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www.westwindsorsun.com M A Y 9 - 1 5 , 2 0 1 2 Annual farmers
www.westwindsorsun.com M A Y 9 - 1 5 , 2 0 1 2 Annual farmers

www.westwindsorsun.com

MAY 9-15, 2012

Annual farmers market opens

By JULIE STIPE

The West Windsor Sun

The West Windsor farmers’ market has something for every- one, from fresh local food to musi- cal entertainment to great people watching, manager Chris Cirkus said. And even if you don’t buy any- thing, she said, the market is a great place to relax, mingle and get to know the community. “It’s a really amazing place to spend my Saturdays,” Cirkus said. This year marks the second season Cirkus will spend as man- ager of the market. For many years, Cirkus said, she was a shopper at the market. “I was pretty conscious of what I fed my own family,” she said. Cirkus saw the position of farmers market manager adver- tised in the newspaper, applied – and ended up with the job. Her job, Cirkus said, is mostly logistical, and much of it involves telling vendors where to set up for the market, and helping with the set-up as well. “I’m the one that walks around with a clipboard,” she said. Cirkus also represents the farmers market administration to vendors and shoppers. “I’m the face of the market on Saturdays,” Cirkus said. Along with Cirkus, the market is run by nine board members who take care of different as- pects. A few of these are founder and board member Mireille Del- man, who helps with accounting for the market, Tom Cooper, who works on marketing, and Theresa Best, who books entertainment for market days. “There’s always a musical please see SOMETHING, page 5

“There’s always a musical please see SOMETHING, page 5 KATIE PARIA/Special to The Sun Eli Silver,

KATIE PARIA/Special to The Sun

Eli Silver, of Silver Forge Farm in Manalapan, helps a customer at the West Windsor Community Farmers’ Mar- ket. The farm sells organic vegetables and eggs, as well as honey and wool products. BELOW LEFT: Radishes seem even more vibrant than usual at the West Windsor Community Farmers’ Market. BELOW RIGHT: Fresh, local green onions are just one kind of produce out of an abundance available at the West Windsor Community Farmers’ Market. The market was to open on May 5 and will run until the end of October.

was to open on May 5 and will run until the end of October. FREE Council
was to open on May 5 and will run until the end of October. FREE Council

FREE

Council seeks review of solar plan

By JULIE STIPE

The West Windsor Sun

West Windsor council mem- bers passed a resolution dur- ing a township council meet- ing on April 30 requesting that Mercer County Community College present itself to the West Windsor planning board for a courtesy review of the college’s plan to build an ap- proximately 50-acre solar panel farm on farmland off Old Trenton Road. The solar farm would bor- der South Post Road on the east side, Mercer County park to the north, and would abut Mercer County Community College facilities on the west side. The council meeting drew a crowd of West Windsor resi- dents, mostly from along South Post Road, who voiced concerns about the solar pro- ject’s possible effects on drainage and storm-water runoff as well as the loss of open space and the financial viability of the project. South Post Road resident Teresa Lourenco gave a de- tailed account of her corre- spondence by email with the college. She said the college held a general meeting for concerned residents last summer, but it took the college several months to set up another meet- please see SOLAR, page 7

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INSIDE THIS ISSUE

Mother’s Day herbs

Herb, plant sale fundraiser on Mother’s Day. PAGE 6

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Scouts looking for members

West Windsor Pack No. 66’s Cub Scouts are looking for a few good young men. Boys in first to fifth grade are welcome to join. The pack has ap- proximately 70 Scouts, primarily from Maurice Hawk, Village and Millstone schools, and meets monthly at Maurice Hawk School, typically on Friday nights

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SCIENCE DAY FUN

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Dutch Neck Elementary School in the West Windsor-Plainsboro Regional School District held a very special Science Day with 38 presentation teams and 100 guest presenters. Students in kindergarten through third grade had the opportunity to see scientific experiments, presentations and demonstrations on topics such as health and the human body, aviation/aeronau- tics, geology, chemistry, space exploration, watersheds, ani- mals, robotics, meteorology and more. Above, Grover Middle School students from Rae McKenna’s science class presented a “Who Done It” activity. Shown are, from left, Sam Merkovitz, Emma Kothari, Shikky Rathnor, Julianna Gay, Matt Stein, Annie Menninger, Cameron Poyd, Ashley Ann Renz, Claudia Siniakow- icz and Jinae Park.

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High school students participate in Champion Schools Program

Students at West Windsor Plainsboro High School South are hoping to bring home a driving simulator for their school by being the best in the state at per- suading their peers to drive safely and avoid distractions while on the roads. The school is partici- pating in the Champion Schools Program, sponsored by the Brain Injury Alliance of New Jersey, New Jersey Division of Highway Traffic Safety, New Jersey Manu- facturers Insurance Company and the Allstate Foundation. A committee of juniors at High School South worked together to spread awareness of the dangers of texting while driving to their classmates during gym classes. The students were shocked by how much texting impairs the driver’s body. Students experienced this first hand, by using the drunk goggles while trying to accomplish every- day tasks. At the Texting While Driving Challenge Day, students were given the opportunity to sign a “Pirate Safe Driver Pledge.” This pledge states a promise that each student made to them- selves to never text while operat- ing a motor vehicle and to always

wear their seat belt. The commit- tee also is in the process of con- structing a Facebook page where students can post about the dan- gers of texting while driving and learn more about the facts of tex- ting while driving. It is important to spread the message of the dangers of texting and driving because not every- body knows the extreme dangers that it brings. A total of 31 schools spread across 14 counties in New Jersey are taking part in the contest. Stu- dents and faculty may choose any type of creative projects that will make an impact on the student community. Two of the 31 schools will be chosen as overall winners at the Project Showcase and Awards event on Friday, May 11 at iPlay America (www.iplayameri- ca.com). The winning schools will be presented with driving simula- tors to help train students in dri- ver’s education classes. Check out last year’s projects at www.ugot- brains.com. “In New Jersey a teenager crashes every 10 minutes, and these crashes are the leading cause of death and disability among that age group,” said Bar-

bara Geiger-Parker, president & CEO of the Brain Injury Alliance of New Jersey. “We are looking for creative students and faculty to help change these statistics.” Teenagers and their family members can find out more infor- mation about driving safety at BIANJ’s websites www.ugot- brains.com, www.njteendriving. com and www.njdrivereduca- tion.com. The Brain Injury Alliance of New Jersey is a statewide organi- zation committed to supporting and advocating for individuals af- fected by brain injury and raising public awareness through educa- tion and prevention. A brain injury can happen to anyone at any time. For more in- formation on the services and re- sources of the Brain Injury Al- liance of New Jersey, please call the toll-free helpline at (800) 669- 4323 or visit www.bianj.org.

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Watch ‘Duck Season’ Mexican comedy on May 11

“Duck Season” (2004), an award-winning Mexican comedy directed by Fernando Eimbcke and written by Eimbcke and Paula Markovitch, will be screened on Friday, May 11, at 7:30 p.m. at the West Windsor Arts Center, 952 Alexander Road, Princeton Junction. Tickets are $7/$6 Members of West Windsor Arts Council. Online box office and direc- tions (free event parking) at www.westwindsorarts.org or call (609) 716-1931. Screening of “Duck Season” will be followed by a discussion with Carlos Gutiérrez, film pro- grammer and distributor, who specializes in recent trends in Latin American Cinema. “Duck Season” is part of the new wave of Mexican Cinema that is shaking up notions of what Mexico and Mexican themes mean to Mexicans and non-Mexicans alike. Set in a well- known apartment complex in Mexico City, the story follows Flama, a 14-year-old boy, and his best friend Moko who have been left by Flama’s mother to their own devices while she spends the day running errands and visiting friends. With money for pizza and soda,

the boys happily gird themselves for a perfect Sunday of video games. They are set – until the power goes out. What happens over the course of the day and the rest of the movie has the quirky feel of Dr. Seuss’ “The Cat in the Hat,” as seen through a post-modernist lens. “Duck Season” was a sensation in Mexico upon its release in 2004. It literally swept the Mexican Acad- emy Awards (Arieles), winning among other awards the best pic- ture, best director, best actor in a leading role, best actress in a lead- ing role and best original screen- play. This was Eimbcke’s first fea- ture film and its exquisite tone is reminiscent of two other first films: Spike Lee’s “She’s Gotta Have It,” and Jim Jarmusch’s “Stranger Than Paradise.” The series features outstand- ing, delightful and provocative award-winning films from all over the world and features dis- cussions with fellow film buffs and aficionado and is underwrit- ten, in part, by PharmaNet/i3, a leading provider of global drug development services to pharma- ceutical, biotechnology, generic drug, and medical device compa- nies.

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MAY 9-15, 2012 – THE WEST WINDSOR SUN 5

Something for everyone at farmers market, says manager

SOMETHING

Continued from page 1

event,” Cirkus said. Strains of bluegrass or coun- try music provide an ambience for the market as people shop or sit. The entertainment also makes the market even more fam- ily-friendly. “Kids will get up and dance by the music tent,” she said. Sometimes, the West Windsor- Plainsboro High School North steel drum band comes to play, Cirkus said, which gets every- one’s attention. “They all wear Hawaiian shirts,” Cirkus said. “The music is very catchy.” But the main focus of the mar- ket, of course, is the food. In its first season in 2004, the market drew eight farm vendors and one bakery. This season, the market has 15

farms and 13 non-farm vendors, said Beth Feehan, board member and co-founder of the market with Delman. During its first season, Feehan said, the market drew maybe 200 to 300 people each Saturday. Now around 500 to 700 people come on market days, she said. “I’ve seen the number of cus- tomers increase every year,” Fee- han said. New this year are vendors Pit- spone Farm, FunniBonz Bar- beque Sauces, Rubs and Mari- nades, Sweetly Spirited Cup- cakes, Joss and Jules Catering, Stace of Cakes, Tumbleweed and Eddie’s, and The Happy Wander- er Bakery. The market also brings in com- munity groups that take turns visiting. The West Windsor Bicycle and Pedestrian Alliance regularly at- tends to give bicycle riding les- sons to kids, as well as tips on how to maintain and tune bicy-

IF YOU GO

The West Windsor Commu- nity Farmers’ Market is open every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The market is located in the southbound Vaughn Drive parking lot of the Princeton Junction train station off Alexander Road.

cles. The University Medical Cen- ter of Princeton offers blood pres- sure screenings, and the Crisis Ministry of Princeton and Tren- ton runs a “Yes We Can” food drive every other week at the market. Some people bring canned goods to the food drive, Cirkus said, but many also purchase fresh produce at the market and

please see BUSINESSES, page 7

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6 THE WEST WINDSOR SUN — MAY 9-15, 2012

in our opinion

Sick means sick

Sick days are for when you are sick, not for when you retire

D o you have an extra $1,300 that you don’t need and wouldn’t mind giving to the govern-

ment? Didn’t think so. But, if you live in New Brunswick, your household is on the hook for $1,330.68 when it comes to covering ac- cumulated sick and vacation time for public workers, according to the gover- nor’s office. Statewide, the governor estimates that accumulated sick and vacation time totals more than $825 million on municipalities’ books. Seems excessive. Or, rather, just plain wrong. As one of the exercise gurus from the ‘80s or ‘90s said: Stop the insanity. The Star-Ledger last week had a great report on how a number of polit-

Sick day reform

The governor and Democrats already have reached an agreement on bene- fits for new employees. Now they should be able to work out the details on the big bills for which taxpayers are still on the hook.

ical figures stand to cash out hand- somely when they retire. It also points out that, while some reform was passed in 2010 capping new employees’ payouts, there’s still a lot of political wrangling going on. The newspaper reported that the Democrats want to allow public workers to keep only the time they’ve accumulated, while Gov. Christie wants to force employees to use banked time when taking days in the future, thereby reducing the num- ber of payable days upon retirement.

For those of us in the private sector, chances are the decision already has been made: We’re not banking any- thing. We’re lucky to have a job. We’re fighting rising health-care premiums and the like, while probably not get- ting much of a raise – if any raise at all. So, the whole concept of banked sick pay is foreign to us. Politicians should take note. It seems the governor and the De- mocrats both recognize the larger problem here, and, in fact, have worked to address it moving forward with new employees. Let’s hope that they can reach an agreement on the details. Taxpayers are footing some mighty big bills now – and will be in the future.

Lions Club eyeglass collection during month of May

What do you do with your old eyeglasses when the prescription changes – or when you or a loved-one no longer need them? The West Windsor Lions Club partici- pates in a unique nation-wide Lions Recy- cle for Sight program, focused on the month of May, to encourage the donation of unwanted prescription eyeglasses for distribution to the needy in developing countries where eye care is often unafford- able or inaccessible. An eye examination could cost as much as one month’s income in many of those countries. The clear or tinted eyeglasses collected in West Windsor are processed at the Lions Club’s New Jersey Recycling Center, at first through the Katzenbach School for the Deaf in Ewing, where they are cleaned, categorized by prescription and prepared for distribution through international health organizations. Last year, the New Jersey Center processed almost 1.2 million eyeglasses of which 78,400 were distributed to 20 coun- tries. Unwanted eyeglasses can be dropped off locally in identified boxes in McCaffrey’s Supermarket, the West Windsor Senior

BRIEFS

Center, the West Windsor Library and the Village Elementary School.

Mother’s Day plant sale fundraiser on May 12

GroWW (Greening of West Windsor) is having a Mother’s Day plant sale fundrais- er at Waterworks in Community Park (193 Princeton-Hightstown Road/Route 571 - Corner of Slayback Drive and Bernt Mid- land Boulevard), on May 12 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Popular herbs like basil, parsley, thyme, rosemary, lavender and mint will be avail- able for just $3 per pot, as well as chives, dill, oregano, sage, tarragon and lemon thyme. Hanging baskets and flowering bushes will also be on sale. Proceeds from the fundraiser will be used for landscaping at the West Windsor Arts Center. Volunteers from the West Windsor Arts Center will offer free face painting at the fundraiser. Community Middle School and Grover Middle School PTSA members will be at the GroWW fundraiser collecting gently used sporting equipment that will be do- nated to local groups that provide athletic opportunities to underprivileged children. Do you have lacrosse equipment left be- hind by your college-going son, or cleats

that your daughter barely wore before she outgrew them? Help a needy child by bringing in your gently used equipment for baseball, football, soccer, lacrosse and basketball.

Republicans sponsoring public forum on May 9

The West Windsor Republicans are sponsoring a public forum on the growth and development of Windsor Plaza on Princeton-Hightstown Road, Route 571 on Wednesday, May 9, from 7 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. at the West Windsor Library located at 333 North Post Road, Princeton Junction. Formerly anchored by an Acme super- market, Windsor Plaza is close to comple- tion with major renovations that will in- crease the number of stores and generate considerable tax revenue for West Windsor Township. It will provide lucrative busi- ness opportunities and numerous new jobs for area residents. The developer, Cyzner Properties, will be presenting and the general public is in- vited to attend. Rachel Cyzner and Marissa Tilbor will provide information about the renova- tions, discuss some of the new stores mov- ing in, as well as answer all questions from the public.

20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A Princeton, NJ 08542 609-751-0245 PUBLISHER Steve Miller GENERAL MANAGER &

20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A Princeton, NJ 08542

609-751-0245

PUBLISHER

Steve Miller

GENERAL MANAGER & EDITOR

Alan Bauer

VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES

Ed Lynes

NEWS

OPERATIONS

Joe Eisele ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Tim Ronaldson DIGITAL MEDIA DIRECTOR Tom Engle ART DIRECTOR CHAIRMAN OF
Joe Eisele
ADVERTISING DIRECTOR
Tim Ronaldson
DIGITAL MEDIA DIRECTOR
Tom Engle
ART DIRECTOR
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD
CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER
Russell Cann
Barry Rubens
Michael LaCount, Ph.D.
VICE CHAIRMAN

ELAUWIT MEDIA GROUP

CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD

VICE CHAIRMAN

Dan McDonough, Jr. Alan Bauer

Dan McDonough, Jr. Alan Bauer

The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit Media LLC, 20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A, Princeton, NJ 08542. It is mailed weekly to select addresses in the 08550 ZIP code. If you are not on the mailing list, six-month subscriptions are available for $39.99. PDFs of the publication are online, free of charge. For information, please call 609-751-0245.

To submit a news release, please email news@westwindsorsun.com. For advertis- ing information, call 609-751-0245 or email advertising@westwindsorsun.com. The Sun welcomes suggestions and com- ments from readers – including any infor- mation about errors that may call for a cor- rection to be printed.

SPEAK UP The Sun welcomes letters from readers. Brief and to the point is best, so we look for letters that are 300 words or fewer. Include your name, address and phone number. We do not print anonymous letters. Send letters to news@westwindsorsun.com, via fax at 609-751-0245, or via the mail. Of course, you can drop them off at our office, too. The West Windsor Sun reserves the right to reprint your letter in any medium – includ- ing electronically.

MANAGING EDITOR, NEWS

MANAGING EDITOR, PRODUCTION

WEST WINDSOR EDITOR

Kevin Canessa Jr. Mary L. Serkalow Julie Stipe

MANAGING EDITOR, NEWS MANAGING EDITOR, PRODUCTION WEST WINDSOR EDITOR Kevin Canessa Jr. Mary L. Serkalow Julie
MANAGING EDITOR, NEWS MANAGING EDITOR, PRODUCTION WEST WINDSOR EDITOR Kevin Canessa Jr. Mary L. Serkalow Julie

MAY 9-15, 2012 – THE WEST WINDSOR SUN 7

Solar panel farm would sit off Old Trenton Road

SOLAR

Continued from page 1

ing, and her request for a third open meeting received a response from the college stating that an- other meeting “would not be pro- ductive at this time.” The college has provided very little information to residents of South Post Road and West Wind- sor in general, Lourenco said. “They’ve stated a lot of promis- es throughout this project,” she said. Nicole Miller worried about the financial side of the project, commenting that at the time the project was conceived, solar renewable energy certificates (SRECs) were valued at $600, but have now dropped to around

$100.

SRECs are awarded as a solar facility produces energy, and may be sold as a way to make a solar project more viable. Because of the SREC’s low value, Miller said, other counties and organizations with similar plans have pulled back from the projects. “It seems to me that it’s clear there should be an exit plan,” Miller said. West Windsor resident Jim Biz- zoni noted kids of many residents in the area have found artifacts

such as arrowheads and musket balls on the farmland, and he’s worried the construction would ruin artifacts found on the land. “I can't understand why Mer- cer County Community College would be party to the destruction of historically significant land,” Bizzoni said. Rich Michal said that although he presently lives in Robbinsville, his mother and brother live di- rectly adjacent to the property where the college plans to install panels. Like many other residents at the meeting, Michal stated he is not against solar or renewable energy. “I think it’s a very good thing going into the future,” Michal said. However, Michal said he is wor- ried about the possible conse- quences of a large project like the one the college is planning, espe- cially since the area has a history of flooding problems, which could be exacerbated by runoff from the solar farm. The college, Michal said, made no effort to in- form residents “how massive this project was going to be.” South Post Road resident Mari- lyn Stoddard said residents on the road are on well water and use septic systems, and that some of the wells along South Post Road are contaminated and are being treated and observed by the New

Jersey Department of Environ- mental Protection. Because of this, she said, in- creased runoff and flooding are a major concern, as they could af- fect residents’ water supplies and septic systems. Rich Campbell, another resi- dent of South Post Road noted, “It takes a lot to get folks on this block riled up,” and added that communication by the college with the community has been “botched” from the start. The col- lege hasn’t solicited input from residents, Campbell said, and an- swers to concerned residents’ questions have been “dismissive absolutes.” Campbell asked the township council to talk to the county and college. “I ask you to use whatever influence you have on our behalf,” he said. Township council members were unanimous in their agree- ment with residents. “I’m out- raged by this,” councilman Bryan Maher said, saying the college “flagrantly disregarded” resi- dents’ concerns. Councilwoman Geevers lamented the fate of the open space. “This beautiful bucolic farm- land may soon become covered by glass and metal,” she said. Geev- ers asked the council to consider requesting the college to come to West Windsor and have the town-

Businesses all local at market

BUSINESSES

Continued from page 5

donate it to the crisis ministry. “It’s really nice to see the out- pouring of support,” Cirkus said. “It’s one of the most wonderful things you ever want to be a part of.” Each farm and business at the market is local, which means not only is the food is incredibly fresh (and likely more nutritious than that bought at a supermarket, since it comes from small-scale farms), but also, that patronizing

the market supports small local businesses. “Your money is going right back into the community,” Cirkus said. All the farms are “conscious of their growing practices,” Cirkus said, and care about good stew- ardship of the land; a few even sell certified-organic produce. Because of these numerous ad- vantages farmers markets have over supermarkets, Cirkus hopes shoppers will begin to change the way they think about where they buy their food. She believes that consumers should buy the bulk of their groceries at the farmers’

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market, and fill in the gaps at su- permarkets. “Support local first,” Cirkus said. “Then go bigger later.” Certainly most items you might buy at a supermarket are available at West Windsor’s mar- ket, even breads, jams, meat and soap. The approach to buying food at a farmers’ market, howev- er, is slightly different. Although it is possible to guess, one can never be entirely certain what will be available at a farm- ers’ market. “You have to go with an open mind,” said Cirkus. “It’s about changing your mindset.”

PSA

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ship’s planning board do a “cour- tesy review” of the project, which would allow the township to go over details of the project and ex- press their concerns. Township attorney Michael Herbert pointed out that although the township can request a cour- tesy review, it cannot require one. He also said that the township is very limited regarding action it can take in the matter since Mer- cer College is a separate jurisdic- tion. “We are stuck as a munici- pality,” Herbert said. Mayor Shing-Fu Hsueh stated that earlier that day he sent a let- ter to president of Mercer County Community College Patricia Donohue, relaying the concerns of West Windsor residents and asking for more information about the financial side of the

project as well as drainage and other health-related issues. “We will continue to contact them about our concerns,” Hsueh said. In a statement, Donohue stressed the sustainability and economic value of the project for the college, stating that the proj- ect will save the college between $750,000 and $1 million. She did not specify over what period of time the savings would take place. Regarding drainage issues Donohue said, “The grounds will remain a permeable surface to allow for drainage.” Donohue also said two public meetings were held with local res- idents, during which the project was presented to residents “in its entirety.”

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PAGE 8

CALENDAR

MAY 9-15, 2012

WEDNESDAY MAY 9

Toddler Story Time & Craft: Ages 2

to 4. 10:30 to 11 a.m. at West Wind- sor Branch Library. Stories and music followed by a craft. Siblings welcome. No registration required.

Bollywood Babies: Age 18 to 36

months. 11:30 to noon at West Windsor Branch Library. Experi- ence the fun of Bollywood dance. Instructor Sunita Raj has over 12 years professional dance experi- ence and a degree in early child- hood education. Children learn simple Bollywood dance moves. No registration requires.

Princeton HealthCare’s Introduc- tion to Babysitting: Ages 12 to

15. 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. at West Windsor Branch Library. Topics include safety, dealing with behavioral problems, age chal- lenges and building your busi- ness. Bring a stuffed animal for practice. Registration required.

THURSDAY MAY 10

Excel I: 6 to 7 p.m. at West Windsor Branch Library. Learn the basics of Excel through making a sam- ple spreadsheet. Formatting, using the autofill feature, using formulas and making simple charts are covered in this class. To sign up, visit the reference desk or call (609) 275-8901. Excel II: 7 to 8 p.m. at West Windsor Branch Library. Learn how to

change chart colors and back- grounds. Also learn how to down- load Excel compatible spread- sheets from the Internet, filter spreadsheets, add conditional formatting to spreadsheets and create a pivot table. To sign up, visit the reference desk or call (609) 275-8901. PowerPoint: 3 to 4 p.m. at West Windsor Branch Library. Learn basics of making presentations, including basic slides, creating slideshows, adding animations and clipart, and transitions between slides. To sign up, visit the reference desk or call (609)

275-8901.

Picture Books & Craft: Ages 3 to 5.

10:30 to 11 a.m. at West Windsor Branch Library. Stories followed by a craft. DIY Art: Ages 6 to 11. 4:15 to 5 p.m. at West Windsor Branch Library. Various materials provided. Par- ents are not to be in the room with the art project, but must remain in the library. No registra- tion required.

American Sign Language Class:

Ages 6 and older. 4:15 to 5 p.m. at West Windsor Branch Library. Introductory class. Learn to sign colors and make simple sen- tences. Online registration required.

West Windsor Township Environ- mental Commission meeting: 8

p.m. For more information or agenda, visit www.westwind- sornj.org.

more information or agenda, visit www.westwind- sornj.org. FRIDAY MAY 11 Friday Film Series : 7:30 p.m.

FRIDAY MAY 11

Friday Film Series: 7:30 p.m. at

West Windsor Arts Center, 952 Alexander Road. Watch “Duck Season.” Guest speaker is Carlos Gutierrez. Cost is $7 general, $6 members. For more information call (609) 716-1931.

English Conversation Class for

ESL Students: 1:15 to 2:30 p.m. Join reference librarian Richard Peterson for informal discussion of language, culture and daily liv- ing. Skills stressed are pronuncia- tion, accent, vocabulary and flu- ency, as well as how to navigate everyday interaction with others. At least some capacity to under- stand English required. Register online. Sing & Play: All ages. 10:30 to 11 a.m. at West Windsor Branch Library. Sing-along program with guitar and CD music. Action songs and finger plays encourage audience participation. Kids Yoga: Ages 4 to 6. 9:45 to 10:30 a.m. and 1:30 to 2:15 p.m. at West Windsor Branch Library. Bring yoga mat and water bottle. Registration required.

SATURDAY MAY 12

GroWW Mother’s Day Plant Sale:

10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Community Park Waterworks, 193 Princeton- Hightstown Road. Fundraiser for the arts. For more information call (609) 716-1931.

Word: 10 to 11:30 a.m. at West Wind- sor Branch Library. Tour through Microsoft Word 2007 and 2010 toolbars. Learn how to change font styles, bullet or number paragraphs, set margins, insert graphics and more. To sign up, visit the reference desk or call (609) 275-8901.

Bharat Natyam Workshop: Ages 6

and older. 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. at West Windsor Branch Library. Indian classical dance workshop. Kinnari Hundiwala will instruct. She has 20 years experience. Class is meant for beginners and held weekly; regular attendance recommended. Registration required.

Hindi Class & Craft: Ages 5 and old-

er. 12 to 12:30 p.m. at West Wind- sor Branch Library. No knowledge of Hindi necessary, but regular attendance encouraged. Ms. Gita teaches an integrated and struc- tured approach covering practi- cal day-to-day conversation, grammar, speaking, listening, reading and writing. Stories and craft are included.

Tamil Language Class: Ages 5 and

older. 3 to 4 p.m. at West Windsor Branch Library. Learn basics of Tamil language. Bring a notebook and pencil. No registration required.

Problem

Solvers: Grades two

through five. 10:30 a.m. to noon at West Windsor Branch Library. Come together with children of the same age to have fun solving logic puzzles. No registration

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required.

Mini Masters Problem Solvers:

Ages 8 to 10 with a guardian. 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. at West Wind- sor Branch Library. Join for a pro- ram teaching kids 21st century skills in a fun and exciting way outside of the classroom. Chil- dren will develop important skills needed to become successful. Registration required.

SUNDAY MAY 13

Celebrate Mother’s Day: 3 p.m. at

West Windsor Arts Center, 952 Alexander Road. Dance, music, treats and more. Cost is $12 gen- eral, $10 members and $6 chil- dren. Children under 2 are free. For more information call (609)

716-1931.

Mother’s Day Story Time: 1:30 to

2:30 p.m. at West Windsor Branch Library. Loving stories and tissue- paper flower craft. All ages. Par- ent/guardian participation required.

MONDAY MAY 14

New Jersey Writers Society meet-

ing: 6:30 to 8 p.m. at West Wind- sor Branch Library. All are wel- come to attend and enjoy chal- lenges of becoming better writ- ers, defeating writer’s block and perfecting the craft. No registra- tion required. Books & Babies: Age birth to 2. 10:30 to 11 a.m. at West Windsor Branch Library. A program of songs, rhymes, movement and simple stories designed to intro- duce babies to the library. Each child must be accompanied by an adult. No registration required. Alphabet Hour: Ages 4 to 6. 6 to 7 p.m. at West Windsor Branch Library. Join Ms. Lisa for an hour of fun and get to know the alpha- bet. Every week children will focus on one letter. Hear stories featuring this letter, sing songs and do a letter-related craft. Reg- istration required.

West Windsor Township Council

meeting: 7 p.m. For more infor-

visit

mation

or

agenda,

www.westwindsornj.org.

West Windsor Township Board of Health meeting: 7 p.m. For more

information

www.westwindsornj.org.

or

agenda,

visit

TUESDAY MAY 15

Plant a Library Garden: Ages 4 to

11. 4:15 to 5:15 p.m. at West Wind- sor Branch Library. Discuss importance of local organic gar- dening. Plant various vegetables. Take turns digging soil and plant- ing tomatoes, peppers, cucum- bers, zucchini and flowers. Wear clothes that can get dirty. No reg- istration required.

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