LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

1st Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 4 Launch Lesson

THEME: Culture, Dignity, and Identity
CONCEPT: Lessons from Africa-African American Families, Traditions and Lifestyles

CONTENT TOPIC: Exploring African and African American family structures and traditions through fiction and nonfiction texts UNIT TITLE: Families Then and Now Quarter: 4 Unit: 1 Week 1 of 4 Day 1 Objective(s): Students will be able to determine important information using pictures, words, or phrases from a text. Students will be able to identify three things they learned from the text by recording their thoughts on a reading response sheet. Materials/Resources: ● The Story of Ruby Bridges by Robert Coles ● Ruby Bridges Goes to School: My True Story (Scholastic Reader Level 2) by Ruby Bridges ● 3,2,1 Reading Response sheet ● T-chart labeled Then/ Now ● Markers ● http://www.rubybridges.com/story.h tm ● http://www.scholastic.com/browse/a rticle.jsp?id=3755117

CCSS Standards:
RI.1.2 Identify the main topic and retell key details of the text. SL.1.2. Ask and answer questions about key details in a text read aloud or information presented orally or through other media.

Sample Student Outcome Statements

Students will be able to --- with African and African American Studies Connections

Students will be able to --- from Literacy and Social Science Planning Guides

L1
Adapted from Garden Grove Unified School District, Office of Secondary Education Department of 7-12 Instructional Services

LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

1st Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 4 Launch Lesson
At the end of this lesson, students will be able to identify three facts about desegregation. “I DO IT” Teacher says: “Boys and Girls, a couple of months ago we learned about storytelling and how it is used to pass down history from generation to generation. We are going to talk about the common history of African Americans growing up during times like the civil rights era and Great Depression. The civil rights era was around 1955-1968. Many of your grandparents and great grandparents were alive and may have interesting stories to tell you. Today we will focus on a girl named Ruby Bridges. She is an African American girl who was the first to attend an all white school. I will read you her true story. I want you to think about what life was like growing up during this time. Listen as I read”. Explicitly model how you as a reader determine important information using pictures, words, or phrases from a text and identify three things learned from the text by recording your thoughts on a reading response sheet. For example, you might say: I’m noticing that African American people and White people could not attend the same schools at that time, I can tell from the people’s faces in the pictures that they are really angry about Ruby attending this school. I will make a L2
Adapted from Garden Grove Unified School District, Office of Secondary Education Department of 7-12 Instructional Services

At the end of this lesson, students will be able to use words and phrases from the text to determine important information. Input & Modeling

LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

1st Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 4 Launch Lesson
note of this on the board/on my reading response sheet so that I hold on to that important detail. “WE DO IT” Teacher says: “We have just listened to Ruby’s story. We learned that African Americans and whites could not go to the same school. We learned that there were many people who were brave and worked hard to change that rule. We also learned that some people did not want the change in the school to happen. We learned all of these things by paying close attention to the pictures, words and phrases in the text. I am going to record all the things that I have learned about going to school during the civil rights era on our Tchart/my reading response sheet. I will write these ideas on the side that says THEN”. “Now let’s look at page 5 and 6. The first thing I notice in the picture is the judge. This makes me think something important is happening, like the judge is telling people they must follow the laws”. “I’m going to reread this page. I want you to listen for important words or phrases. Let me know when you hear something you think is important so I can make a note on the board.”
(Possible phrases to note: Black children and white children went to separate schools; It wasn’t fair; It was against the law)

Guided Instruction

L3
Adapted from Garden Grove Unified School District, Office of Secondary Education Department of 7-12 Instructional Services

LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

1st Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 4 Launch Lesson
“YOU DO IT TOGETHER” Teacher says: “Now we will watch a student video interview of Ruby Bridges. Listen closely to the interview paying especially close attention to the pictures, words, or phrases from the text so that you can identify three things learned from the text and record your thoughts on you reading response sheet. Write down anything you think may be important about schools in the civil rights era. Then you will work with a partner to determine any important information the two of you learned. http://www.scholastic.com/browse/articl e.jsp?id=3755117 “Did you and your partner learn anything new? What did Ms. Bridges say to make you think that? Did you confirm any of the things we already learned? What did Ms. Bridges say to make you think that? Give partnerships time to share out Collaborative Learning

L4
Adapted from Garden Grove Unified School District, Office of Secondary Education Department of 7-12 Instructional Services

LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

1st Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 4 Launch Lesson
“YOU DO IT ALONE” Teacher says: “I want you to read the book Ruby Bridges Goes to School: My True Story alone. When you read I want you to determine important information using pictures, words, or phrases from the text. Then, record 3 things you found out, 2 interesting things and 1 question you still have about attending school during the civil rights era. Please use the response sheet to record your thinking. Remember to write down words or phrases that gave you information like I did on the board earlier and pay close attention to the pictures as well because they can give lots of important information too. This text is Guided Reading Level K. Teacher can pre-record a reading of the book for students to read-along with for those who have not achieved this reading level yet. Other possible substitute- Let’s Read About Ruby Bridges by Grace Maccarone (Level H) “CLOSURE of LESSON” whole group reflection Teacher says: Today we discussed the civil rights era, which was around 1955-1968. We focused on a girl named Ruby Bridges. She is an African American girl who was the first to attend an all white school. We determined important information using pictures, words, or phrases from a text. That important information told us what life was like for kids growing up during that time and added that information to L5
Adapted from Garden Grove Unified School District, Office of Secondary Education Department of 7-12 Instructional Services

Independent Practice

LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

1st Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 4 Launch Lesson
our T-chart. We said that ………….. Many of your grandparents and great grandparents were alive and may have interesting stories to tell you. When you go home tonight, ask them to tell you some of their stories and tell them what you learned in school.

ASSESSMENT
What will you ask? When will you ask during the lesson? What will kids say or do to demonstrate understanding of the objective?

Summative: Formative: Teacher will use Teacher will use the 3,2,1 Reading Response as the assessment. dialogue during discussion and the notes from the partner work to assess students.

L6
Adapted from Garden Grove Unified School District, Office of Secondary Education Department of 7-12 Instructional Services