
you to Michael Phelps, Mark
Spitz, Ian Thorpe and Kristin
Otto.
“I still can’t really believe that
it happened,” Franklin said.
She claimed her record sixth
gold medal of the world champi-
onships Sunday night, swimming
the leadoff leg for the Americans
in the 400-meter medley relay.
Franklin gave the U.S. a slight
lead in the backstroke, and her
teammates — Jessica Hardy, Dana
Vollmer and Megan Romano —
made it look easy from there.
The winning time was 3 min-
utes, 53.23 seconds, nearly two
seconds ahead of runner-up
Australia, with Russia claiming
the bronze.
“I had some really great races
that I’m really proud of, and
there’s still a bunch where I have a
lot of room to improve,” Franklin
said. “So I’m really excited for the
next year and the year after that
and all the years following those.”
It might be hard to top this one.
Franklin became the winningest
female swimmer ever at a world
meet, eclipsing the record that was
shared by Tracy Caulkins, who
won five times in 1978, and Libby
Trickett, who did it in 2007.
Perhaps more impressively,
Franklin became only the fifth
swimmer to capture as many as six
golds at either worlds or an
Olympics.
Quite a club it is.
Phelps won six golds at the
2004 Athens Olympics, seven at
the 2007 worlds and, of course, a
record eight at the Beijing
Olympics, eclipsing Spitz’s mark
of seven at the 1972 Munich
Games. Otto won six golds at the
1988 Seoul Olympics — an
accomplishment since clouded by
revelations of rampant doping in
East Germany — and Thorpe
claimed a half-dozen victories at
the 2001 worlds.
Now, there’s Franklin.
She completed a grueling week
in which she competed in eight
events. She dropped out of the 50
backstroke after swimming in the
preliminaries of the non-OIympic
event, wanting to focus on more
important races, and took fourth
in the 100 freestyle. Otherwise, it
was all gold.
She improved on her perform-
ance at the London Olympics,
where she was one of the biggest
stars with four golds and a bronze.
“I just wanted to see where I was
after London,” Franklin said. “It’s
kind of an unknown year. There are
so many things that can happen.”
Indeed. Check out what tran-
spired with the American men in
their 400 medley relay.
They celebrated what looked to
be an easy victory, only to dis-
cover that 19-year-old breaststro-
ker Kevin Cordes, the least experi-
enced member of the foursome,
left too soon on the exchange
between the first and second legs.
The U.S., which touched nearly
1 1/2 seconds ahead of France, was
disqualified. The French moved up
to take the gold, while the silver
went to Australia and Japan
snatched the bronze.
“That’s like a punch in the gut
right there,” said Bob Bowman,
coach of the U.S. men’s team.
Cordes stood on the deck in dis-
belief, hands on his head, but the
replay showed he clearly left the
block before backstroker Matt
Grevers touched the pad. Ryan
Lochte could only shake his head,
having contributed a strong but-
terfly leg that didn’t matter. He was
denied his fourth gold medal of the
meet, leaving him tied with
Chinese star Sun Yang as the win-
ningest male swimmers.
“Arelay disqualification is not a
particular individual’s fault,” said
Nathan Adrian, who swam the
anchor leg in vain. “It falls on all
of our shoulders.”
Franklin was not even chosen as
the top female swimmer of the
meet. That award went to fellow
American Katie Ledecky, who won
four golds and set two world
records.
She edged out Franklin based on
a formula that doesn’t count the
relays and gives bonus points for
world marks.
Franklin had no complaints.
“It could not go to a better per-
son,” Franklin said. “I am
sooooooo proud of Katie. She was
absolutely unbelievable. I think
she has probably been my
absolute favorite swimmer to
watch ever. ”
Franklin wins record 6th gold at worlds
By Ann M. Peterson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PORTLAND, Ore. — Less than
12 hours after a hard-fought
Cascadia Cup match against rival
Vancouver, Portland Timbers cap-
tain Will Johnson was slogging a
wheelbarrow full of bark chips
through a public park.
Johnson, who has led the
Timbers’ resurgence this season,
also helped kick off the team’s
annual Stand Together Week of
community service on Sunday.
Portland’s All-Star midfielder
has a career-high six goals and
three assists this season, and he’s
become a fan favorite in soccer-
crazy Portland. But he’s not above
doing some
manual labor
for a good cause
— in this case,
restoring a
series of com-
munity trails.
“I really like
playing for this
team. The fans
are amazing,
the organization is big-time,” he
said. “I’m having a lot of fun here,
and I’m playing free.”
The Timbers acquired Johnson,
26, in the offseason from Real
Salt Lake, where he played for five
seasons and was also an All-Star
in 2009. A native of Montreal,
Johnson also plays for the
Canadian national team.
Johnson fit in immediately with
first-year Portland coach Celeb
Porter’s new possession-oriented
system, so much so that he was
chosen team captain.
“He’s a great player, but a
tremendous leader,” Porter said
earlier this season. “He’s done a
lot to transform this club into the
club that we are now. We’re on the
right track, and we’re hoping at
the end of the year we’re in the mix
to make a run at this thing.”
And it’s not just Johnson who
has thrived under Porter. The
Timbers, who finished last season
8-16-10 and ranked second-to-last
in Major League Soccer’s Western
Conference, are 8-3-11 so far this
season and sit in a tie for second
place in the conference. The
team’s turnaround has been high-
lighted by a 15-match midseason
unbeaten streak.
“I credit it to a bunch of guys all
buying into the same philosophy.
Humble, hard-working, disci-
plined, respectful but aggressive.
There are all qualities we have as a
team,” he said. “But more than
anything, we are a team. We fight
for each other — win together,
lose together. ”
Johnson has also endeared him-
self to Portland. At a recent match
a fan held up a sign that said
“Where there’s a WILL there’s a
win.”
Earlier this season, he traded
jerseys with 8-year-old Atticus
Lane-Dupre, a cancer patient
whose youth soccer team scrim-
maged against the Timbers. “It’s
the first and only time in my
career I’ll ask for somebody’s jer-
sey,” Johnson said as he proudly
donned the too-small No. 1 Lane-
Dupre shirt.
In an April match against the
San Jose Earthquakes, forward
Alan Gordon directed a slur at
Johnson — who in turn responded
with the game-winning goal.
Gordon apologized in a statement
released by the team but was later
suspended for three games.
Johnson was diplomatic about
the incident, preferring to let his
goal do the talking.
Timbers: Where there’s a Will there’s a win
REUTERS
Missy Franklin (R) hugs her team mate Megan Romano after winning the
women’s 4x100m medley final during the World Swimming Champi-
onships at the Sant Jordi arena in Barcelona Sunday.
Will Johnson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
RENO, Nev. — The momentum slip-
ping away in the Reno-Tahoe Open,
Gary Woodland got out of trouble in a
hurry on the par-4 14th hole.
After nearly losing his ball in the
pine needles and sagebrush, Woodland
chipped in from the rough from 58 feet
for one of his four birdies Sunday en
route to his second PGATour victory.
“I got lucky to find my ball on 14
there in the hazard and I kind of
chopped it out,” Woodland said. “The
chip that went in I was just trying to
get it on the green, let alone go in. It
was one of the best shots I’ve ever hit.”
Woodland finished with 44 points in
the modified Stableford format that
awards eight points for double eagle,
five for eagle, two for birdie, zero for
par, minus-one for bogey and minus-
three for double bogey or worse.
Jonathan Byrd and Andres Romero
tied for second with 35 points.
Woodland, also the 2011 Transitions
Championship winner as a tour rook-
ie, earned $540,000 for the victory
and got a spot next week in the PGA
Championship.
Gary Woodland wins Reno-Tahoe Open
SPORTS 14
Monday • Aug. 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Melvin said. “We’re confident we will. We
just need to sustain it. Not just one game
here and one game there. We need to get on
a roll with it and then we can put this period
past us.”
Nate Freiman had two hits for the A’s, who
have lost four of five.
Griffin (10-8) lasted 6 2-3 innings, allow-
ing four runs — three earned — on five hits.
He walked one and struck out seven.
“It’s just two pitches every game,” Griffin
said. “I feel like I pitched real well all game.
Then Moreland hits a home run. That’s the
way it goes. I don’t worry about our lineup.
The little slump, it’s going to pass and
we’re going to go out there and rake. We’re
going to turn the corner here.”
Griffin became the first Oakland pitcher to
give up two or more home runs in four con-
secutive starts since Mark Redman did it in
2007.He pitched well enough to keep us in
the game. We just didn’t do much offensive-
l y,” Melvin said. “He’s not pitching poor-
l y. The home runs just stand out.”
The A’s managed to rally in the ninth
when Joe Nathan walked Josh Donaldson
and allowed an infield single to Yoenis
Cespedes to start the inning. Pinch hitter
Brandon Moss grounded into a force out and
Alberto Callapso hit into a game-ending
double play.
“Personally I’m not frustrated,” A’s Coco
Crisp said. “It happens, wish it didn’t, but
it’s the way it goes.”
NOTES: Rangers RHP Matt Garza apolo-
gized for remarks he made on twitter follow-
ing Saturday’s loss. He responded in anger
to a tweet by Eric Sogard’s wife, KayCee. He
gave this statement: “All I want to say is I
let my competitive spirit cross outside the
lines, and that shouldn’t happen. I let my
passion, my fire carry over, and that’s not
how this game should be played. And for
that I apologize to the Sogards for anything
that was said through my Twitter. That’s all
I have. I regret what happened.” ... Sogard
and his wife said they have been treating it
as though it were a joke and would continue
to do so. “There’s no hard feelings,” he
said. ... RHP Dan Straily (6-5, 4.41) will
start Tuesday night in Cincinnati for the
A’s. He is on a three-game losing streak. ...
A’s C Stephen Vogt, who was hit on the top
of his head by the backswing of Jurickson
Profar Saturday, was cleared to play follow-
ing a battery of tests.
Continued from page 11
A’S
single.
“For some reason, we’ve walked too
many leadoff guys and it’s come back to
haunt us,” Bochy said.
Both of Tampa Bay’s runs in Saturday
night’s 2-1, 10-inning decision were the
results of leadoff walks.
Alex Torres (4-0) started Tampa Bay’s
bullpen parade Sunday by replacing
Roberto Hernandez with two outs in the
fifth and struck out two over 1 1-3 innings.
Jake McGee worked a perfect seventh and
Joel Peralta left Hunter Pence stranded at
second after a two-out double in the eighth
before Fernando Rodney pitched the ninth
for his 27th save.
Brandon Crawford drove in two with a
triple off Hernandez as the Giants grabbed a
3-2 lead in the fourth. Evan Longoria, mired
in an 0 for 19 slide, pulled the Rays even at
3 on a run-scoring single during the fifth.
Moscoso’s start was in place of Barry
Zito, who was moved to the bullpen. It was
his first start since last Aug. 15 while with
Colorado.
Hernandez gave up three runs and eight
hits in 4 2-3 innings for the Rays, who
have won 25 of 31.
Pence, who is hitting .393 in 16 games
since the All-Star break, is very receptive to
the idea of leading off.
“I like leading off,” he said. “I feel pretty
fast on the base paths right now and it’s fun
to lead off an inning, have a chance to spark
something. I think it would be something
to get on base in front of Scutaro and Pablo
(Sandoval) and (Buster) Posey, maybe gen-
erate some spark.”
Gregor Blanco led off twice and Andres
Torres once for the Giants in their series
against the Rays. They went 1-for-13 and
failed to produce a run.
“We’ve talked about Pence going there,”
Bochy said. “We’re at a time where it’s time
to change because they’re really going
through a tough time. We can’t get ‘em on
base.”
NOTES: The Giants pitched to a 2.94
earned run average during their 3-3 trip. ...
Crawford drove in five of the Giants’ eight
runs in the series. .... Giants RHP Ryan
Vogelsong (fractured right hand) allowed
one run and five hits over six innings for
Double-A Richmond. It hasn’t been decided
if he will need one more rehab start. ...
Giants CF Gregor Blanco tripped and went
down on a knee running back to the dugout
after grounding out in the first. ... Florida
State University baseball coach Mike
Martin threw a ceremonial first pitch. Posey
played for the Seminoles. ... The Rays are
30-12 since Myers came up from the minors
on June 18.
Continued from page 11
GIANTS
By Ronald Blum
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Alex Rodriguez will be
suspended Monday, likely through the 2014
season, as part of Major League Baseball’s
latest drug investigation but can play while
he appeals, a person familiar with the deci-
sion told the Associated Press.
Major League Baseball informed the New
York Yankees on Sunday that A-Rod will be
suspended for his links to a clinic accused of
distributing banned performance-enhancing
drugs, the person said, speaking on condi-
tion of anonymity because no statement
was authorized.
The Yankees weren’t told the exact length
of the suspension, though they were under
the impression it will be through the 2014
season, the person said. The Yankees star
could get a shorter penalty if he agrees to
give up the right to file a grievance and force
the case before an arbitrator, the person
added.
Asuspension from Monday through 2014
would add to 214 games, and an unsuccessful
appeal could stretch serving the penalty
into 2015. In the era before players and
owners agreed to a drug plan in late 2002,
arbitrators often shortened drug suspen-
sions — in the case of Yankees pitcher
Steve Howe, his penalty was cut from a life-
time ban to 119 days.
MLB planned an announcement for noon
EDT Monday, a second person familiar with
the deliberations said, also on condition of
anonymity.
Rodriguez is the most famous player
linked to the now-closed Biogenesis of
America anti-aging clinic in Florida, and
the Yankees expect him to be charged with
interfering with MLB’s
investigation, resulting
in a harsher penalty than
the other 13 players fac-
ing discipline.
Barring an agreement,
Rodriguez’s appeal would
be heard by arbitrator
Fredric Horowitz.
Adding to the drama:
The 38-year-old
Rodriguez, a three-time AL MVP, was due to
return to the major Monday night when the
Yankees play at Chicago White Sox, his
first big league appearance since hip surgery
in January.
“He’s in there, and I’m going to play
him,” Yankees manager Joe Girardi said
Sunday after New York’s 6-3 loss at San
Diego.
Yankees outfielder Curtis Granderson was
excited A-Rod could play during an appeal.
“I want him back with us. This is arguably
one of the best hitters of all-time,” he said.
“Having him in the lineup is obviously
going to be very positive for us.”
New York is a season-high 9 1/2 games
out of first place in the ALEast and 4 1/2 out
in the race for the second wild-card spot.
“We’re going to be happy to see him back
in the lineup, especially the way we’ve been
playing,” second baseman Robinson Cano
said. “He can come up and help us win some
games.”
All-Stars Nelson Cruz of Texas, Jhonny
Peralta of Detroit and Everth Cabrera of San
Diego were among those who could get 50-
game suspensions from the probe, sparked
in January when Miami New Times pub-
lished documents linking many players to
the closed clinic in Coral Gables, Fla.
A-Rod can play during
appeal of suspension
Alex Rodriguez
SPORTS 15
Monday • Aug. 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
by
Special:
4 Speakers
By Dan Gelston
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LONG POND, Pa. — Jeff Gordon
had the inside line, a lead and his
first win of the season in sight,
usually a sure thing for Pocono’s
top winner.
Kasey Kahne was about out of
time to pass his Hendrick
Motorsports teammate.
“It was either to go for it and
make it work,” Kahne said. “Or
not.”
Cruising from the outside,
Kahne got the jump he needed,
zipped past Gordon and pulled
away with two laps left Sunday to
win at Pocono Raceway.
“I about gave it away when Jeff
got by me,” Kahne said.
Kahne recovered in the No. 5
Chevrolet for his second victory
of the season, all but securing his
spot in the Chase for the Sprint
Cup championship. He had the car
to beat for the final half of the
400-mile race until a late caution
bunched up the field.
Gordon nudged past Kahne after
some thrilling two-wide racing
and seemed poised to win at
Pocono for the seventh time. After
the final caution, Kahne was sim-
ply too fast, too strong to be
denied his first win at Pocono
since 2008.
So close to the checkered, this
loss stung Gordon. Even worse,
his runner-up finish came on his
42nd birthday in his 42nd career
Pocono start.
“I thought all I needed to do was
get in here and got to the bottom
and I’d be good,” Gordon said. “He
got a killer run and blasted by on
the outside of me. Caught me by
surprise. It just kills your momen-
tum.”
Kurt Busch, who also celebrated
a birthday, Ryan Newman and Dale
Earnhardt Jr. rounded out the top
five. The top five cars were
Chevrolets.
Busch helped out Kahne with
one final push down the
frontstretch to find some needed
speed.
“That was kind of the race at that
point,” Kahne said. “Once I
cleared (Gordon) getting into two,
from there it was just, don’t make
a mistake and try to run the quick
lap on the last one.”
Kahne, Gordon and Earnhardt
made it an outstanding race for
Hendrick. Teammate and series
points leader Jimmie Johnson was
13th after a blown tire knocked
him out of the lead.
Kahne had stretched his lead to
almost 8 seconds when a caution
for debris came out with 12 laps
left. Gordon, who won at
Pocono each of the last two
years, was strong in the No. 24
and had the lead as he tried to
extend his record for career wins
at Pocono.
Matt Kenseth spun with four
laps left to erase Gordon’s lead and
set up the thrilling finish. Gordon
led again until Kahne ran him
down with a hard, sweeping run
past his teammate for the win.
Kahne holds off Gordon to win at Pocono
By Doug Ferguson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ST. ANDREWS, Scotland —
Stacy Lewis felt such a spiritual
connection with St. Andrews that
even when she was three behind
with three to play, she never lost
hope she could win the Women’s
British Open.
No way could she have scripted a
finish like this.
Facing the scariest shot and the
hardest hole on the Old Course —
the approach to the 17th, the
famous Road Hole — Lewis pic-
tured a low 5-iron that a right-to-
left wind would knock down and
allow to bounce up the slope
toward the flag
without going
over the back
of the green.
“It’s one of
those shots you
see in your
head, but you
don’t really
ever pull it
off,” Lewis
said. “And just
off the club face, it was perfect.”
The ball settled 3 feet away for
birdie, the best shot of the tourna-
ment, maybe the best of her
career.
Then, she wisely used putter
from 40 yards short of the 18th
green, through the Valley of Sin to
25 feet. Lewis bent over and
placed both hands on her knees
after making the putt, a birdie-
birdie finish that gave another
special moment at the home of
golf — her second major title.
Lewis saved her best for the final
two holes of a marathon finish
Sunday and closed with an even-
par 72 for a two-shot victory over
Na Yeon Choi and Hee Young Park.
It ended a record drought for the
Americans in the majors — 10
straight, all won by Asian play-
ers.
“It’s unbelievable,” Lewis said.
“It all happened so fast at the end.
You’re afraid for every shot, and
all of a sudden you make a couple
of birdies and it’s over. ”
It was over early for Inbee Park
and her bid to become the first pro
golfer to win four straight majors
in a single season.
Returning to the Old Course in
the morning in calm conditions to
complete 14 holes of her third
round, she couldn’t make a putt
and lost ground. Park had a 74-78
finish and wound up 14 shots
behind.
“I’m really relieved,” she said.
“I really enjoyed this week, every
moment I was here. But it’s tough
to be in the center of everything
for a week, and I feel exhausted.”
The last time Lewis was on these
hallowed grounds of golf was in
2008 for the Curtis Cup, her final
event as an amateur, and she went
5-0 in her matches to lead the
Americans to victory. The love
affair continued this week, and her
second big win at St. Andrews was
even sweeter.
“I love the golf course more
than anything. I love the history.
I almost felt like I was meant to be
here,” Lewis said. “I think I was
happy being here all week, and I
was comfortable. And I think
that’s a lot of the reason I’m here
right now. ”
Having the silver trophy at her
side also required no less than her
best golf over 36 holes Sunday.
Lewis wins Women’s British Open at St. Andrews
Dodgers win 14th straight on road, top Cubs 1-0
CHICAGO — The Los Angeles Dodgers overcame anoth-
er injury scare and extended their franchise-record road win-
ning streak to 14 games.
A.J. Ellis hit an RBI single, and Stephen Fife pitched
into the sixth inning on a day when Zack Greinke was
pushed back for rest to help the Dodgers to a 1-0 victory
over the Chicago Cubs on Sunday.
Manager Don Mattingly moved Greinke’s scheduled start
to Monday, saying he wanted to keep his starting pitchers
fresh and rested. Mattingly said there was nothing wrong
with Greinke, who will face the St. Louis Cardinals on
Monday. A day after rookie Yasiel Puig injured his thumb
trying to make a catch, another Dodgers star was hurt.
Shortstop Hanley Ramirez exited the game in the seventh
inning with a jammed right shoulder after he tumbled into
the stands catching a fly ball.
Sports brief
Stacy Lewis
16
Monday • Aug. 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 66 45 .595 —
Washington 54 57 .486 12
Philadelphia 50 60 .455 15 1/2
New York 49 60 .450 16
Miami 43 67 .391 22 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Pittsburgh 67 44 .604 —
St. Louis 65 45 .591 1 1/2
Cincinnati 61 51 .545 6 1/2
Chicago 49 62 .441 18
Milwaukee 47 64 .423 20
West Division
W L Pct GB
Los Angeles 61 49 .555 —
Arizona 56 55 .505 5 1/2
San Diego 52 60 .464 10
Colorado 52 61 .460 10 1/2
San Francisco 49 61 .445 12
Saturday’sGames
Kansas City 4, N.Y. Mets 3, 12 innings
Atlanta 5, Philadelphia 4, 12 innings
L.A. Dodgers 3, Chicago Cubs 0
Pittsburgh 5, Colorado 2
Boston 5, Arizona 2
Cleveland 4, Miami 3
Tampa Bay 2, San Francisco 1, 10 innings
Cincinnati 8, St. Louis 3
Washington 3, Milwaukee 0
N.Y.Yankees 3, San Diego 0
Sunday’sGames
Cleveland 2, Miami 0
Kansas City 6, N.Y. Mets 2
St. Louis 15, Cincinnati 2
Boston 4, Arizona 0
Pittsburgh 5, Colorado 1
Tampa Bay 4, San Francisco 3
Milwaukee 8,Washington 5
L.A. Dodgers 1, Chicago Cubs 0
San Diego 6, N.Y.Yankees 3
Atlanta at Philadelphia, late
Monday’sGames
Atlanta (Minor 11-5) at Washington (Strasburg 5-9),
4:05 p.m.
L.A.Dodgers (Greinke 8-3) at St.Louis (Wainwright
13-6), 4:05 p.m.
Milwaukee (Thornburg 1-0) at San Francisco
(Gaudin 5-2), 7:15 p.m.
Tuesday’sGames
Atlanta at Washington, 4:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Philadelphia, 4:05 p.m.
Miami at Pittsburgh, 4:05 p.m.
Colorado at N.Y. Mets, 4:10 p.m.
East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 68 45 .602 —
Tampa Bay 66 45 .595 1
Baltimore 61 51 .545 6 1/2
New York 57 53 .518 9 1/2
Toronto 51 60 .459 16
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 64 45 .587 —
Cleveland 62 49 .559 3
Kansas City 56 52 .519 7 1/2
Minnesota 48 60 .444 15 1/2
Chicago 40 69 .367 24
West Division
W L Pct GB
Oakland 64 47 .577 —
Texas 62 50 .554 2 1/2
Seattle 52 59 .468 12
Los Angeles 51 59 .464 12 1/2
Houston 36 74 .327 27 1/2
Saturday’sGames
Kansas City 4, N.Y. Mets 3, 12 innings
Oakland 4,Texas 2
Seattle 8, Baltimore 4
Detroit 3, Chicago White Sox 0
Boston 5, Arizona 2
Cleveland 4, Miami 3
Minnesota 6, Houston 4
Tampa Bay 2, San Francisco 1, 10 innings
N.Y.Yankees 3, San Diego 0
L.A. Angels 7,Toronto 3
Sunday’sGames
Detroit 3, Chicago White Sox 2, 12 innings
Cleveland 2, Miami 0
Kansas City 6, N.Y. Mets 2
Boston 4, Arizona 0
Seattle 3, Baltimore 2
Tampa Bay 4, San Francisco 3
Minnesota 3, Houston 2
Toronto 6, L.A. Angels 5
Texas 4, Oakland 0
San Diego 6, N.Y.Yankees 3
Monday’sGames
Detroit (Ani.Sanchez 9-7) at Cleveland (Kluber 7-
5), 4:05 p.m.
Boston (Lackey 7-8) at Houston (Oberholtzer 1-0),
5:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Correia 7-7) at Kansas City (Guthrie 11-
7), 5:10 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Pettitte 7-8) at Chicago White Sox
(Quintana 5-3), 5:10 p.m.
Texas (M.Perez 3-3) at L.A. Angels (Williams 5-7),
7:05 p.m.
Toronto (Dickey 8-11) at Seattle (Iwakuma 10-4),
7:10 p.m.
AMERICAN LEAGUE NATIONAL LEAGUE
EASTERNCONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
New York 11 7 5 38 36 29
Kansas City 10 7 6 36 33 24
Montreal 10 6 5 35 33 32
Philadelphia 9 7 7 34 34 32
Houston 9 6 6 33 26 21
New England 8 8 6 30 27 20
Chicago 8 9 4 28 27 31
Columbus 6 11 5 23 25 30
Toronto FC 4 10 8 20 20 29
D.C. 3 15 4 13 13 36
WESTERNCONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Real Salt Lake 11 7 5 38 38 26
Portland 8 3 11 35 32 21
Colorado 9 7 8 35 30 26
Vancouver 9 7 6 33 34 30
Los Angeles 10 9 3 33 32 27
FC Dallas 8 6 8 32 27 30
Seattle 9 7 4 31 27 22
San Jose 8 9 6 30 25 33
Chivas USA 4 13 5 17 19 39
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie.
———
Saturday’s Games
New York 3, Sporting Kansas City 2
D.C. United 3, Montreal 1
Chicago 2, Philadelphia 1
Colorado 2, Real Salt Lake 2, tie
Houston 3, Columbus 1
San Jose 2, Chivas USA 0
Seattle FC 3, FC Dallas 0
Portland 1, Vancouver 1, tie
Sunday’s Games
Toronto FC 1, New England 0
Saturday, Aug. 10
Seattle FC at Toronto FC, 4 p.m.
New York at Columbus, 4:30 p.m.
San Jose at Vancouver, 4:30 p.m.
D.C. United at Philadelphia, 5 p.m.
New England at Sporting Kansas City, 5:30 p.m.
Montreal at Chicago, 5:30 p.m.
Houston at Real Salt Lake, 6:30 p.m.
Sunday, Aug. 11
Los Angeles at FC Dallas, 5 p.m.
Colorado at Chivas USA, 8 p.m.
MLS GLANCE
8/4 8/3
Brewers
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
8/5 7/31 7/30 8/1 8/2
7/29
at Reds
4:10p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/6 7/30 7/31 8/4 8/2 8/3
8/3
@Montreal
5p.m.
8/7
@ Vancouver
4:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/10
vs.K.C.
8p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/18
@Dallas
6p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/24
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CANTON, Ohio — Rookie
Devonte Holloman’s 75-yard
interception return with a tipped
pass keyed the Dallas Cowboys’
24-20 victory over the Miami
Dolphins in the Hall of Fame game
Sunday night that opened the
NFL’s preseason.
The sixth-round pick from South
Carolina was perfectly situated
when rookie Chad Bumphis had
Matt Moore’s pass go off his
hands in the second quarter. It was
the biggest play for a Dallas
defense switching to a 4-3 align-
ment under new coordinator Monte
Kiffin.
“Man, that was exciting,”
Holloman said.
The Cowboys controlled most
of the game one night after their
former offensive lineman, Larry
Allen, and former coach, Bill
Parcells, were inducted into the
hall.
Quarterback Tony Romo, com-
ing off back surgery to remove a
cyst, sat out for Dallas. So the
Cowboys turned to their ground
game — and ground down Miami
as few regulars got onto the field.
Linebacker Hollomon sped
toward the end zone with a group
of blockers escorting him, and
after he scored he tightly clutched
the ball as he headed to the Dallas
sideline.
Coach Jason Garrett was thrilled
by the play of his youth corps.
“Any time you can give young
players and extra chance to play in
a game, they grow,” he said before
adding of Holloman’s touchdown:
“It was fantastic, a really great
play from him. We were swarming
to the football, had a lot of guys
around the quarterback, and then
the ball pops in the air and he
makes a great play and great run.”
Bumphis otherwise had a strong
game with five receptions for 85
yards.
Rookie’s INT for TD
lifts Dallas, 24-20
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LEXINGTON, Ohio — Charlie Kimball is
a diabetic. A condition the IndyCar driver
manages with a mixture of vigilance, disci-
pline and perspective.
Kind of like the way he handles the horse-
power at his fingertips.
Six years after the diagnosis that changed
his life and two-plus seasons into a career
blossoming right under his feet, the guy
who used to wonder if he’d get to do this for
a living is now a race winner.
Kimball slipped by Simon Pagenaud with
18 laps remaining then pulled away to win
the Indy 200 on Sunday at Mid-Ohio, his
triumph validation that the plan team owner
Chip Ganassi put in place when he hired
Kimball as the third driver on his powerful
team remains very much on schedule.
“The last couple years, we got the experi-
ence, we built the foundation,” Kimball
said. “As a team we’re ready to win.”
It certainly looked like it after Kimball’s
crew decided to ditch the initial strategy that
asked him to save as much fuel as he could
with his No. 83 Honda, figuring two pit
stops instead of three would be the quickest
route to victory lane.
After a few trips around the tricky 2.258-
mile circuit, Kimball knew the only way he
could win would come if he punched it.
While top qualifiers Ryan Hunter-Reay, Wi l l
Power and Scott Dixon eased off the gas to
stretch their mileage, Kimball pressed his
foot to the floor figuring he could make up
whatever precious seconds he lost by pit-
ting three times if he just kept the hammer
down.
It worked better than he imagined, pro-
pelling the 28-year-old to the top of the
podium and erasing any lingering doubts he
had about whether he belonged in North
America’s top open-
wheel series.
“Getting the win quiets
a lot of voices for sure,”
Kimball said.
“Especially the ones
within myself.”
The moment when the
goal Ganassi set out
when he brought on
Kimball three years ago
happened with less than 20 laps to go.
Kimball surrendered the lead to Simon
Pagenaud when he ducked into the pits for
the last time, then tried to erase the deficit
when Pagenaud went in for his final pit
stop.
Pagenaud managed to exit pit lane with
the lead then held off a hard-chargi ng
Kimball, sending Kimball briefly into the
grass.
The triumph only proved temporary.
Kimball remained right in Pagenaud’s
rearview and slipped by at the end of the
long straightaway nearing Turn 4 then had
little trouble the rest of the way, a move he
called “50 percent momentum and 75 per-
cent commitment.”
The remainder of the top five wasn’t in
sight as Kimball zipped by the finish line to
continue Ganassi Racing’s dominance at
arguably the most difficult road course on
the schedule. The team has now won each of
the last five visits to the 13-turn test tucked
in central Ohio.
Pagenaud held on for second while Dario
Franchitti took third. Power was fourth fol-
lowed by Hunter-Reay and series leader
Helio Castroneves.
Dixon, who was bidding to become the
first IndyCar driver since 2006 to take the
checkered flag in four straight races, never
threatened and finished seventh.
Kimball earns first
career win at Indy
Charlie Kimball
By Derrik J. Lang
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — The action-packed “2
Guns” is No. 1 at the weekend box office.
The Universal film starring Denzel
Washington and Mark Wahlberg pulled the
trigger to capture the top spot with $27.4
million, according to studio estimates
Sunday.
The picture is based on a graphic novel of
the same name and features Washington as a
DEA agent and Wahlberg as a Naval
Intelligence officer who must team up for an
undercover operation involving drug traf-
fickers and the CIA.
Nikki Rocco, head of distribution for
Universal, said “2 Guns” opened at the stu-
dio’s expectations and attributed the film’s
success to Icelandic director Baltasar
Kormakur and the first-time pairing of
Washington and Wahlberg.
“It was super casting,” she said. “There
was remarkable chemistry. The two of them
work so well together. You see it on screen.
Baltasar really gave them the energy to be
able to do what they did in this film.”
Fox’s Japan-set superhero flick “The
Wolverine” starring Hugh Jackman as the
clawed warrior scratched out the No. 2 spot
with $21.7 million in its second weekend,
bringing the Marvel icon’s total domestic
haul to $95 million. “Wolverine” earned
another $38.5 million in 67 international
territories.
“The Smurfs 2” launched in the No. 3
position with $18.2 million. While Sony’s
kid-friendly computer-generated sequel
based on the blue-hued cartoon franchise
debuted below expectations in North
America, “Smurfs 2” earned a bright $52.5
million in 43 international markets.
“It is one of those films that seems to res-
onate on every continent,” said Rory Bruer,
Sony’s president of worldwide distribution.
“We have about 36 big territories to go,
including China. They love the blue ones.”
The Warner Bros. haunted house tale “The
Conjuring” crossed the $100 million mark
at No. 4 domestically after exorcising
$13.7 million in its third weekend.
Elsewhere at the box office, Sundance
Film Festival favorite “The Spectacular
Now” starring Miles Teller and Shailene
Woodley earned $190,000 in four theaters
in its debut weekend, while “The Canyons”
made just $16,000 at two theaters, though
“Canyons” distributor IFC Films said the
erotic thriller starring Lindsay Lohan is per-
forming strongly through video-on-demand
services.
Other smaller films continued to perform
solidly at the box office, including
Sundance winner “Fruitvale Station” with
$2.7 million in 1,086 theaters and director
Woody Allen’s “Blue Jasmine” with $2 mil-
lion in 50 theaters.
“Summer is not just about blockbusters,”
said Paul Dergarabedian of box-office track-
er Hollywood.com. “It’s also about Woody
Allen. It’s about specialized films that chal-
lenge the audience — or are just different
from the traditional, cookie-cutter, summer-
style movie.”
Overall ticket sales this weekend were up
more than 15 percent over the same week-
end last summer, Dergarabedian said.
‘2 Guns’ shoots to No. 1 at box office
DATEBOOK 17
Monday • Aug. 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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REALTOR™
L
ast Friday, we held the 15th gradua-
tion ceremony for our TAILS pro-
gram. TAILS, which stands for
Transitioning Animals Into a Loving
Situation, is a unique partnership between the
Peninsula Humane Society and our local
Sheriff’s Office. We select four of five shelter
dogs at a time — dogs with various chal-
lenges keeping them from being adopted —
and they spend eight weeks in our special
program with minimum security inmates at a
Redwood City correctional facility. Inmates
with nothing but time give their time to dogs
who need nothing more than time, direction,
guidance and companionship. Martina
Contreras, who has her own wildly successful
training business, volunteers her time each
Friday to teach a class for the inmate handlers
and their dogs. Outside of class, the handlers
are responsible for homework from class,
socialization, exercise, clean-up, grooming
and overall well-being for their assigned
dogs. The results are startling. We’ve found
home for 50 of 51 dogs in three years. Now,
four more — Chispita, Violet, Flash and
Clifford — need homes. Three Chihuahuas
and a Jack Russell. The name of our program
is a bit misleading; it implies the dogs are
transitioning from a situation where they
had no love. And, this may be true, consid-
ering we don’t know much about their back-
grounds before they came to us and before
TAILS. But for most, the TAILS program is
the best eight weeks they’ve ever had. Our
biggest challenge is finding a home as good
as the one they had in jail: they were show-
ered with affection and attention from not
one, but two handlers; enjoyed many, daily
off-leash romps in the facility’s spacious
yard and “play dates” with other dogs; spent
time in a structured training class taught by
a local training star; and received countless
ear scratches and belly rubs. My advice this
week: if you want a great dog, adopt a TAILS
grad. We have four!
Scott oversees PHS/SPCA’s Customer
Service, Behavior and Training, Education,
Outreach, Field Services, Humane
Investigation, Volunteer, and Media/PR pro-
gram areas and staff.
1.“2 Guns,”$27.4 million.
2.“The Wolverine,”$21.7 million
($38.5 million international).
3.“The Smurfs 2,”$18.2 million
($52.5 million international).
4.“The Conjuring,”$13.7 million
($11.6 million international).
5.“Despicable Me 2,”$10.4 million
($13.8 million international).
6.“Grown Ups 2,”$8.1 million
($2.8 million international).
7.“Turbo,”$6.4 million
($6.9 million international).
8.“Red 2,”$5.6 million
($9.3 million international).
9.“The Heat,”$4.7 million
($6.9 million international).
10.“Pacific Rim,”$4.6 million
($53 million international).
Top 10 movies
Sand dunes engulfing
‘Star Wars’ set
PROVO, Utah — Time may be run-
ning short for hardcore “Star Wars”
fans to see the real-life set used to
portray Anakin Skywalker’s child-
hood home of Mos Espa on the
planet Tatooine.
Brigham Young University plane-
tary scientist Jani Radebaugh said
new research shows a fast-moving
sand dune is spilling onto streets of
the set in the Tunisian desert and
will eventually bury buildings.
She said the dune was measured at
20 feet tall and 300 feet wide in
2009, and it’s been moving toward
the set about 50 feet per year since
2002. Research by her and two col-
leagues was recently published in
the journal Geomorphology.
Entertainment
“2 Guns”topped the weekend box office.
18
Monday • Aug. 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
650-354-1100
ANGEL VILLARREAL
One of 440 riders, this participant in Breathe California’s 22nd Annual Bike 4 Breath event July 13 rode in memory of a loved
one affected by lung disease.Since 1908,Breathe California has been dedicated to fighting lung disease,advocating for clean
air and promoting public health in local communities.
Bike 4 Breath
TOM JUNG
Peninsula Family Service’s Senior Peer Counseling
Program celebrated 26 years of service to the
community with a July 23 luncheon and “recog-
nition event” at the Basque Cultural Center in
South San Francisco. Honorees included (left to
right) Howard Lader, former manager of the Se-
nior Peer Counseling Program; Mary Dolezal,
Volunteer,for her 10 years of service; Martha Ros-
ales,Senior Peer Counseling Volunteer,for her 15
years of service; and Peninsula Family Service Ex-
ecutive Director Arne Croce. The Senior Peer
Counseling Program provides free volunteer peer
counseling to adults 55 years and older in San
Mateo County. Services are available in English,
Spanish, Cantonese, Mandarin, and Tagalog.
26 years
of service
Birth announcements:
Stephen Dick and Lindsey Hart net t, of Menlo
Park, gave birth to a baby girl at Sequoia Hospital in
Redwood City July 21, 2013.
Carlos and Chrys t i ne Villarreal, of San Jose, gave
birth to a baby boy at Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City
July 22, 2013.
Damien Basey and Kristen Owens, of Redwood
City, gave birth to a baby girl at Sequoia Hospital in
Redwood City July 23, 2013.
Wik and Rita Dippenaar, of San Carlos, gave birth
to a baby girl at Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City July
23, 2013.
John Hatfield and Xin We i, of Stanford, gave birth
to two baby girls at Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City
July 23, 2013.
Scott and Carol yn Mezvi nsky, of Palo Alto, gave
birth to a baby boy at Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City
July 25, 2013.
Amro and Harmony Younes, of Redwood City, gave
birth to a baby girl at Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City
July 26, 2013.
Mikhail and Dina Grigorovi t c h, of Belmont, gave
birth to a baby girl at Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City
July 26, 2013.
Samuel and Molly Davis, of Half Moon Bay, gave
birth to a baby girl at Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City
July 27, 2013.
Stephen and Victoria Humphre y, of Woodside,
gave birth to a baby girl at Sequoia Hospital in Redwood
City July 28, 2013.
Christopher and Kimberly Leach, of Belmont,
gave birth to a baby girl at Sequoia Hospital in Redwood
City July 29, 2013.
Eric and Amy Newby, of Redwood City, gave birth to
a baby boy at Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City July 29,
2013.
LOCAL 19
Monday • Aug. 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The Golden Years are the best years!
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of services, giveaways, information and more!
Free Services include*
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expensive. Her press cost about $2,000 and
larger ones run anywhere from $5,000 to
$30,000, and she likes to share hers with
others since it’s very rare for kids and oth-
ers to have access to a press.
“I’m looking forward to working in new
community,” Kain said. “I’m looking to see
how the space adapts to this kind of use.
You never know what you’re going to get,
but you always get something really fantas-
tic; these kids have a lot of talent.”
Students will use a small 7-inch-by-10-
inch format. Techniques demonstrated may
include monotype, stencil, transfer and dry-
point depending on the needs of the group.
All supplies will be provided along with
instruction and guidance by Kain.
They will also use oil based inks and
Rives 100 percent rag paper and new tech-
niques will be added each week.
Kain has been a master printer for Smith-
Andersen Editions in Palo Alto for 20 years.
She also teaches printmaking at Stanford,
Santa Clara and San Jose State universities,
along with giving private workshops. She
has recently completed teaching a summer
printmaking program for children ages 12-
15 at ArtSeed.
She also currently has an exhibit running
at CSMAin Mountain View.
“I like to think of myself first and fore-
most as an artist, but more well-known as a
teacher,” Kain said.
Kain was born in Toledo, Ohio. She
moved to California at age 21 in 1979 when
she took her first print making class. She
has a bachelor’s in fine arts from San Jose
State University and a master’s from the
San Francisco Art Institute.
angela@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
PRINTER
costs, but the parties expressed some opti-
mism that an agreement could be reached to
avert a strike planned for Monday.
“The parties made some important but
incremental moves yesterday, and I hope to
get to a deal,” Josie Mooney, chief negotia-
tor for the Service Employees International
Union 1021, said Sunday before heading
into negotiations. “If the parties work very
hard, then it’s certainly possible in the
amount of time we have left.”
“There was definitely movement from
both sides,” BARTchief negotiator Thomas
Hock said as he left negotiations late
Saturday night. “Hopefully, if we keep mov-
ing, we will get to a proposal that both
sides can agree to.”
BART’s two largest unions issued a 72-
hour notice Thursday that employees would
walk off the job if they didn’t reach agree-
ment on a new contract by midnight
Sunday.
Bay Area agencies were preparing ways to
get commuters to work if there was a strike,
but officials say there’s no way to make up
for the BART system, which carries about
400,000 riders a day.
“BARTreally is the backbone of the tran-
sit network. No other transit agency has the
ability to absorb BART’s capacity if there’s
a disruption,” said John Goodwin,
spokesman for the Metropolitan
Transportation Commission.
When BART workers shut down train
service for four days in early July, roadways
were packed and commuters waited in long
lines for buses and ferries. The unions
agreed to call off that strike and extend their
contracts until Sunday while negotiations
continued.
Silicon Valley magnate
accused of assaulting wife
SAN JOSE — ASilicon Valley real estate
magnate is being accused of chaining his
pregnant wife to a bed for two days and sex-
ually assaulting her with a golf putter.
A newspaper reports 74-year-old Clyde
Berg has been charged with corporal injury
of a spouse and sexual penetration by force.
If convicted, he could be sentenced to more
than 15 years to life in prison.
Authorities say Berg was arrested last fall
after police found 37-year-old Elena Berg
bloodied and bound in the couple’s San Jose
home. He’s been released on $3 million
bail.
Berg denies the charges and claims he’s
the victim of a scam to get around a restric-
tive prenuptial agreement.
Ajudge is expected to decide this month
whether there’s enough evidence for a trial.
Continued from page 1
BART
Local brief
LOCAL 20
Monday • Aug. 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Paul Larson

MILLBRAE –
Have you ever
attended a funeral
or memorial service
and felt ill-at-ease,
uncomfortable or
awkward when
talking to the family
of the deceased? Have you ever stumbled
through your words and condolences
because you just didn’t know what to say or
how to say it? Have you even decided to not
approach the family for fear of saying the
wrong thing or making a fool of yourself? If
so you are not alone. Many people in this
situation want to provide some kind of
comfort to the immediate family, but just
don’t have the verbal tools to do so in an
assuring manner.
Learning “Funeral Etiquette” can be
useful. Using the right words at the right
time is an appropriate way to show that you
care, and in situations like this can be of
great help when provided correctly.
Standard condolences such as “I am sorry
for your loss” have become routine and
generic. A personalized phrase can be
welcomed such as “John touched many
lives” or “I will miss John”. DO NOT ask
the cause of death, offer advice or make
comments that would diminish the
importance of the loss such as “Oh, you’re
young and can marry again”.
Other ways to demonstrate your support
include: 1. Listening. The family may feel
the need to express their anxiety, and giving
them that opportunity can be therapeutic; 2.
An embrace. This can show that you care
without the need for words; 3. Offering your
services. This shows the family that you are
willing to give extra time for them: “Please
let me know if there is anything I can do to
help” (be prepared to act if needed).
Even if you don’t feel confident in
approaching the family there are other ways
to show that you care: 1. Attending the
funeral and signing the Memorial Book will
show the family that you took the time to be
there in support; 2. Dressing appropriately
for the funeral will demonstrate your efforts
to prepare for this special occasion (dark
colors are no longer a requisite for funerals,
but dressing in a coat, tie, dress or other
attire that you’d wear to any special event
are considered a way of showing you care);
3. In certain cases friends are invited to
stand up and offer BRIEF personal feelings.
Prior to the funeral write a few key notes
and reflections which will help you organize
your thoughts. Even if there is no
opportunity to speak before a group you
may have a chance to offer your thoughts to
the family following the ceremony; 4. A
personalized card or note will help you
arrange your words better and can be kept
by the family. If you don’t have their
mailing address you can send your envelope
to the funeral home and they will forward it
to the next of kin; 5. Providing flowers is a
long time tradition, or making a charitable
donation in the deceased’s memory will give
the family a strong sense of your regards; 6.
If appropriate a brief phone call can show
your immediate concern, but generally this
should be avoided to give the family the
privacy they may need.
If you ever wish to discuss cremation,
funeral matters or want to make pre-
planning arrangements please feel free to
call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF
THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650)
588-5116 and we will be happy to guide you
in a fair and helpful manner. For more info
you may also visit us on the internet at:
www.chapelofthehighlands.com.
Funeral Etiquette Advice:
Show Up, Be Brief, Listen
advertisement
MONDAY, AUG. 5
Meal Solution Mondays. New Leaf
Community Markets, 150 San
Mateo Road, Half Moon Bay.
Looking for some easy meal solu-
tion ideas? A member of the New
Leaf culinary team will provide you
with a new recipe and samples
every Monday. Free. For more infor-
mation call 650-726-3110 ext. 101.
Dance Connection with live
music by the Ron Borelli Trio. Free
dance lessons, 6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m.,
open dance 7 p.m.-9:30 p.m.,
Burlingame Woman’s Club, 241 Park
Road, Burlingame. Stripes/ polka
dots theme. $8 members, $10
guests. Free admission for male
dance hosts. Light refreshments.
For more information call 342-2221.
Master’s and Credentials
Information Forum. 6:30 p.m. to 8
p.m. Sobrato Center for Nonprofits,
350 Twin Dolphin Drive, Redwood
City. Free. For more information go
to http://info.ndnu.edu/evening-
bachelor-info-forum/.
KZVB Open Mic Features Groovy
Judy. 6:30 p.m. to 11 p.m. Hola!
Restaurant, 1015 Alameda de las
Pulgas, Belmont. All ages. Free. For
more information call 591-1735.
Carmina Burana Sing Along. 7:30
p.m. Mountain View Center for the
Performing Arts, 500 Castro St.,
Mountain View. $20.
Coastal Rep Presents ‘HAIR.’ 8
p.m. Coastal Repertory Theatre,
1167 Main St., Half Moon Bay. $27.
For more information call 569-3266
or go to www.coastalrep.com.
TUESDAY, AUG. 6
County Board of Supervisors
Kicks Off National Recovery
Month in San Mateo County. 9
a.m. 400 County Center, Redwood
City. Events are scheduled through-
out September to raise public
awareness about services for peo-
ple with mental health and/or sub-
stance use disorders. For more
information call 573-3935.
Animals in Action. 11 a.m. Come
see the animal keepers at
CuriOdyssey doing animal enrich-
ment activities, taking animals for
walks, or even doing training ses-
sions. Free with admission. The
exhibit is open Tuesdays through
Saturdays. CuriOdyssey, 1651
Coyote Point Dr., San Mateo. For
more information call 342-7755.
Andy Z. 5 p.m. Belmont Library,
1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. Sing and dance with the
silly and wonderful musician Andy
Z. For more information call 591-
8286.
2013 National Night Out
Celebration: America’s Night Out
Against Crime. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Courthouse Square, downtown
Redwood City. Music, Activities,
Information and Giveaways (from
6pm - 8pm) and fingerprinting for
children. Neighborhood Watch
materials and disaster prepared-
ness information. Free. For more
information call 780-7104.
Mark Tercek, CEO, Nature
Conservatory and Author of
‘Nature’s Fortune.’ 7 p.m. Oshman
Family JCC, 3921 Fabian Way, Palo
Alto. $12 for members and $20 for
non-members. For more informa-
tion go to https://www.common-
wealthclub.org/events/2013-08-
06/mark-tercek-how-business-and-
society-thrive-investing-nature.
WEDNESDAY, AUG. 7
JVS Peninsula Orientation and
Enrollment Session. 10 a.m. to
noon. Peninsula JCC, 800 Foster City
Blvd., Foster City. Free. For more
information email jcowan@jvs.org.
Beginning Internet. 10:30 a.m.
Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de
las Pulgas, Belmont. Learn how to
evaluate and search the Internet for
information. Free. For more infor-
mation contact conrad@smcl.org.
San Mateo Professional Alliance
Weekly Networking Lunch. Noon
to 1 p.m. Spiedo Ristorante, 223 E.
Fourth Ave., San Mateo. Free admis-
sion, but lunch is $17. For more
information call 430-6500.
The Pacific Art League at Gordon
Biersch. 6 p.m. Pacific Art League,
640 Emerson Street, Palo Alto.
Music in the Park - Pure Ecstasy. 6
p.m. to 8 p.m. Stafford Park, corner
of King Street and Hopkins Avenue,
Redwood City. Free.
Evening Bachelor’s Information
Forum. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Sobrato
Center for Nonprofits, 350 Twin
Dolphin Drive, Redwood City. Free.
For more information go to
http: //i nfo. ndnu. edu/eveni ng-
bachelor-info-forum/.
Menlo Park Summer Concert
Series: Tom Rigney and
Flambeau. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Fremont Park, Santa Cruz and
University avenues, Menlo Park.
Free. For more information go to
www.menlopark.org.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
leaves taxpayers paying the price through
slashed services, higher taxes or both.
County officials disagreed with the majori-
ty of the jury’s conclusions and recommenda-
tions.
The 10-year timeline proposed for the pen-
sion reduction coincides with the sunset of
Measure A, the county’s half-cent sales tax.
The proposal coming before the Board of
Supervisors Tuesday doesn’t directly recom-
mend using that tax revenue to prefund retire-
ment but Maltbie said tying the two together
will let the county continue programs funded
by the tax if voters do no reauthorize Measure
A.
Allocation of Measure Arevenue led to the
suggestion of making a lump sum or extra
contributions to the San Mateo County
Employees’ Retirement Association. In
response, SamCERA’s actuary returned with
five options ranging from doing nothing up
to increasingly larger contributions. Some of
the scenarios called for setting the initial $50
million and subsequent $10 million pay-
ments in a separate SamCERA account and
calculating contributions as though they had
not been made. Doing so would accelerate the
increase in the funded ratio.
The lump sum and annual payments would
come from a combination of department
reserves and excess property taxes known as
Educational Revenue Augmentation Funds.
The county expects to use a minimum of $40
million in ERAF the first year and $5 million
annually after. The county will also transfer
25 percent of its operating department
reserves. If the plan is approved, the county
would make the first payment in Spring 2014
after reimbursing itself from bond proceeds
for expenses from the new jail.
All five options, including the favored
alternative, coming before the board each
assume that the San Mateo County
Employees’ Retirement Association achieves
its 7.5 percent earnings target each year. The
estimate also excludes the Superior Court and
county Mosquito and Vector Control District
which both belong to the fund.
Maltbie’s recommendation of what he
deems the most aggressive paydown option
comes with the caveat the county retain dis-
cretion to make a smaller contribution when
other funding priorities take precedence or
the general fund reserve falls below 15 per-
cent. Reserves are currently 16.6 percent.
The Board of Supervisors meets 9 a.m.
Tuesday, Aug. 6 in Board Chambers, 400
County Government Center, Redwood City.
Continued from page 1
PENSIONS
The two batches up next focus on infrastruc-
ture, both facilities and network.
But the list also includes $35,000 to install
14 Air Blade hand dryers in some county office
rest rooms and $105,000 to purchase and
install seven electric vehicle charging sta-
tions. The maintenance costs of the hand dry-
ers is expected to be offset by not needing to
buy and stock paper towels. The charging sta-
tions will include four at the county center
available for a fee, two at the Health Campus in
San Mateo and one in the Tower Road motor
pool area.
Aside from these two sustainability proj-
ects, the Board of Supervisors will also con-
sider proposals that help the county play
catch-up on hundreds of millions of dollars in
long-deferred infrastructure needs.
The new emergency operations center pro-
posed for the current juror parking lot on the
corner of Veterans Boulevard and Middlefield
Road would move several services like dis-
patch and a sheriff’s substation into a seismi-
cally safe building. The $16.25 million price
tag includes $250,000 of new furniture but not
the cost of moving departments or providing
more juror parking.
Another $6 million is requested for a new
7,880-square-foot fire station east of Butano
Creek in Pescadero to protect it from annual
flood threats that cause mold and plumbing
backups.
The county also wants to replace the
Cordilleras Mental Health Facility but is only
seeking $250,000 now to develop a financing
plan for the 117-bed locked psychiatric facili-
t y. The building, designed for tuberculosis
patients, is falling apart and doesn’t meet cur-
rent practices of keeping the seriously mental-
ly ill in a more home-like setting than large
institution. If the replacement facility has
small buildings, it could qualify for federal
reimbursement up to 50 percent.
Although Measure Afunding is recommend-
ed for only these four projects, County
Manager John Maltbie is also asking the
supervisors to consider a list of others in the
county’s five-year facilities capital plan. The
projects include an $11 million new public
health lab, a $20 million animal shelter at
Coyote Point, $4 million annually to tackle a
backlog of deferred public works maintenance
and $15 million to renovate 455 County
Center.
On Tuesday, supervisors will also consider
enhancing its communication network system
to support more traffic and new technology
like cloud computing and public Wi-Fi access.
The existing network is “a very small road in
very poor condition” to transport all the nec-
essary technology, Maltbie wrote in a report
to the board.
Once completed, the core network speed is
projected to switch from 10G to 100G and the
number of Wi-Fi access sites go from the 50
existing spots to 300.
More than $43 million in Measure Afunds
have been tentatively approved for fiscal year
2013-2014 and $25.1 million for the year
after. Those allocations include money for
county fire vehicle replacement, universal pre-
school, summer library reading programs and
library capital needs, a coastside mobile
health clinic, homeless outreach and re-estab-
lishing a stand-alone Parks Department. The
totals also include $11.5 million for Seton
Medical Center and $10 million for the San
Mateo County Transit District.
Continued from page 1
TAX
COMICS/GAMES
8-5-13
weekend’s PUZZLe sOLVed
PreViOUs
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answers
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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5 Allow
8 Fossey pal
11 Revival cry
12 Lawman Wyatt
14 Piece of cloth
15 Enclosing boundary
17 Lennon’s wife
18 Kim of “Picnic”
19 Aerie builders
21 Smooth the way
23 Shout
24 Cramp
27 Feds (hyph.)
29 Samovar
30 Old cars, maybe (hyph.)
34 Meat go-with
37 Romaine
38 Naughty kid
39 Intimidate
41 Quartet minus one
43 Fawn’s dad
45 Pipe down (2 wds.)
47 Cry of woe
50 Jacket feature
51 Gad about
54 Tennis stroke
55 Gargantuan
56 Barely makes do
57 Airline initials
58 “— Miserables”
59 Hunt for
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1 Mortarboard
2 Bad sign
3 Despot who fddled
4 Cutlery
5 Mild onions
6 Consume
7 Family diagram
8 On — — (lucky)
9 Jury
10 Id companions
13 Said the rosary
16 Polite address
20 Heredity unit
22 White herons
24 Have dinner
25 Debate side
26 “A Bug’s Life” hero
28 More, in Madrid
30 — — fault
31 Hosp. area
32 — compos mentis
33 Concorde, e.g.
35 Not much (2 wds.)
36 Slop holder
39 Painter Salvador —
40 Tequila cacti
41 Pitch
42 Cuban dance
44 Fables
45 Ocean mineral
46 Newman or McCartney
48 Birthday treat
49 Trouser part
52 Not sm. or med.
53 For shame!
diLBerT® CrOsswOrd PUZZLe
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MOndaY, aUGUsT 5, 2013
LeO (July 23-Aug. 22)–A disagreement with either a
family member or a good friend needs to be settled
as speedily as possible. If fences aren’t mended
quickly, a small rift could get much worse.
VirGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)–If someone recently did
something that you resent and you’re still holding
a grudge, you need to get over it. You need to let
bygones be bygones and move on.
LiBra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)–This is an especially good
day to review how much time and money you’ve been
spending on inessential items and activities. Once you
identify the waste, you’ll fnd ways to weed it out.
sCOrPiO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)–Objectives you set for
yourself might not be easy to reach. If you’re aware
of this fact from the get-go, you won’t be inclined to
quit the moment things get rough.
saGiTTariUs (Nov. 23-Dec. 21)–You might have too
many doubts for your own good. Being cautious is
one thing, but just being negative is detrimental and
prohibits progress.
CaPriCOrn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)–Don’t overlook or
ignore an old fnancial obligation to a friend just
because he or she is a pal. The quickest way to end
the relationship is to fail to do what you promised.
aQUariUs (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)–If at all possible, avoid
friends who tend to be pessimistic. Sadly, they will
have a negative effect on your outlook and end up
putting a damper on your day.
PisCes (Feb. 20-March 20)–Your way of doing
things is likely to turn insignifcant tasks into major
undertakings. Do your best to plan your moves in
advance before you swing the hammer.
aries (March 21-April 19)–Don’t waste time
worrying about things that have little chance of
happening. If you want to succeed, concentrate on
your goals and not on nonexistent problems.
TaUrUs (April 20-May 20)–If things go wrong in your
household today, don’t try to pin the blame on any one
person; view the entire picture. It usually takes more
than one cause to make things go askew.
GeMini (May 21-June 20)–Stick to the facts if
you’re trying to promote something special. The
worst thing you could do would be to embellish your
wares. Your deception will quickly be discovered.
CanCer (June 21-July 22)–If you need to make a
purchase of fnancial consequence today, be certain
that you’re getting exactly what you want. Don’t
let yourself be saddled with something that’s not
perfect.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Monday • Aug. 5, 2013 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Monday • Aug. 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
Employment Services
110 Employment
EXPERIENCED PIZZA Maker, Eve-
nings, Avanti Pizza, (650)508-1000 2040
Ralston Ave. Belmont
CAREGIVERS
NEEDED
Hourly and Live In
Sign on bonus
650-458-0356
recruiter@homecarecal.com
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
110 Employment
BIOTECHNOLOGY
GILEAD Sciences, Inc., a biopharma-
ceutical company, has openings in Fos-
ter City, CA for Associate Director, Clini-
cal Research (CRD03): provide high lev-
el and complex scientific and clinical
guidance to Clinical Trials Management,
Biometrics, Global Drug Safety, Regula-
tory and Project Management staff to
meet project deliverables and timelines;
Manager, Regulatory\ Affairs (MRA01):
prepare moderately complex regulatory
submissions which require interaction
with departments outside of Regulatory
Affairs for investigational and commercial
products for assigned territories in line
with ICH requirements, regional require-
ments and scientific and company poli-
cies and procedures; Research Scientist
II, Biology (RS04): conduct scientific re-
search for the discovery of drugs, the de-
velopment of drug candidates or the re-
search support of marketed drugs; and
Sr. Analyst Business Analytics (SA13):
provide routine analysis of data relating
to a specific area of concentration. If in-
terested, please reference code and
send resume to Gilead, Attn: HR, #CM-
0819, 333 Lakeside Dr. Foster City, CA
94404.
CAREGIVERS, HHA,
CNA’S
needed immediately.
Please apply in person at:
15 N. Ellsworth Avenue,
Suite 200, San Mateo, CA
or call (650)206-5200
CUSTOMER SERVICE/
SEAMSTRESS -
YOU ARE INVITED
Are you:
Dependable
Friendly
Detail Oriented
Willing to learn new skills
Do you have:
Good English skills
A Desire for steady employment
A desire for emplployment benefits
Sewiing skills
If the above items describe you,
please call (650)342-6978.
Immediate opening available for
Customer Service/Seamstress.
Call for appointment.
Crystal Cleaning Center
San Mateo CA, 94402
EMBROIDERY MACHINE OPERATOR,
Full time, busy Burlingame uniform and
advertising. Near public transportation.
Experience preferred.
Call (650)697-7550
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
110 Employment
RESTAURANT -
Now hiring for Quick Service / Counter
Service positions. Apply in person at
753 Laurel Street, San Carlos
RETAIL -
What if you found opportunity right in
your neighborhood? Choice. Ad-
vancement. Excitement. FULFILLED.
There’s a way. At Walgreens, our
stores offer you numerous and varied
career paths. From beauty advisor to
management trainee and photo tech
to opportunities in Pharmacy, we de-
pend on our team members to be the
face of Walgreens. In return, each job
offers you the potential for growth and
a clear path to advancement – both
within the store environment and be-
yond. It’s a diverse atmosphere in
which you’ll find supportive co-work-
ers, a positive environment and the
tools you need to pursue your inter-
ests and grow your skills.
We are currently hiring for part time
and full time positions for Daly City,
San Mateo, Palo Alto, Mountain View
and the general Peninsula area
stores. To apply, visit www.wal-
greens.jobs.
Walgreens is an Equal Opportunity
Employer and welcomes individuals of
diverse talent and backgrounds. Wal-
greens promotes and supports a
smoke-free and drug-free workplace.
Walgreens. There’s a way.
RETAIL JEWELRY
SALES
Start up to $13.
Experience up to $20.
Benefits-Bonus-No Nights!
(650)367-6500 FX 367-6400
jobs@jewleryexchange.com
TAXI DRIVER
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
Clean DMV and background. All shifts
available. Call (650)703-8654
UBER AND Limo and Taxi Driver
Wanted, Living from San Mateo to San
Jose making $600 to $900 a week,
Fulltime, (650)766-9878
23 Monday • Aug. 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 522735
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Petranka Ivanova Gidikova
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Petranka Ivanova Gidikova
filed a petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Petranka Ivanova Gidiko-
va
Proposed name: Petra Ivanova Gidikova
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on September
11, 2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J,
at 400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 07/31/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 07/23/2013
(Published, 08/05/13, 08/12/2013,
08/19/2013, 08/26/2013)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257016
The following person is doing business
as: J’s Beauty Salon, 191 87th St., DALY
CITY, CA 94015 is hereby registered by
the following owners: Rijo Min Wu, 661
Sierra Point Rd., Brisbane, CA 94005
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
08/01/2013.
/s/ Mamie Zhu /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/01/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/03/13, 08/10/13, 08/17/13, 08/24/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256968
The following person is doing business
as: Happy Hearts Child Care/Pre-School,
115 Stanley Rd., BURLINGAME, CA
94010 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Peter Kozaczuk, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
04/02/2013.
/s/ Peter Kozaczuk /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/30/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/05/13, 08/12/13, 08/19/13, 08/26/13).
203 Public Notices
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE
TS No. 12-0070696
Title Order No. 09-8-345127
APN No. 034-332-100
YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A
DEED OF TRUST, DATED 03/14/2007.
UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PRO-
TECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE
SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU
NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NA-
TURE OF THE PROCEEDING
AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CON-
TACT A LAWYER. Notice is hereby giv-
en that RECONTRUST COMPANY,
N.A., as duly appointed trustee pursuant
to the Deed of Trust executed by MI-
CHAEL B GUESS AND FELICITAS
SOLZER-GUESS, HUSBAND AND
WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS, dated
03/14/2007 and recorded 3/21/2007, as
Instrument No. 2007-042603, in Book
N/A, Page N/A, of Official Records in the
office of the County Recorder of San Ma-
teo County, State of California, will sell
on 08/20/2013 at 1:00PM, San Mateo
Events Center 2495 S. Delaware Street
Auction.com Room San Mateo CA 94403
at public auction, to the highest bidder for
cash or check as described below, paya-
ble in full at time of sale, all right, title,
and interest conveyed to and now held
by it under said Deed of Trust, in the
property situated in said County and
State and as more fully described in the
above referenced Deed of Trust. The
street address and other common desig-
nation, if any, of the real property descri-
bed above is purported to be: 715
FOOTHILL DRIVE, SAN MATEO, CA,
944023319. The undersigned Trustee
disclaims any liability for any incorrect-
ness of the street address and other
common designation, if any, shown here-
in. The total amount of the unpaid bal-
ance with interest thereon of the obliga-
tion secured by the property to be sold
plus reasonable estimated costs, ex-
penses and advances at the time of the
initial publication of the Notice of Sale is
$1,040,918.19. It is possible that at the
time of sale the opening bid may be less
than the total indebtedness due. In addi-
tion to cash, the Trustee will accept
cashier's checks drawn on a state or na-
tional bank, a check drawn by a state or
federal credit union, or a check drawn by
a state or federal savings and loan asso-
ciation, savings association, or savings
bank specified in Section 5102 of the Fi-
nancial Code and authorized to do busi-
ness in this state. Said sale will be made,
in an ''AS IS'' condition, but without cove-
nant or warranty, express or implied, re-
garding title, possession or encumbran-
ces, to satisfy the indebtedness secured
by said Deed of Trust, advances there-
under, with interest as provided, and the
unpaid principal of the Note secured by
said Deed of Trust with interest thereon
as provided in said Note, plus fees,
charges and expenses of the Trustee
and of the trusts created by said Deed of
Trust. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BID-
DERS If you are considering bidding on
this property lien, you should understand
that there are risks involved in bidding at
a trustee auction. You will be bidding on
a lien, not on a property itself. Placing
the highest bid at a trustee auction does
not automatically entitle you to free and
clear ownership of the property. You
should also be aware that the lien being
auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you
are the highest bidder at the auction, you
are or may be responsible for paying off
all liens senior to the lien being auctioned
off, before you can receive clear title to
203 Public Notices
the property. You are encouraged to in-
vestigate the existence, priority, and size
of outstanding liens that may exist on this
property by contacting the county record-
er's office or a title insurance company,
either of which may charge you a fee for
this information. If you consult either of
these resources, you should be aware
that the lender may hold more than one
mortgage or deed of trust on the proper-
ty. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER
The sale date shown on this notice of
sale may be postponed one or more
times by the mortgagee, beneficiary,
trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section
2924g of the California Civil Code. The
law requires that information about trust-
ee sale postponements be made availa-
ble to you and to the public, as a courte-
sy to those not present at the sale. If you
wish to learn whether your sale date has
been postponed, and, if applicable, the
rescheduled time and date for the sale of
this property, you may call 1-800-281-
8219 or visit this Internet Web site
www.recontrustco.com, using the file
number assigned to this case 12-
0070696. Information about postpone-
ments that are very short in duration or
that occur close in time to the scheduled
sale may not immediately be reflected in
the telephone information or on the Inter-
net Web site. The best way to verify
postponement information is to attend
the scheduled sale. DATED:
11/11/2012 RECONTRUST COMPANY,
N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-
01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063
Phone/Sale Information: (800) 281-8219
By: Trustee's Sale Officer RECON-
TRUST COMPANY, N.A. is a debt col-
lector attempting to collect a debt. Any
information obtained will be used for that
purpose. FEI # 1006.171092 7/22, 7/29,
8/05/2013
210 Lost & Found
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Cente, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST JORDANIAN PASSPORT AND
GREEN CARD. Lost in Daly City, If
found contact, Mohammad Al-Najjar
(415)466-5699
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
210 Lost & Found
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
SOLID OAK CRIB - Excellent condition
with Simmons mattress, SOLD!
296 Appliances
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
JENN-AIR 30” downdraft slide-in range.
JES9800AAS, $875., never used, still in
the crate. Cost $2200 new.
(650)207-4664
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25.SOLD!
PRESSURE COOKER Miromatic 4qt
needs gasket 415 333-8540 Daly City
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor,
(650)726-1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call (650)591-3313
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
298 Collectibles
"OLD" IRON COFFEE GRINDER - $75.,
(650)596-0513
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
1940 VINTAGE telephone guaranty
bench Salem hardrock maple excellent
condition $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
1990’S UPPER DECK LIFESIZE CUT-
OUTS - Aikman, Marino, Jordan, $20.
each, (650)701-0276
84 USED European (34) and U.S. (50)
Postage Stamps. Most issued before
World War II. All different and all detach-
ed from envelopes. $4.00, 650-787-
8600
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
$100., (650)348-6428
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
AUTOGRAPHED GUMBI collectible art
& Gloria Clokey - $35., (650)873-8167
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
CHINESE STAMPS - (90) all different,
early 20th century, $6.for all, SOLD!
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JAPANESE MOTIF end table, $99
(650)520-9366
298 Collectibles
JAPANESE MOTIF end table, $99
(650)520-9366
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MENORAH - Antique Jewish tree of life,
10”W x 30”H, $100., (650)348-6428
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
SILVER PEACE dollar circulated $30
firm 415 333-8540 Daly City
TATTOO ARTIST - Norman Rockwell
figurine, limited addition, $99., (650)766-
3024
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
VINTAGE 1970S Grecian Made Size 6-7
Dresses $35 each, Royal Pink 1980s
Ruffled Dress size 7ish $30, 1880s Re-
production White Lace Gown $150 Size
6-7 Petite, (650)873-8167
VINTAGE BLOW torch-turner brass
work $35 (650)341-8342
WORLD WAR II US Army Combat field
backpack from 1944 $99 (650)341-8342
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
BARBIE BLUE CONVERTIBLE plus ac-
ccessories, excellent shape, $45.,
(650)344-6565
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertable
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE OAK SCHOOL DESK - with
ink well, pencil holder and under seat
book shelf, great for a childs room or of-
fice, $48., (650)574-4439
ANTIQUE STOVE, Brown brand, 30",
perfect condition, SOLD!
ANTIQUE WALNUT Hall Tree, $800 obo
(650)375-8021
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” high, 40” wide, 3 drawers, Display
case, bevelled glass, $500
(650)766-3024
VINTAGE THOMASVILLE wingback
chair $50 firm, SSF SOLD!
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $20 each or both for $35 nice set.
SSF SOLD!
303 Electronics
2 MP3 multi media player new in box
(both) for $20 (650)726-1037
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
HP PRINTER - Model DJ1000, new, in
box, $38. obo, (650)995-0012
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
1 COFFEE table - 15" high x 24" wide x
50 1/2 " long. Dk walnut with 3 sections
of glass inset. SOLD!
1940 MAHOGANY desk 34" by 72" 6
drawers center drawer locks all. with 3/8"
clear glass top $70 OBO (650)315-5902
2 END tables - 18" x 21" Dk brown wood
with glass tops & open bottoms. SOLD!
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 LAMPS. 25" high. Cream ceramic With
white shades. SOLD!
2 PLANT stands $80 for both
(650)375-8021
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
7 FOOT couch with recliners & massag-
ers on ends. Brown. $100., SOLD!
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CABINET BLOND Wood, 6 drawers, 31”
Tall, 61” wide, 18” deep, $45
(650)592-2648
CHAIR (2), with arms, Italian 1988 Cha-
teau D'Ax, solid, perfect condition. $50
each or $85 for both. (650)591-0063
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet with 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
COPENHAGEN TEAK DINING TABLE
with dual 20" Dutch leaves extensions.
48/88" long x 32" wide x 30" high.
SOLD!
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER - 6 draw dresser 61" wide,
31" high, & 18" deep $50., (650)592-
2648
DRESSER - all wood, excellent condition
$50 obo (650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
GLASS DINING Table 41” x 45” Round-
ed rectangle clear glass top and base
$85 (650)888-0129
GLIDE ROCKER with foot stool. Dk
brown walnut with brown cushions. $75.,
SOLD!
GRANDMA ROCKING CHAIR - beauti-
ful white with gold trim, $100.,
(650)755-9833
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
INDOOR OR OUTSIDE ROUND TABLE
- off white, 40”, SOLD!
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 medal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MATCHING RECLINER, SOFA & LOVE
SEAT - Light multi-colored fabric, $95.
for all, (650)286-1357
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
NATURAL WOOD table 8' by 4' $99
(650)515-2605
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
ORGAN BENCH $40 (650)375-8021
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
24
Monday • Aug. 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Abbr. on old
Eurasian maps
4 Video game area
10 Dashboard
gauge, briefly
14 Green org. with a
floral logo
15 Honeybunch
16 Scandinavian
capital that uses
garbage to
generate energy
17 Stephen Colbert
asset
18 Funny bits you
need to see
20 Bangkok native
22 T-shirt size array,
briefly
23 Online finance
company
24 Building blocks of
matter
25 Cheerios grain
27 Prefix with verse
28 Personal
assessments of
worth
33 Eisenhower and
Turner
34 Tolkien monster
35 Post- opposite
36 Arnaz of
Hollywood
37 “I give up!”
39 H.S. exam
43 Gov. Cuomo’s
domain
45 Inner tube filler
46 Nobelist Morrison
47 V8 Spicy Hot, e.g.
51 Animation frame
52 Govt.-issued ID
53 Often-pressed
key
54 Negative particle
56 Former NBAer __
Ming
59 Tapped barrels
60 Music channel
host whose
abbreviation hints
at this puzzle’s
theme
63 Cooperstown Hall
of Famer Mel
65 Sealed, as a win
66 “Man of the
House” author Tip
67 Division of history
68 Subtraction word
69 “Stop dreaming!”
70 Roget entry:
Abbr.
DOWN
1 Attach a button,
say
2 Bit of physical
comedy with a
sprayed
beverage
3 Entry points for
some rodent
nests
4 Provide counsel
to
5 Portuguese king
6 Pop’s Mama
7 Calla lily family
8 Conversation in a
screenplay
9 Cooked sushi fish
10 Hammer or saw
11 Invite to dinner,
e.g.
12 Spruces up
13 Egypt’s Mubarak
19 Yankee shortstop
Derek
21 Funny
24 Enthusiastic
26 Electric current
unit
29 Knight games
30 Decorative vase
31 1983 Mr. T film
32 Planet farthest
from the Sun, now
38 “__ Abner”
40 “C’est la vie”
41 Family tree
subject
42 Bleacher part
44 Simple question
type
47 Grand Canal city
48 Slurs over
49 “I wouldn’t do this
for just __”
50 Hyde was his
alter ego
51 Raise petty
objections
55 Weighty Brit.
references
57 Masterful server
58 Dust Bowl
migrant
61 LinkedIn listing
62 She, in Lisbon
64 Beachgoer’s
goal
By C.C. Burnikel
(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
08/05/13
08/05/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
304 Furniture
PATIO TABLE , UMBRELLA & 6
CHAIRS - metal/vinyl, $35.,
SOLD!
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41” in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RECLINING CHAIR, almost new, Beige
$100 (650)624-9880
ROCKING CHAIR & HASSOCK - light
wood, gold cushions. SOLD!
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden, with
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR with wood carving,
armrest, rollers, and it swivels $99.,
(650)592-2648
SHELVING UNIT interior metal and
glass nice condition $70 obo
(650)589-8348
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 (650)322-2814
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
SWIVEL CHAIR - dark blue leather, very
comfortable, good condition, bought for
$900., sell for $80.obo, (650)345-5502
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
WICKER ENTERTAINMENT CABINET -
H 78” x 43” x 16”, almost new, $89.,
(650)347-9920
306 Housewares
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, (650)595-3933
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
8 PLACE setting 40 piece Stoneware
Heartland pattern never used microwave
and oven proof $50 (650)755-9833
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
FIREPLACE SET - 3 piece fireplace set
with screen $25 (650)322-2814
ICE CREAM MAKER - Westbend 4 qt.
old fashion ice cream maker, brand new,
still in box, $30., (650)726-1037
JAPANESE SERVER unused in box, 2
porcelain cups and carafe for serving tea
or sake. $8.00, (650)578-9208
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good con-
dition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
TWO 21 quart canning pots, with lids, $5
each. (650)322-2814
VINTAGE LAZY susan collectable excel-
lent condition $25 (650)755-9833
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
WATCHES - Quicksilver (2), brand new
in box, $40. for both, (650)726-1037
308 Tools
1/2 HORSE power 8" worm drive skill
saw $40 OBO SOLD!
10" BAN SAW- SOLD!
6-8 MISC. TOOLS - used, nail tray with
nails, $15., (650)322-2814
308 Tools
12-VOLT, 2-TON Capacity Scissor Jack
w/ Impact Wrench, New in Box, Never
Used. $85.00 (650) 270-6637 after 5pm
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CIRCULAR SAW-BLACK & DECKER -
2 1/8 hp. 7 1/4 inch blade. Good condi-
tion. Extra blades. $20., (650)654-9252
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTMANS PROFESSIONAL car buf-
fer with case $40 OBO SOLD!
CRAFTSMAN 1 1/2 HP ROUTER & TA-
BLE - Excellent condition, case, acces-
sories & extra cutters included. $60.,
(650)654-9252
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 3D SANDER - Brand new
never used-still in box. Great for sanding
furniture or round surfaces. Extra sand-
ing disks. $25., (650)654-9252
CRAFTSMAN 3X21" BELT SANDER - 1
hp w/ dust bag. $50., (650)654-9252
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
ELECTRIC HEDGE trimmer good condi-
tion (Black Decker) $40 (650)342-6345
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
MAKITA 21" belt sander $35 also 10
boxes of belt make offer, 650)315-5902
NEW DRILL DRIVER - 18V + battery &
charger, $30., (650)595-3933
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
SMALL ROTETILLER 115 Volt Works
well, SOLD!
308 Tools
RYOBI DETAIL SANDER - Pointed tip
can sand small area, good for
furniture/chairs, good condition, $25.,
(650)654-9252
TORO ELECTRIC POWER SWEEPER
blower - never used, in box, SOLD!
309 Office Equipment
COPIER - Brother BCP7040, Laser(black
& white), printer & fax machine, $35.,
(650)212-7020
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
SAFE - Sentry Fireproof, new, black,
15” x 16” x 18”, capacity 1.7CF, pur-
chased for $400., will sell for $195.,
(650)464-0042
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
2 GALLON Sprayer sears polythene
compressed air 2 1/2 inch opening, used
once $10 San Bruno (650)588-1946
3 LARGE old brown mixing bowls $75
for all 3 (650)375-8021
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History,
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
5 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $9. for all
(650)347-5104
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
AIR CONDITIONER - Window mount,
SOLD!
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ALOE VERA PLANTS - (30) medicine
plant, $3.00 each, (650)678-1989
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99., (650)580-
3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99., (650)580-
3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN - (7) Olde Brooklyn
lanterns, battery operated, safe, new in
box, $100. for all, (650)726-1037
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
ASTRONOMY BOOKS (2) Hard Cover
Cambridge Encyclopedia of Astronomy,
World of Discovery, $12., (650)578-9208
BACKPACK- Unused, blue, many pock-
ets, zippers, use handle or arm straps
$14., (650)578-9208
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BASS PRO SPOTLIGHT - (2) one mil-
lion candlelight, new in box, $100 for
both, (650)726-1037
BATHROOM VANITY light fixture - 2
frosted glass shades, brass finish, 14”W
x 8.75”H x 8.75”D, wall mount, $40,
(650)347-5104
BATHROOM VANITY light fixture - 2
frosted glass shades, brass finish, 14”W
x 8.75”H x 8.75”D, wall mount, $40,
(650)347-5104
BAY BRIDGE Framed 50th anniversary
poster (by Bechtel corp) $50
(650)873-4030
BELL COLLECTION 50 plus asking $50
for entire collection SOLD!
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BUBBLE GUM MACHINE - Commercial,
$50., (650)726-1037
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
310 Misc. For Sale
COLEMAN ICE CHEST - 80 quart, $20.,
(650)345-3840
COPPER LIKE TUB - unused, 16 inches
long, 6 in. high, 8 inch wide, OK tabletop-
per, display, chills beverages. $10.,
(650)578-9208
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 (650)375-1550
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
GOOD HEALTH FACT BOOK - un-
used, answers to get/stay healthy, hard
cover, 480 pages, $8., (650)578-9208
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HUMAN HAIR Wigs, (4) Black hair, $90
all (650)624-9880
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15., (650)345-
3840
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX - for dogs 21-55 lbs.,
repels and kills fleas and ticks. 9 months
worth, $60., (650)343-4461
KIRBY COMBO Shampooer/ Vacuum/
attachments. "Ultimate G Diamond
Model",SOLD!
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $10., (650)347-5104
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $10., (650)347-5104
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide in wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
LAUNDRY SORTER - on wheels, triple
section, laundry sorter - $19., (650)347-
9920
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
MATCHING LIGHT SCONCES - style
wall mount, plug in, bronze finish, 12” L x
5”W , $12. both, (650)347-5104
MATCHING LIGHT SCONCES - style
wall mount, plug in, bronze finish, 12” L x
5”W , $12. both, (650)347-5104
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MEN’S LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.(650)322-2814
MICHAEL CREIGHTON HARDBACK
BOOKS - 3 @ $3. each, (650)341-1861
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW COWBOY BOOTS - 9D, Unworn,
black, fancy, only $85., (650)595-3933
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
NIKE RESISTANCE ROPE - unopened
box, get in shape, medium resistance,
long length, $8., (650)578-9208
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OUTDOOR GREENHOUSE. Handmade.
Ideal for Apartment balconies. 33" wide x
20 inches deep. 64.5 " high. $70.00
SSF, (650)871-7200
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PRINCESS CRYSTAL glasswear set
$50 (650)342-8436
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
PUZZLES - 22-1,000 pc puzzles, $2.50
each, (650)596-0513
RALPH LAUREN TWIN SIZE COM-
FORTER - sheets & bedskirt, blue/white
pattern, perfect condition, $60., SOLD!
310 Misc. For Sale
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
RN NURSING TEXTBOOKS & CD un-
opened, “Calculate with Confidence”, 4th
edition, like new, $25., (650)345-3277
RN NURSING TEXTBOOKS - “Human
Physiology Mechanisms of Disease”, 6th
edition, $15., and “Pathphysiology Bio-
logic Basics”, 4th edition, $25., (650)345-
3277
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SAFETY SHOES - Iron Age, Mens steel
toe metatarfal work boots, brown, size 10
1/2, in box, $50., (650)594-1494
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
SLIDE PROJECTOR - Airequipt Super-
ba 66A slide projector and screen.
$50.00 for all. (650)345-3840
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
STAINED GLASS panels multi colors
beautiful work 35" long 111/2" wide $79
OBO (650)349-6059
STAINED GLASS,
28”x30” Japanese geisha motif, multi
colored, beautiful. $200 (650)520-9366
STAINED GLASS,
28”x30” Japanese geisha motif, multi
colored, beautiful. $200 (650)520-9366
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TOM CLANCY HARDBACK BOOKS - 7
@ $3.00 each, (650)341-1861
“UP STAIRS DOWN STAIRS” - first two
years, 14 videos in box, $30 for all,
(650)286-9171
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VHS MOVIES and DVD's. (20) Old to
current releases. $2 per movie. Your
choice. South San Francisco
(650) 871-7200
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WEATHER STATION, temp., barometer
and humidity, only $10 (650)595-3933
311 Musical Instruments
GUITAR FOR sale. Fender Accoustic,
with case. $89.00 SOLD!
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
MARTIN GUITAR 1971 D-18S Great
shape, Great sound. Price reduced to
$1200. SOLD!
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
100% COTTON New Beautiful burgundy
velvet drape 82"X52" W/6"hems: $45
(415)585-3622
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
COAT - Dressy ladies short trench coat,
red, brand new, weather proof, light-
weight, size 6/8, $25.,(650)345-3277
DINGO WESTERN BOOTS - (like new)
$60., (408)764-6142
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
INDIAN SARI $50 (650)515-2605
IONIC BREEZE quadra, Sharper Image,
3 level silent air purifier. 27”h, energy
saver, original box with video. Excellent
condition. $77. (650)347-5104
25 Monday • Aug. 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
316 Clothes
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
LEVIS JACKET - size XXL, Beautiful
cond., med., $35., (650)595-3933
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, beauitful color, megenta, with
shawl like new $40 obo (650)349-6059
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
WHITE LACE 1880’s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
brand new, never worn for $25
(650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
(2) 50 lb. bags Ultra Flex/RS, new, rapid
setting tile mortar with polymer, SOLD!
150 COPPER spades for #6 strand.
Copper wire. $50.00 for all.
(650)345-3840
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all,
(650)851-0878
ELECTRICAL MATERIAL - Connectors,
couplings, switches, rain tight flex, and
more.Call. $50.00 for all (650)345-3840
PACKAGED NUTS, Bolts and screws,
all sizes, packaged $99 (650)364-1374
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
PVC SCHEDULE 80 connectors and
coupling. 100 pieces in all. $30.00 for all
(650)345-3840
STEEL MORTAR BOX - 3 x 6, used for
hand mixing concrete or cement, $35.,
(650)368-0748
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
FISHERS MENS skis $35 (650)322-2814
318 Sports Equipment
4 TENNIS RACKETS- and 2 racketball
rackets(head).SOLD!
AB-BUSTER as seen on T.V. was $100,
now $45., (650)596-0513
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF CLUB Cleveland Launcher Gold,
22 degrees, SOLD!
KELTY SUPER TIOGA BACKPACK -
$40., (650)552-9436
LADIES BOWLING SET- 8 lb. ball, 7 1/2
sized shoes, case, $50., (650)766-3024
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
ROLLER SKATES - Barely used, mens
size 13, boots attached to 8 wheels, $85.
obo, (650)223-7187
ROWING MACHINE - SOLD!
STATIONARY EXERCISE BICYCLE -
Compact, excellent condition, $40. obo,
(650)834-2583
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
TENT - one man packable tent - $20.,
SOLD!
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
THULE SKI RACK - holds 3 pairs, $85.,
(650)594-1494
TREADMILL EXERCISE- Pro Form 415
Crosswalk, very good condition $100 call
(650)266-8025
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
VOLKI SNOW SKIS - $40.,
(408)764-6142
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTMAN 5.5 HP gas lawn mower
with rear bag $55., (650)355-2996
LAWN MOWER - 48 volt Craftman elec-
tric lawn mower, SOLD!
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $65.,
(650)342-8436
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
SHOWER CHAIR, WALKER, WHEEL-
CHAIR, POTTY - $25. each obo,
(650)766-9998
SLEEP APNEA breathing machine com-
plete in box helps you breathe, costs $$$
sacrifice for $75, (650)995-0012
WALKER - $25., brand new, tag still on,
(650)594-1494
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650)595-0805
ONE BEDROOM APARTMENT - $1250.
month, $800. deposit, close to Downtown
RWC, Call (650)361-1200
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
ACURA ‘97 - 3.0 CL CP, Black, Auto-
matic, $2800., (650)630-3216
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 2,000
Good Condition (650)481-5296
620 Automobiles
2000 DODGE Durango SLT SUV with
156k miles nice full size and room for 7
people 4 wheel drive auto third row seat
#5034 on sale for $3995.00 plus fees.
www.autotradecentercars.com.
(650)637-3900
2000 INFINITI QX4 SUV with 187k miles
major recent service done; in excellent
condition great 4 wheel drive automatic
#4445-1 comes with all factory options
must see on sale for $4995.00 plus
fees.(650)637-3900
2001 AUDI A4 Avanti Wagon with 127k
miles allwheel drive V6 loaded extra nice
sports wagon clean Car Fax priced to
sell #4441 more info www.autotradecen-
tercars.com for $6500.00 plus fees.
(650)637-3900
2002 CHRYSLER PT Cruiser Limited
with121k miles in excellent conditions
loaded with clean Car Fax leather &
moon roof #4515 hard to find www.au-
totradecentercars.com on sale for
$4995.00 plus fees.(650)637-3900
2002 TOYOTA Celica GT Liftback with
140k miles in exellent conditions 5 speed
manual with very nice body kit moon roof
& much more hard to find in this condi-
tion #4524 on sale for $8000.00 plus
fees., (650)637-3900
2003 AUDI A6 Quarto sedan with 90k
miles excellent conditions clean Car Fax
great sport sedan automatic & loaded.
#4424 more info www.autotradecenter-
cars.com on sale for $7995.00 plus fees.
(650)637-3900
2003 FORD Mustang GT Convertible
with 102k miles automatic with power top
clean Car Fax nice stereo #5031 on sale
for quick sale
www.autotradecentercars.com asking
$7995.00 plus fees.(650)637-3900
2004 CHEVY MALIBU Classic sedan
with only 87k miles 4 door automatic
power package Clean Car fax #4437 on
sale for $5850.OO plus fees.www.auto-
tradecentercars.com. , (650)637-3900
2005 TOYOTA Sienna XLE All wheel
drive Minivan with 119k miles clean Car
Fax & loaded more info and pictures on-
line at www.autotradecentercars.com
#4503 on sale for $12995.00 plus
fees.(650)637-3900
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY 1998 Monte Carlo 59,000 Miles
$5,000, Call Glen @ (650) 583-1242
Ext. # 2
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
OLDSMOBIL”79Royal Delta 88, 122k
Miles, in excellent Condition $1,500
(650)342-8510
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$7,500 obo (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUV’s
2000 TOYOTA Camry LE with 101k
miles runs great and get awesome mpg
all power package and cold ac & clean
Car Fax manual transmission #4509 on
sale for $4600.00 plus fees.
(650)637-3900
DODGE ‘06 DAKOTA SLT model, Quad
Cab, V-8, 63K miles, SOLD!
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $6,200.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
HONDA 90 - 1968 excellent, 165 mpg,
can deliver, $900., (831)462-9836
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $50. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35., (650)670-
2888
NEW MOTORCYCLE HELMET - Modu-
lar, dual visor, $69., (650)595-3933
645 Boats
‘72 18’ RAYSON V Drive flat boat, 468
Chevy motor with wing custom trailer,
$20,000 obo, (650)851-0878
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4’ wide, 6
1/2 ‘ long & 2 1/2’ deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
2 1976 Nova rims with tires 2057514
leave message $60 for all, SOLD!
2 BACKUP light 1953 Buick $40
(650)341-8342
2013 DODGE CHARGER wheels & tires,
Boss 338, 22-10, $1300 new,
(650)481-5296
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
EDELBROCK VALVE COVERS - for a
389 engine, new in box, $100., (650)726-
1037
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
670 Auto Parts
FORD FOCUS steel wheels. 14in. rims.
$100. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
HONDA SPEAR tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
MECHANIC'S CREEPER - vintage,
Comet model SP, all wood with
pillow,four swivel wheels, great shape.
$40.00 (650)591-0063
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
RADIALS - pair, PT215/60R17, $15. for
pair, SOLD!
RUBBERMAID 2 Gallon oil pan drainers
(2). Never used tags/stickers attached,
$15 ea. (650)588-1946
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Bath
TUBZ
Over 400 Tubs on display!
World’s Largest “Hands-On, Feet-In”
Showroom
4840 Davenport Place
Fremont, CA 94538
(510)770-8686
www.tubz.net
Carpentry
D n’ J REMODELING
Finish Carpentry
• Windows • Doors •
• Cabinets • Casing •
• Crown Moulding •
• Baseboards •
• Artificial Grass • Gazebos •
(650)291-2121
Cabinetry Contractors
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
Home repairs &
Foundation work
Retaining wall • Decks • Fences
No job too small
Gary Afu
(650)207-2400
Lic# 904960
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Cleaning Cleaning Concrete
CHETNER CONCRETE
Lic #706952
Driveways - Walkways
- Pool Decks - Patios - Stairs
- Exposed Aggregate - Masonry
- Retaining Walls - Drainage
- Foundation/Slabs
Free Estimates
(650)271-1442 Mike
26
Monday • Aug. 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Construction
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
LEAK PRO
Sprinkler repair, Valves, Timers,
Heads, Broken pipes,
Wire problems, Coverage,
Same Day Service
(800)770-7778
CSL #585999
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
RAIN GUTTERS
• Gutters and downspouts,
• Rain gutter repair,
• Rain gutter protection (screen),
• Cleaning service.
Free Estimates
(650)669-6771
(650)302-7791
Lic.# 910421
Handy Help
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)4581572
contreras1270@yahoo.com
Handy Help
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FERNANDO’S HANDYMAN
Painting - Exterior/Interior,
Stucco, Floors, Demos,
Lawns, Pavers, etc.
Free Estimates
Senior Discounts
Lic.& Bonded
(650)834-4824
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof
Repair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
AAA RATED!
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$40 & UP
HAUL
Since 1988
Licensed/Insured
Free Estimates
A+ BBB Rating
(650)341-7482
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Hauling
Landscaping
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
10% OFF
PRO PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MK PAINTING
Interior and Exterior,
Residental and commercial
Insured and bonded,
Free Estimates
Peter McKenna
(650)630-1835
Lic# 974682
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
Painting
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
HAMZEH PLUMBING
5 stars on Yelp!
$25 OFF First Time Customers
All plumbing services
24 hour emergency service
(415)690-6540
Remodeling
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile
BELMONT TILE &
FOLSOM LAKE TILE
Your local tile store
& contractor
• Tile • Mosaics
• Natural Stone Countertops
• Remodeling
Free Estimates
651 Harbor Blvd.
(near Old County Road)
Belmont
650.421.6508
www.belmontile.com
M-Sa 8:30 am - 5 pm
CASL# 857517
Window Coverings
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame • 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos • 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates • Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
27 Monday • Aug. 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
KAY’S
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
DR INSIYA SABOOWALA DDS
DECCAN DENTAL
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
Cantonese, Mandarin & Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
Food
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AUTO • HOME • LIFE
Brian Fornesi
Insurance Agency
Tel: (650)343-6521
bfornesi@farmersagent.com
Lic: 0B78218
Insurance
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$45 per Hour
Present ad for special price
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
SEVEN STARS
DAY SPA
615 Woodside Road Redwood City
(650)299-9332
Body Massage $60/hour
$40/half hour,
$5 off one hour w/ this ad
Open Daily 9:30 AM to 9:30 PM
UNION SPA
Grand Opening
Open Daily
Full Massage and
Brazilian Wax
(650)755-2823
7345 Mission St., Daly City
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
O’DOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
Real Estate Services
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
Video
ADULT VIDEOS - (50) for $50.,
(415)298-0645
28
Monday • Aug. 5, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL

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