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GENERAL FOR OOW ORALS

OOW SAFETY
LSA AND FFA
1) LAUNCHING PROCEDURE OF AN ENCLOSED LIFEBOAT:
INITIALLY: I. II. III. IV. V. VI. Carry out risk assessment Raise alarm Muster people, take head count, check PPE and ask duties Secure painters fore and aft Disconnect battery connection Secure drain plug and try out engine ahead and astern for 3 min. and check rudder movement

AFTER CARRYING OUT INITIAL CHECKS: I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII. XIII. Get out of the boat and remove centre gripe Remove harbour safety pins Remove fore and aft gripes Look overside and lower embarkation ladder Report to master All clear Check speed Max 5 knots Lower by gravity and stop just above water level All crew go down by ladder board the boat and make sure everyone seated and belted Remove FPD (Fall Preventer Device) and close hatches Start engine and check fore and aft movement (seated and belted) Lower the boat in water Release hooks and painter Close hatches and drive away

2) USE OF FPD (FALL PREVENTOR DEVICE):


FPD is required for on-load release system It is a system which prevents unintentional release of a lifeboat due to failure or misuse of its main method of connection to the fall wire

3) MARKINGS ON A LIFERAFT CONTAINER:


I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. Makers name Serial number Length of painter Launching instructions SOLAS Date of last service Number of persons permitted to carry Max permitted stowage weight Name of approving authority Type of emergency pack enclosed

4) MARKINGS ON A LIFEBOAT:
I. II. III. Number of persons permitted to carry Name of ship Port of registry

5) CHECKS TO BE MADE ON A LIFEBOAT:


I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. Physical condition of lifeboat (fixed as well as loose equipment) Lifeboat equipment Sprinkler system Air supply system Power supply system Manoeuvring sytem Engine and propulsion system
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VIII. IX. X.

Check operation of devices used for activating release gear Cables for control and release Bailing system

6) MAINTANANCE REQUIRED ON LIFEBOAT FALLS:


I. II. III. IV. Shall be maintained by ships crew as per PMS (Planned Maintanance system) Shall be examined by a competent person during every safety equipment survey Shall be renewed in every 5 yrs or when deteriorates whatever is early There is no longer any requirement of end to end change after 2.5 yrs

7) MUSTER LIST:
I. II. III. Muster list is made by the master and the owner It must be dispalyed on the bridge, engine room and crew accommodation Contents of muster list: i. Description of general emergency alarm, fire alarm and public address system ii. Description of how the order to abandon ship is given iii. Indicate primary and secondary muster station for each crew member iv. Duties of all ranks in case of emergencies v. Substitues for key persons who may become disabled vi. Person responsible for each lifeboat vii. Person assigned for communication in case of any emergency

8) FREQUENCY OF BOAT AND FIRE DRILLS:


I. II. Must be held within 24 hrs after departure if more than 25% of crew changes If not possible to conduct a full fledge drill in 24 hrs then atleast a muster should be taken, duties explained and abandon ship procedures should also be explained Shall be such that every crew member takes part in 1 abandon ship and 1 fire drill each month

III.

9) MONTHLY CHECKS ON FFA (FIRE FIGHTING APPLIANCES):


I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. 10) PA system and ships alarms All fire extinguishers, hydrants, hoses and nozzles All fire mans outfits. SCBA sets, EEBDs Portable gas detectors PFE (Portable Fire Extinguishers) and portable foam applicators Fire door and dampers Sprinkler system International shore connection Quick closing valves O2 resuscitator

QUARTERLY CHECKS ON FFA:


I. II. III. IV. V. Check all fire extinguishers are at correct pressure and not due for servicing All automatic alarms for sprinkler system activate International shore connection is serviciable Fire fighting equipment locker contains full inventory All fire doors, dampers and closing devices can be operated locally

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I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII.

ANNUAL INSPECTION ON FFA:


Operation of all hydrants Antifreeze solutions Remote operation of fire doors, ventilation and dampers Visual inspection of all fixed fire fighting equipments, free from damage or obstruction Operation of all fixed foam and water fire fighting equipments Check all fire pumps develop correct pressure and flow rates Check all fire detection systems work correctly as per manufactuters instructions

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I. II. III.

WEEKLY TEST OF LSA:


Survival craft, rescue boat and launching appliances Rescue boat and lifeboat engines must be tried out General emergency alarm system

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I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX.

CONTENTS OF A FIRE PLAN:


Fire fighting equipments Ventilation system Means of access to spaces Remote controls Identification of fire zones Location of control stations Location of detection systems Crew list Stowage plan

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I. II. III.

CONTENTS OF SOLAS TRAINING MANUAL:


Use of survival equipment Use of fire detection equipment Safe use of LTA (Line Throwing Apparatus)
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IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X.

Safe use of lifejackets, immersion suits and TPA Boarding, launching and clearing of survival craft Recovery of survival craft and rescue boat Hazards of exposure and need of warm clothing Contents of muster list and emergency instructions Instructions for emergency repair of LSA Procedure of helicoptor rescue

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I. II.

REQUIREMENT FOR CARRIAGE OF LIFE JACKETS:


Adults 125% of the capacity (min 4) Small jackets / infants 100% of the capacity (min 2)

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I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII.

REQUIREMENT FOR CARRIAGE OF LIFE BUOYS:


Under 100m 8 100m to under 150m 10 150m to under 200m 12 200m and above 14 50% with self igniting lights 2 with 27.5m of buoyant line 2 with light/smoke float capable of quick release

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I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII.

LIFE BUOY REQUIREMENT:


Outer diameter not < 800mm Inner diameter not < 400mm Diameter of grab line not < 9.5mm Capable of being dropped from a height of 30m without sustaining damage Line if fitted must be of 27.5m in length Light must have an intensity of 2 candela and if flashing than 50 flashes per minute Should be atleast 2.5kgs by weight

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I. II. III.

REQUIREMENT OF FIRE PUMPS (Cargo ships > 1000GT):


2 pumps, each capable of delivering a jet from any 2 hydrants In addition one other pump such as a ballast pump shall be capable of delivering water to fire main In addition and emergency fire pump located outside amchiner space capable of delivering a jet from any 2 hydrants

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I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII.

REQUIREMENT FOR FIRE HOSES:


1 hose for every 30m of length Minimum 5 + 1 spare Total hoses length atleast 60% of LOA Maximum hose length 18m In E/R machinery spaces atleast one hydrant on each side with a hose and nozzle All nozzles shall have a spray, jey and shut off facility Hose diameter 64mm if unlined and 45mm if lined

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I. II. III. IV.

MONTHLY CHECKS TO BE CARRIED ON SCBA:


Visual inspection (visor, straps, demand valve, hoses harness and lifeline) Check pressure for SCBA bottles Check low level whistle alarm Carry out leak test

OOW LEGAL
ISPS CODE 1) WHAT SHIPS COMPLY WITH ISPS CODE?
I. II. III. IV. Cargo ships and MODUs 500GT and above on international voyages comply with ISPS code All passenger ships (domestic/international voyages) Port facility serving 1 and 2 above Repair yards

2) REQUIREMENT FOR CSR (CONTINUOUS SYNOPSIS CERTIFICATE):


I. II. III. Every ship must have a CSR from 1st July 2004 For ships built before July 2004, CSR should, atleast, provide details from that date CSR issues by flag state to each ship entitles to fly its flag

INFORMATION IN CSR: I. Name of flag state II. Date of registry III. IMO number IV. Name of ship, port of registry V. Name and address of owners VI. Name and address of charterers VII. Name and address of company which carries out safety management activity for that ship VIII. Name of classification society IX. Name of administration which issued DOC, interim Doc, SMC, interim SMC X. Name of administration which issues ISSC, interim of short term ISSC XI. When the ship is sold ortransferred, CSR remains on board
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3) DECLARATION OF SECURITY (DOS):


It is a ship shore security checklist to which SSO and PFSO will agree as to who will be responsible for what part. For eg. I. Vessels contact details II. Port contact details III. Security level maintained by the ship and port IV. Period of validity

WHEN DO YOU EXCHANGE DOS: Higher Definition 3 D Camera Gives Immense Sensation I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. H Higher level D Loading/Discharging, transitting with DG (Dangerous goods) 3 Security level 3 D Dirty port ie non ISPS port C Change of security level G Govt. official tells to do so I Security incident S Ship to ship (even if same level)

4) FREQUENCY OF SECURITY DRILLS AND EXERCISES:


DRILLS: I. Security drill must be carried out once every 3 months II. If at any one time, more than 25% of crew changes then a security drill must be carried out within 1 week EXERCISES: I. At least once every 12 months with no more than 18 months between exercises

5) SECURITY RECORDS MAINTAINED UNDER ISPS:


As per flag state, UK records of following shall be kept onboard for 3 yrs I. Training, drills and exercises II. Changes in security level III. Security threats and incidents IV. Breaches of security V. DOS (Document Of Security) of last 10 port of calls VI. Internal audits and reviews VII. Periodic review of ship security plans VIII. Periodic review of ship security assessment IX. Testing, calibration and maintenance of ship security equipment X. Communication related to direct security of ship

6) CONTENTS OF SSP (Ship Security Plan):


I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. Hot to test, calibrate, maintain and use of safety equipment How to do training and drills How to deal with ports How to control access What to do in security level 3 Which restricted areas to be locked and monitored Security records to maintain Duties of personnel SSAS test, maintenance and use procedure Audit procedure SSP review procedure

7) WHAT PARTS OF YOUR SSP CAN A PSC (Port State Control) OFFICER SEE?
I. II. III. IV. Visitor log Visitor passes and crew ID International ship security certificate CSR (Continuous synopsis report)
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V. VI. VII. VIII.

Last 10 port of calls and security level maintained Dates of drills but not the actual minutes Sight of SSP but cannot go through it Approval stamp of SSP

WHAT PARTS OF YOUR SSP CAN A FLAG STATE SEE? Everything

8) TOOLS FOR IMPLEMENTING ISPS:


I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. SSP itself has procedures and can act as a tool for implementing ISPS BMP4 checklist Training matrix Circulars from company Piracy reports on SAT-C Drug and stowaway checklist Visitor passes, IDs, visitor log, restricted areas Private armed guards SSP review checklist ISPS audit checklist

9) DUTIES OF CSO (COMPANY SECURITY OFFICER)


Super Stupid American Tickled Crazy Indian I. S - Ship security assessment (SSA) II. S Develop, implement and maintain SSP III. A Carry out internal ISPS audit and arrange for ISPS external audit IV. T Arrange training V. C Ensure effective communication and co-operation between SSO and PFSO VI. I Advice ship of any security related issues

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10)
I. II. III. IV. V. VI.

DUTIES OF SHIP SAFETY OFFICER:


Follow health and safety culture Induce safety culture Take feedback from crew regarding safety Investigate accidents Keep a record of accidents and incidents Stay vigilant

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ISM CODE
1) DEFINITION:
International management code for safe operation of ships and pollution prevention

2) OBJECTIVE:
I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. To ensure safety at sea Prevention of human injury or loss of life Avoidance of damage to the environment Provide safe practices in ship operation and safe working environment Establish safeguards against all identified risks Improve safety management skills of personnel ashore and onboard ships Preparing for emergencies related to both safety and environmental protection Ensure compliance with mandatory rules and regulations by all organizations

3) SMS (SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM) DEFINITION:


It is a system that ensures compliance with the guidelines of ISM code

4) SMS 6 KEY ELEMENTS / FUNCTIONAL REQUIREMENTS SOCREM:


I. II. III. IV. S - Safety and environmental protection policy O - Procedures to ensure safe operation of ships and protection of the environment C Levels of authority and lines of communication defined R Procedures for reporting accidents and non-confirmities
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V. VI.

E Procedures to prepare for and respond to emergencies M Procedures for internal audits and management reviews

5) PMS (PLANNED MAINTANANCE SYSTEM) BENEFITS:


I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. Work is planned in advance taking into account resources available, type of voyages and routes No equipment is missed or ignored Critical equipment is identified and maintained accordingly Ship is ready for surveys Stores and spares are ordered on time Unreliable equipment is identified Inspections are held at appropriate intervals Records of activities are maintained Any non-confirmity is reported with its possible cause if known and appropriate corrective action is taken DOC (DOCUMENT OF COMPLIANCE): i. Issued to the company and copies sent to each ship DOC is a evidence that company complies with ISM code ii. DOC contains: a) Classes of substances that a ship can carry b) Cargo spaces where such cargoes can be carried c) Additional safety equipments that a ship must carry SMC (SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM): It is issued to each ship to verify that the ship is operated in accordance with documented SMS Both certificates are issued by MCA and renewed in every 5 yrs Annual verification is carried out to maintain DOC Intermediate verification of SMC is carried out between 2 nd and 3rd anniversary
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6) CERTIFICATES ISSUED UNDER ISM:


I.

II.

III.

7) HOW DOES ISM HELPS IN YOUR ROLE AS AN OFFICER:


I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. I will have a safe and healthy working environment I will have a defined role - job description My areas of responsibility will be ready for surveys I will have benefits of PMS Company will be responsible to arrange familiarization training for me I will have a set of procedures for guidance in day-today working activity I will have a set of procedures for guidance in emergencies My ship will have procedures to report accidents and nonconfirmities rather than burying them under sand I can request master to conduct an internal audit for my areas of responsibility to ensure compliance with code I can use an established procedure to raise issues and suggest improvements

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IMDG CODE
OBJECTIVE:
Enhance safe carriage of dangerous goods by sea VOLUMES IN IMDG CODE: I. VOL I General information about all classes Packaging information Stowage and segregation requirements II. VOL II DG (Dangerous Goods) list III. SUPPLEMENTS EMS (Emergency schedules), MFAG (Medical First Aid Guide)

CONTENTS OF IMDG CODE: I. II. UN Number and proper shipping name Dangerous goods declaration: It is provided by the shipper and has relevant details as per IMDG code Container packing certificate: It is made as per IMDG requirement. Personnel responsible for packing provides it Not required for portable tanks

III.

DANGEROUS GOODS DECLARATION and CONTAINER PACKING CERTIFICATE can be combined in one form and must contain: I. II. III. IV. UN number Proper shipping name Class Quantity
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V. VI. VII.

Number of goods Packaging groups Subsidiary risks

CLASSIFICATION OF DANGEROUS GOODS: English Girl Free Fuddi O T R C Mei I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. Explosives Gases Flammable liquids Flammable solids Oxidizing substances Toxic substances Radioactive substances Corrosive materials Miscellaneous substances

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RISK ASSESSMENT
1) WHAT IS RISK ASSESSMENT:
It is a process of detecting hazards and assessing associated risks RISK ASSESSMENT IS USED TO: I. Identify hazards II. Control risks III. Make decisions on priorities COSWEP will guide in carrying out a risk assessment (COSWEP Chapter 1 Risk assessment)

2) STEPS TO CARRY OUT A RISK ASSESSMENT:


I. II. III. Identify all hazards involved in the operation Determine risk from hazards by estimating potential severity of harm and likelihood that harm can occur Finally, determine the level of risk and act accordingly

3) ELEMENTS OF RISK ASSESSMENT: I. Classify work activities II. Identify hazards and personnel at risk III. Identify risk control (Permit to work) IV. Estimate the risk (Slight, moderate or severely harmful) V. Decide tolerability of risk VI. Make risk control plan VII. Review adequacy of risk control plan VIII. Ensure risk assessment and controls are up to date

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WORK AND REST HOURS


From 1st January 2012 all ships need to comply with STCW 2010 hours of rest
I. II. Minimum amount of rest 77 hours per week Minimum 10 hours of rest out of 24 hours 10 hours of rest can be divided into 3 parts one of which has to be of at least 6 hours and the other 2 should not be less than 1 hour each Max interval between 2 periods should not be more than 14 hrs Exceptions can be made during an emergency Records should be maintained and readily available for inspection

III. IV. V.

MARPOL
1) SOPEP CONTENTS:
I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. General arrangement plan, tank plan and fuel oil piping diagram Ships identification data page Statement about person responsible for reporting Coastal state contacts (published annually, updated quarterly by IMO) Port contact sheet Ship interest contact list Steps to control discharges

VOLUNTARY ENTRIES OF SOPEP: I. Training and drills procedures II. Record keeping procedures III. Plan review procedures IV. Public affairs policy

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2) HOW DOES MARPOL ANNEX 1 AFFECT YOU?


I. II. III. IV. V. VI. I will follow, maintain, implement SOPEP Follow discharge criteria for oil Maintain records in ORB PART 1 and PART 2 Do SOPEP drill every 3 months Display placards of discharge criteria at prominent places Maintain oil pollution equipments UTI, ODME, oily water separator and other SOPEP gear

3) HOW DOES MARPOL ANNEX 5 AFFECT YOU?


I. II. III. IV. V. VI. As per my GMP (Garbage Management Plan), I will segregate, store and process garbage Follow discharge criteria Maintain records in GRB Display placards of discharge criteria at prominent places Maintain, implement and follow GMP Know responsible officer for garbage

4) WHAT POLLUTION PREVENTION EQUIPMENT YOU HAD ONBOARD?


I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. UTI ODME Oily water seperator Incinerator SOPEP gear Sewage treatment plan IOPP (International Oil Pollution Prevention) certificate

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CHARTS AND PUBLICATIONS


1) LIST OF MANDATORY PUBLICATIONS: I. List of lights II. List of radio signals III. Tide tables IV. Tidal stream atlases V. Sailing directions VI. Merchant shipping notices VII. Mariners handbook VIII. Nautical almanac IX. IAMSAR Volume 3 X. International code of signals XI. Weekly notices to mariners XII. Annual summary of notices to mariners XIII. Instruction manual for navigation aids 2) NOTICES TO MARINERS:
I. II. III. Annual summary of notices to mariners Published every week Quarterly weekly notice to mariners A weekly WNM which comes out with additional sections at the end of 3 months Cumulative notice to mariners Published every 6 months (includes chart correction numbers for last 2 yrs + current edition of all publications) Weekly notice to mariners Published annually

IV.

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SECTIONS OF WEEKLY NOTICE TO MARINERS: Every Cunt Needs Sex Like Animals i. Explanatory notes and exit charts ie charts to be published and withdrawn ii. Index of charts affected, T&P and permanent corrections to charts iii. Reprints of navigational warnings iv. Sailing directions Corrections v. List of lights and fog signals - Corrections vi. ALRS corrections vii. Hydrographic note

3) MARINE NOTICES:
I. II. III. MSN MERCHANT SHIPPING NOTICES These are regulations and mandatory to be complied with MGN MARINE GUIDANCE NOTICES These are guidance to the regulations in MSN MIN MARINE INFORMATION NOTICES These give information on various things such as list of approved doctors, exam dates, oral syllabus etc.

ALL M-NOTICES ARE WHITE IN COLOUR

4) CONTENTS OF ANNUAL SUMMARY OF NOTICES TO MARINERS:


I. II. ANM Part-1 contains notices 1-26 plus list of valid T&Ps ANM Part-2 contains list of valid corrections to sailing directions in force

5) CONTENTS OF SAILING DIRECTIONS:


I. Also referred as pilot books, sailing direction amplifies chart information

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II.

It contains landscape pictures as well as information on navigational hazards, buoyage, meteorological data, details of pilotage, regulations, port facilities and guide to major port entry

HOW TO CORRECT SAILING DIRECTIONS: i. ii. iii. iv. v. Remove whole section 4 of latest WNM File it in sailing direction correction folder Enter details of correction week number at the back of the front cover of the sailing direction book In sailing direction book write the week number at the bottom of the page with pencil Every 3 months update the list of valid corrections to sailing direction in the correction folder

SAILING DIRECTION IS FOR COASTAL PASSAGES

6) CONTENTS OF OCEAN PASSAGES OF THE WORLD:


I. II. III. IV. Shortest routes between ports and important positions Routing details for powered and sailing vessels Chapters on each of the worlds oceans Advice on winds, weather, climate, currents, swell, ice hazards

OPW IS FOR OCEAN PASSAGES

7) Which publication will you refer to find out whether a nautical publication (for eg. Dover strait sailing direction) on board is right edition or not?
I. II. Cumulative notice to mariners Section 1B of quarterly weekly notice to mariners

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8) How would you know what T&P notices apply to your voyage charts?
I. II. Annual summary of notice to mariners Section 1A of quarterly weekly notice to mariners

9) HOW WILL YOU ASCERTAIN RELIABILITY OF A NAVIGATIONAL CHART:


PAPER CHARTS: I. Go to source data diagram on the chart II. Look at the year of survey and scale of survey III. Go to 1st section of mariners handbook for quality of survey ENC CHARTS: I. Check marine quality objects for CATZOC (Category of zone of confidence)

BESIDE CHECKING THE SURVEY QUALITY YOU ALSO NEED TO CHECK THE FOLLOWING: I. II. III. IV. Edition of chart Scale of chart Chart correction status Cautions on the chart and sailing directions regarding shifting nature of seabed

10) I. II. III.

How will you know that a chart is corrected up to date?


Look for the last correction number in section 2 of WNM Compare that number with the number written at the bottom of the chart I will do it till I reach most recent cumulative notice to mariners and compare the numbers at the bottom of the chart for past 2 yrs
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IV. 11)

Also check T&P for voyage charts

HOW TO CORRECT A CHART?


I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. Remove cancelled charts using WNM section 1 and also remove these from chart correction folder Using section 2 of WNM enter chart correction numbers in the chart correction log Write correction range on top of each tracing pack Correct the charts Write correction number at the bottom of the chart with pen After writing the number on the bottom of the chart scratch off the tracing Correct T&Ps for voyage charts

12)
I. II. III. IV. V. VI.

ALRS VOLUMES:
ALRS VOL 1 Maritime Radio Stations ALRS VOL 2 Radio Aids to Navigation ALRS VOL 3 Maritime Safety Information Services ALRS VOL 4 Meteorological Observation Stations ALRS VOL 5 Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) ALRS VOL 6 Pilot Services

13)
I.

PUBLICATIONS:
Weather/Monthly Routing Chart There are 12 of them for each ocean region. They contain information such as recommended routes with gc distances, ice limits, special areas, currents, TRS, wind roses, fog probability, etc Mariners Routing Guide These are published for high traffic density areas such as Chart 5500 for English Channel. They have general recommendation for passage planning, VTS info, reporting requirements, special rules for special class of vessel, DW routes, etc
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II.

III.

IMO Ships Routing Guide Contains list of IMO adopted TSS, diagram, lat and long of all those TSSs, deep water routes, areas to be avoided and mandatory ship reporting system

14)
I. II. III. IV. V.

CONTENTS OF A TRACING:
Chart number Edition number Present correction number Previous correction number and Correction itself

15) Publications that are to be refered to find out whether a TSS is OMO adopted or not are as follows:
I. II. III. IV. V. 16) I. II. Sailing directions Guide to port entry Mariners routing guide IMO ships routing guide Annual summary of notices to mariners

Publications to refer to find out dock water density:


Guide to port entry Sailing directions

17)
I.

Publication to know the diurnal variation of pressure:


Sailing directions

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PASSAGE PLANNING:
1) MERCATOR CHARTS:
Advantages: I. Distances are easily measured II. Rhumb line course is easily laid off III. Shapes of landmasses correctly shown Disadvantages: I. Great circle courses cant be laid off II. Scale of distance varies as per latitude III. Areas cant be compared due to varying distortion

2) APEM:
I. Appraisal: It is a stage of gathering information for the passage such as: i. ETD/ETA (departure and arrival port) ii. Departure draft iii. UKC iv. Weather v. Tide and currents vi. Loadine zones vii. Charterers instructions viii. Masters standing instructions ix. Special areas x. Ballast exchange Apart from these following charts and publication must also be referred: i. ii. iii. Chart catalogues List of lights ALRS
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iv. v. vi. vii. viii. ix. x. xi. II.

Tide tables Tidal stream atlases Routing guide Distance tables Mariners handbook Guide to port entry BPG Pilot books

Planning: Following should be done in planning: i. Arrange charts ii. Mark initial and final position iii. Draw a free hand route as required by sailing direction iv. Mark no go areas v. Decide way points vi. Draw courses and distances vii. Mark call master point, DTG, reporting points, SBE and 1 hr notice viii. Relevant information as per sailing direction ix. Parallel indexing x. Clearing bearings xi. Abort points xii. Contingency anchorage Execution: In this stage final changes to passage plan are made prior departure such as: i. Updated weather and tidal conditions ii. Masters charterers instructions might change iii. Fuel requirement iv. Manning level might change v. Navigational equipment might change
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III.

vi. vii. viii. ix. x. IV.

Security concerns / piracy warnings Latest WNM (weekly notices to mariners) requirement Point A Point B ETAs Final drafts Cargo related deviations

Monitoring: In this stage we monitor our progress during passage by: i. Checking position visual, celestial, electronic means, bearings, ranges, HSA, VSA, transit bearings, parallel indexing, RADAR ranges and depth contours ii. Weather and navigational warnings iii. RPM and ETA iv. Continuous depth monitoring v. Security

NOTES PREPARED BY: SANYYAM SOOD

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MISC. CONTENT:
1) NEW INSPECTION REGIME:
What is PSC (Port state control): In the early days of shipping a lot of companies started to register their ships with a flag of convenience (FOC) to save money. Ships registered with these FOCs were poorly maintained and had very poor living and working conditions and a lot of pollution incidents and accidents were taking place on such ships. So, in 1978 IMO started PSC which has a network of maritime authorities who inspect foreign slag vessels coming to their country. Whole world is split up into various PSC MOU regions Paris MOU, Indian MOU, etc. Purpose of PSC: i. Eliminate substandard ships ii. Eliminate substandard companies iii. Eliminate FOC iv. Ensure health safety and welfare of crew v. Verify the competency of master and officers on board vi. Verify condition of ship and its equipments as required by international law vii. Make sure that ship is manned and operated in compliance with applicable international law Items inspected by PSC: I. Initially: i. Safe means of access ii. Markings loadlines iii. Hygiene iv. Certificates
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v. vi. vii. II.

Crew certificates Master ISM form Walk around deck, bridge and engine room

Expanded (only for high risk vessel): i. Emergency generator ii. Emergency stop iii. Emergency lights iv. Emergency fire pump v. Emergency steering vi. Boat/Fire drill vii. On tankers IG (inert gas) system

2) HOW TO MAINTAIN A ROPE:


I. II. III. IV. V. VI. Store in pallets Do not store in direct contact with steel deck Keep it away from direct sunlight Keep it away from chemicals Remove any kinks Frayed end to be spliced

3) QUESTIONS FOR TANKERS:


I. Use of deck water seal: Purpose of deck water seal is to prevent back flow of gases to the engine room from cargo tanks Checks to be made on deck seal: Steam coils Alarms Free movement of valves

II. III. IV. V.

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4) PLANNED MAINTANANCE SYSTEM:


I. On my last ship my company had setup a PMS for all equipments onboard. It gave us instructions when to do maintenance of which equipment. It gave list of tools to carry such maintenance Each officer was deligated various parts to maintain. We had to enter dates and times in the software to verify that a particular task had been completed. For eg. our PMS system was split up into deck and engine PMS. It was further subdivided into LSA, FFA, nav. equipment, critical equipment, etc. If the PMS reminded us to grease the lifeboat davit at a date we used to do it and enter it in the PMS software, if a particular task could not be done due to unavoidable reasons then it was shown as pending. We used to do it at the next earliest opportunity. Our PMS was connected live with company officer so they could monitor the progress.

II.

5) CRITICAL EQUIPMENT:
As per my company policy we had a list of critical equipment failure of which may lead to serious problems related to pollution and safety of life at sea. These equipments need more monitoring additional and more frequent monitoring Eg. fire pumps, emergency generator, ODMCS checked weekly Critical equipment on deck Deck seal, PV breaker, mast riser, COW machine, etc

6) CONTENTS OF FIRE WALLET:


I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. Crew list Cargo plan MSDS (Material safety data sheet) DG list Emergency contacts General arrangement for LSA/FFA Bunker tank location
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7) LOCATION AND USE OF DECK ISOLATION VALVE:


It is located at break of accommodation It is used to isolate deck and engine room fire line when shore water is being pumped in to increase pressure towards the area of fire

8) HOW TO KNOW NATURE OF SEABED?


I. II. III. Charts Sailing directions Hand lead line, tallow paste

9) HOW TO PICK UP A PILOT?


I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. Check pilot ladder clean and rigged properly Check lifebuoy light working Keep a heaving line standby Maintain communication with bridge When pilot on ladder report to bridge Assure that search light isnt flashing on pilot boat When pilot on deck report back to bridge

10)

WHAT IS EGC?
EGC Enhanced Group Call: Safety message received on INMARSAT-C

11)

WHEN TO TAKE A SIGHT?


Civil twilight

12)
I. II. III.

GAS METERS:
Multi gas detector sent ashore and cartridges replaced O2 meter spare gas is provided on board for calibration Flammable gas detector sent ashore, glass tube replaced

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13) WHERE WILL YOU FIND FIXED FIRE FIGHTING SYSTEM INSTALLED? I. Cargo space and pumproom II. Paint locker III. Machinery space with steam turbine, boiler, CAT-A machinery space and space containing internal combustion type machinery 14) TRS (Tropical revolving storm): Signs of a TRS: I. Moist unstable air II. Sea temperature of 27 degrees III. Barometer reading: 3mb below average TRS in vicinity 5mb below average TRS within 200nm IV. Wind speed: 250 miles from center light winds 150 miles from center force 8 <70 miles from center force 12 V. Wind direction - Unexpected change in wind direction VI. Red/copper sky upto 500miles away VII. Clouds - Cirrus clouds bearing in direction of storm Cumulus/Altostratus can also be seen VIII. Swell - Pronounced swell from unexpected direction upto 1000 miles away IX. Humidity heavy humid atmosphere X. Storm tides 3-5m higher than expected XI. Radio warnings Radio message to be sent if TRS suspected (SOLAS) Action: I. Determine bearing and distance of storm centre: i. Buy ballots law ii. Meteorological observations iii. Radio information II. Construct a plot:
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i. ii. iii. III.

Position of TRS Position of ship Update as information available

Determine/predict the path of storm: i. Radio information ii. Plotting information iii. History of previous TRSs iv. 40 degrees either side of track Determine the vessels relative position: i. Pressure falling vessel in advance of TRS ii. Pressure rising - vessel at rear of TRS

IV.

WIND DIRECTION Wind veers Wind backs Wind steady

NORTHERN HEMISPHERE Dangerous semi-circle Navigable semi-circle In the path

SOURTHERN HEMISPHERE Navigable semi-circle Dangerous semi-circle In the path

V.

Manoeuvre according to rules:

NORTHERN HEMISPHERE
i. ii. iii. Dangerous semi-circle Put wind on starboard bow and make best speed Navigable semi-circle Put wind on starboard quarter and make best speed In the path Alter course to port as wind backs

SOURTHERN HEMISPHERE: i. ii. iii. Dangerous semi-circle Put wind on port bow and make best speed Navigable semi-circle Put wind on port quarter and make best speed In the path Alter course to starboard as wind veers

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Difference between a TRS and Depression: TRS DEPRESSION i. ii. iii. iv. v. vi. vii. viii. Depression is round the year Forms at higher latitudes Wind force more than 7 Does not depend on sea temp. Moves from west to east Does not recurve Sustains on land Forms due to jet streams

i. ii. iii. iv. v. vi. vii. viii.

TRS is seasonal Occurs in tropical region Wind force less than 7 Require a sea temp. of 27 degrees and above Moves from east to west TRS recurves TRS dies out when hits land Occurs due to coriolis effect

NOTES PREPARED BY SANYYAM SOOD

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