er our i C

Claremont

t

CHS GIRLS VOLLEYBALL GRABS FIRST WIN OF THE SEASON/PAGE 16
Friday, October 11, 2013 u One dollar

claremont-courier.com

An appetite for art

PAGE

10

COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff Artist Luis Ramirez, left, describes the techniques he used to create a carving housed at the Lemon Tree Cafe. Catherine Dickerson, a caterer and owner of the cafe, said the sculpture will be a permanent decoration at the new restaurant, located at the Claremont School of Theology.

t

Big shoes to fill after Roni Lomeli announces retirement/PAGE 11

Hiram Chodosh
Claremont McKenna College welcomes its fifth president

PAGE

5

What a kick! Pilgrim takes to the mat
PAGE

14

t

t

POLICE BLOTTER/ PAGE 4 OBITUARIES/ PAGE 10

LETTERS/ PAGES 2 AND 7 CALENDAR/ PAGE 20

Find out what everyone’s talking about. Visit our website: claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 11, 2013

2

1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Ste. 205B Claremont, CA 91711 (909) 621-4761 Office hours: Monday-Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Owner Janis Weinberger Publisher and Owner Peter Weinberger
pweinberger@claremont-courier.com

To ‘frustrated’ in Claremont

READERS’ COMMENTS
Town and gown
Dear Editor: What happened to the “Town and Gown” philosophy? I am referring to the closure of the Claremont Golf Course, owned by The Colleges. I have lived in Claremont since 1947. My husband and I began taking golf lessons at this course in 1980. I have been playing with the women’s golf club, composed of 78 members who play every Tuesday. Who else plays on the course? Claremont High School’s golf teams practice here; many of the retired folks from around the area; familis with their children. It is true that some of these folks are not playing there as often as they did. Why is that? Simply because there is not enough money to water the course and keep out the gophers. As we in Claremont know, our water bills are astronomical! The greens are the only areas that are watered now. What can be done? The fact is, The Colleges were given this property years ago and enjoy large endowment funds. It is hard to understand why they cannot—or won’t—put some money into this longstanding institution in our fair city. Our Claremont Heritage focuses on preserving historical buildings and places—it seems The Colleges could do the same. There are so many unhappy and sad people in our community and surrounding cities because of The Colleges’ decision to close our only golf course. Please reconsider.

ADVENTURES
IN HAIKU
Seasons change slowly Heat may fade in October Summer soon to fall
—Louis White Haiku submissions should reflect upon life or events in Claremont. Please email entries to editor@claremont-courier.com.

Editor-in-Chief Kathryn Dunn
editor@claremont-courier.com

Newsroom
City Reporter Beth Hartnett
news@claremont-courier.com

Education Reporter/Obituaries Sarah Torribio
storribio@claremont-courier.com

Sports Reporter
Bryan Stauffer sports@claremont-courier.com

Photo Editor/Staff Photographer Steven Felschundneff
steven@claremont-courier.com

Reporter At Large Pat Yarborough Calendar Editor
Jenelle Rensch calendar@claremont-courier.com

Back Page Sammy
sammy@claremont-courier.com

Dear Editor: I, too, am tired of the ongoing fight between the city, Claremont Outrage and Golden State Water Company. However, I believe we must continue this fight. My wife and I live in what I feel is an average Claremont home—1500 square feet on a 10,000-square-foot lot. I, too, monitor my water, electric and gas usage. My average water bills in the summer are $270 and $90 in the winter. In the last three years, I’ve seen my water bill go up nine percent in 2011, 12 percent in 2012 and I estimate it will go up 21 percent in 2013. My water bill for 2012 will be about $2,000, almost the same as my property taxes. We do something we can to conserve water, but there is a limit to what can be done. And even if we do conserve, we are hit with WRAM. Yes, we will have to pay more for water if Claremont acquires the water system. But we are going to pay more regardless. Yes, there are people who use huge quantities of water and they will benefit the most. But so will we. Frustrated hopes to be in Claremont for the long run. And I hope she is. But if our water rates keep going up 9 to 10 percent every year, she, and we, will no longer be able to afford Claremont. The city passed up several opportunitites to buy the water system in the past. It is not going to get cheaper in the future. The time is now. And I hope the city will go for revenue bonds, as opposed to a parcel tax. That way, everyone will share in the cost of acquiring the water system.
David Comerzan Claremont

GOVERNING OURSELVES
Agendas for city meetings are available at www.ci.claremont.ca.us Tuesday, October 15 City Council Neighborhood Forum Blaisdell Center, 6 to 8 p.m. Planning Commission Council Chamber, 7 p.m.

Carlynn Christian Claremont

READERS’ COMMENTS Please send readers’ comments via email to editor@claremont-courier.com or by mail or hand-delivery to 1420 N. Claremont Blvd. Ste. 205B, Claremont, CA 91711. The deadline for submission is Tuesday at 5 p.m. The COURIER cannot guarantee publication of every letter. Letters are the opinion of the writer, not a reflection of the COURIER. We reserve the right to edit letters. Letters should not exceed 250 words.

More READERSʼCOMMENTS/page 7

Production
Ad Design Jenelle Rensch Page Layout Kathryn Dunn, Jenelle Rensch

Advertising
Advertising Director Mary Rose
maryrose@claremont-courier.com

Classified Editor Jessica Gustin
classified@claremont-courier.com

Business Administration
Office Manager/ Legal Notices Vickie Rosenberg
legalads@claremont-courier.com

Billing/Accounting Manager Dee Proffitt Distribution/Publications Tom Smith
tomsmith@claremont-courier.com

Circulation/Subscriptions
subscriptions@claremont-courier.com

Interns Christina Burton Ryan Gann

The Claremont Courier (United States Postal Service 115-180) is published once weekly by the Courier Graphics Corporation at 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Suite 205B, Claremont, California 91711-5003. The Courier is a newspaper of general circulation as defined by the political code of the state of California, entered as periodicals matter September 17, 1908 at the post office at Claremont, California under the act of March 3, 1879. Periodicals postage is paid at Claremont, California 91711-5003. Single copy: One dollar. Annual subscription: $52.00. Send all remittances and correspondence about subscriptions, undelivered copies and changes of address to the Courier, 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Suite 205B, Claremont, California 91711-5003. Telephone: 909-621-4761. Copyright © 2013 Claremont Courier

one hundred and fifth year, number 48

CITY NEWS

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 11, 2013

3

Big-ticket projects have council setting tough priorities

F

ollowing a sleepy summer, Claremont has woken up with recent movement on three longstanding issues—water system ownership, building a new police facility and updating and expanding the Joslyn Senior Center. But with these developments comes a major city dilemma: prioritizing the priorities.  

“Everything is pretty much laid out, now how much are we willing to spend?” Councilmember Sam Pedroza posed at Tuesday night’s city council meeting. Multi-million dollar projects have been at the forefront of the Claremont council’s discussion over the past month. On September 28, the city’s water negotiating team moved forward with a new $55 million offer to Golden State Water Company and, at the same time, the new police facility ad hoc committee brought its feasibility study forward to the council with a cost estimate of at least $42 million for a new police center. Both would rely on some sort of bond measure to move forward. Tuesday’s council meeting presented more of the same with a report given on the Larkin Park Campus Improvement Project, a 14,000-square-foot expansion

and renovation to Larkin Park and the Joslyn Center that is estimated at about $15 million. Like the others, the Larkin Park improvement plan has been a council priority for years, stalled only because of lack of available funds. While estimating about CITY $2 million of that COUNCIL could be raised through local fundraising efforts and available grants, the project’s ad hoc committee recognized the rest would need to be acquired through a bond. While acknowledging the concerns of moving forward with voting on a bond measure while the city pursues other costly ventures, the committee urged the council to allow them to move forward in conducting a feasibility study. They also offered a gift of $20,000 from the Claremont Senior Foundation fund to help pay for a bond survey to evaluate interest not only for the Larkin Park renovation, but also for the police station upgrade.   While maintaining that renovating and expanding the Joslyn Center is still a city priority, and agreeing that a feasibility study should be conducted, council members were hesitant to move forward with the survey. In a 4-0 vote, with Councilmember Larry Schroeder absent, the council opted to advance with the feasibility study while holding off on a survey until the public can be presented with all the options. City Manager Tony Ramos expects that information will be ready in about six to

nine months, at which time a feasibility study with more realistic cost estimates for both the police facility and Larkin Park are expected to be complete. “I don’t want to confuse the people of the community by a survey that tells them one thing and then later on we come back and say there is something else we want to look at,” said Mayor Opanyi Nasiali. Mr. Nasiali illuminated his point by referring back to the city’s efforts to purchase Johnson’s Pasture in 2006. Survey results at that time showed that the community was interested in a bond measure to help purchase the pasture. At the same time, however, the city was working on expanding Padua Park. When it came to placing a bond measure on the spring 2006 ballot, it was decided that funding for parks should also be attached to the Johnson’s Pasture ballot initiative. The measure ended up failing. “I do not wish to face that situation again,” Mr. Nasiali said. While pleased with the efforts made on moving forward with all of these city priorities, council members cautioned residents about the potential burdens. As it is, City Manager Tony Ramos noted that Claremont residents with an assessed property of $450,000 pay a little more than $1,000 in special assessment taxes already. “All of these [priorities] are going to have to be put into context...There are a lot of needs for this community,” Coun-

cilmember Corey Calaycay said. “Ironically, this being for seniors, seniors tend to be on limited incomes, so some seniors might have a challenging time trying to accommodate all of the things that are a priority to our community.” City arborist hire postponed After more than two hours of debate, the council also opted to hold off on another city expenditure, that of hiring an urban forester, or arborist. The decision was made 4-0, much to the dismay of many in the audience, including members of the city’s sustainability committee and delgates from the nonprofit Sustainable Claremont and that organization’s Tree Action Group. For several years the city has contracted out for tree services, a decision that many felt was unwise for a place known as the City of Trees. “We lost our designated internal advocate for trees,” said Michael Heilpern. “Our staff, including our Community and Human Services Department, is highly competent and professional. But as the staff report tonight reminds us, they are responsible for a variety of things: hardscape and utilities, park maintenance and, additionally, trees. It’s a lot to keep track of. When you try to manage all of those things...it leads to short-term thinking.” The updated Sustainable City Plan, presented by an ad hoc committee on Tuesday, called for the city to reinstate
COUNCIL/continues on the next page

Sixty-foot sign approval sought from Planning Commission

T

he Planning Commission, on Tuesday, October 15, will discuss whether to amend the city’s zoning code to allow a 60-foot sign at Base Line Road and Towne Avenue.

The sign being proposed would support a potential small retail development at the southeast corner of Base Line and Towne. The development is located within the city’s mixed-use zoning district, which calls for “commercial uses to be located on the corner.” The zone does not, however, allow tall signs for those developments. To support the potential retail center, staff believes a 60-foot sign would be necessary in order to be seen over the freeway grade and other site constraints such as tall power lines. Community members are invited to take part in the discussion. The meeting takes place at 7 p.m. in the City Council Chamber, 225 W. Second St. Those unable to attend may send writCOURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff ten comments to PO Box 880, Claremont, CA Two young men cross Foothill Boulevard in a heavy downpour on Wednesday afternoon in Claremont. The seasonʼs 91711. For more information, contact Associate first significant storm system came through the region beginning about 2 p.m., with substantial rain and occasional thunder. Planner Luke Seibert at 399-5483.

CITY NEWS

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 11, 2013

4

City ups offer to Golden State Water by $1 million
City to elaborate on water issues at town hall meeting next month

T

he city of Claremont has offered Golden State Water Company $55 million for the purchase of Claremont’s water system, city officials confirmed this week.

This is the second offer the city has made to the privately-owned water company. Last November, Claremont officials presented Golden State Water with a $54 million offer, which they turned down. On September 24, City Attorney Sonia Carvalho announced that the city had revised its offer after an updated appraisal of the city’s water system. However, the amount of that offer was not disclosed. Golden State Water officials released the information in a press release sent Friday, October 4. Water company administrators have not confirmed whether or not they have refused the city’s offer. A
COUNCIL continued from the previous page

statement given by Denise Kruger, Golden State’s senior vice president of regulated utilities, instead points to the burden a $55 million offer would have on Claremont residents. “Based on this new offer, residents will have to pay more than $133 million in principal and interest to acquire the water system,” Ms. Kruger wrote. “The city cannot match Golden State’s level of drinking water quality, infrastructure maintenance and customer service; and the water system is not for sale. If the city pursues its takeover effort, hundreds of millions in tax debt and higher water rates will put other public services at risk.” In response, the city calls attention to the upcoming town hall on Wednesday, November 6—to be held at 6 p.m. in Taylor Hall—at which time officials say residents will receive more information on the city’s plan to pursue acquisition of the Claremont water system. “Over the past several months, city staff has been

carefully evaluating key issues related to the city’s potential acquisition of the water system,” said City Manager Tony Ramos.

n November, the city council will conduct a town hall meeting where residents will learn about issues relating to the potential acquisition of the water system,” Mr. Ramos added. “ In addition, our residents will have an opportunity to share their thoughts and opinions with the city council regarding the future of Claremont’s water system.”
—Beth Hartnett news@claremont-courier.com

“I

Village Venture fair approaches

the city arborist position. City administrators, however, were hesitant. Seeing it as too costly a venture at this time, city staff recommended the council veto the committee’s recommendation. The council remained split on the matter. Councilmembers Sam Pedroza, Corey Calaycay and Mayor Pro Tem Joe Lyons were supportive of the city’s strides and lofty goals in terms of sustainability. However, Mr. Pedroza and Mr. Calaycay, as well as Mayor Opanyi Nasiali, were hesitant to support the goal of rehiring a city arborist with the city’s economic uncertainties. “We cannot allow the city’s fiscal climate to be affected because we are focusing on one thing and ignoring what that impact would be,” Mr. Nasiali said. Mr. Lyons remained firm in his belief that the city should hire an arborist, but he conceded to the will of the council with the caveat that the council remain open to the future possibility of reinstating the position. With a 4-0 vote, the council agreed that the hiring of a city arborist will be reexamined within the city’s upcoming budget proceedings.
—Beth Hartnett news@claremont-courier.com

T

he Claremont Chamber of Commerce is hard at work preparing for the Village Venture arts and crafts fair. With an estimated 15,000 people in attendance, the streets of the Claremont Village will be filled with more than 500 booths at this annual event on Saturday, October 26 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
The streets will be lined with booths selling unique art, original crafts, apparel, business and organization information, international food and providing entertainment. Sponsored by The Claremont Sunrise Rotary, a children’s pre-carved pumpkin competition will be held at Shelton Park on the corner of Harvard and Bonita Avenues. Judging for the contest will take place at 2 p.m. The traditional children’s Halloween costume parade will begin at 9:30 a.m. All participants need to assemble at the corner of Harvard and Bonita Avenues by 9:15 a.m. No motorized vehicles

will be allowed in the parade. A complimentary off-site shuttle service will be provided. Shuttle locations include Claremont University facilities on First Street and COURIER photo/Cameron Barr Mills Avenue, at the Cahuilla Park parking lot on Scripps Drive and Indian Hill Boulevard and St. Ambrose Episcopal Church on Bonita and Mountain Avenues. First Street to Fourth Street and Indian Hill Boulevard to College Avenue will be closed to vehicle traffic throughout the day. Volunteers are needed to man entrances and exits to the fair. Contact the Chamber for information. For more information, contact the Claremont Chamber of Commerce at 624-1681 or visit www.claremontchamber.org

Thursday, October 3 The bad luck streak continues for the Claremont Forum, located at 586 First St. in the Claremont Packing House. For the third time within a month, vandals attempted to break into the nonprofit. Similar to the last attempt, however, the crooks were unable to gain entrance. The handles to the store’s outward-facing door were broken, but there was no other damage. The damages continued in the Packing House basement, where a vehicle was found with a smashed window. Lucky for the owner, there was no property loss. Any information on either of these incidents should be reported to the Claremont Police Department at 399-5411.

POLICE BLOTTER

Saturday, October 5 The Los Angeles County HAZMAT

crew was called to Golden State Water, 110 S. College Ave., on Saturday morning after a very angry man wreaked havoc on the facility. The man—who claimed a voice had told him to break the company’s pipes and allegedly stated, “I’d blow this place up if necessary”—broke into the building, yelling and screaming as he destroyed pipes and equipment, according to Detective Robert Ewing. In the process, the suspect caused a leak in a 40-gallon tank of chlorine. The HAZMAT team was called to the scene and the man was taken to the hospital, first for treatment of chemical burns to his body and next for a mental hold. He was also arrested for burglary and vandalism. **** The weather has been getting peculiar

at Pitzer College, where several have reported fruit mysteriously falling from the sky near the vicinity of Pitzer Hall. In one of the most recent cases, a female student was walking in the 1000 block of the Pitzer Service Road when she was struck in the face by a falling apple. There were no witnesses. The mystery remains unsolved. Monday, October 7 Alan Balchazar, 24, of Pomona decided to go on an early-morning drive on Monday. Unfortunately, it was on the wrong side of the road. His journey quickly drew to a close when he crashed his car into a fence near Base Line Road and Monte Vista Ave. His car was a little worse for wear, but Mr. Balchazar left the scene unharmed except for a bruised ego. He was arrested for driving under the influence.  

Tuesday, October 8 Riding skateboards in a strange neighborhood at 3 a.m. is likely going to cause suspicion, two young men and a teenager discovered a little too late on Tuesday. Police caught up with them in the 2100 block of Forbes Avenue, where 20-yearold Cody Bridges of Pomona, 19-yearold Timothy Glasby of Ontario and 20-year-old Stephen Harrison-Granato of Upland were found laden with stolen property from a series of car thefts in the area. Loot included cash, GPS units and sunglasses. Two of the crooks remained tight-lipped, but the third didn’t receive the memo, and admitting to police, “We were walking around stealing things from unlocked cars.” Property was returned to the rightful owners, while the men remained behind bars.
—Beth Hartnett news@claremont-courier.com

EDUCATION

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 11, 2013

5

New CMC president speaks from heart about education, success

H

iram E. Chodosh, who was inaugurated as the fifth president of Claremont McKenna on Saturday, has some distinct goals as he takes the reins of the prestigious liberal arts

college. The first of these is to moderate the cost of a CMC education by marshaling more means to aid students and their families. He considers it equally important to ensure that every possible resource is shepherded to meet students’ needs “in an extraordinary way.” “We need to be engaged in thinking about value in terms of the capabilities students will carry out with them, to ensure that their capacities are well-aligned with what the world values,” he said. It’s a challenge to keep up with the demands of the global marketplace, and to predict what will be needed next. “You have to ask a lot of questions and think critically about the answers, making sure they are not ephemeral. You have to make educated guesses about long-term trends,” he explained. “Yogi Berra said, ‘The future isn’t what is used to be.’ You have to use caution when making guesses about the future.” Luckily, there are constants when it comes to the characteristics that will generate success, regardless of time or trend, Mr. Chodosh said. People will always be soughtafter if they are imaginative, analytically critical and ethical; if they communicate with and work well with others; and if they are able to get out of their comfort levCOURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff els and absorb lessons from dealing with others. During a recent interview, Hiram Chodosh, the new president of Claremont McKenna College, laid out his plan “Science, computer science and quantitative skills, as for the future of the liberal arts college. well as sophistication with technology, are increasingly support of my family, getting an education, these things Keck Graduate University. important. But they can’t be pursued in isolation from the were no longer enough. “There’s nothing like it in higher education,” Mr. Chodeepest questions of society,” Mr. Chodosh cautioned. “Suddenly I was a young man accountable, responsi- dosh said. “This country has consortia of colleges, but “Sometimes people say humanities are important for ble for carrying the namesake of the man she loved and none as concentrated, proximate and extraordinarily suctheir own sake,” he continued. “It’s important in addition missed so much,” he continued. “Responsible for doing cessful. There’s no hierarchal arrangement above The to note that humanities also have enormous instrumental good in the world, for sharing that sense of fortune, free- Colleges. value to making decisions on almost every important pol- dom and family—for sharing all I could learn with oth“This set-up requires a special commitment to collabicy and dilemma in the world—questions about the value ers. So today, I draw on the parallel lesson of that quiet oration, a very generous spirit of sharing what each of us of human life, about how to pursue a good end through gathering of three in today’s spirited gathering of hun- has to offer to the others,” he continued. “It’s the most good means. These often can’t be answered alone dreds. Today, I cross the stage and I take responsibility.” unique experiment in comparative advantage in US edthrough a quantitative method.” As he does so, Mr. Chodosh is committed to fostering ucation.” —Sarah Torribio Mr. Chodosh, who assumed his presidency on July 1, an atmosphere that inspires Claremont McKenna stustorribio@claremont-courier.com comes to the college after a seven-year tenure at the Uni- dents to take responsibility, to take action informed by versity of Utah. There, he served as dean of the SJ Quin- knowledge, something he feels is at the heart of a liberal ney College of Law as well as the Hugh B. Brown arts education. One of the hallmarks of a Claremont Endowed Presidential Professor of Law and Senior McKenna education, more specifically, is a tradition of Presidential Adviser on Global Strategy. Prior to that, academic innovations that he vows to continue. Mr. Chodosh was a professor and administrator for 13 To have an event listed, email Kathryn Dunn, editor, at One such innovation is bringing departments together editor@claremont-courier.com. years at Case Western Reserve University School of on major issues in the development of students and sociLaw in Cleveland, Ohio and before that, he practiced ety. CMC demonstrated this sort of convergence with a law. He earned his bachelor’s degree in history from series of public sessions, themed The Art and Science of Saturday, October 12 Dave Nemer’s campaign invites you to an afternoon Wesleyan University and his Juris Doctor degree from Decision-Making, held the day before Mr. Chodosh’s ingathering at the Gardens hosted by Carole, 900 E. HarriYale Law School. stallation ceremony. The presentations explored “how a son, Apt B1, from 2 to 4 p.m. Info: 626-1723 or 621-2703. Mr. Chodosh’s achievements are myriad but, in his in- liberal arts education harnesses many academic disciaugural speech, he insisted he can’t take credit for his ac- plines to help students develop a richer understanding of The Nancy Treser Osgood campaign welcomes the complishments. Instead, he attributes his success to the decision-making.” public to a gathering hosted by Barbara Rugeley and Greg many people who have inspired him over the years. Not Mr. Chodosh would rather spend time championing Shapton, 2 to 4 p.m., at 1436 Mural Dr. least among these is his grandmother, who at 18 fled the the importance of a liberal arts education and getting persecution of Jews in her native land, traveling via steer- down to the business of helping CMC maintain its long- Monday, October 14 age class from her small village near Odessa in the standing excellence. Nonetheless, he took a moment to Michael and Karen Rosenthal will host “Appetizers and Ukraine to New York’s Ellis Island. address how the school is repairing its image in the wake Aperitifs” with Steven Llanusa to discuss realigning eleAlong with imparting love over milk, chocolate Her- of a scandal that came to light in 2012, in which a senior mentary school attendance boundaries at 7 p.m. at 1100 shey Kisses and games of canasta and gin rummy, Mr. administrator admitted that he had for six years inflated Oxford Ave. Info: 215-1290. Chodosh’s grandmother passed on stories that impressed the SAT scores of incoming freshmen in order to advance him with the importance of family, freedom and strength the institution’s national rankings. Tuesday, October 15 Enjoy dessert and coffee with Paul Steffen at the home in the face of adversity. “I don’t think there’s anything left to repair,” Mr. ChoMr. Chodosh told the gathered crowd of the time dosh said simply. “The school responded immediately of John and Carolyn Bifone, 2124 Kemper Ave., from 7 to when, to mark his 13th birthday, his grandmother sat and transparently. It [initiated] an independent investiga- 9 p.m. down with him and his mother for a quiet, personal sort tion and improved and intensified a whole series of data Linda Troyer, Roberto Muñoz and Steve McCuen will of bar mitzvah. Over Lipton tea and Entenmann’s cake, integrity measures internally. I think the response was host “Dessert and Discussion” with Steven Llanusa at 136 she told him he was named after her husband, who died exemplary.” N. Bedford at 7 p.m. Info: www.electllanusa.com. before he was born. She then presented him with a rumMore interesting to Mr. Chodosh is the power of the pled envelope containing a number of five- and ten-dol- Claremont Colleges Consortium, an association that joins Nancy Treser Osgood’s campaign supporters invite you lar bills that she had amassed over years of savings. the resources of the town’s five undergraduate institu- to share ideas at a gathering hosted by Mitra and Swapan “My Nana didn’t have much money or formal educa- tions and two graduate universities: Pomona, Scripps, tion, and yet she taught me a grand lesson that day,” he Harvey Mudd, Claremont McKenna and Pitzer Colleges Nag and Anna Asker and Donald Hafner, at 1043 Alamrelated. “Just feeling fortunate, being free, having the as well as the Claremont Graduate University and the osa, from 6:30 to 8 p.m.

CANDIDATES’ CORNER

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 11, 2013

6

Filling the generation gap
by Ron White, local stake president, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

O

n a hot Arizona night in the 1930s, my Dad walked through the back door of his childhood home and found his brothers arguing and fighting. Things calmed down briefly as he entered the room but then his youngest brother spit out a toxic combination of threats and obscenities aimed at the others. The reaction was chemical, stripping the brotherhood from the room.
Fortunately, no one was seriously hurt that night but such episodes were not uncommon among them. They were bound by rules and traditions much like the old “Code of the West,” which they learned long before Zane Grey’s book was published in 1934. In fact, you might say the unwritten code that governed frontier living was in their blood. Their grandfather was a famous frontiersman turned justice of the peace and their Uncle Jim, an infamous gunfighter turned lawman. Life was harsh in Depression-era

Inter-Faithfully SPEAKING
Phoenix. Jobs were few, wages were low and conflict was everywhere. From sputtering factories and fallow farms to tension-filled homes and empty-cupboard kitchens, people knew the only thing great about the Depression was its burden, and their suffering. Kids don’t always comprehend the reasons for such things. They only sense that life isn’t quite right. Meals are meager; quarrels are frequent. They see uncertainty in their parents’ faces. They hear whispers about bills, creditors and foreclosure, and they no longer feel secure, not even at home, sometimes, especially at home. If they are lucky, they find places to go to feel normal: the ballpark, the YMCA, a tree house, church. Hitler’s Nazi army invaded Poland, setting off World War II, nine months before Dad graduated from high school. He enlisted as a private in the Army Air Corps one month after graduation and later became a pilot. His remarkable wartime experiences from the ages of 18 to 23 included triumphs and failures, cruelty and kindness, fear and exhilaration. He was one of the boys trying to save the world, and the memories were riveted to his soul. They have not left him to this day. Now 92, Dad has spent the last couple of years talking to me about things we had never before discussed. He has opened up to me about the war, the Great Depression, race relations and other experiences that shaped his personality and outlook on life. We have come a long way since the time I was a teenager. Back then, it seemed we were from different worlds. His generation was the Greatest Generation; mine, the Woodstock Generation. His generation marched to defend liberty. Many of my generation marched to protest the war in Vietnam while others marched to advance civil rights in the south. There definitely was a gap between us. People called it a generation gap. I am grateful that gap has finally closed. It took time, patience and genuine interest. It took a willingness to listen with the goal of understanding each other’s perspective. It required a

determination to leave feelings of hurt and memories of recrimination in the past. It required love. If a generation gap separating father and son can be filled, is it possible that our collective family—the human family—can find ways to overcome the labels, stereotypes and political slogans that have divided us for so long? The answer is yes, if we have the will to do so. Each of us has the ability to affect such change in our respective spheres of influence. We can choose to be agents who act for the good of mankind instead of waiting to be acted upon by those empowered by the status quo. It must start in our homes and then flow into our communities. It will require the best we have to offer. It will require greatness from all generations. Ron White is an attorney/mediator by profession. He serves as a local stake president of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and is the immediate past president of the Claremont Interfaith Council. The views expressed herein are strictly his own and do not necessarily reflect the views of his church or the interfaith council.
Cariniʼs Out of MyMind/page 9

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 11, 2013

7

Congressional crybabies
Dear Editor: I am a Democrat and an Obama supporter and, while I have a lot of reservations about the Affordable Health Care Act, I think we deserve to give it some time to see what parts of it work and what parts do not. I believe the Tea Party lackeys, currently controlling congress, are not only funnier to follow than the Kardashians— they are doing the Democrats a great service. Their “Take my marbles and go home” mentality are guaranteeing Hillary Clinton a two-term victory and handing us a future Democratic majority in Congress, as well! If you think the Dems are putting through “socialist” legislation now, just wait until they control the Senate and the House. Kudos to the “Fools on the Hill.” Clowns like House Speaker Boehner and Senator Cruz are the donkey’s best friends! Keith Thomas
Claremont

cies are hosting the event, but guess what? No Golden State. Obviously, they would rather rake in the greater profits from our use of more water than the WRAM surcharge we get to pay for conserving. Robert Bird
Claremont

READERS’ COMMENTS

Stuck in the mud
Dear Editor: During the last two months, updates on the proposed legislation for a National Recreation Area (NRA) designation being prepared by Congresswomen Chu have been filtering out to the public. It’s been a balancing act for the Congresswoman to draft legislation that will fullfill the needs of the many disadvantaged communities of the San Gabriel Valley whose need for recreation activity is limited to what public space is truly open to the public and not fenced off. For folks who buy and sell water for public benefit, the designation status could limit the ability to purchase vacant land along the foothills and the area above Claremont that can be used for spreading and capturing water. The issue is one of so much controversy that the progress being made in the SGV cog might get stuck in the mud. In a recent meeting of a water agency located in Claremont Hills, a staff report

Garden-friendly
Dear Editor: I was very interested to see last week’s Foothill Reader article on the Inland Empire garden-friendly event scheduled at the Upland Home Depot. Billed as the Water-Wise Plant Sale, discounts are being offered on climateappropriate plants that help conserve water. Many local municipal water agen-

national renown, co-sponsored by Common Cause and the Claremont Graduate University. Two more forums are already being planned. was prepared and the members present The first, on Sunday, October 13, will mulled over the significant impacts that explain how to use the features of the Afcould occur if such a designation were to fordable Care Act to find affordable become rule of the land. health insurance; details are on the InstiAreas of concern were the impact on tute’s website, www.taipd.org. existing property and water rights/local The second, on March 1 of next year, supply in designated areas for public will be a day-long series of panels on benefit, responsibility for funding and global, national, state and regional water upkeep of a designated area for benefi- issues. Several highly-knowledgeable cal use and the compromise of local con- speakers have already committed to partrol for general public benefit. ticipate. The devil is in the details of the NRA The TAIPD website has featured both document being drafted by Congress- short and medium-length thought pieces women Chu. Will and should the areas on a variety of topics, as well as our origsouth of Claremont which include San inal Manifesto. The most recent material Bernadino be included has many con- includes an online debate (three articles cerned who attended the TVMWD meet- on different principled approaches to ing. One in particular, Ben Lewis of protection of civilians in Syria and elseGolden State Water Company and chair where). of the Six Basins Watermaster, made Unlike so many of the online political clear at the water meeting in Claremont journals, the website does not publish October 2 that the NRA designation area news of the day but, instead, takes a will be discussed at an upcoming Six somewhat longer view. That means the Basins meeting at the Claremont Hills. material need not be read immediately, John Mendoza before it becomes obsolete; its value lies Pomona in the exposition of practical principles which we hope are of permanent value. TAIPD think tank TAIPD also strongly encourages peoDear Editor: ple (that means you, dear readers), Our small but well-educated town of whether or not you usually write, to subClaremont is a fine location for a think- mit your own analysis and commentary. tank, so a number of us progressives This is no guarantee that they will be founded one a few years ago. Its name is published, but the website editor Merrill The American Institute for Progressive Ring has a strong inclination to have a Democracy (TAIPD). Its officers and di- large and diverse stable of writers, frerectors represent a variety of academic, quent and occasional. The submission legal, government and business back- guidelines (which actually are quite flexgrounds. ible) and the email address are on In 2011, TAIPD sponsored an inform- www.taipd.org. Bob Gerecke ative and well-attended public forum on Claremont campaign finance, featuring panelists of

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 11, 2013

8

Pilgrim Place open house to launch physical rehabilitation unit
The Pilgrim Place Health Services Center will debut its physical therapy unit to local residents on Thursday, October 17, with an open house from 4 to 6 p.m., and a ribbon-cutting ceremony at 5:30 p.m. The facility includes both indoor and outdoor exercise areas. The enclosed courtyard hosts an exercise station, walking surfaces of varying textures for patients recovering from knee surgery and similar procedures, and a putting green, used for re-establishing balance and hand-eye coordination. There are also a variety of stations inside: exercise machines, resistance train-

OUR TOWN
ing, parallel bars for learning how to walk again, steps, tables for helping individuals to stretch and increase mobility, and even a flat-screen television equipped with therapeutic games that make rehabilitation fun. “Some of these games are just amazing for relearning lost skills,” explained Rehab Manager Marie McKinney. “When people are enjoying the experience they forget how hard they are working to get back to their highest functional level, which is our goal.” The spacious center includes an office and a therapeutic studio apartment designed for occupational therapy. The Bistro is located across the corridor from

the rehabilitation center, where individuals can relax and get a snack after their workout. The remodel of the Rehabilitation Center at Pilgrim Place is another step towards person-centered care, a journey Pilgrim Place has been on for several years. RSVPs are not needed for the event. Questions can be directed to Joyce Yarborough at 399-5511 or by email to joyce@pilgrimplace.org. Pilgrim Place, founded in 1915, is a senior community for 330 retired clergy, missionaries and social activists. Residents are committed to social justice, world peace, prophetic environmentalism and ongoing intellectual, spiritual and social growth.

Colors 91711, Bert and Rocky’s, Amelie, Aromatique, The Green Gypsie, Claremont Chamber of Commerce, Forté Salon, Lizzie’s Goldmine, Jacqueline’s Home Decor, The Last Drop Cafe, Claremont Forum, Salad Farm, Nectar, Sonja Stump Photography, I Like Pie and Heirloom. Claremont’s Village Marketing Group, the sponsor for this campaign, is hoping for 1000 bundles of donated socks. These businesses will be accepting sock donations through December. For more information, contact Joan Bunte at Stamp Your Heart Out, 621-4363, or Susan Pearson at The Bath Workshop, 625-3417.

Assemblyman Chris Claremont Village sock Holden to visit Demorequest for kids cratic Club meeting Eighteen Claremont Village businesses are participating in the new sock request to benefit Claremont’s Shoes That Fit nonprofit organization. Shoes That Fit has an immediate need for new, six-packs of socks—all sizes, styles and colors. Shoes That Fit provides new shoes and a six-pack of socks to children in need in Claremont schools, surrounding school districts and local nonprofits. Donations may be dropped off at The Bath Workshop, Stamp Your Heart Out,

Assemblyman Chris Holden (D-A41) will discuss legislative issues, both past and future, at the meeting of the Democratic Club of Claremont today, Friday, October 11. The meeting will be held at Casa de Salsa with a buffet lunch from noon to 1 p.m., at which time Mr. Holden will talk and answer questions until 2 p.m. The cost is $16, which covers food, non-alcoholic drinks, taxes and tip. Everyone is welcome.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 11, 2013

9

A glut of happiness
by Debbie Carini

W

hen I was young and learning about foreign foods like tacos and chow mein, I fell in love with an eating experience that is at once uniquely American and yet attains a hint of foreign intrigue when it goes by its Scandinavian name, Smorgasbord.
Of course, I’m talking about the buffet, and I can’t imagine anything more democratic than this system of serving meals in which food is placed in a public area where the diners generally serve themselves (according to Wikipedia). At the buffet, the humble meat loaf can rub shoulders with the stately prime rib and lime-flavored Jello can aspire to stature as a “green.” There are many different types of buffets, but the prepaid, all-you-can-eat buffet is a marvel of abundance. Cast your eyes down the glistening selection of choices, steaming under the sneeze-guard: there are vegetable and fruit varieties so vibrant in their color that you briefly wonder if they were grown too close to a nuclear power plant; there are ribs and wings, and hunks and balls of meat; and the

starches—lustrous mashed potatoes, luminous white rice and pastas with every kind of topping (most not involving a single vegetable). My love affair with the buffet began more than 40 years ago, aptly enough on Main Street in Disneyland at one of those “old-timey” restaurants where everyone on staff is dressed like a member of a barbershop quartet. I slid my tray along the counter, past the pot roast and the bright red spaghetti sauce until I found what I would have to describe as a vegetable-aversechild’s dream cuisine—a hot, open-faced sandwich of white bread and white turkey meat, with a side of white mashed potatoes, all bathed in a creamy yellow gravy. And so it began...a lifetime of wanting to wait in line and pile up a plateful of carbohydrates.

To this day, the buffet brings out the worst in me. I have it a little more under control in a cafeteria, where I know I’m going to be paying for each item I put on my plate (which is why I love Ikea—hello 15 meatballs, mashed potatoes and whatever lingonberry sauce is, all for $5.99!) But there are nice restaurants that also feature buffets— this past weekend, my husband and I joined friends at a chic LA eatery where a dinner special can run as high as $40, but we were there for the “boutique dinner buffet,” a fancy way to say this isn’t your school cafeteria but your dinner is still coming on a tray. This buffet table featured crispy fried chicken and sweet potato fries, pulled pork and fried catfish, pasta alfredo and even vegetables, lounging in a pool of butter (like movie stars on inflatable rafts). Sometimes, in the face of so many choices, I am almost overwhelmed with gastronomic anxiety. But there are websites to help one conquer this fear. Wikihow.com has an entire section entitled “Eat-at-a-Buffet,” and there is another website with “16 tips to conquer buffet binging.” And so, last Saturday night, I held my tray with confidence and loaded-up on the greasy and fattening—and I even found a new white food: grits! ment necessary to load and transport the mulch. The city offers free mulch to Claremont residents six times a year in an effort to close the recycling loop.

Temporary closure of childrenʼs section at Claremont Library
With construction underway in the children’s section of the Claremont Public Library, books for Claremont’s youngest readers have been temporarily moved to the library’s meeting room. However, with the upcoming fall book sale—taking place on October 25 and 26—library employees have announced that services for its little bookworms will be temporarily shut down from October 18 through October 29. Any questions or requests for help will be handled at the regular adult reference desk during that nine-day period.

OUR TOWN
Help the hungry during government shutdown
With the government shutdown forcing closure of local WIC centers and delaying federal assistance payments, Inland Valley Hope Partners needs the community’s help to provide for the area’s needy. The local nonprofit is looking for individuals, schools, companies and places of worship to host food drives or to donate food items. On average, Hope Partners serves some 4,500 people monthly. This number is expected to rise as the problems in Washington continue. Non-perishable food items like rice, canned meat or mac and cheese may be

dropped off at Hope Partners Sova food pantry, located at 904 E. California St. in Ontario, or the Beta food pantry located at 209 W. Pearl in Pomona, Monday through Thursday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. For information, call Fran Robertson at 622-3806, ext. 231 or email franr@inlandvalleyhopepartners.org.

Mental health first aid training through Tri-City
Tri-City Mental Health Services invites the community to a free two-day mental health first aid training on Saturday, October 19 and 26 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Hughes Community Center, 1700 Danbury Rd. Mental Health First Aid teaches a fivestep action plan to offer help to people with the signs and symptoms of a mental illness or crisis and connect them with appropriate care. For information, email mhfa@tricitymhs.org or call 784-3249.

Get free mulch at Cahuilla next Saturday
West Coast Arborist, the city’s tree maintenance contractor, will be providing mulch to residents on Saturday, October 19 at Cahuilla Park, located at Scripps Drive and Indian Hill Boulevard. Mulch will be available on a first-come, first-served basis, beginning at 6 a.m. Residents will need to bring all equip-

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 11, 2013

10

Cafe offers sweet tastes for discriminating palette

I

n a hidden nook of the Claremont School of Theology, Claremont caterer Catherine Dickerson is blending together two of Claremont’s most recognized features, citrus and art. The resulting combination is the newlyopened Lemon Tree Cafe, a tranquil retreat for the colleges and community alike.
Through the Lemon Tree Cafe, the local caterer of nearly 13 years has finally found a space to ground her. While her workweek takes her back and forth along the Foothill communities nearly 18 hours a day, she’s happy to call her little restaurant her resting place. She hopes others will feel the same. “I love the environment here on campus—the students, the faculty. It’s a refreshing place to be,” Ms. Dickerson said. “I want to create a place of warmth where others feel they can come to relax as well.” The Lemon Tree Cafe breathes life into the space once known as The Broken Loaf. As the School of Theology broadens its scope, Ms. Dickerson felt a change in the culinary offerings on campus was also needed. The Lemon Tree Cafe was dubbed not only because of its tie to the teeming citrus of Claremont’s past, but the fresh perspective of the Claremont COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff School of Theology’s present. Longtime Claremont caterer Catherine Dickerson will be running the new campus restaurant at The Claremont School of Theology called Lemon Tree Cafe. The cafe has the rather difficult task of offering quality food to “We are a very diverse, multi-cultural, multi-relithe students, many of whom have dietary restrictions tied to their religious beliefs. Ms. Dickerson aims to keep gious university at this point that perhaps wasn’t so the prices affordable for studentsʼ limited budgets. much in the past,” she reflected. “Now we are embracing being able to offer courses in Among the decor is a special oneIslam, courses in Judaism and really of-a-kind art piece, created by local creating a space for all religions. For artist Luis Ramirez, a fourth-generame, that’s what the lemon tree repretion woodworker. The giant, three-disents.” mensional lemon tree, crafted out of As the theological school’s food African mahogany, took the artist 4 provider, Ms. Dickerson makes sure to months to complete and features a not only provide her hungry patrons large tree adorned with 60 woodwith healthy made-to-order meals, but carved lemons. Guests are invited to with dishes that are sensitive to the diview the finished product, and in this etary restrictions of the students’ relicase are encouraged to touch the art. gious values. That means following In addition to her unique emblem Halal for the Muslim students and and the design of her dining space, Kosher practices for those of the JewMs. Dickerson takes pride in her ish faith. For her patrons who practice menu, which features a variety of hot Jainism, a religion that prescribes a and cold dishes, and a daily special for path of nonviolence toward all living $6.75 that includes a drink. Standout things, she has to be careful not to use items include her handcrafted chipotle garlic or onions as these plants are Lemon Tree Cafe at the Claremont School of Theology is open to the general pub- dressing, served with her Southwestconsidered still living since they are ern Salad, and the Bistro Salad, a bed lic Monday through Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. found under the ground. of fresh kale sprinkled with cranberWith the multi-religious background that makes up schoolbooks and headed to Paris, where she resumed ries, edamame and pumpkin seeds with complementhe theological school, it can be a tall order to cater to her studies at Le Cordon Bleu, trading Dr. Dickerson tary sesame dressing. for Chef Dickerson. everyone, but it’s an aim that allows Ms. Dickerson Like she caters to her students, Ms. Dickerson She returned to the United States to put her newthe chance to embrace her culinary creativity. shows the same consideration for cafe clients, moldfound knowledge into practice, teaching cooking “It’s a challenge, but it’s exciting,” she said. “I ing her menu to include a little bit of something for classes at William Sonoma and Sur La Table. Thanks everyone. Grilled or not, loaded with veggies or laden enjoy coming up with different things to accommoto the network she had built during her doctorate date all of these religious restrictions.” with meats, the culinary artist looks forward to sharstudies, she soon returned to Claremont, picking up It’s a task she takes seriously, understanding the ing her labor of love. catering gigs at The Colleges and event planning for feelings food evokes. “Food is all about love and emotion and comfort,” “It’s not just about sustaining health or keeping the the Claremont School of Theology’s Whitehead Inter- she said. “I’m excited to be a part of that.” national Film Festival. body fueled. Food is emotional as well,” she recogThe Lemon Tree Cafe is located at 1325 College Familiar with the food service at the School of The- Ave., tucked away on the campus of the Claremont nized. “We don’t want to leave anyone out or make ology because of her work with the school’s film fes- School of Theology. From the frontage road, pass the them feel they are being disrespected.” tival, she leaped at the opportunity to take over the That emotional connection associated with food is school’s white staircase and turn right on the narrow post when it became availablelast January. She enthu- road before the bank. The cafe will be on your rightpart of what drew Ms. Dickerson to work as a food siastically set to work revamping the school’s cafe provider. Before catering at the School of theology hand side next to a parking lot and small playground. into a space all her own over the past 6 months. Flowand Claremont Colleges, she was a 5Cs student herLemon Tree Cafe is open for lunch Monday ing white drapes and a sunny interior provide a sharp through Friday, from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. For more self, enrolled as a PhD student in the Claremont contrast to the boxed building. Indoor and outdoor ta- information, contact Ms. Dickerson at (951) 505Graduate University’s women’s studies and religion program. She was studying the ways in which forbid- bles and loungers, located around the citrus trees of 8598 or catherinecdickerson@gmail.com. —Beth Hartnett den foods relate to gender issues within religion when the cafe’s back patio, provide a comfortable space for news@claremont-courier.com patrons stopping by for a quiet place to work or for a she felt a pull away from her studies and into food laid-back lunch. service. Heeding her instincts, she packed up her

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 11, 2013

11

Outgoing director leaves ‘Shoes’ in good hands

A

fter more than a decade at the helm of the Claremont-based nonprofit Shoes That Fit, distributing countless pairs of shoes to children in need, longtime executive director Roni Lomeli is set to retire this January.
“My retirement is bittersweet,” Ms. Lomeli said. “Shoes That Fit has been an important part of my life for the past 18 years.” Ms. Lomeli has brought the local service organization a long way in her nearly two decades of service, working her way from volunteer to board member to executive director beginning in 2001. Her work has been applauded by the local community and across the country. She was recently named one of Town and Country magazine’s distinguished “Women Who Make a Difference” for her strides in helping children across the United States. “Roni has been the award-winning leader and driving force behind Shoes That Fit’s extraordinary success,” said Ralph Shapira, board member-at-large and former chair. “Her inspired leadership has transformed Shoes That Fit from a superb local service organization into a highly efficient national charity. She leaves Shoes That Fit in an excellent position to expand its helping reach to countless additional schoolchildren still in need.” She began as a volunteer in 1994, stuffing envelopes in a closet-sized office off Harvard Avenue, where the organization managed efforts to provide footwear to children of Arroyo Elementary School in Pomona. Today, Ms. Lomeli leaves behind a legacy that includes distribution of more than one million pairs of shoes to children in 1,600 schools in 42 states across the country. Though retirement will afford her the opportunity to travel with her husband, Martin Lomeli, and help with the success of other local charities, the nonprofit’s longtime leading lady knows she will find it impossible not to give back to Shoes That Fit in some capacity. “[The organization] grows on you, it gets in your blood,” Ms. Lomeli said. “The more you work with the program and see what it does for the kids, the more you want to do it.” Part of her mission has been to help others feel that same itch. Taking a look at the numbers, it’s clear she succeeded. Without any government funding and starting with only six employees, the organization now boasts a network of more than 300 sponsor organizations. Ninety percent of all their donations go directly to the children the charity serves, which prompted Charity Navigator, a nonprofit watchdog organization, to confer its highest 4-star rating on Shoes That Fit in November 2012. It was the third consecutive year they received the accolade. Along with Shoes That Fit’s growing sponsorships, their services have also expanded, from focusing exclusively on shoes to encompassing socks and school supplies. The nonprofit’s recent Backpack Campaign yielded about 250 backpacks stuffed with back to school goodies for children in the Claremont, Upland, Montclair, Ontario and Fontana school districts. In return, Ms. Lomeli has received thousands of thank you letters on behalf of the organization, each child’s story and gratitude warming her heart more than the next. She insists the crayon-colored sentiments are the most satisfying part of her job. “When these kids tell you what these shoes meant to them, that’s what makes it all worthwhile,” Ms. Lomeli said. “You know it is making a difference in their lives.” And they in hers, which is part of the reason it has taken her a couple years to finally come to her decision to retire. Easing her departure is the fact that she

COURIER photos/Ryan Gann Roni Lomeli, left, is retiring as the executive director of the nonprofit organization Shoes That Fit at the end of January 2014. Amy Fass, right, will take over as the new executive director.

will be passing on the torch to longtime donor Amy Fass, who has also served as the organization’s director of corporate giving for the past several years. “She knows our organization and has a passion for what we do,” Ms. Lomeli said. “It’s really going to be a smooth transition for us.” Ms. Fass understands she has big shoes to fill but, with Ms. Lomeli’s confidence, is ready to help Shoes That Fit continue its climb.   “We are in expansion mode,” she said. “I hope I can continue that.”

—Beth Hartnett news@claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 11, 2013

12

Dolores J. Hill
Longtime Claremont resident Dolores Joan Hill died peacefully on Thursday, September 26 in her home less than two weeks after celebrating her 92nd birthday. Mrs. Hill was the wife of former Claremont broadcaster (Focus 91711, Quakes Dugout Show, Inland Empire Sports Scene) Jim Hill, who died on July 4, 2003. Mrs. Hill was born on September 14, 1921 in Minot, North Dakota where she was adopted by her parents, Jerome and Flora Hoch. She grew up in Bauer, Iowa and graduated from high school in Des Moines, Iowa. She worked in the Des Moines police department vice squad where she met Mr. Hill, who was a police reporter for a local newspaper. They married in

OBITUARIES

Beloved matriarch, sports fan, car connoisseur
1943 and lived in Des Moines until 1960, when they moved to Milwaukee, Wisconsin. In the 1970s, they bought a home in Sun Lakes, Arizona and then moved to Claremont in 1988 to help raise their grandsons.  Mrs. Hill was active around Claremont, attending school events and local AYSO, Little League and Claremont Youth Basketball games. She was a car enthusiast who made sure she got a new model every few years and enjoyed nothing more than going for a long drive. In fact, Mrs. Hill drove up until New Years Eve last year. She was also a big Dodgers fan, loved Pixie donuts, read the COURIER every week and enjoyed dining out and drinking beer. Mrs. Hill is survived by her four sons and their partners, Michael and Judith Hill of New York City, Robert and Joan Hill of St. Petersburg, Florida, James Hill, Jr. and Sherri Shell of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and Thomas Hill and Lynda Talve of Claremont. She leaves her three Claremont grandsons, Alec of Brooklyn, New York, Daniel of Seattle, Washington and Garett, a student at UC Santa Barbara. She was also blessed with two step-grandchildren and three step-great-grandchildren. A private memorial service will be held over Thanksgiving weekend. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests that donations be made in Dolores Hill’s name to VNA & Hospice of Southern California, 150 W. First St., Suite 270, Claremont, CA 91711.

PROFESSIONAL SERVICE DIRECTORY
accounting Christiansen Accounting
Corina L. Christiansen, CPA 140 W. Foothill Blvd., Suite E Claremont, CA 91711

For information on inclusion in the professional service directory, call Mary Rose at 621-4761.
architect attorney MIKE F. OʼBRIEN
Attorney at Law

architect/contractor
HARTMANBALDWIN
DESIGN/BUILD

WHEELER & WHEELER
A.I.A. Architects, Inc.
133 South Spring Street Claremont, CA 91711

100 West Foothill Blvd. Claremont, CA 91711

212 Yale Avenue Claremont, CA 91711

(909) 447-6802
www.christiansenaccounting.com
www.facebook.com/christiansenaccountingcpa

(909) 670-1344
www.hartmanbaldwin.com Since 1984
Residential remodeling, historic restorations, and custom home building

(909) 624-5095
www.wheelerarchitects.com

(909) 626-9999
www.mikefobrien.com
Specialist in personal injury and wrongful death cases. Se habla español

Specialize in small business accounting and tax planning since 1962.

Building a better Claremont since 1985

attorney PAUL L. BRISSON
Attorney at Law 112 Harvard Avenue Claremont, CA 91711

attorney
BUXBAUM & CHAKMAK
A Law Corporation

attorney Kendall & Gkikas LLP
Attorneys at Law 134 Harvard Avenue, 2nd Floor
Claremont, CA 91711

child & family therapy
ANN BINGHAM NEWMAN, PH.D., MFT
Child Specialist
Children have problems at home, at school and with friends... Is your child having difficulties? I can help. Individual, Child and Family Therapy

(909) 553-2182
Free consultation, 23 years experience. Low, flat fee Chapter 7 and 13 Bankruptcy, Civil Litigation, Evictions, Family Law, Small Claims, Wills & Living Trusts.

414 Yale Avenue, Suite K Claremont, CA 91711

(909) 482-1422
Specializing in Family Law in Claremont since 1994: Divorce, Custody, Visitation with Children, Property Division, Alimony, Child Support

(909) 621-4707
41 years experience in: Business Law, Probate, Family Law, Estate Planning, Real Estate Law, Civil Litigation, Bankruptcy.

(909)398-1984

NEW CAR GUIDE
mazda
ROMERO MAZDA ONTARIO AUTO CENTER (866) 232-4092 NEW AND PRE-OWNED SALES LEASING • SERVICE • PARTS
SERVING YOUR NEEDS OVER 35 YEARS 15 FREEWAY, EXIT JURUPA AVE. WWW.ROMEROMAZDA.COM

hyundai
ROMERO HYUNDAI ONTARIO AUTO CENTER (866) 232-4092 NEW AND PRE-OWNED SALES LEASING • SERVICE • PARTS
15 FREEWAY, EXIT JURUPA AVE. WWW.ROMEROHYUNDAI.COM

volvo
EXCLUSIVELY VOLVO 1300 AUTO CENTER DR., ONTARIO CALL: SAM NASRI (909) 605-5700 WWW.EXCLUSIVELYVOLVOCARS.COM GOING ABROAD? CALL ABOUT “EUROPEAN DELIVERY”

fiat
FIAT OF ONTARIO ONTARIO AUTO CENTER 1201 AUTO CENTER DR. 800-BUY-FIAT 800-289-3428 WWW.FIATOFONTARIO.COM

cadillac
CRESTVIEW CADILLAC 2700 EAST GARVEY SOUTH, WEST COVINA (626) 966-7441
NEW AND CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED SALES

nissan
EMPIRE NISSAN ONTARIO AUTO CENTER (866) 234-2544
15 FREEWAY, EXIT JURUPA AVE.

volkswagen
EXCLUSIVELY VOLKSWAGEN 1300 AUTO CENTER DR., ONTARIO CALL CHRIS OR DON (909) 605-8843 WWW.EXCLUSIVELYVW.COM WE REFUSE TO BE UNDERSOLD

toyota
CLAREMONT TOYOTA 508 AUTO CENTER DR., CLAREMONT (909) 625-1500 SALES • SERVICE • PARTS

LEASING • PARTS • BODY SHOP

NEW AND PRE-OWNED SALES LEASING • SERVICE • PARTS WWW.EMPIRENISSAN.COM

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 11, 2013

13

Frank Minano, Sr.
Barber, beloved husband, father and grandfather
Frank Minano, Sr., a longtime Claremont barber, died peacefully in Upland on Friday, October 4, 2013 surrounded by his family. He was 97. He was born in 1916 in Guardia Piemontese in the province of Cosenza, Italy to Maddalena and Vincenzo Minano. In 1927, young Frank immigrated to the United States, coming through Ellis Island. His family settled in Detroit, Michigan, where his father took a position with the Ford Motor Co. There, Mr. Minano met his future wife, Violet Condino, whom he married in 1938 in Dearborn, Michigan. They had four children, Gloria, Madeline, Linda and Frank, Jr. In 1945, Mr. Minano moved to California with his family. While Mr. Minano never got beyond eighth grade in school, he graduated from cosmetology school at Citrus College with skills that would serve him throughout his life. He Mr. Minano was beloved for his good humor and was always whistling, singing and telling humorous stories. He was also a veritable repository of local news, so much so that upon his retirement, the late Monsignor William Barry of Our Lady of Assumption Church asked, “Where will Claremont go to gossip?” Mr. Minano was a member of the Roman Catholic Church. He enjoyed cooking with fresh vegetables and prided himself on his fig tree. He also loved listening to music, particularly tunes by Italian luminaries like Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin and Sergio Franchi. Another favorite pastime was heading to Santa Anita to enjoy the horse races. In honor of Mr. Minano’s 90th birthday, his friend Dennis, who owns horses, even dubbed one of his horses Frank the Barber. In his later years, many people asked Mr. Minano the secret of his longevity.

OBITUARIES

worked as a barber with his brother in the Claremont Village for 45 years. Mr. Minano kept generations of Claremonters well-groomed, including giving a young COURIER publisher Peter Weinberger his first haircut, a momentous occasion documented in the pages of the newspaper.

His philosophy of how to live a long and healthful life was simple: “Have a glass of red wine each day, eat greens with every meal, don’t eat out because you don’t know what they are putting in your food and never go to bed angry.” Mr. Minano’s beloved wife Violet died a year ago after celebrating 73 years of marriage. He is survived by his brother, Carmen, and by his children, Gloria, Madeline, Linda and Frank, Jr. and their families, including 7 grandchildren and 9 great-grandchildren. A service for Mr. Minano will be held on Friday, October 11 at 10 a.m. at St. Anthony’s Catholic Church, 2110 N. San Antonio Ave. in Upland. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests that donations be made to VITAS Community Connection.

Dorothy Norris
Dorothy D. Norris, a longtime Claremont resident, died peacefully on Monday, October 8, 2013. She was 94. A service for Mrs. Norris will be held on Monday, October 14 at 10 a.m. at Todd Memorial Chapel, 325 N. Indian Hill Blvd. in Claremont. A full obituary on Mrs. Norris will be printed in a future edition of the COURIER.

Rachel Gage
Rachel E. Gage, a longtime resident of Claremont, died on Wednesday, October 2, 2013. She was 97. In keeping with Mrs. Gage’s wishes, services will be held on Friday, October 18 at 2:30 p.m. at Forest Lawn, Covina Hills, 21300 E. Via Verde St. in Covina, where she will be buried next to her husband. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests that contributions be made to the library of the Pilgrim Congregational Church in Pomona, to the American Red Cross or to any charity of your choice. A full obituary on Mrs. Gage will be included in a future edition of the COURIER.

SERVICE DIRECTORY
design/build SRS GENERAL CONTRACTOR, INC.
909-621-1559
www.srsgeneralcontractor.com
Practical design, tastefully executed.
• Residential Remodel • Restoration of Unique & Vintage homes • Room additions.

PROFESSIONAL

chiropractor
DR. MARTIN S. McLEOD
411 N. Indian Hill Blvd.

c.p.a. LIGHTFOOT • RALLS & LIGHTFOOT LLP
Certified Public Accountants 675 W. Foothill Blvd., Suite 300 Claremont, CA 91711

Claremont, CA 91711 (909) 621-1208
• Joint & Muscle Pain • Headache • Sciatica • Pinched nerve • Most Insurance accepted • Personal injury

For information on inclusion in the professional service directory, call Mary Rose at 621-4761. dentist
PETER T. IGLER, D.D.S. D. INGRID ROJAS, D.D.S.
Cosmetic & General Dentistry
615 W. Foothill Blvd. Claremont, CA 91711

(909) 626-2623
Tax Planning & Preparation • Accounting

financial consultants
PAMELA J. ZEDICK
CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER® Securities and advisory services offered through National Planning Corporation. Member of FINRA/SIPC, a registered investment advisor

financial consultants
SUZANNE H. CHRISTIAN
CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER® Professional Securities offered through LPL Financial Member of FINRA/SIPC

(909) 624-6815
1 Hour In-Office Bleaching, Veneers, White Fillings, Dental Implants, Dentures.

393 W. Foothill Blvd, Suite 110 Claremont

419 Yale Ave. Claremont

(909) 626-1947
Intelligent solutions, Exceptional service

(909) 625-1052
“Your financial security is my priority”

optometry
ANNA M. TORRES, O.D.

optometry
Ann M. Johannsen, O.D. Brad A. Baggarly, O.D.

real estate broker Geoff T. Hamill
Broker Associate, ABR. CRS. GRI, E-PRO, SRES, D.R.E. #00997900
Wheeler Steffen Sothebyʼs International Realty

tax preparation/EA D. PROFFITT, EA
Claremont, CA 91711

OPTOMETRY
1420 N. Claremont Blvd.,Ste. 209-B Claremont

OPTOMETRY
695 W. Foothill Blvd. Established 1972

Phone: (909) 445-1379
dee@dproffittea.com Visit my website at www.dproffittea.com
Income Tax Specialist since 1981
Payroll Service • Accounting

Phone: (909) 621-0500
Geoff@GeoffHamill.com
#1 in Claremont sales & listings since 1988

(909) 621-0057
www.visioncenterofclaremont.com
United Healthcare • VSP • MES • Medicare

(909) 625-7861
www.claremontoptometry.com
Eyemed - VSP - MES - Medicare

Best Possible Price Achieved, Every Time!

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 11, 2013

14

COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff Pilgrim Place resident Henry Atkins, 74, practices his kicking technique during a ceremony last week at Sekai Black Belt Academy in Claremont. Mr. Atkins was awarded his brown belt during the class, which places him in the advanced level of the Sekai discipline.

Claremonter gets a kick by challenging body and mind

T

he Reverend Canon Henry Atkins has traded his priestly apparel for an entirely different set of dress, one that comes with a pair of nunchucks and boxing gloves.

The new look and mindset suit him. Last Saturday, the 74-year-old Pilgrim Place resident SENIOR became the oldest recipient of the SPOTLIGHT Sekai Black Belt Academy’s brown belt distinction, just one level below the coveted title of black belt. When asked why an Episcopal priest would turn to kickboxing and martial arts, a frequently asked question, he answers with a smile: “I was tired of turning the other cheek.” In fact, it was his propensity for peacekeeping that prompted him into combat practice three years ago. “It’s a way of testing your inner and outer strength,” Fr. Atkins reflected. “There is a lot of discipline involved, particularly when someone kicks you in the side of the head. You could get angry, but then you’d lose the match. You have to learn to move to a place where you can appreciate what the other person is doing.” Though relatively new to the world of martial arts, Fr. Atkins has long held an interest in contemplative prayer, which led him to the study of T’ai Chi 35 years ago. While the form of movement meditation is often recognized for its stress relief and health benefits, T’ai Chi is also known as a form of self-defense, dubbed Chinese boxing, the hobbyist noted. Despite his fascination with the discipline, years of

Fr. Atkins gets into a fighting stance during a class last week at Sekai Black Belt Academy in Claremont.

study never translated to actual practice for Fr. Atkins as his pastoral duties commanded most of his time. Retirement to Pilgrim Place finally provided him with the chance to delve into his hobbies. With his spare time, he took up walk/jogging with the Pilgrim Pacers and then, with the help of trainer Denise Kane, started kickboxing. Stumbling into Fr. Atkins practicing his moves in his carport at Pilgrim Place became a regu-

lar, unquestioned occurrence, shared friend and fellow Pilgrim Ruth Brown. “That’s Henry,” she said of her active friend. “He is the biggest inspiration.” Fr. Atkins was a quick learner and, with the encouragement of his trainer, soon began searching for a studio in order to more fully engage in the practice of martial arts. His homework led him to the Sekai Academy on Foothill Boulevard in Claremont, where he began practicing under the guidance of former world champion kickboxer Maria Brandt. His first class consisted of Ms. Brandt and three other students, all of whom he noticed were at least 50 years his junior. That realization only served to motivate him. “It’s sort of an ego thing, fighting with an 18-yearold kid when you are 74 years old,” he laughed. “It’s the best medicine. People should never use age as an excuse.” Fr. Atkins might be the oldest student Ms. Brandt has ever taught, and the oldest she has ever awarded a brown belt. But the accolade was well-earned, she acknowledged. “He never gives up, no matter what I give to him,” Ms. Brandt said. “He always tries his best and never misses a class. It’s awesome to have a student with that kind of energy and excitement.” He knows the art form takes time and dedication and has set aside a large chunk of time to his practice. His schedule includes three days of training at the studio and two days of kickboxing at Pilgrim Place, which he admits can be a challenge both physically
MIND AND BODY/continues on the next page

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 11, 2013

15

Colleges have an array of free, thought-provoking lectures

T

he weather may be cooling down, but things are heating up at The Claremont Colleges. If you’re looking for intellectual stimulation, look no further than our local schools of higher learning. This month they feature one or more fascinating lectures scheduled nearly every night of the week. Here are some COURIER recommendations covering October 14 through 26.

I say tomato On Tuesday, October 15, there will be a screening of the film Fair Tomatoes: A Story about Justice, Dignity and Sustainability at 7:30 p.m. in the Garrison Theater at Scripps College, 241 E. 10th St. The documentary explores the plight of farm workers in Immokalee, a small Florida town that is the tomato capital of the country, who face abuse, unjust labor conditions and sub-standard wages. Afterwards, there will be a Q & A with filmmaker Ernie Zahn of NPeaches. A new generation of activists On Thursday, October 17 at 4:15 p.m., San Francisco State University sociologist Adreana Clay will speak at the Hahn Building at Pomona College, 420 Harvard Ave. Her talk is titled, “We Can’t Stop: Young women of Color, Feminism and Social Movement Organizing.” Ms. Clay’s 2012 book, The Hip-Hop Generation Fights Back: Youth Activism and Post-Civil Rights Politics, explores how young people of color organize and identify as activists in the post-civil rights era. The birth of modern thought On Wednesday, October 23 at 6:45 p.m., Stephen Greenblatt will discuss “Lucretius and the Toleration of Intolerable Ideas” at Claremont McKenna College’s Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum, 385 E. 8th St. Mr. Greenblatt—the John Cogan University Professor of the Humanities at Harvard University—is the author of the Pulitzer-prize winning 2011 book The Swerve: How the World Became Modern, which describes how an ancient Roman philosophical epic helped pave the way for modern thought. On local citrus workers On Thursday, October 24, Matthew Garcia, a professor of history and transborder studies at Arizona State University, will talk about “Race, Labor and Community” from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. in the Humanities Auditorium at Scripps College, 1030 Columbia Ave. Mr. Garcia, who is director of comparative border studies at ASU, will speak about the history of

race, labor and the community of citrus workers in the Claremont area. Anatomy of fraud Julie Zauzmer, who served as managing editor of the Harvard Crimson in 2012, is author of the book Conning Harvard: Adam Wheeler, the Con Artist Who Faked His Way into the Ivy League. In 2010, Mr. Wheeler pleaded guilty to 20 counts of fraud. His exploits included faking SAT scores, fabricating letters of recommendation, plagiarizing essays and counterfeiting high school and college transcripts. He is said to have ultimately duped Harvard out of more than $40,000 in grants and prizes. Ms. Zauzmer will speak on Thursday, October 24 at 6:45 p.m. at the Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum at Claremont McKenna College, 385 E. 8th St. Exploring diversity Kelly Mack, executive director of the Association of American Colleges and Universities’ Project Kaleidoscope, will speak at Harvey Mudd College on Thursday, October 24 from 7:30 to 8:45 p.m. Her talk, “That None Shall Perish,” is part of the 2013 Nelson Series exploring how diversity has and will continue to shape advances in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. (STEM). Her talk will take place in HMC’s Shanahan Center, 320 E. Foothill Blvd. in Claremont. Amassing images A panel discussion featuring photo collectors, called “Focus on Photographs: Building a Collection,” will be held on Saturday, October 26 at 4 p.m. in the Humanities Auditorium of Scripps College 1030 Columbia Ave. in Claremont. This event is being held in conjunction with the opening of the “Focus on Photographs: Building a Collection” exhibition at the Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery, held later in the evening from 7 to 9 p.m. and featuring music and light refreshments. The exhibition will showcase works by Ansel Adams, Diane Arbus, Julia Margaret Cameron, Graciela Iturbide and Edward Weston, among others. —Sarah Torribio
storribio@claremont-courier.com

Muslims in Tibet David Atwill, associate professor of history and Asian studies at Penn State, will present a talk titled “Islamic Shangri-La: Tibetan Muslims and the Formation of Modern Tibet” on Monday, October 14 from noon to 1 p.m. His discussion of Tibetan Muslims and their role in Tibetan society will take place in the Oldenborg Center at Pomona College, 350 N. College Way in Claremont. Keeping the balance Swami Sarvadevananda is a spiritual leader with the Vedanta Society of Southern California and a monk with the Ramikrishna Order in India. He will speak on Monday, October 14 from 6:45 to 8 p.m. on “Vedanta, Vivekananda and Human Excellence: Living a Balanced Life of Doing.” His presentation will be held in the Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum at Claremont McKenna College, 385 E. 8th St. Arab Spring A panel discussion, “The Maghreb After the Arab Spring: Hope, Change and Conflict,” will be held on Monday, October 14 at 7 p.m. in the Rose Hills Theater at Pomona College, 170 E. 6th St. Speakers will discuss changes that have swept across the Maghreb region (Mauritania, Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia and Libya) in the past two years, and their implications for Europe and the United States.

MIND AND BODY continued from the previous page

and mentally. One of the most difficult obstacles for him, however, was learning to be comfortable sparring with his teacher. “I was a little intimidated going up against her. I knew as my teacher she could handle it, but I have never kicked or punched a woman before. I felt like I shouldn’t do it,” he recalled. “That lasted until about the second time she kicked me in the side of the head.” He showed none of that initial hesitation last week as he punched and kicked his way to his brown belt with the support of his friends in the audience. Becoming a martial artist is all about learning to overcome fears, both in and out of the studio, he shared.   “Boxing can be thought of as a metaphor for life,” Fr. Atkins said. “You are constantly engaging in one struggle, one conflict, one fight after another. There is something to be said about being able to act that out physically that prepares you to do the same in life.”

—Beth Hartnett news@claremont-courier.com

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff Henry Atkins smiles as Maria Brandt formally presents him with his brown belt at Sekai Black Belt Academy last week. By earning the brown belt, Fr. Atkins reached the advanced level of Sekai training after practicing for just two years.

SPORTS

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 11, 2013

16

CHS girls volleyball snags first win of season

I

n arguably their toughest match of the year, the Claremont girls volleyball team defeated Sierra League rival South Hills in a 5-set thriller on Tuesday night to earn their first conference victory of the season.
The Wolfpack were down 0-1 and 1-2 early on, but rallied in sets 2 and 4 behind the strong play of their seniors to draw even with the Huskies and force a fifth set. After trailing 8-4 in set 5, Claremont rallied back to even the score up at 9-9. Junior Denise Brittain helped the Wolfpack jump out to a 13-11 lead, but the Huskies would fight back with several points of their own, tying the game at 14-14 and 15-15 after being down in both situations. Unfortunately, the Huskies could not hold off the Wolfpack much longer and conceded 3 of the next 4 points to give Claremont an 18-16 victory. Before the final set, head coach Allan Comerford reminded his team to play smart and to focus on executing the upcoming serves. “I told them, ‘let’s just keep our serves in and play the defense like we normally would,’” Coach Comerford said. “They stepped up and they kept their swings in.” Claremont was led by a trio of senior captains who set the tone for the Wolfpack on both offense and defense. Janie Feldsher recorded 13 kills and a team-high 6 blocks while Gina Valvo led the team with 5 digs. Annalyese Fausel played a crucial role in the Wolfpack’s offense with 32 assists. A win like this can do wonders for Claremont moving forward, but Coach Comerford said this match served as a reminder that nothing is over until it is over. “I think [this win] lets the girls know that they have to fight for every point,” Coach Comerford said. “No matter what the score is, whether they’re up by one or down by a couple, they need to work hard.” In the opening set, Claremont exchanged points back and forth with South Hills, but was unable to put game away, falling 25-21. Claremont turned up their intensity in set 2 with a 2519 victory to pull even with South Hills, 1-1. Valvo made a number of key hustle plays on offense and defense to spark the Wolfpack’s comeback win. After falling behind 16-10 in the third set, Claremont went on a 7-1 scoring run to take the lead 17-16. They could not hold on to the lead, however, surrendering the game 25-19. In a must-win fourth set, the Wolfpack opened with an 8-3 scoring run. Claremont widened their lead at 2010 and never looked back, claiming the fourth set 25-18 to force a fifth and final set. Throughout the match, Claremont did a good job of keeping South Hills on its toes with its explosive and timely offense, which is exactly what they wanted to do coming into the match. “I wanted to focus a lot on taking [South Hills] out of their system, as far as getting into the setter, putting up a good block and making sure that we run our offense quickly,” Coach Comerford said. Results of Thursday’s match with St. Lucy’s will be in the next edition of the COURIER. The Wolfpack will compete in the Ayala Tournament this weekend and will take on Chino Hills and Charter Oak next Tuesday and Thursday, respectively.
—Bryan Stauffer sports@claremont-courier.com

COURIER photos/Steven Felschundeff Claremont High Schoolʼs Simone Bliss, left, and Denise Brittain gang up to block a shot from South Hills on Tuesday at CHS. The girls lost the first game but came back to win the second game. After exchanging two more games, the Pack outlasted the Huskies in the fifth and final match to win 3-2. Claremont High Schoolʼs new girls volleyball head coach Allan Comerford gives his team some pointers on Tuesday.

SPORTS

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 11, 2013

17

COURIER photos/Steven Felschundeff Claremont High School volleyball standout Janie Feldsher celebrates after the Pack scored a particularly hard-won point on Tuesday during their match against South Hills. The Wolfpack pulled off a very narrow victory over the visiting Huskies, winning the second, fourth and fifth games for a 3-2 final score.

Claremont High School senior Gina Valvo dives for the ball during the second game between the Wolfpack and the visiting South Hills Huskies on Tuesday at CHS. AT RIGHT: The faces of the players tell the story as Claremontʼs varsity volleball team celebrates a win by the Wolfpack. The South Hills junior varsity team sulks as CHS wins the JV matchup on Tuesday.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 11, 2013

18

Poetry reading by Kingsley Tufts winner
Marianne Boruch, Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award winner for 2013, will present a special poetry reading alongside presentations by several local authors and artists at the Claremont Graduate University on Friday, October 11 at 5 p.m. The event is free and open to the public. Taking place at the Peggy Phelps and East Galleries, 251 E. 10th St., the event includes readings from Brent Armendinger, assistant professor at Pitzer Colleges; and Hillary Gravendyk, assistant professor at Pomona College; and artwork from first- and second-year MFA students from the CGU Art Department. Drinks and hors d’ouevres will be provided.

OUR TOWN
Busy people should pause with poetry
The Art of Pausing, a 200-page gift book with haiku, reflections and photographs, offers daily meditations for extremely busy people seeking to capture a few moments of contemplation each day. The book’s authors—Judith Valente, Brother Paul Quenon and former Claremonter Michael Bever—feel that reading and writing haiku is an essential spiritual practice. Each haiku is accompanied by a reflection by the same author or an abstract photo of nature by Brother

Quenon. Ms. Valente is a broadcast journalist who covers religion news for PBSTV and the author of two poetry collections and a book on contemporary monastic life. Brother Quenon is a Trappist Monk of the Abbey of Gethsemane, who studied under spiritual writer Thomas Merton. Mr. Bever, a retired educator and doctor of theology, is an ordained Disciples of Christ minister who was drawn later in life to Catholic traditions. He combines Zen and Sufi practices with his Christian heritage. Mr. Bever, along with Claremonter Andrea Eldridge, is credited with suggesting the weekly Adventures in Haiku column in the COURIER. He recently moved from Claremont to Illinois to be

near family. The book is available on Amazon.

Yard sale will raise funds for Save Mrs. Bobo campaign
Ann Kroutil Donnan will host a yard sale at her home, 265 W. 11th St. in Claremont, on Saturday, November 2 to benefit the Save Mrs. Bobo campaign. The last such effort raised more than $1000. Ruth M. Bobo is a former Claremont High School English and creative writing teacher who is struggling to stay in her Claremont home in the face of mounting medical expenses. To learn more about how you can help, visit www.ruthmbobofund.com.

Friday, October 11 to Saturday, October 19

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 11, 2013

20

YOUR WEEK IN 9 DAYS

CALENDAR
11

Performing arts
Last chance to see Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street.

Nightlife
Gogol Bordello performs at the Fox Theater in Pomona.

Page 22
ica and Don’t Speak German,” focusing on finding ancestors who came from Germany. This event is hosted by the Pomona Valley Genealogical Society. 2 p.m. Pomona Library, 625 S. Garey Ave., Pomona. 599-4062. COCKTAIL HOUR Before touring the homes on this year’s Heritage Home Tour, taking place on Sunday, October 13, join friends for a sunset cocktail reception at one of Claraboya’s custom view homes in the foothills overlooking Claremont. Sample food from Walter’s and handcrafted drinks while listening to a presentation by architect and author Alan Hess. Photographs by Julius Shulman will be on display and each guest will receive a complimentary commemorative printing of Claraboya’s History, written by Sharon Hightower and published by Claremont Heritage. 6 to 9 p.m. $50 or $45 for Heritage members and students. www.claremontheritage.org.

Page 24
Center for Health Policy Research, will present “Obamacare: How Will it Affect You?” A one-hour Q&A will follow the presentation with representatives from Kids Come First for Health, Pomona Valley Hospital Medical Center, California Nurses Association, NAMI, Small Business Majority, AARP and OURWalmart. 2 to 5 p.m. Taylor Hall at Cahuilla Park, 1775 N. Indian Hill Blvd., Claremont.

October Friday

ASSEMBLYMAN CHRIS HOLDEN will discuss legislative issues, both past and present, at today’s meeting of the Democratic Club of Claremont. The meeting will be held at Casa de Salsa with a buffet lunch from noon until 1 p.m. Mr. Holden will talk and answer questions until 2 p.m. The cost is $16, which covers food, non-alcoholic drinks, taxes and tip. Everyone is welcome. FRIDAY NIGHTS LIVE Dine downtown, then stroll the Village to hear free live music performances from 6 to 9 p.m. This week’s performers include Mick Rhoads and the Hard 8 (rock) at the Public Plaza, Steve Rushingwind (Native American flute) at the Claremont Chamber and Ultimate Vibe (rock/jazz) at city hall. GREAT AMERICAN NIGHTMARE Rob Zombie, the provocative filmmaker and musician, is bringing 15 nights of top

national and regional rock artists to the Fairplex, including The Used, Reel Big Fish, Goldfinger, Kottonmouth Kings and others. Three haunted houses based on his horror films will also be open, promising screams, laughter and adrenaline all month. Event dates are October 11-13, 17-20, 24, 27 and 31 and November 2. Fairplex, 1101 W. McKinley Ave., Pomona. Visit www.fairplex.com. BRADLEY CHILDREN BENEFIT at Dale Bros Brewery. Friends of the late Matthew Bradley are invited to attend a fundraiser to go towards a college fund for his children. $5 suggested donation. Music by the Claremont Voodoo Society at 5 p.m. and the McCrevasse Bros at 7 p.m. Food from WTF Pizza available from 5 to 8 p.m. 2120 Porterfield Way, Upland. www.dalebrosbrewery.com.

October Monday

14
15

SHAKESPEARE CLUB Actress and professor Amanda Zarr will discuss “Experiencing Juliet.” All are welcome. 2 p.m. Joslyn Senior Center, 660 N. Mountain Ave., Claremont. 629-2711.

October Saturday

12 October
Sunday

October Tuesday

GERMAN RECORDS Jean Wilcox Hibben will present “Researching German Records When You Live in Amer-

13

COMIC BOOK SHOW Browse comic collectibles, art dealers, original art, prints, action figures, games and more. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Free admission. 532 W. First St., Claremont Packing House. HOME TOUR Claremont Heritage features Claraboya in this year’s Home Tour. $40 day of the tour. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Visit www.claremontheritage.org for more information. ON THE SAME PAGE Conversation with Susan Straight, author of Take One Candle Light a Room. The author will join in the conversation about her book, its origins and its implications. A free On the Same Page event sponsored by the Friends of the Claremont Library. 2 p.m. Pomona College, Tranquada Student Center, 757 N. College Way, Claremont. Ms. Straight’s books will be available for purchase, cash or checks only. She will autograph her works after her talk. THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT Gerald Kominski, PhD, director of UCLA

METAPHYSICS John Cobb, professor emeritus of the Claremont School of Theology, presents “The Practical Importance of Metaphysics.” He will describe how metaphysical assumptions shape our thinking fundamentally, even though most people don’t realize they have such assumptions. A buffet lunch is available at 11:30 a.m. for $12. Dessert and coffee is available for $6. The University Club meets each Tuesday in the Hughes Community Center, 1700 Danbury Rd., Claremont. CAREGIVER SUPPORT Laura Van Dran, affiliated with the Alzheimer’s Association, California Southland Chapter, and Lisa Jeffers of Right At Home in Home Care and Assistance will discuss helpful strategies and providing real solutions to the everyday struggles of the caregiver. The meeting will end with an open discussion. Alzheimer’s Caregiver Support Group. 7 to 9 p.m. Free. The Claremont Club, 1777 Monte Vista Ave., Claremont.
9-DAY CALENDAR continues on the next page

Jenelle Rensch covers the calendar, arts and entertainment. Deadline: Thursday at 5 p.m., one week before publication. Include date, time, address, a contact phone number and fee for admission (if applicable). Email: calendar@claremont-courier.com. Phone: 621-4761. Fax: 621-4072. Address: 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Suite 205-B, Claremont, 91711. There is NO guarantee that items submitted will be published.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 11, 2013

21

9-DAY CALENDAR continued from the previous page

COMPUTER CLUB Adelina Adams hosts “Tips & Tricks” focusing on folders and files, Netflix and sending pictures from Picassa. Hosted by the Claremont Senior Computer Club. 7:30 p.m. Hughes Community Center, 1700 Danbury Rd., Claremont. 399-5488.

October Wednesday

16

FALL FACULTY LECTURE SERIES Media studies professor Jonathan Hall will deliver a lecture, “Film with No Leader, Movement Without Edge: Politics, Fantasy and Japanese Left Cinema.” The Fall Faculty lectures are open without charge to Pomona College faculty, students, staff and to the community at large. 12:10 p.m., Pomona College Blue Room, Frank Dining Hall, located at 260 E. Bonita Ave., Claremont. 6073452 or amy.crown@pomona.edu. LITERARY SERIES READING Novelist Peter Rock, author of My Abandonment, The Bewildered, and Carnival Wolves will read from his recently released The Shelter Cycle as part of the Pomona College English Department Literary Series. 5 p.m. Pomona College Crookshank 108, located at 140 W. Sixth St., Claremont. 607-2212 or nancy.jugan@pomona.edu.

present “Celebrating United Nations Day.” International Place of the Claremont Colleges. 11:45 a.m. to 1 p.m. $6 for lunch, no cost for lecture. McKenna Auditorium, Claremont McKenna College, 390 E. Ninth St., Claremont. 607-4571. LECTURE “The Heart of the Liberal Arts: Humanities in the Liberal Arts College” Speaker Series. Marjorie Garber will deliver a lecture titled “Occupy Shakespeare: Shakespeare in/and the Humanities.” 8 p.m. Pomona College Rose Hills Theatre, located on the Smith Campus Center, 170 E. Sixth St., Claremont. For more information, contact nancy.jugan@pomona.edu.

October

Friday

18

SCIENCE Scott Little, director of applied math and computational science, will present “Electromagnetic Black Hole Analogies in General Relativity.” Pomona Valley Amateur Astronomers Club. 7:30 p.m. Beckman Hall, Harvey Mudd College, 1250 Dartmouth Ave., Claremont. www.pvaa.us.

October

Saturday

19

October Thursday

17

LUNCH & CONVERSATION Speaker Bertil Lindblad, senior adviser for International Initiatives, Pomona College will

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff Images from David Michalekʼs art installation “Slow Dancing,” are projected onto screens hanging from Bridges Auditorium at Pomona College. Three giant screens displayed figures filmed in slow motion as part of a larger exhibit of the artistʼs work on display at the Pomona College Museum of Art.

OKTOBERFIESTA at Dale Bros Brewery with music by The Plus Tones and food from The Viking Truck from 5 to 8 p.m. Proceeds will benefit Shoes That Fit. Bring a new pair of athletic shoes—sizes 10 youth to 12 adult—to be entered into a charity raffle. $5 cover. 2120 Porterfield Way, Upland. www.dalebrosbrewery.com.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 11, 2013

22

PERFORMING ARTS
BALCH AUDITORIUM: 1030 Columbia Ave., Claremont. 607-2671. —Friday, October 11: Friday, Noon Concert featuring Ken Foerch on saxophone and Stephen Klein on tuba. Music by Barbara York and more. Free admission. 12:15 p.m. BOONE RECITAL HALL: 241 E. 10th Street, Claremont. —Sunday, October 13: “Paris and Eastward” performed by Rachel Huang on violin and Tatiana Thibodeaux on piano. Music of Germaine Tailleferre, Janacek and Bartok. Admission is free. 3 p.m. BRIDGES AUDITORIUM: 450 N. College Way, Pomona College. Box-office hours are Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 607-1139. Tickets may be purchased online; you can easily choose seats at www.pomona.edu/bridges.

Photo courtesy of Candlelight Pavilion “Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street” concluds on October 13 at The Candlelight Pavilion.

—Through October 16: The Courage to Remember, a traveling Holocaust exhibit. Free and open to the public in the Bridges Auditorium main lobby. Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

—Thursday, October 31: Screening of the psychological horror film The Shining, produced and directed by Stanley Kubrick, starring Jack Nicholson and Shelley Duvall. Not recommended for children or the faint of heart. $10. 10 p.m. BRIDGES HALL OF MUSIC: Pomona College, 150 E. Fourth St., Claremont. 607-2671. —Saturday, October 12 at 8 p.m. and Sunday, October 13 at 3 p.m.: Pomona College Orchestra conducted by Eric Lindholm featuring soprano Gwendolyn Lytle. —Sunday, October 20: Opening its 61st season, the Claremont Symphony Orchestra will celebrate the centennial birthdays of three well-known composers. Music director Robert Sage will lead the orchestra in Benjamin Britten’s “Simple Symphony” as well as pieces by Giussepe Verdi and Richard Wagner. Free admission. 3:30 p.m. —Friday, October 25: “Baroque Masters” featuring JungHae Kim on harpsichord and Josh Lee on viola da gamba. Music by Boismortier, Marais, D’Anglebert, Corrette, Telemann and Bach. Free admission. 8 p.m. —Sunday, October 27: “Songs of Celebration” featuring Millennium Consort Singers and conducted by Martin Neary. Music by Tom Flaherty accompanied by the Pomona College Choir. Free admission. 8 p.m. CANDLELIGHT PAVILION: 455 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont. Thursday, Friday and Saturday evening shows: dinner at 6 p.m., performance at 8:15 p.m.; Sunday evening shows: dinner at 5 p.m., performance at 7:15 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday matinees: lunch at 11 a.m., performance at 12:45 p.m. 626-1254, ext.1 or www.candlelightpavilion.com. —Through October 13: Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street. —October 18 through November 24: Seven Brides for Seven Brothers. HAUGH PERFORMING ARTS CENTER: 1000 W. Foothill Blvd., Glendora. Discounts available for students, seniors and youth. 626-963-9411 or www.haughpac.com. —Saturday, October 12: A Conversation with Edith Head. In her six decades of costume design, Edith Head dressed most of the great stars from Mae West to Elizabeth Taylor, received 35 Academy Award nominations and won an unprecedented 8 Oscars. Susan Claassen stars as Edith Head in this behindthe-scenes feast of great movie lore and stories filled with humor, ambition and, above all, glamour. Complimentary tea and light refreshments will be served starting at 1 p.m. The show begins at 2 p.m. Tickets are $32 or $30 for students and seniors. LYMAN HALL: Thatcher Music Building, 340 N. College Ave., Claremont. —Wednesday, October 30: Student recital. Free admission. 8:15 p.m.

Traveling Holocaust exhibit stops at Claremont theater
The Museum of Tolerance’s “The Courage to Remember” traveling Holocaust exhibit, featuring 200 original photos and a 40-panel visual narrative of the Holocaust, will be on view at Pomona College’s Bridges Auditorium, 450 N. College Way, Claremont through October 16. The exhibit is an educational series that has circled the globe since 1988 as both a tribute in honor of the millions of lives lost to the horrors of the Holocaust and a warning that the root causes remain. “We want people to learn about what happened and never forget,” says Ted Gover, executive director of Foundation for California. The exhibit is free and open to the public Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Free parking is available in the south campus parking structure, located at First Street and Columbia Avenue. For more information, call 607-1139 or visit www.couragetoremember.com.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 11, 2013

24

NIGHTLIFE
CASA DE SALSA: 415 W. Foothill Blvd. This is a restaurant that offers weekly live entertainment. 445-1200. —Thursdays: Michael Ryan and Friends. 6 to 9 p.m. —Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays: Romantic guitarist Vicente Victoria. 5 p.m. —Sundays: Mariachi San Pedro. Brunch. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. EUREKA CLAREMONT: 580 W. First St., Claremont. Open from 11 a.m. to midnight Sunday through Thursday; closes at 1 a.m. Friday and Saturday. “Hoppy” Hour daily from 2 to 6 p.m. 445-8875. —Mondays: Local Mondays featuring $3 Dale Bros. Brewery pints. —Tuesdays: 50 percent off all wines by the glass. —Wednesdays: Steal-the-Glass craft beer of the week. Meet the brewer first Wednesday of every month. —Thursday, October 17: All Tito’s Vodka drinks $2 off and Eureka Thursday Night Music with Escensy. THE FOLK MUSIC CENTER: 220 Yale Ave., Claremont Village. —Open mic night, the last Sunday of every month. Sign-up begins at 6 p.m.; performances run from 6:30 to 9 p.m. Admission is $1. Info: 624-2928 or www.folkmusiccenter.com. FLAPPERS COMEDY: 540 W. First St., Claremont Packing House. 18+. Show times: Friday at 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. and Saturday at 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. Tickets can be purchased

online or at the door. —Friday and Saturday, October 11 and 12: Born in the Midwest, raised on the east coast and now living out west, Jason Dudey can be seen spreading his quirky views on life, love and family throughout the country. —Friday and Saturday, October 18 and 19: Lou Santini is the weekly man on the street and studio commentator for The Countdown on REELZ TV, and has made appearances on Playboy TV, Frank TV and TV Guide Network. He won the 2011 Detroit Comedy Festival and has opened for Bob Saget and Paul Reiser. His second full-length comedy album, Let’s Get Bloated, is available on iTunes and www.ama zon.com. FOX THEATER POMONA: 301 S. Garey Ave., Pomona. www.fox‐ pomona.com. —Friday, October 11: Gogol Bordello. —Tuesday, October 15: Disclosure. —Friday, October 25: AFI. —Saturday, October 26: The Naked and Famous. —Thursday, November 21: Sleeping with Sirens. HIP KITTY JAZZ & FONDUE: 502 W. First St., Claremont Packing House. Tuesday through Sunday, 5:30 p.m. to 2 a.m. Live jazz every night. Admission: 2-drink minimum. Info: 447-6700 or www.hipkittyjazz.com. —Friday, October 11: Lil “A” and the Allnighters (blues). 8 p.m. $5 cover charge. —Saturday, October 12: Sugah Daddy (swing/boogie). 8 p.m. $5 cover charge. —Sunday, October 13: The Happi-

ness Jazz Band (jazz). 7 p.m. —Tuesday, October 15: Ireesh Lal (electronic/world/jazz). 9 p.m. —Wednesday, October 16: Open Jam Night with Sean Amato & Friends (rock). 8 p.m. —Thursday, October 17: The Jonathan Rowden Group (jazz). 7 p.m. —Friday, October 18: The Lindy Sisters (swing/jazz). 8 p.m. $5 cover charge. —Saturday, October 19: Nutty (swing/lounge). 8 p.m. $5 cover charge. HOTEL CASA 425: 425 W. First St., Claremont. Call 624-2272 or visit www.casa425.com. —Saturday, October 26: Brandon Bernstein (trio) performs 7 to 10 p.m. THE PRESS RESTAURANT: 129 Harvard Ave., Claremont Village. Thursday through Saturday until 2 a.m. Live DJ every Thursday at 11 p.m. 21+ after 9 p.m. Standing room only after 9:30 p.m. No cover. 625-4808. —Friday, October 11: Kern Richards. 10 p.m. —Saturday, October 12: Solid Ray Woods (soul). 10 p.m. —Sunday, October 13: Sunday dinner piano music. 6 to 8 p.m. —Tuesday, October 15: King Trivia Night. Answer trivia questions for a chance to win beer. 9:30 p.m. —Wednesday, October 16: Half-off Wine Wednesday. 11 a.m. to closing. —Thursday, October 17: Baldy Mountain Jazz Band at 8 p.m. and DJ Catlike at 10 p.m. —Friday, October 18: Wreck N’ Sow. 10 p.m. —Saturday, October 19: Grant

Langston. 10 p.m. PIANO PIANO: 555 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont. Live dueling piano show times: Wednesday and Thursday, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; Friday and Saturday, 8 p.m. to 1 a.m. 21+. $5 cover charge on Fridays and Saturdays after 8 p.m. (no cover charge with student ID). 547-4266. —Tuesdays: Taco Tuesday with $1 tacos, $2 Coronas and $3 margaritas. Rock the mic or jam with the band. —Wednesdays: “Rockstar Karaoke.” Rock the mic or jam with the band. $2 Bud Lights and $4 Vodka Rockstars. 9 p.m. WALTER’S RESTAURANT: 310 Yale Ave., Claremont. VIP and fire pit lounge open from 7 to 10 p.m. Happy hour specials are only valid in the bar and lounge areas. 767-2255. —Margarita Mondays: $2 house margaritas, $3 house wine, $3 delirium tremens and $3 bolawnies. —Tequila Tuesdays: $2 house tequila, $3 house wine, $3 Coronas and $3 nachos. —Whiskey Wednesdays: $2 house scotch or bourbon, $3 house wine, $3 Stella and $3 bruschetta. —Thirsty Thursdays: Half-off all drinks and appetizers all evening. —Finest Fridays: $2 house vodka, $3 Pomona Queen, Green Flash and Hanger 24. Plus $3 house wine, $4 nachos and $6 classic burger and fries all evening. Kimera performs Gypsy Kings-style music. —Saturdays and Sundays: $3 Bloody Marys, mimosas and Afghan fries from opening to closing. Live jazz music is performed on weekends.

COURIER CROSSWORD

Crossword by Myles Mellor. Puzzle #232

Across

1. Go inside 6. Arctic 11. Matterhorn, e.g. 14. Coronet 15. Muddle 16. Swarmer 17. Tribal ruler 18. Claremont All-Stars Little League pitcher 20. Stumble 22. Give the heave-ho 23. Philosophy that natural objects have souls 27. Titled Indian 28. Light cotton cloth 29. Disguise source of funds 31. Perfume ingredients 32. Moolah 34. Crafty, like a fox

35. One who gets even 37. Drug used in "The Good Shepherd" 40. Other halves 41. Diamond Head locale 42. Claremont tennis star, Raquel ___ 46. King Lear became one 48. Bunk 49. Barbary sheep 50. Sewed up 51. Disentangle 54. Reducing 56. Excessive 61. Auberge 62. Aquatic mammal 63. Track competitions 64. Prized 65. Annoying neighbor quality 66. Fair-sized musical group

Down

Answers to last weekʼs puzzle #231

1. And all that jazz 2. Health org. 3. Japanese fish 4. "___ he drove out of sight..." 5. Basket material 6. Sacred song 7. Tending to business 8. Put on board, as cargo 9. Remote 10. Cut and ___ 11. Be plentiful 12. Rent payer 13. Dog 19. Horse color 21. Long-eared pack animal 23. Biblical prophet 24. Finger tip 25. Casually 26. "___ Robinson" - Song from "The Graduate" 27. German river 29. Schleps 30. Get on in years 32. Buddhist divinity 33. Richard Bach novel 35. Traveling 36. To wit 37. Dalai ___ 38. Certain herring 39. Nags about the money 41. Peculiar 42. An apostle 43. Tertiary period 44. Refrains 45. Many wines 46. Cattle sound 47. Fall 49. Ticked off 51. Said ____ me... 52. Pesky insects 53. Leg connector 55. One billion years 57. Prefix with orthodox 58. Secluded room 59. Beehive state native 60. D.C. setting

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 11, 2013

25

GALLERIES
BUDDHAMOUSE EMPORIUM: 134 Yale Ave., Claremont. Open daily from 10:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. www.buddhamouse.com. 626-3322. —Through October 31: “Claremont Noir,” exhibiting a selection of illustrations by Kendall Johnson. CLAREMONT COMMUNITY FOUNDATION ART GALLERY: 205 Yale Ave., Claremont Chamber of Commerce. Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 398-1060. —Through October 31: Rebecca Hamm’s work presents points where nature overcomes and reclaims— gradually or dramatically—human constructs. Ms. Hamm creates energetic, abstracted visions that overflow with color and hidden life. At a distance, the stream emerges and the rock forms in a constant state of flux. The serenity of nature is simultaneously presented as mysterious and comforting, fascinating and awestriking, terrifying and instructive. CLAREMONT FORUM GALLERY: 586 W. First St. in the Packing House. Tuesday through Thursday, noon to 7 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, noon to 9 p.m.; and Sunday, noon to 7 p.m. 626-3066. —Through October 31: “Dream Dancer,” an art exhibition by Mary Beth Fletcher. CLAREMONT GRADUATE UNIVERSITY: 150 E. Tenth St., Claremont. 621-8000. —Through October 25: “Remodel 2: Expanding the Dialog Exhibition.” THE COLONY AT LOFT 204: 532 W. First St., #204, Claremont Packing House. Open Tuesday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Extended hours on the first Friday of the month for Claremont Art Walk until 9 p.m., with live music sponsored by Live on Analog Records at 8 p.m. Visit www.loft204.com. Email info@loft204.com for information about purchasing monthly wall space for artwork display or to inquire about event rental of gallery space. Call Vicki at 626-224-7915 or 626-963-4238 for one-on-one art instruction for junior high and high school age students. —Through October 31: Find yourself transported through the Twilight Zone this haunted holiday season with The Colony’s ghoulish new exhibit, featuring the artwork of graphic artist and illustrator Matthew Jager. —Tuesdays: Yoga class for all levels. Instructor Jasmin Iskandar has over 400 hours of teacher training in Hatha and Vinyasa Yoga. She was first trained in the Krishnamacharya lineage by Shiva Rea at Exhale Center for Sacred Movement in Venice Beach. Later, Ms. Iskandar traveled to India to study the Sri Sivananda Saraswati lineage of Hatha yoga. Her classes offer the dynamism of Vinyasa with the science of Hatha. Visit www.levitatela.com to learn more about Ms. Iskandar. 7 to 8 p.m. $10. —Wednesdays: Belly dance class for all levels. Instructor Adina Dane performs at many locations in the area including Mediterranean restaurants and community events. Learn basic upper and lower body isolations, footwork and important

Image courtesy of Barbara Morgan, The Barbara Morgan Archive This 1940 gelatin silver print by Martha Graham is in the “Focus of Photographs” exhibit on display from October 26 through December 15 at Scripps Collegeʼs Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery.

stretching techniques. Wear comfortable clothes. Bring a yoga mat and water bottle. 7 to 8 p.m. $10. FIRST STREET GALLERY ART CENTER: 250 W. First St., Suite 120, Claremont. Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 626-5455. —Through November 15: “Tile Show 2013,” featuring Nathan Murri. Mr. Murri appropriates characters from animated feature films to explore narrative and character development in unique works. The annual tile show is a community event where artists from the public join First Street Gallery clients and staff in creating and exhibiting unique ceramic tiles. Every tile in the show is donated to the exhibition and all sales benefit the programs and artists of First Street Gallery. GINGER ELLIOTT EXHIBITION CENTER: 840 N. Indian Hill Blvd., Claremont. Garner House. Open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from noon to 4 p.m. Claremont Heritage, 621-0848. —Through October 20: “16 Architects” exhibition paying homage to the 1950 groundbreaking exhibition that was mounted in the galleries of Scripps College, bringing together the most significant modern architecture produced in southern California after World War II. Material for the exhibition was collected and organized by architect Whitney Smith with the assistance of students in the architecture department. The exhibition was documented in the April 1950 issue of Arts & Architecture Magazine with photos by Julius Shulman. The exhibit features examples of mid-century modern architecture that was produced in Claremont by 16 architects and designers. Opening reception: Friday, October 11 from 7 to 9 p.m. LENZNER FAMILYART GALLERY: First floor of Atherton Hall on the Pitzer College campus. Free admission. Tuesday through Friday, noon to 5 p.m. or by appointment throughout the year. 607-8797. —Through December 6: “Emerging Artist Series #8: Danielle Adair—On the Rocks, in the Land.” This documentaryperformance-video installation analyzes the role of the tourist-observer, within

contemporary conflict zones, and questions how a tourist perceives and experiences sites of historic and contemporary political significance. NICHOLS GALLERY: First floor of the Broad Center on the Pitzer College campus. Tuesday through Friday, noon to 5 p.m. or by appointment throughout the year. 607-8797. —Through December 5: “Glyphs: Acts of Inscription” explores the consequences of such acts on the poetic and political dimensions of representation, difference and visibility. Working in photography, moving image and mixed-media, the artists cannibalize and query such archives to create new image repertoires that point to the lacunae—the silences, absences and erasures—contained within prevalent visual-historical renderings. PETTERSON MUSEUM OF INTERCULTURAL ART: 730 Plymouth Road, Pilgrim Place. Friday, Saturday and Sunday, 2 to 4 p.m. Contains collections of international fine art, folk art and material culture from 10,000 BCE to the present, contributed by Pilgrim Place residents and community friends, covering every continent. 399-5544. —Through November 25: “Stepping Out in Style,” an exhibition exploring the countless ways human beings have designed and worn footwear all over the planet. Over 100 historic and contemporary shoes, boots, sandals, slippers and stockings—many from the Petterson’s significant collection of historic Chinese costumes—will be on display. POMONA COLLEGE MUSEUM OF ART: 333 N. College Ave., Claremont. Open Tuesday through Sunday, noon to 5 p.m. Art After Hours on Thursday, 5 to 11 p.m. Open September 5 though December 5; closed Thanksgiving day. For more information, visit www.pomona.edu/museum. Contact Pomona College Museum of Art by email at museuminfo@pomona.edu or call 621-8283. —Through October 20: “Project Series 46: Hirokazu Kosaka—On the Verandah Selected Works 1969-1974.” This exhibition, co-curated by Rebecca McGrew and Glenn Phillips, brings together documentation of Kosaka’s early artworks and rarely-seen films

and is accompanied by a publication. —October 31 through December 22: “Project Series: Krysten Cunningham: Ret, Scutch, Heckle.” The 47th installment of the Pomona College Museum of Art’s Project Series will present sculpture and drawings by Los Angeles-based artist Krysten Cunningham. Opening reception: Thursday, October 31 from 7 to 9 p.m. RAYMOND M. ALF MUSEUM: 1175 W. Base Line Road, Webb Schools campus. Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. (closed from noon to 1 p.m.) and Saturdays 1 to 4 p.m. Admission: $6 per person, 4 and under free. The paleontology museum features fossils of dinosaurs and mammals. 624-2798 or www.alfmuseum.org. —Wednesday, October 16: The Alf Museum will be celebrating National Fossil Day, with a variety of activities and halfoff admission for the day. $3 per person. Ages four and under may attend for free. The museum will have a fossil “touch table,” paleo scavenger hunt, a takehome “Paleo Pack” for kids and more. 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. RUTH CHANDLER WILLIAMSON GALLERY: 1030 Columbia Ave., at 11th and Columbia on the Scripps College campus. Wednesday through Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m. during exhibitions. Free admission. 607-3397 or www.scrippscoll ge.edu/williamson-gallery/. —Through October 13: “Chasing Daylight, Philip Latimeer Dike 1927-1943.” Mr. Dike contributed greatly to the California art scene of the 1930s and 1940s through his work in what would later become known as the “California Style” of watercolor painting. As the 1920s drew to a close and throughout the 1930s, Mr. Dike began to master the art of translating the effects of light and color into watercolor. In those early years, his fascination with this work led the rather shy and private artist on a journey throughout the United States and Europe. With more than 50 paintings, the exhibition tells the story of these years in detail. Visitors will view his impressions of life in New York in the late 1920s and his studies at the Arts Students League; his work in Europe, including his time at the American Academy of Art at Fontainebleau; and his travels afterwards. Paintings created after his return from his travels overseas will also be on display, as he continued his exploration of light and color by recording street scenes, architecture and landscapes in southern California and the southwest. Closing reception: Sunday, October 13, featuring a watercolor demonstration. SQUARE i GALLERY: 110 Harvard Ave., Claremont. Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. or by appointment. Square i is an annex of the Artist Trait Gallery. Exhibits rotate approximately every six weeks. Call 621-9091 or e-mail info@squareigallery.com. —Through October 31: Joyce Hesselgrave has an MFA in painting and drawing from Claremont Graduate University and currently teaches art at Cal Poly, Pomona. Ms. Hesselgrave explains, “I hold a fascination with the mood and light of nighttime places—the feel of magic when the sun is down, the streets lit with electricity, and errant strangers walk the dark streets anonymously.”

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 11, 2013

26

Scouts find ghostly way to raise money for troop

The Seaver House on College Avenue is notorious for a trickster ghost who turns the light on in the top floor of the building. Docent Leah Key-Ketter tells the story during a preview of the first annual Village Ghost Walk.

he Girl Scouts of Troop 1094 are providing the spooks this Halloween season.
Besides cookie sales and community service, the Sycamore School Juniors have a new focus: the paranormal. The girls are getting ghoulish this weekend with the city’s first community-wide Village Ghost Walk, showcasing Claremont’s local hauntings. The Sycamore scouts and their leaders, Leah Key-Ketter and Holly Pugno, have spent the last three months becoming experts in the ethereal, researching and interviewing Village folks who claim to have seen ghosts. The scouts’ work will be put to the test this Saturday and Sunday as they lead small groups to some of the hauntings, Bridges Auditorium and Colors 91711 among them. While the apparitions certainly take center stage in their eerie expedition, the experience is about more than just the ghost stories. “It’s a fun way of learning about Claremont’s history while hearing some great storytelling,” Ms. Pugno said. “You walk away with a better understanding of Claremont.” This is the second year the Girl Scouts will be showcasing their storytelling prowess, but the first time the Claremont community is invited to take

T

COURIER photos/Jenelle Rensch Sycamore Girl Scout leaders Holly Pugno and Leah Key-Ketter begin a preview of Village Ghost Walk in front of the Claremont Depot. At the event set, for this Saturday and Sunday, guests will be treated to an evening of storytelling about local history and hauntings.

Beth Garvin, her 12-year-old son Jack and Nancy Tresor Osgood listen to their own stories come to life during the Village Ghost Walk.

part. After limiting their initial showing to fellow scouts, this year the ghost walk is expanding. Joan Bunte, owner of Stamp Your Heart Out, and the Village Marketing Group have helped with

that effort, eager to join in on the fun. “I have always heard about ghost walks/tours and was very jealous when I learned that Riverside had one,” Ms. Bunte said. “I kept my ears open and when [I heard] Leah had put one together last year for and with her Girl Scouts, that was the open door.” Ms. Bunte and the Village Marketing Group weren’t the only ones on board with broadening the scope of the Ghost Walk. Within a matter of days, the event was sold out, with proceeds benefitting the scouts’ summer camp fund. It took Troop 1093 two-and-a-half years to raise money for last year’s Girl Scout Camp. With the success of this year’s walk, they might already have their ticket to this year’s summer excursion.

Putting together a haunted trek worthy of the crowds is a tall order. Thankfully Ms. Key-Ketter, who has helped coordinate the effort, is a sage when it comes to spooky storytelling. The Claremont mom has been leading her own ghost walks for her son and his friends for years. She is now sharing her craft with her scouts, much to their delight. “It’s fun to be creepy for a night,” said 11-year-old Edyn Hawke, who will be serving as one of the tour’s docents. The tour begins at the Claremont Depot and slowly winds its way to Stamp Your Heart Out, where Girl
GHOST WALK continues on the next page

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 11, 2013

27

COURIER photos/Jenelle Rensch Chuck Ketter (left) and Leah Key-Ketter (above) give dramatic interpretations of ghost stories during a preview of Village Ghost Walk in Claremont. The tour, which will take place this weekend, is already sold out.

niture, another aspect of the story that amuses 11-yearold Lilly Pugno. In addition to Timmy, the girls are partial to a giddy young ghost that features in one of the outings’ final accounts, a story provided by Ms. Bunte’s daughter, Beth Garvin, and 12-year-old grandson, Jack. While convincing their tour guests that ghosts are real might be a bit of a challenge, the Sycamore docents weren’t a hard sell. “I’ve always believed in ghosts,” declared Ruby Berke. “I probably believe more now.”
—Beth Hartnett news@claremont-courier.com

GHOST WALK continued from the previous page

Scouts—dressed in their gypsy finest—will be waiting to read palms, dole out hot cider and present a festive Halloween craft. The Ghost Walk makes its first stop at Some Crust bakery, a local haunt in both senses of the word. Those who believe in the paranormal say that the longer a place has been around, the more chance it has to be haunted. Some Crust Bakery, one of the

most historic places of business in the Claremont Village, is no exception to this rule. Owners and employees of the Village staple say they have experienced phenomena suggesting it is haunted to its very foundation. While some of the stories feature seemingly sinister spirits, like Some Crust, not all of the tales’ phantom characters have a mean streak. The young docents have taken a liking to “Timmy” the ghost, a spirit who has been known to haunt what used to be a Fourth Street hair salon and is now Olga’s Underground Fur-

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 11, 2013

28

RESTAURANT ROW

CALL MARY TODAY: 621-4761

House of Ruth and the Pomona Police Department partner in candlelight vigil
House of Ruth is holding a candlelight vigil and domestic violence awareness event on Tuesday, October 15 at 6 p.m. at the Pomona Outreach Center 599 N. Main Street, Pomona. The theme of this year’s candlelight vigil will be “What Men Can Do to Stop Violence,” and will encourage men to take an active role toward ending domestic violence in our communities. House of Ruth will honor many of our community supporters at the event including Hair Phases Salon, Family and Friends Golf, Chris Anzalone from Tri-City Mental Health Services and Randy Prout. This event is free to the public and light refreshments will be served. To acknowledge the seriousness and the continuing presence of domestic violence in our communities, this candlelight vigil and domestic violence awareness event invites members of the general public to gather in support of House of Ruth’s work providing services to battered women and their children. The event will offer those in attendance the opportunity to acknowledge and support families victimized by domestic violence, and honor those who have lost their lives to domestic violence. House of Ruth began in 1977 as a graduate studies project, by a group of students from Claremont Graduate School. They assessed the need for domestic violence services in the Pomona Valley and the response was overwhelming. House of Ruth Incorporated in 1978 with a 24-hour hotline, referrals to services and crisis counseling. In 1981, an 18-bed shelter was opened and within 24 hours it was full. Thirty-five years later, House of Ruth has become a domestic violence agency providing direct services to women and children. Since its humble beginnings 36 years ago as a 24hour hotline, which operated around a kitchen table of a female Claremont Graduate University student, House of Ruth’s mission has been to advocate for and assist women victimized by domestic violence and children exposed to violence in transforming their lives by providing culturally competent shelter, programs, opportunities and education. In the past year, House of Ruth served a total of 4,110 people through various programs and services which include, but are not limited to, an emergency shelter and transitional shelter, a child abuse treatment program, and a 24hour emergency hotline. In addition, staff and volunteers provided community education services to a total of 21,654 people. For more information about the candlelight vigil and how you can become involved in Domestic Violence Awareness Day, call 623-4364, ext. 6054. For assistance with any emergency or for more information about domestic violence, call the 24-hour hotline at 988-5559.

OUR TOWN
an Francisco State University sociologist Andreana Clay will deliver a lecture titled, “We Can't Stop: Young Women of Color, Feminism and Social Movement Organizing,” on Thursday, October 17 at 4:15 p.m. at Pomona College’s Hahn 108, 420 N. Harvard Ave., Claremont.
In her talk, Ms. Clay will explore how youth of color organize and identify as activists in the postCivil Rights era. A reception precedes the talk. Ms. Clay is the author of The Hip-Hop Generation Fights Back: Youth Activism and Post-Civil Rights Politics (2012), reviewed by Choice magazine as “an engaging work [that] demonstrates that

Pomona College lecture to focus on race, gender, social movement
despite common stereotypes, youth today are committed to bringing about social change by using popular culture.” Ms. Clay’s articles on hip-hop culture, queer sexuality, popular culture and hip-hop feminism have appeared in several anthologies and academic journals, including Home Girls Make Some Noise!: A Hip-Hop Feminist Anthology, the Journal of Popular Music Studies and Meridians: A Journal of Race, Feminism, and Transnationalism. She blogs at QueerBlackFeminist (http://queerblackfeminist.blogspot.com/). “In her work, Clay listens to today's youth of color. She spotlights the transformative power of hip-hop and spoken word — leaving her audiences with optimism, inspiration and strategies for addressing multiple inequities,” says Pomona College professor of sociology Gilda Ochoa. For more information, email gilda.ochoa@pomona.edu.

S

Generations of Claremont High School alumni invited to homecoming
Generations of former Claremont High School students, faculty and staff will reconvene for three days of reunion activities during the CHS Homecoming Weekend Oct. 18-20. Every person who ever attended or taught at Claremont High School is invited to attend the festivities, highlighted by a Sock Hop for all alumni on Saturday, October 19, from 6-10 p.m. at the Claremont University Consortium Administrative Campus Center at 101 S. Mills Ave. in Claremont. Presented by the Claremont High School Wolfpack Alumni Society, the All Alumni Sock Hop includes entertainment, dinner, a no-host bar, historical exhibits and raffle prizes–and the chance to reconnect with old friends from all CHS classes. The cost to attend is $40, including $10 in beverage tickets, before October 19 and $50 at the door. Coming “home” to the Pack will have special meaning for the CHS Class of 1973, which will hold its 40year Reunion at the October 19 Sock Hop. In addition, the Golden Grads of ’64 will be honored, and Claremont High Class of 1961 will have a mini-reunion during the event as well. Saturday’s activities will also include walking tours of Claremont led by former Claremont Mayor Peter Yao, a CHS graduate of 1963. On Friday, October 18, the Alumni Society invites all CHS alumni to attend the CHS Homecoming Rally at Memorial Park in Claremont at 3 p.m. and participate in the annual parade that follows at 3:30 p.m. The Class of 1964 will be honored as the Golden Grads, whose own Homecoming was 50 years ago. They will be honorary grand marshals of the parade and will be introduced on the field after the first quarter of the Homecoming game that evening. Alumni from all CHS classes will gather after the parade for a no-host happy hour at Eureka Burger starting at 4 p.m., followed by the Wolfpack football game against South Hills High School at Claremont High at 7 p.m. On Sunday, October 20, all CHS alumni are invited to meet at the Village Square in downtown Claremont from 9 a.m. to noon for coffee, breakfast or brunch. Friends and families are welcome. The Claremont High Alumni Society was formed in 2010 to honor the high school’s 100-year anniversary. It held its inaugural all-class reunion in 2011, bringing together generations of CHS graduates from classes of 1945 to 2005. To make reservations or for more information about any of the alumni events, visit the free Alumni Society website at www.claremonthighalumnisociety.com. For sponsorship opportunities or more information about the Claremont High All-Alumni Homecoming or other Alumni Society activities, contact Sharon Esterley at esterley@aol.com or visit www.claremonthighalumnisociety.com.

909.621.4761
Friday 10-11-13

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

29

CONTACT US 1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072 classified@claremont-courier.com Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

CLASSIFIEDS
rentals..............29 legals..............30 services...........33 real estate.......36
RENTALS
Office Space For Rent
VILLAGE office. Exceptional building. Utilities, waiting room, parking. 419 Yale Ave. Weekdays from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

REAL ESTATE
Land For Sale
GET away from it all! 18.3 acres. Beautiful four bedroom gated ranch home. Santa Ynez mountain views. Pools, citrus trees. Rentals, optional oil rights $2.5 million plus. 805-452-7235. (Cal-SCAN) THIRTY-EIGHT acre wilderness ranch, $193 monthly. Prime 38 acre cabin site atop evergreen wooded ridge, overlooking wilderness valley, on secluded north Arizona ranch. Plentiful groundwater, good soil, beautiful rock formations, 6200-foot elevation. Borders 640 acres of State Trust Land. $19,900, $1990 down, $193 monthly. Order brochure, 800966-6690, 1st United-Woodland Valley Ranch #32. www.woodlandvalleyranch sale.com. (Cal-SCAN)

MARKETPLACE
Announcements
DID you know that 10 million adults tweeted in the past month, while 164 million read a newspaper in print or online in the past week? Advertise in 240 California newspapers for one low cost. Your 25 word classified ad will reach over six million plus Californians. For brochure call Elizabeth, 916-288-6019. (Cal-SCAN)

MARKETPLACE
Financial
WANTED- Tax practice/bookkeeping service. West end of San Bernardino County to the east end of LA County. Established buyer EA, 25 years at this location. Full service, year-round, seasoned staff. Branch site or merger ok. Principals only, cash/ carry, asking one year guarantee. Call 593-7431, ask for Bernie.

BULLETINS
Business
DIRECTV. Over 140 channels only $29.99 a month. Call now! Triple savings! $636 in savings, free upgrade to Genie and 2013 NFL Sunday ticket free! Start saving today! 1-800-2910350. (Cal-SCAN) SAVE money on auto insurance from the major names you know and trust. No forms. No hassle. No obligation. Call Ready For My Quote now! Call 1-888-706-8325. (Cal-SCAN) REDUCE your cable bill! Get an All-Digital Satellite system installed for free and programming starting at $24.99 per month. Free HD/DVR upgrade for new callers, so call now! 877366-4509. (Cal-SCAN) DISH TV Retailer. Starting at $19.99 a month for 12 months and high speed internet starting at $14.95 a month (where available). Save! Ask about same day installation! Call now! 1888-806-7317. (Cal-SCAN) AT&T U-Verse for just $29 a month! Bundle and save with AT&T internet, phone, TV and get a free pre-paid Visa card (select plans). Hurry, call now! 800-319-3280. (Cal-SCAN)

Apartment For Rent
CLAREMONT: Three bedroom, two bathroom apartment. $1600 monthly. $800 security deposit on approved credit. 624-9958.

Antiques
AMERICAN and European antiques, furnishings, home and garden decor. New shipment weekly! The Ivy House. 214 W. Foothill Blvd. 6216628. A BARN and house full of antiques, furniture and smalls. Refinishing too! 593-1846. La Verne. Kensoldenoddities.com.

Garage Sales
CLAREMONT, Saturday, October 12. Mountain Village Senior Apartments. 115 N. Mountain Ave. 9 a.m. rain or shine. Collectables, household goods. FRIDAY, Saturday, Sunday, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. 4195 Oak Hollow Rd. Furniture, household items, toys and more. FROM trinkets to treasures! Multi-family garage sale. Saturday, October 12, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Brigham Young Drive, off Mills.

House For Rent
THREE bedrooms, 1.75 bathrooms with approximately 1598 sq. ft. Fresh paint, fireplace. Includes water, trash, gardener and appliances. $2150 monthly. WSPM, 621-5941. WALK to Village. Two bedrooms, one bathroom, two-car garage. Includes refrigerator, water, sewer and trash. No pets. $1400 monthly. WSPM, 621-5941. GREAT four bedroom, 2.5 bathroom home on a large lot. Private automatic gate. Refrigerator and breakfast bar. Large master bedroom and bathroom with oversized tub. $2250 monthly. CBTC, 621-6761.

Donations
DONATE your car. Fast, free towing, 24-hour response. Tax deduction. United Breast Cancer Foundation. Providing free mammograms and breast cancer information. 888-792-1675. (Cal-SCAN)

For Sale
NEW, unused camping gear: air mattresses, Coleman stoves and lanterns, multiple pumps, tools, radio, toothbrushes. 593-2721.

EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
DRIVERS: A-CDL train and work for us! Professional and focused training for your Class A-CDL. You choose between Company Driver, Owner Operator, Lease Operator or Lease Trainer. 877-369-7091.
www.centraltruckdrivingjobs.com.

Education
BE an immigration or bankruptcy paralegal. $395 includes certificate, resume and 94 percent placement in all 58 California counties. For more information visit www.mdsassociates.com or call 626-552-2885 and 626-9183599. (Cal-SCAN) AIRLINE careers begin here. Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified. Housing available. Job placement assistance. Call AIM, 877-804-5293. (Cal-SCAN)

Estate Sales
ESTATE sale: Saturday, October 12, 7 a.m., 2636 Sweetbriar Drive, Claremont. China, glassware, knickknacks, collectibles, etc. from around the world.

Want To Buy
CASH for cars. Vintage Mercedes convertibles, Porsche, Jaguar, Alfa, Lancia, Ferrari, Corvettes, Mustangs, early Japanese cars, other collector cars of significant value desired. 7 1 4 - 2 6 7 - 3 4 3 6 . michaelfield204@gmail.com. (Cal-SCAN) CASH paid for Diabetic strips! Don’t throw boxes away, help others! Unopened/unexpired boxes only. All brands considered! Call anytime, 24-hours a day, 7-days a week. 888491-1168. (Cal-SCAN)

Townhome For Rent
TWO bedrooms, 2.5 bathrooms. Living room with laminate flooring and fireplace. Two-car garage, community pool. Includes refrigerator, washer and dryer. $1650 monthly. WSPM 621-5941.

Financial
CUT your student loan payments in half or more, even if late or in default. Get relief fast, much lower payments. Call Student Hotline, 855589-8607. (Cal-SCAN) GUARANTEED income for your retirement. Avoid market risk and get guaranteed income in retirement! Call for a free copy of our safe money guide plus annuity quotes from A-rated companies! 800375-8607. (Cal-SCAN) GET free of credit card debt now! Cut payments by up to half. Stop creditors from calling. 888-416-2691. (CalSCAN)

(Cal-SCAN) DRIVERS: New trucks arriving! Experience pays up to 50 cpm. Class A-CDL required. Full benefits and quality home time. 877-258-8782. www.ad-drivers.com. (Cal-SCAN) DRIVERS: Owner operators wanted. New Century is hiring CDL-A owner operators. Sign-on incentives. Competative pay package. Long haul frieght paid loaded and empty miles. Also hiring company teams, or solo drivers looking to team. Call 866-938-7803 or apply online at www.dri vectrans.com. (Cal-SCAN)

Vacation Rental
$399 CABO San Lucas all inclusive special. Stay six days in a luxury beachfront resort with unlimited meals and drinks for $399! 888-826-2141. www.luxurycabohotel.com. (CalSCAN) SIX day vacation in Orlando, Florida! Regularly $1175. Yours today for only $389! Your save 67 percent. Plus one week car rental included. Call for details. 1-800-9856809. (Cal-SCAN)

Health
DO you take Cialis or Viagra? Save $500! Get 40 pills for only $99! Buy the blue pill! Call 888-547-7975, Satisfaction guaranteed. (Cal-SCAN)

BULLETINS
Business
SAVE on cable TV, internet, digital phone, satellite. You’ve got a choice! Options from all major service providers. Call us to learn more! Call today, 888-706-4301. (Cal-SCAN)

Personals
MEET singles right now! No paid operators, just real people like you. Browse greetings, exchange messages and connect live. Try it free. Call now, 1-800945-3392. (Cal-SCAN)

Rates and deadlines are subject to change without notice. The publisher reserves the right to edit, reclassify, revise or reject any classified advertisement. Please report any error that may be in your ad immediately. The Courier is not responsible for any unreported errors after the first publication. It is the advertiser’s obligation to verify the accuracy of his/her ad.

DEADLINES
All new accounts and Garage Sale ads must be prepaid. Payment by cash, check. Credit cards now accepted. Sorry no refunds. Classified: Wednesday by noon Real Estate: Tuesday by 5 pm Service Pages: Tuesday by 5 pm

PRICING
Classified: 1-16 words $20.00, each additional word $1.25 Display Ad: $10 per column/inch, 3 column minimum Service Ad: Please call for pricing.
All phone numbers in the classified section are in the 909 area code unless otherwise noted.

LEGAL TENDER
APN: 8307-012-019 TS No: CA08000683-13-1 TO No: 8253052 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED June 2, 2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On October 29, 2013 at 09:00 AM, Behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona CA 91766, MTC FINANCIAL INC. dba TRUSTEE CORPS, as the duly Appointed Trustee, under and pursuant to the power of sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust Recorded on June 20, 2005 as Instrument No. 05 1434604 of official records in the Office of the Recorder of Los Angeles County, California, executed by BRIAN F SWIENTON AND CATHERINE A SWIENTON HUSBAND AND WIFE AS COMMUNITY PROPERTY WITH RIGHT OF SURVIVORSHIP, as Trustor(s), in favor of SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC. as Lender and MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. as nominee for Lender, its successors and/or assigns, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER, in lawful money of the United States, all payable at the time of sale, that certain property situated in said County, California describing the land therein as: AS MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN SAID DEED OF TRUST The property heretofore described is being sold "as is". The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 1518 BENEDICT AVE, CLAREMONT, CA 91711 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the Note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said Note(s), advances if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligations secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of this Notice of Trustee`s Sale is estimated to be $404,868.17 (Estimated), provided, however, prepayment premiums, accrued interest and advances will increase this figure prior to sale. Beneficiary`s bid at said sale may include all or part of said amount. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept a cashier`s check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the California Financial Code and authorized to do business in California, or other such funds as may be acceptable to the Trustee. In the event tender other than cash is accepted, the Trustee may withhold the issuance of the Trustee`s Deed Upon Sale until funds become available to the payee or endorsee as a matter of right. The property offered for sale excludes all funds held on account by the property receiver, if applicable. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder`s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. Notice to Potential Bidders If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a Trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a Trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same Lender may hold more than one mortgage or Deed of Trust on the property. Notice to Property Owner The sale date shown on this Notice of Sale may be postponed one or more times by the Mortgagee, Beneficiary, Trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about Trustee Sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call Priority Posting and Publishing at 714-573-1965 for information regarding the Trustee's Sale or visit the Internet Web site address on the previous page for information regarding the sale of this property, using the file number assigned to this case, CA08000683-13-1. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Date: September 25, 2013 TRUSTEE CORPS TS No. CA08000683-13-1 17100 Gillette Ave, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-8300 Lupe Tabita, Authorized Signatory SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.priorityposting.com FOR AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL: Priority Posting and Publishing at 714-573-1965 TRUSTEE CORPS MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. P1062244 10/4, 10/11, 10/18/2013

legalads@claremont-courier.com 909.621.4761
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 194558 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as CLAREMONT CHIROPRACTIC, TRI CITY WELLNESS, 2440 W. Arrow Route, Ste. 5A, Upland, CA 91786, San Bernardino County. Mailing address: 689 W. Foothill Blvd., Ste. C, Claremont, CA 91711. MARK WATERMAN CHIROPRACTIC CORP., 689 W. Foothill Blvd., Ste. C, Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above in February, 1999. /s/ Mark Waterman Title: CEO This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 09/16/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: September 27, October 4, 11, and 18, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 190975 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as Actua!!y HandyMan, 766 W. 1st Street, Claremont, CA 91711. Miles Lee Bennett, 766 W. 1st Street, Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ Miles Lee Bennett This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 09/11/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: September 20, 27, October 4 and 11, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013192988 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as CLAREMONT ACUPUCTURE HEALTH CENTER, 250 W. First St., Ste#112, Claremont, CA 91711. Mailing address: 1016 Trevecca Place, Claremont, CA 91711. Lu Zhao, 881 Orchid Ct., Apt#16, Upland, CA 91786. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above on 09/12/2013. /s/ Lu Zhao This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of LosAngeles County on 09/13/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: September 20, 27, October 4 and 11, 2013 SUMMONS(CITACION JUDICIAL) NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (A VISOALDEMANDADO): ILENE D. NICELY aka ILENE DENISE NICELY, an individual; THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA, acting by and through the CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF MOTOR VEHICLES, a government entity; and DOES 1 to 20, inclusive. YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: (LO ESTÁ DEMANDANDO EL DEMANDANTE): LBS FINANCIAL CU, a California corporation NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court's lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. ¡AVISO! Lo han demandado. Si no responde dentro de 30 días, la corte puede decidir en su contra sin escuchar su versión. Lea la información a continuación. Tiene 30 DÍAS DE CALENDARIO después de que le entreguen esta citación y papeles legales para presentar una respuesta por escrito en esta corte y hacer que se entregue una copia al demandante. Una carta o una llamada telefónica no lo protegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene que estar en formato legal correcto si desea que procesen su caso en la corte. Es posible que haya un formulario que usted pueda usar para su respuesta. Puede encontrar estos formularios de la corte y más información en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www.sucorte.ca.gov), en la biblioteca de leyes de su condado o en la corte que le quede más cerca. Si no puede pagar la cuota de presentación, pida al secretario de la corte que le dé un formulario de exención de pago de cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a tiempo, puede perder el caso por incumplimiento y la corte le podrá quitar su sueldo, dinero y bienes sin más advertencia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es recomendable que llame a un abogado inmediatamente. Si no conoce a un abogado, puede llamar a un servicio de remisión a abogados. Si no puede pagar a un abogado, es posible que cumpla con los requisitos para obtener servicios legales gratuitos de un programa de servicios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro en el sitio web de California Legal Services, (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California, (www.sucorte.ca.gov) o poniéndose en contacto con la corte o el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO: Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar las cuotas y los costos exentos por imponer un gravamen sobre cualquier recuperación de $10,000 ó más de valor recibida mediante un acuerdo o una concesión de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil. Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte antes de que la corte pueda desechar el caso. The name and address of the court is (El nombre y direcciόn de le corte es): SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona, CA 91766 CASE NUMBER (Número del Caso) KC065879 ‘G’ The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: (El nombre, la dirección y el número de teléfono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante que no tiene abogado, es): Thomas J. Prenovost, Jr., SBN 77813 Tom R. Normandin, SBN 102265 PRENOVOST, NORMANDIN, BERGH & DAWE 2122 North Broadway, Suite 200 Santa Ana, CA 92706-2614 Tel. 714-547-2444, 714-835-2889 Date: (Fecha) March 20, 2013, Clerk: John A. Clarke, by (Secretario): L. Mascorro, Deputy(Adjunto). (For proof of service of this summons, use Proof of Service of Summons (form POS-010).) (Para prueba de entrega de esta citation use el formulario Proof of Service of Summons, (POS-010). PUBLISH: 09/20/13, 09/27/13, 10/04/13,10/11/13 Claremont Courier FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 198122 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as GRAND PA HENRY BBQ, 1918 Glassboro Ave., Claremont, CA 91711. Henry Arenas, 1918 Glassboro, Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ Henry Arenas This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 09/20/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: September 27, October 4, 11 and 18, 2013 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE T.S No. 138441731 APN: 8703-016-001 TRA: 10010 LOAN NO: Xxxxxx4649 REF: Lamay, Charles IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED August 01, 2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On October 24, 2013, at 9:00am, Cal-western Reconveyance Llc, as duly appointed trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded August 17, 2005, as Inst. No. 05 1971716* in book XX, page XX of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles County, State of California, executed by Charles Lamay and Silvana Lamay, Husband And Wife As Joint Tenants, will sell at public auction to highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the financial code and authorized to do business in this state: Behind the fountain located in civic center plaza, 400 civic Center Plaza Pomona, California, all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: Completely described in said deed of trust *loan modification agreement recorded 5/27/2008 as doc # 20080927371 The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 428 Navajo Springs Road Diamond Bar CA 91765 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be held, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, condition or encumbrances, including fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to pay the remaining principal sums of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is: $399,178.00. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the suc-

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, October 11, 2013
cessful bidder shall have no further recourse. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (619)590-1221 or visit the internet website www.dlppllc.com, using the file number assigned to this case 1384417-31. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web Site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. For sales information:(619)590-1221. Cal-Western Reconveyance LLC, 525 East Main Street, P.O. Box 22004, El Cajon, CA 92022-9004 Dated: September 19, 2013. (DLPP-433389 10/04/13, 10/11/13, 10/18/13) ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME FILE NO: 2013187103 Current File Number: 2013192973 The following person has/have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name CLAREMONT ACUPUNCTURE HEALTH CENTER, located at 250 W. First Street, #112, Claremont, CA 91711-4743. The fictitious business name referred to above was filed on 09/06/2013 in the County of Los Angeles. Registered Owner(s) are: Tammy Wang, 1016 Trevecca Place, Claremont, CA 91711. Yi Zhou, 17690 Osbourne Ave., Chino Hills, CA 91709. The business is conducted by Copartners. This statement was filed with the Registrar-Recorder/ County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 09/13/13. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Tammy Wang Publish: September 20, 27, October 4 and 11, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 195886 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as Light of Life Optometry, 418 Auto Center Drive, Claremont, CA 91711. Mailing address: 2503 Cottonwood Trail, Chino Hills, CA 91709. Bebawy Optometry Inc., 418 Auto Center Drive, Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ Magdy Bebawy Title: President This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 09/18/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: September 27, October 4, 11 and 18, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 189249 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as Dr. Lisa Hypnotherapy, 250 West First Street, Suite 250a, Claremont, CA 91711. Dr. Lisa Pion-Berlin, 630 Perdue Dr., Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above on 07/01/12. /s/ Dr. Lisa Pion-Berlin This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 09/10/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: September 20, 27, October 4 and 11, 2013 NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF HANS A. BUNZEL CASE NO. PROPS1300827 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of HANS A. BUNZEL A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by GISELA BUNZEL in the Superior Court of California, County of San Bernardino. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that LINDA M. BATTRAM be appointed as personal rep-

30

resentative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING ON THE PETITION WILL BE HELD IN THIS COURT AS FOLLOWS: Date: November 21, 2013 at Time: 9:00 A.M. in Dept. S15 located at: Superior Court Of California, County Of San Bernardino, 351 North Arrowhead Avenue San Bernardino, CA 92415-0212 CENTRAL IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a CONTINGENT CREDITOR OF THE DECEDENT, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE THE FILE KEPT BY THE COURT. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: Linda M. Battram SBN#135073 Law Offices Of Linda Battram 140 West Foothill Boulevard, Suite B Claremont, CA 91711 909-445-1010 Publish: October 11, 18 and 25, 2013 ORDINANCE NO. 2013-09 AN ORDINANCE OFTHE CITY OF CLAREMONT ADDING SECTION 10.32.220 (E) TO CHAPTER 10.32 OF THE CLAREMONT MUNICIPAL CODE CONCERNING REGULATIONS AUTHORIZING THE REMOVAL OF VEHICLES FOR ALL LOCATIONS WITHIN THE CITY WHERE PARKING IS PROHIBITED, AND THE APPROPRIATE TOWAWAY SIGNAGE IS POSTED. WHEREAS, California Vehicle Code (CVC) Section 22651 establishes regulations by which a vehicle may be removed from an on-street location; and WHEREAS, CVC 22651(n) stipulates that vehicles may be removed whenever a vehicle is parked or left standing where local authorities, by resolution or ordinance, have prohibited parking and have authorized the removal of vehicles; and WHEREAS, to provide the Claremont Police Department with additional and stricter enforcement options for vehicles parked in areas where parking is prohibited, the City Council has authorized the establishment of tow-away zones for all locations within the City where parking is prohibited, and approved the enforcement of these tow-away zones once appropriate signage establishing the zone has been installed. THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF CLAREMONT DOES ORDAIN AS FOLLOWS: SECTION 1. Chapter 10.32 of the Claremont Municipal Code is amended to add a new Subsection “E” to Section 10.32.220 titled, “Removal of Vehicles Authorized When” to read as follows: E. Any vehicle that is parked in a location within the City where parking is prohibited, as established through: (a) red curb striping; (b) no parking signage; (c) provisions of Chapters 10.32, 10.44, 10.68 and 10.69 of this Code; or, (d) provisions of the California Vehicle Code, and where signs are posted giving notice of the removal. SECTION 2. The Mayor shall sign this ordinance and the City Clerk shall attest and certify to the passage and adoption of it and, within 15 days, publish it in the Claremont Courier, a semi-weekly newspaper of general circulation, printed, published, and circulated in the City of Claremont, and 30 days thereafter it shall take effect and be in force. PASSED, APPROVED, AND ADOPTED this 8th day of October, 2013. __________________________ Mayor ATTEST:

____________________________ City Clerk APPROVED AS TO FORM:

______________________________ City Attorney STATE OF CALIFORNIA ) COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES ) ss. CITY OF CLAREMONT ) I, Lynne E. Fryman, City Clerk of the City of Claremont, County of Los Angeles, State of California, hereby certify that the foregoing Ordinance No. 201309 was introduced for first reading at a regular meeting of the City Council on the 24th day of September, 2013. That thereafter, said Ordinance was passed and adopted at a regular meeting of the City Council on the 8th day of October, 2013, by the following vote: AYES: COUNCILMEMBERS: PEDROZA, SCHROEDER, LYONS, CALAYCAY, NASIALI NOES: COUNCILMEMBERS: NONE ABSTAINED: COUNCILMEMBERS: NONE ABSENT: COUNCILMEMBERS: NONE ________________________________ City Clerk Publish: October 11, 2013

LEGAL TENDER
ORDER FOR PUBLICATION SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELS CASE NUMBER: SD032258 Plantiff: Renzo A. Blazek Defendant: Judith M. Blazek IT IS ORDERED that the service of the summons, citation or notice of hearing or Summons of Legal Separation in this action be made upon defendant, respondent, or citee Judith M. Blazek by publication thereof in the Claremont Courier a newspaper of general circulation published at 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Ste. 205B, Claremont, CA, Los Angeles County, and that said publication be made at least once a week for four successive weeks. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of said summons, citation or notice of hearing and of said complaint or petition in this action be forthwith deposited in the United States Post Office, postage prepaid, directed to said defendant, respondent, or citee if his address is ascertained before expiration of the time prescribed for the publication of this summons, citation or notice of hearing. A declaration of this mailing, or of the fact that the address was not ascertained, must be filed at the expiration of the time prescribed for the publication. Dated: September 10, 2013 Judicial Officer of the Superior Court: Matthew C. St. George, Commissioner Publish: 10/04/13, 10/11/13, 10/18/13, 10/25/13 SUMMONS (Family Law) (form FL-110) CITACIÓN (Derecho familiar) SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELS CASE NUMBER: SD032258 NOTICE TO RESPONDENT: AVISO AL DEMANDADO (Nombre): Judith M. Blazek You are being sued. Lo están demandando. PETITIONER’S NAME IS: NOMBRE DEL DEMANDANTE: Renzo A. Blazek You have 30 calendar days after this Summons and Petition are served on you to file a Response (form FL-120 or FL-123) at the court and have a copy served on the petitioner. A letter or phone call will not protect you. If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders affecting your marriage or domestic partnership, your property, and custody of your children. You may be ordered to pay support and attorney fees and costs. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. If you want legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. You can get information about finding lawyers at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), or by contacting your local county bar association. Tiene 30 días corridos después de haber recibido la entrega legal de esta Citación y Petición para presentar una Respuesta (formulario FL-120 ó FL123) ante la corte y efectuar la entrega legal de una copia al demandante. Una carta o llamada telefónica no basta para protegerlo. Si no presenta su Respuesta a tiempo, la corte puede dar órdenes que afecten su matrimonio o pareja de hecho, sus bienes y la custodia de sus hijos. La corte también le puede ordenar que pague manutención, y honorarios y costos legales. Si no puede pagar la cuota de presentación, pida al secretario un formulario de exención de cuotas. Si desea obtener asesoramiento legal, póngase en contacto de inmediato con un abogado. Puede obtener información para encontrar a un abogado en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www.sucorte.ca.gov), en el sitio Web de los Servicios Legales de California (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org) o poniéndose en contacto con el colegio de abogados de su condado. NOTICE: The restraining orders on page 2 are effective against both spouses or domestic partners until the petition is dismissed, a judgment is entered, or the court makes further orders. These orders are enforceable anywhere in California by any law enforcement officer who has received or seen a copy of them. AVISO: Las órdenes de restricción que figuran en la página 2 valen para ambos cónyuges o pareja de hecho hasta que se despida la petición, se emita un fallo o la corte dé otras órdenes. Cualquier autoridad de la ley que haya recibido o visto una copia de estas órdenes puede hacerlas acatar en cualquier lugar de California. NOTE: If a judgment or support order is entered, the court may order you to pay all or part of the fees and costs that the court waived for yourself or for the other party. If this happens, the party ordered to pay fees shall be given notice and an opportunity to request a hearing to set aside the order to pay waived court fees. AVISO: Si se emite un fallo u orden de manutención, la corte puede ordenar que usted pague parte de, o todas las cuotas y costos de la corte previamente exentas a petición de usted o de la otra parte. Si esto ocurre, la parte ordenada a pagar estas cuotas debe recibir aviso y la oportunidad de solicitar una audiencia para anular la orden de pagar las cuotas exentas. The name and address of the court are (El nombre y dirección de la corte son): Los Angeles Superior Court (West Division) 1725 Main St. Santa Monica, CA 90401 The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s attorney, or the petitioner without an attorney, are: (El nombre, dirección y número de teléfono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante si no tiene abogado, son): Jeffrey L. Harris Esq. SBN #281778 6601 Center Drive West, Ste 553, Los Angeles, CA 90045 Tel. 310-745-8644. Date: (Fecha) September 6, 2013, Clerk, by (Secretario, por) N. Valles, Deputy(Asistente). NOTICE TO PERSON SERVED: You are served as an individual. (AVISO A LA PERSONA QUE

legalads@claremont-courier.com 909.621.4761
RECIBIO´ LA ENTREGA: Esta entrego se realiza a usted como individuo). WARNING—IMPORTANT INFORMATION WARNING: California law provides that, for purposes of division of property upon dissolution of a marriage or domestic partnership or upon legal separation, property acquired by the parties during marriage or domestic partnership in joint form is presumed to be community property. If either party to this action should die before the jointly held community property is divided, the language in the deed that characterizes how title is held (i.e., joint tenancy, tenants in common, or community property) will be controlling, and not the community property presumption. You should consult your attorney if you want the community property presumption to be written into the recorded title to the property. STANDARD FAMILY LAW RESTRAINING ORDERS Starting immediately, you and your spouse or domestic partner are restrained from 1. Removing the minor child or children of the parties, if any, from the state without the prior written consent of the other party or an order of the court; 2. Cashing, borrowing against, canceling, transferring, disposing of, or changing the beneficiaries of any insurance or other coverage, including life, health, automobile, and disability, held for the benefit of the parties and their minor child or children; 3. Transferring, encumbering, hypothecating, concealing, or in any way disposing of any property, real or personal, whether community, quasi-community, or separate, without the written consent of the other party or an order of the court, except in the usual course of business or for the necessities of life; and 4. Creating a nonprobate transfer or modifying a nonprobate transfer in a manner that affects the disposition of property subject to the transfer, without the written consent of the other party or an order of the court. Before revocation of a nonprobate transfer can take effect or a right of survivorship to property can be eliminated, notice of the change must be filed and served on the other party. You must notify each other of any proposed extraordinary expenditures at least five business days prior to incurring these extraordinary expenditures and account to the court for all extraordinary expenditures made after these restraining orders are effective. However, you may use community property, quasi-community property, or your own separate property to pay an attorney to help you or to pay court costs. ADVERTENCIA – INFORMACIÓN IMPORTANTE ADVERTENCIA: De acuerdo a la ley de California, las propiedades adquiridas por las partes durante su matrimonio o pareja de hecho en forma conjunta se consideran propiedad comunitaria para los fines de la división de bienes que ocurre cuando se produce una disolución o separación legal del matrimonio o pareja de hecho. Si cualquiera de las partes de este caso llega a fallecer antes de que se divida la propiedad comunitaria de tenencia conjunta, el destino de la misma quedará determinado por las cláusulas de la escritura correspondiente que describen su tenencia (por ej., tenencia conjunta, tenencia en común o propiedad comunitaria) y no por la presunción de propiedad comunitaria. Si quiere que la presunción comunitaria quede registrada en la escritura de la propiedad, debería consultar con un abogado. ÓRDENES DE RESTRICCIÓN NORMALES DE DERECHO FAMILIAR En forma inmediata, usted y su cónyuge o pareja de hecho tienen prohibido: 1. Llevarse del estado de California a los hijos menores de las partes, si los hubiera, sin el consentimiento previo por escrito de la otra parte o una orden de la corte; 2. Cobrar, pedir prestado, cancelar, transferir, deshacerse o cambiar el nombre de los beneficiarios de cualquier seguro u otro tipo de cobertura, tal como de vida, salud, vehículo y discapacidad, que tenga como beneficiario(s) a las partes y su(s) hijo(s) menor(es); 3. Transferir, gravar, hipotecar, ocultar o deshacerse de cualquier manera de cualquier propiedad, inmueble o personal, ya sea comunitaria, cuasicomunitaria o separada, sin el consentimiento escrito de la otra parte o una orden de la corte, con excepción las operaciones realizadas en el curso normal de actividades o para satisfacer las necesidades de la vida; y 4. Crear o modificar una transferencia no testamentaria de manera que afecte el destino de una propiedad sujeta a transferencia, sin el consentimiento por escrito de la otra parte o una orden de la corte. Antes de que se pueda eliminar la revocación de una transferencia no testamentaria, se debe presentar ante la corte un aviso del cambio y hacer una entrega legal de dicho aviso a la otra parte.Cada parte tiene que notificar a la otra sobre cualquier gasto extraordinario propuesto, por lo menos cinco días laborales antes de realizarlo, y rendir cuenta a la corte de todos los gastos extraordinarios realizados después de que estas órdenes de restricción hayan entrado en vigencia. No obstante, puede usar propiedad comunitaria, cuasicomunitaria o suya separada para pagar a un abogado o para ayudarle a pagar los costos de la corte. Publish: 10/04/13, 10/11/13, 10/18/13, 10/25/13 NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF DAVID WAYNE PARKER CASE NO. BP145393 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of DAVID WAYNE PARKER, A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Carolyn S. Parker in the Superior Court of California, County of Los Angeles. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that Carolyn S. Parker be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING ON THE PETITION WILL BE HELD IN THIS COURT AS FOLLOWS: Date: November 4, 2013 at Time: 8:30 in Dept. 9, Room: located at: Superior Court Of California, County of Los Angeles, Central District 111 North Hill Street, Los Angeles, CA 90012-3014 IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a CONTINGENT CREDITOR OF THE DECEDENT, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE THE FILE KEPT BY THE COURT. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: Douglas A. Scott, Esq. SBN#058257 Law Office of Douglas A. Scott 10788 Civic Center Drive, Suite 110 Rancho Cucamonga, CA 91730 909-980-9199 Publish: October 4, 11 and 18, 2013

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, October 11, 2013
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 203549 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as Polished Proofs, Canine Wellness Therapeutics, 164 Castleton Dr., Claremont, CA 91711. Registrant(s): Lori R. Bleich, 164 Castleton Drive, Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ Lori R. Bleich This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 09/27/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: October 4, 11, 18 and 25, 2013 T.S. No.: 13-01376 Loan No.: 1425510366 T.O. 01180-55565 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 9/26/2011. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Trustor: Mu Li, a married woman as her sole and separate property Duly Appointed Trustee: Stewart Default Services Recorded 10/4/2011 as Instrument No. 20111345104 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Los Angeles County, California, Date of Sale: 10/28/2013 at 09:00 AM Place of Sale: Behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona CA Amount of un-

31

paid balance and other charges: $149,457.84 Street Address or other common designation of real property: 907 Whitecliff Drive , Diamond Bar, CA 91765 LEGAL DESCRIPTION: Lot 9, of Tract No. 42575, in the City of Diamond Bar, County of Los Angeles, State of California, as per Map recorded in Book 1085, Page(s) 27 through 32 inclusive of Maps, in the Office of the County Recorder of said County. Except therefrom all minerals, gas, oils, petroleum, naphtha, hydrocarbon substances and other minerals in or under said land, lying 500 feet or more below the surface of said land, as excepted and reserved in various Deeds of Record. A.P.N.: 8701-046-026 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common desgination, if any, shown above. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 888-2106524 or visit this Internet Web site www.priorityposting.com using the file number 13-01376 assigned to this case. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Date: 9/30/2013 Stewart Default Services 7676 Hazard Center Drive, Suite 820 San Diego, California 92108 (888) 210-6524 Sale Line: 714-573-1965 Website: www.priorityposting.com Olesia Williams, Trustee Sale Officer If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. P1063070 10/4, 10/11, 10/18/2013

REAL ESTATE OPEN HOUSE DIRECTORY
1-4 p.m. 2290 Forbes Ave., Claremont. For sale by owner.

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13

1-4 p.m. 2290 Forbes Ave., Claremont. For sale by owner. 1-4 p.m. 2576 San Andres Way, Claremont. Curtis Real Estate. 1-4 p.m. 2691 King Way, Claremont. Wheeler Steffen Sothebyʼs International Realty. 2-4 p.m. 861 Kent Ave., Claremont. Wheeler Steffen Sothebyʼs International. 2-5 p.m. 2650 N. Mountain, Claremont. Wheeler Steffen Sothebyʼs International Realty.

LEGAL TENDER
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE APN: 8671-039002 Trustee Sale No. 1377208-31 [ATTENTION RECORDER: PURSUANT TO CIVIL CODE Section2923.3, THE SUMMARY OF INFORMATION REFERENCED BELOW IS NOT ATTACHED TO THE RECORDED COPY OF THIS DOCUMENT BUT ONLY TO THE COPIES PROVIDED TO THE TRUSTOR.] NOTE: THERE IS A SUMMARY OF THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT ATTACHED TRA:2730 REF: BENNETT, ANDREW P. UNINS Property Address: 2417 BONNIE BRAE AVENUE, CLAREMONT CA 91711 IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED June 21, 2004. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER On October 17, 2013, at 11:00am, CAL-WESTERN RECONVEYANCE LLC, as duly appointed trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded June 29, 2004, as Inst. No. 04 1655346, in book XX, page XX, of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, State of CALIFORNIA executed by: ANDREW P. BENNETT AND SARAH L BENNETT, HUSBAND AND WIFE WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER'S CHECK DRAWN ON A STATE OR NATIONAL BANK, A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, OR A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION, SAVINGS ASSOCIATION, OR SAVINGS BANK SPECIFIED IN SECTION 5102 OF THE FINANCIAL CODE AND AUTHORIZED TO DO BUSINESS IN THIS STATE: BY THE FOUNTAIN LOCATED AT 400 CIVIC CENTER PLAZA , POMONA, CALIFORNIA all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: COMPLETELY DESCRIBED IN SAID DEED OF TRUST *SERIES 2004-X The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2417 BONNIE BRAE AVENUE CLAREMONT CA 91711 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be held, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, condition, or encumbrances, including fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to pay the remaining principal sums of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is: $466,117.89. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (714)730-2727 or visit the Internet Web Site WWW.LPSASAP.COM using the file number assigned to this case 1377208-31. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web Site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. FOR SALES INFORMATION: (714)730-2727 CAL-WESTERN RECONVEYANCE LLC 525 EAST MAIN STREET P.O. BOX 22004 EL CAJON CA 92022-9004 Dated: September 10, 2013 CAL-WESTERN RECONVEYANCE LLC A-4414643 09/27/2013, 10/04/2013, 10/11/2013 APN: 8285-011-018 TS No: CA01000071-13 TO No: 95303217 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED June 15, 2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On October 18, 2013 at 09:00 AM, behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona CA 91766, MTC FINANCIAL INC. dba TRUSTEE CORPS, as the duly

legalads@claremont-courier.com 909.621.4761
Appointed Trustee, under and pursuant to the power of sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust Recorded on June 29, 2007 as Instrument No. 20071563644 of official records in the Office of the Recorder of Los Angeles County, California, executed by MARY JO ZEPEDA AN UNMARRIED WOMAN, as Trustor(s), in favor of NATIONAL CITY MORTGAGE A DIVISION OF NATIONAL CITY BANK, A NATIONAL BANKING ASSOCIATION as Beneficiary, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER, in lawful money of the United States, all payable at the time of sale, that certain property situated in said County, California describing the land therein as: LOT 42 OF TRACT 25990 IN THE CITY OF DIAMOND BAR, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 694, PAGES 29 THROUGH 31, INCLUSIVE OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY. AS MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN SAID DEED OF TRUST AND ALL RELATED LOAN DOCUMENTS The property heretofore described is being sold "as is". The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2551 CROOKED CREEK DRIVE, DIAMOND BAR, CA 91765 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the Note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said Note(s), advances if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligations secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of this Notice of Trustee`s Sale is estimated to be $33,339.37 (Estimated), provided, however, prepayment premiums, accrued interest and advances will increase this figure prior to sale. Beneficiary`s bid at said sale may include all or part of said amount. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept a cashier`s check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the California Financial Code and authorized to do business in California, or other such funds as may be acceptable to the Trustee. In the event tender other than cash is accepted, the Trustee may withhold the issuance of the Trustee`s Deed Upon Sale until funds become available to the payee or endorsee as a matter of right. The property offered for sale excludes all funds held on account by the property receiver, if applicable. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder`s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. Notice to Potential Bidders If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a Trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a Trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same Lender may hold more than one mortgage or Deed of Trust on the property. Notice to Property Owner The sale date shown on this Notice of Sale may be postponed one or more times by the Mortgagee, Beneficiary, Trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about Trustee Sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call Priority Posting and Publishing at 714-573-1965 for information regarding the Trustee's Sale or visit the Internet Web site address on the previous page for information regarding the sale of this property, using the file number assigned to this case, CA01000071-13. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Date: 9/20/2013 TRUSTEE CORPS TS No. CA01000071-13 17100 Gillette Ave, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-8300 Matthew Kelley, Trustee Sale Officer SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.priorityposting.com FOR AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL: Priority Posting and Publishing at 714-573-1965 TRUSTEE CORPS MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. P1061568 9/27, 10/4, 10/11/2013 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE T.S No. 138361731 APN: 8293-014-003 TRA: 10068 LOAN NO: Xxxxxx7831 REF: Loor, Paul IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED July 17, 2000. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On October 17, 2013, at 9:00am, Calwestern Reconveyance Llc, as duly appointed trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded July 20, 2000, as Inst. No. 00 1119350 in book XX, page XX of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles County, State of California, executed by Paul A. Loor and Susie M. Loor, Husband And Wife, will sell at public auction to highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the financial code and authorized to do business in this state: Behind the fountain located in civic center plaza, 400 civic Center Plaza Pomona, California, all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: Completely described in said deed of trust The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 22844 Mountain Laurel Way Diamond Bar CA 91765 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be held, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, condition or encumbrances, including fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to pay the remaining principal sums of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is: $219,563.50. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (619)590-1221 or visit the internet website www.dlppllc.com, using the file number assigned to this case 1383617-31. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web Site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. For sales information:(619)590-1221. Cal-Western Reconveyance LLC, 525 East Main Street, P.O. Box 22004, El Cajon, CA 92022-9004 Dated: September 17, 2013. (DLPP-433310 09/27/13, 10/04/13, 10/11/13) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 194962 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as Blue Dot Safes, 2707 N. Garey Ave., Pomona, CA 91767. Blue Dot Safes Corporation, 2707 N. Garey Ave., Pomona, CA 91767. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above in 07/2004. /s/ Berge Jalakian Title: President This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of LosAngeles County on 09/17/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: September 27, October 4, 11 and 18, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013198228 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as GENETIC ECOLOGY CONSULTANTS, 2105 Foothill Blvd., Suite B130, La Verne, CA 91750. James R. Harkrider, 2105 Foothill Blvd., Suite B130, La Verne, CA 91750. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ James R. Harkrider This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 09/20/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, October 11, 2013
(b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: September 27, October 4, 11 and 18, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 198376 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as D&K SERVICES , 2141 Edinboro Ave., Claremont, CA 91711. Kristine M. Ronchetti, 2141 Edinboro Ave., Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ Kristine M. Ronchetti This statement was filed with the Registrar-Recorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 09/20/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: September 27, October 4, 11 and 18, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 195669 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as Your Health In Motion, 456 A San Jose Ave., Claremont, CA 91711. Setareh Derakhshan, 10850 Church St. #J301, Rancho Cucamonga, CA 91730. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ Setareh Derakhshan This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 09/17/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: September 27, October 4, 11 and 18, 2013 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE T.S No. 119237831 APN: 8735-055-030 TRA: 008442 LOAN NO: Xxxxxx2893 REF: Corona, Enrique IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED October 13, 2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On October 31, 2013, at 9:00am, Cal-western Reconveyance Llc, as duly appointed trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded October 25, 2005, as Inst. No. 05 2561195 in book XX, page XX of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles County, State of California, executed by Enrique E Corona A Married Man, will sell at public auction to highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the financial code and authorized to do business in this state: Behind the fountain located in civic center plaza, 400 civic Center Plaza Pomona, California, all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: Completely described in said deed of trust The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 978 Barcelona Pl Walnut CA 91789-4346 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be held, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, condition or encumbrances, including fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to pay the remaining principal sums of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is: $853,572.68. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself.

32

Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (619)590-1221 or visit the internet website www.dlppllc.com, using the file number assigned to this case 1192378-31. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web Site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. For sales information:(619)5901221. Cal-Western Reconveyance LLC, 525 East Main Street, P.O. Box 22004, El Cajon, CA 92022-9004 Dated: September 30, 2013. (DLPP433693 10/11/13, 10/18/13, 10/25/13) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 208443 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as Photo Cube, 326 West Point Dr., Claremont, CA 91711. Registrant(s): Photo Cube Inc., 326 West Point Dr., Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above on 09/17/13. /s/ Michael Davis Title: President This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 10/04/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: October 11, 18, 25 and November 1, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 202402 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as Kpups Studio & Photography, LLC, 2105 Foothill Blvd., Suite E, La Verne, CA 91750. Registrant(s): Kpups Studio & Photography, LLC, 2105 Foothill Blvd., Suite E, La Verne, CA 91750. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ Edwards Gonzalez Title: President This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 09/26/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: October 4, 11, 18 and 25, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 199181 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as Spring Foot Massage, 934 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont, CA 91711. Registrant(s): Yanju Wang, 2700 Walnut Grove Ave., Apt. K, Rosemead, CA 91770. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ Yanju Wang This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 09/23/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: October 4, 11, 18 and 25, 2013

SERVICES
Acoustical
QUALITY Interiors. Acoustical contractor, specializing in acoustic removal, texture, painting, acoustic re-spray and drywall repairs. Lic.602916. 909-624-8177.

Friday 10-11-13

CONTACT US
1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072 classified@claremont-courier.com Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

33

Carpet Service
ANDERSON Carpet Service. Claremont resident serving Claremont since 1985. Powerful truck mounted cleaning units. Expert carpet repairs and stretching. Senior discounts. 24-hour emergency water damage service. Please call 621-1182.

Contractor
KOGEMAN CONSTRUCTION
Room additions. Kitchen/bath remodeling. Custom cabinets. Residential/commercial. 946-8664 Lic.B710309 Visit us on Facebook!

Electrician
Since 1978 Bonded * Insured No job too big or small! Old home rewiring specialist. 24-hour emergency service.

Gardening

Handyman

Hayden’s Services Inc.

909-982-8910
* Senior Discount * Lic.359145

AC/Heating
DOUG CHAPLINE Heating & Air Conditioning
Since 1979 - Prompt repairs, serious service. Free estimates for complete installations and equipment change outs. Competitive rates. Visa, MC accepted. Lic.C20-383912. Call 626-3933.

Chimney Sweep
Gash Chimney Sweep
Dust free chimney cleaning. Repairs, chimney covers, spark arrestors, masonry and dampers. BBB. Please call 909-467-9212.

Drywall

Fences & Gates
*REDWOOD OR CEDAR *ORNAMENTAL IRON *BLOCK WALLS Installations and Repairs Since 1980. Lic.557151. C.F.Privett 909-621-5388

Eco-friendly landscaping. We will get you a $3000 grant to remove your lawn! Why mow when you can grow? From the creators of The Pomona College Organic Farm. Specializing in native and edible landscapes. 909-398-1235 www.naturalearthla.com Lic.919825 *$1.50 sq. ft. rebate* MANUELS Garden Service. General cleanup. Lawn maintenance, bush trimming, general maintenance, tree trimming and removal. Low prices and free estimates. Please call 909-391-3495 or 909-239-3979. GARDEN Maintenance. Mowing, hand pull weeding, trimming, sprinkler work and cleanups. David, 374-1583.

HANDYMAN Service. "Your small job specialist." Steve Aldridge. Day: 909-455-4917. Evening: 909-625-1795. PLASTER, stucco, drywall. Texture. Acoustics. Small job specialist. 909-629-7576. Unlicensed. Local 30 years.

Hauling
SAMEDAY-HAULAWAY
Free estimates. Senior discount! WE HAUL IT ALL CHARLIE! 909-382-1210 sameday-haulaway.com

Quality Fireplace & BBQ Chimney sweeping.
Complete fireplace, woodstove installation, service and repair. Spark arrestor supply and installation. Call 920-6600. 392 N. 2nd Ave., Upland.

THOR McAndrew Construction. Drywall repair and installation. Interior plaster repair. Free estimates. CA Lic.742776. Please call 909-816-8467. ThorDrywall.com.

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran New, repairs. ONE CALL DOES IT ALL!

909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691
Lic.323243

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Same Day One call does it all! Garage, yard, home, moving!

Electrician
ASA ELECTRIC Any and all electrical needs Residential and Commercial Low price/Craftsman quality Service panel upgrades, etc. Call for free estimate. Claremont resident. 951-283-9531 Lic.860606 CALL Lou. Flush lights, service changes, repairs, service calls, outdoor lighting and room additions. Lic.258436. Call 909-2417671, 909-949-8230. SPARKS ELECTRIC Local electrician for all your electrician needs! 626-890-8887 or 909-251-2013. Lic.922000

Fictitious Name
A FICTITIOUS Name Statement (D.B.A.) is required if you’re in business. You are required to file and publish a DBA in the local newspaper. You must renew every five (5) years. You must republish if any changes have been made to your business. If your business is in LA COUNTY, The Courier will provide the legal form, file it with the L.A. County Clerk, publish the Statement and provide you with proof of publication. Only $95.00 to publish plus a $26 county fee. Claremont Courier: 1420 N. Claremont Blvd, Suite 205B Claremont. Call Vickie, 621-4761.

Girl Friday

909-599-9530

Concrete
SAME DAY SERVICE Free service call with repair. Only $49.50 diagnostic fee without repair. All repairs—All brands Edison and Gas Company rebates. Great prices. Friendly service. We're local. 909-398-1208 www.novellcustom.com Lic.958830

House Cleaning
ROSIE'S Spic Span Cleaning Service. Residential, commercial, vacant homes, apartments, offices. Free estimate. Licensed. 909-986-8009. TRUSTWORTHY woman will clean your home. Excellent references. 15 years experience. Eva, 909-753-6517. CAROUSEL Quality Cleaning. Family owned for 20 years. Licensed. Bonded. Senior rates. Trained professional services including: baseboards, ovens, windows. Fire/water damage. Hauling. Move in/out. 10 percent discount to Claremont College staff and faculty. Robyn, 621-3929. ROSIES House Cleaning. 12 years experience, references. House, offices, apartments. Senior discount. 24hour service. 909-983-5834. 20 YEARS experience. Free estimates. Excellent references. Tailored to your individual needs. Senior care, day or night. Call Lupe, 909-452-1086.

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly Stamped, broom, color finishes. Slate, flagstone, planters, walls and walkways.

TOP notch care. Errands, pet and house sitting. Bonded, experienced, reliable. References. Call Colleen 909-489-1862. I’M here to help! Housekeeping, shopping, errands. Pet, plant, house sitting. Jenny Jones, 909-626-0027, anytime!

Call 909-599-9530 now Cell 626-428-1691
Claremont area 30 years! Lic.323243 JDC CONCRETE 909-624-9000 Driveways/walkways, block walls, pavers, bricks, stone veneer, concrete staining, drainage. Lic.894245 C8, C29.

STEVE’S HEATING & Air Conditioning
Serving your area for over 25 years. Repairs all makes/models. Free service call with repair. Free estimate on new units. MC/Visa. 100 percent financing. Senior discounts. Lic.744873 909-985-5254

Furniture Restoration
KEN'S Olden Oddities.com. Taking the time to care for Courier readers complete restoration needs since 1965. La Verne. Call 909-593-1846. DOT Will Do It! A full-service errand business. Dorothy "Dot" Sheehy. www.dotwilldoit.com. 909-621-9115 or 909-782-2885.

Contractor
PPS General Contractor. Kitchen and bathroom remodeling. Flooring, windows, electrical and plumbing. Serving Claremont for 25 years. Lic.846995. 951-237-1547. Custom Construction Kitchen and bathroom remodeling, room additions and more! Lic.630203. 1072 W. Ninth St. Suite C, Upland. 909-996-2981 909-946-2924 WENGER Construction. 25 years experience. Cabinetry, doors, electrical, drywall, crown molding. Lic.707381. Competitive pricing! 951640-6616.

Bathroom Remodeling
A Bath-Brite authorized dealer. Bathtubs and sinks. Showers, tile, countertops. Refinish - Reglaze - Restore Porcelain, ceramic, fiberglass. Quick and affordable. Please call 945-7775. www.bath-brite.com

MOR ELECTRIC & HANDYMAN SERVICES Free estimates and senior discounts. 909-989-3454 Residential * Industrial * Commercial. We do it all. No job too big or small! 24/7 emergency services. Reasonable and reliable. Lic.400-990 30 years experience.

Garage Doors

Handyman
SMALL repair jobs, fencing, gates, brick block, concrete cutting, breaking and repair. 25 years in Claremont. Paul, 909-753-5360.

Irrigation
SPRINKLER SYSTEMS
INSTALLATIONS EXPERT REPAIRS DRIP SYSTEM SPECIALISTS C.F.PRIVETT, LIC.557151

Serving Claremont Since 1995. Residential, Commercial.
Recessed lighting and design, breaker replacement, service panel upgrades, ceiling fans, troubleshooting, landscape lighting, rewires and LED lighting. Free estimates. 24-hours emergency service. References.

SERVICE * REPAIR * INSTALL Doors, Openers, Gates Same Day 24/7 Emergency Service 909-596-3300 accessdoorsco.com

Claremont Handyman Service
Carpentry, repairs, gates, lighting, small painting projects. Odd jobs welcome! Free consultations. 909-921-6334 A-HANDYMAN New and Repairs Inside, outside, small, large, home, garage, yard, ONE CALL DOES IT ALL! 909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691 Lic.323243 30 years experience! Claremont area.

Gardening
EXPERIENCE our award winning maintenance! We create a customized maintenance program for your property and lifestyle needs. Sprinkler repairs and low voltage lighting. Call Alan Cantrall, 909-224-3327. Lic.861685 and insured.

909-621-5388 Hayden’s Services Inc.
Since 1978 Bonded * Insured No job too big or small!

Carpentry
SEMI-RETIRED rough to finish remodeler. Kitchens, porches, doors, decks, fences, painting. Lots more! Paul, 909-919-3315.

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran New and repairs.

909-599-9530
Serving Claremont for 30 years! Lic.323243

909-900-8930 909-626-2242 Lic.806149

24-hour emergency service. 909-982-8910
* Senior discount * Lic.359145

SERVICES
Irrigation
ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly New, repairs. Professional. All sprinkler repairs.

Friday 10-11-13

tax help • antiques • house cleaning • landscaping pet care • roofing • elder care • computer services
Although paid advertisements may appear in Claremont COURIER publications in print, online or in other electronic formats, the Claremont COURIER does not endorse the advertised product, service, or company, nor any of the claims made by the advertisement.

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

34

Landscaping
Dale's Tree & Landscape Services
Pruning, removal, planting, irrigation and yard cleanup. 909-982-5794 Lic#753381

Painting
KPW PAINTING
Older couple painting, 40 years experience! Competitive rates. Small repairs. No job too small. References available. We work our own jobs. Carrie or Ron 909-615-4858 Lic.778506 COLLINS Painting & Construction Company, LLC. Interior, exterior. Residential and commercial. Contractors Lic.384597. 985-8484.

Plastering & Stucco
PLASTERING by Thomas. Stucco and drywall repair specialist. Licensed home improvement. Contractor Lic.614648. 984-6161. www.wall-doctor.com.

Roofing
DOMINICS Roofing. Residential roofing and repairs. Free estimates. Lic.732789. Call Dominic, 951-212-9384.

Tree Care
Johnny's Tree Service Tree trimming and demolition. Certified arborist. Lic.270275, insured. Please call: 909-946-1123 951-522-0992

Call 909-599-9530 Now Cell: 626-428-1691

Plumbing
STEVE’S PLUMBING 24-hour service* Low cost! Free estimates. All plumbing repairs. Complete drain cleaning, leak detection, water heaters. Your local plumber for over 25 years. Senior discounts. Insured, Lic.744873. * 909-985-5254 *

Sprinklers & Repair
SPRINKLER Experts. Repairs, installation, water saving sprinklers, artificial turf. Call 909-749-2572. State Contractor Lic.B/C27 856372. ADVANCED DON DAVIES Veteran Mt. Sac, Cal Poly
New, repairs. Professional. All sprinkler repairs.

Landscape Lighting
ENJOY your yard after dark! We offer expert design installation and repair of low voltage lighting. Alan Cantrall Landscaping. 909-224-3327. Contractor Lic.861685.

Landscaping
SEMIRETIRED landscaper will work by the hour. Charles Landscape and Sprinkler Service. 909-217-9722. DLS Landscaping and Design. Claremont native specializing in drought tolerant landscaping, drip systems and lighting. Artistic solutions for the future. Over 35 years experience. Call: 909-225-8855, 909-982-5965. Lic.585007.

SUNSET GARDENS LANDSCAPING. C-27 Lic.373833. Drought resistant landscapes. Turf removal. Irrigation specialist. Naturescapes. Desertscapes. Rockscapes. Masonry. Call John Cook, 909-231-8305. Claremont.

BAUER TREE CARE 40 plus years in Claremont. Ornamental pruning available for your perennials. 909-624-8238.

STEVE LOPEZ PAINTING
Extensive preparation. Indoor, outdoor, cabinets. Offering odorless green solution. 33-year master. Lic.542552

Tutoring
USC graduate. Tutoring K-12 English, math , SAT in the convenience of your home. Experienced, references. $20 hourly. cdelabeg@usc.edu. 909-983-5834. CLASSROOM teacher, formerly of Lindamood-Bell, available to tutor all subjects, K-8. Specializing in literacy for those with learning issues. Upland, Claremont, surrounding areas. Gina 510-301-6004.

Please call 909-989-9786.

DANS GARDENING SERVICE
Sprinklers installed, repaired. Clean-up, hauling. Sod, seed, planting, lighting, drainage. Free written estimates. Insured. References. Since 1977. Lic.508671. Please call 909-989-1515.

Hayden’s Services Inc.
Since 1978 Bonded * Insured NO JOB TOO BIG OR SMALL! 24-hour emergency service.

Call 909-599-9530 now Cell: 626-428-1691
WASTING WATER? Poor Coverage? Sprinkler repair. Installations and modifications. C.F. Privett 621-5388 Lic.557151 DURUSSEL Sprinklers. Install, repair, automate. Since 1982. Free estimates. Lic.540042. Call 909-982-1604.

GREEN SIDE UP LANDSCAPING
Landscape design and construction. New, re-landscaping and repairs. Concrete, block walls, masonry, BBQ, patio covers and fountains. Planting, irrigation, drainage, lighting and ponds.

Learn Japanese

AFFORDABLE. Traditional or green options. Custom work. No job too big or too small. 20 years of Claremont resident referrals. Free estimates. Lic.721041. 909-922-8042. www.vjpaint.com.

909-982-8910
* Senior discount * Lic.359145 RENES Plumbing and AC. All types residential repairs, HVAC, new installation, repairs. Prices to fit the working family’s budget. Lic.454443. Insured professional service. 909-593-1175.

Upholstery

Patio & Decks
Patio Repairs, balconies and decks. New construction and remodeling. Serving the Inland Empire since 1988. Free estimates. Isom Construction Jesse Isom. Lic.B531291. 909-234-3261 ADVANCED DON DAVIES
New, refurbish and repair. Concrete, masonry, lighting, planters and retaining walls.

Tile
PINK UPHOLSTERY 48 years of experience. Up to 30 percent discount on fabric. Free pickup and delivery. Please call 909-597-6613.

Call 909-992-9087 Lic.941734 GREENWOOD LANDSCAPING CO.
Landscaping contractor for complete landscaping, irrigation, drainage, designing and gardening. Lic.520496 909-621-7770 ADVANCED DON DAVIES Mt. Sac, Cal Poly New, refurbish or repair. Design, drainage, concrete, slate, flagstone, lighting, irrigation, decomposed granite. 909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691 Claremont area 30 years! Lic.323243 TAUGHT by Sumi Ohtani at the Claremont Forum in the Packing House. Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday afternoons and evenings, for different levels. Tutoring available. Information: 909626-3066.

EXCEL PLUMBING
Family owned and operated. 30 plus years experience. Expert plumbing repairs and drain cleaning. Water heaters, faucets, sinks, toilets, disposals, under slab lead detection, sewer video inspection. Licensed, bonded and insured. Lic.673558. 909-945-1995

Weed Abatement
Regrout, clean, seal, color grout. 909-880-9719, 1-888764-7688. MASTER tile layer. Quick and clean. Stone and granite work. Residential, commercial. Lic.830249. Ray, 731-3511.

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran Weed eating, mowing, tractor fields, manual slopes, hauling.

Painting
ACE SEVIER PAINTING Interior/Exterior BONDED and INSURED Many references. Claremont resident. 35 years experience. Lic.315050 Please call: 624-5080, 596-4095. D&D Custom Painting. Bonded. Lic.423346. Residential, commercial. Interior or exterior. Free estimates. 909-982-8024.

909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691
Claremont area 30 years! Lic.323243

909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691
JOHNNY'S Tree Service. Weed abatement/land clearing. Disking and mowing. Please call 909-946-1123, 951-522-0992. Lic.270275. TIRED of dealing with weed problems on your lot or field? Help control the problem in an environmentally safe manner. To receive loads of quality wood chips. Please call 909-214-6773. Tom Day Tree Service.

Pet Sitting

Power Washing
D&L Services FROM ROOFTOP TO SIDEWALK Hot or cold exterior washing. Owner operated for 25 years. Free estimates. 909-262-5790

Tree Care
Dale's Tree Service
Certified arborist. Pruning and removals. Landscaping, corrective and restoration trimming and yard clean up. 909-982-5794 Lic#753381 MGT Professional Tree Care. Providing prompt, dependable service for all your tree care needs. Certified arborist. Matt Gray-Trask. Call 946-7444. TOM Day Tree Service. Fine pruning of all trees since 1974. Free estimate. 909629-6960.

Eco-friendly landscaping. We will get you a $3000 grant to remove your lawn! Why mow when you can grow? From the creators of The Pomona College Organic Farm. Specializing in native and edible landscapes. 909-398-1235 www.naturalearthla.com Lic.919825 *$1.50 sq. ft. rebate*

OFFERING free one month minimum sabbatical coverage to Claremont residents. Experienced, responsible pet sitters. claremontpets@hotmail.com.

Piano Lessons
RESIDENTIAL/Commercial. Quality work at reasonable prices. Free estimates. Lic.541469. 909-622-7994. EVELYN Hubacker. Piano teacher accepting new students. 909-626-2931. 909868-8284. www.evelyn hubacker.com.

Roofing
GORDON Perry Roofing. Reroofing, repairs of all types. Free estimates. Quality work. Lic.C39588976. 909-944-3884.

Window Washing
NACHOS Window Cleaning. For window washing, call Nacho, 909-816-2435. Free estimates, satisfaction guaranteed. Resident of Claremont.

909.621.4761
Friday 10-11-13

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

35

SERVICES
ADVERTISE

CONTACT US 1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072 classified@claremont-courier.com Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

AUTOMOTIVE

COMPUTERS

Selling, Buying or Renting?
Advertise in the Claremont Courier! Call Jessica, Courier Classifieds at 621-4761.

HEALTH & WELLNESS

HEALTH & WELLNESS
Do you know if your service provider can pass a background check? We do! REAL Connections provides quality service providers, vetted through the Department of Justice. Looking for a painter, roofer, plumber, electrician? Call us, we’ve got the best!
Looking for more? We’ve got that too! We offer social events to connect with your community, and vetted volunteers to help with all of life’s to-do’s!

HOME IMPROVEMENT

Options In-Home Care is built on integrity and compassion. Our friendly and professional staff provides affordable non-medical home care service, tailored care for our elderly clients, including personal hygiene, Alzheimer & dementia care, meal prep, bathing and light house keeping. For your convenience our Operators and Case Managers are available 24/7! Now offering VA benefit support assistance. Office #: 909-621- CARE(2273) Fax #: 909-621-1114 Website: www.optionsinhomecare.com

Call us to find out more! 909-621-6300 www.realconnections.org

HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOUSE CLEANING

Cleaning Service
Call for a free estimate: House or Business!

909-621-5626

909.234.5766

Kandi Ford

Top 10 reasons why the COURIER is a great investment
10: To stay in the know about the people, places closest to you. 9: You can trust the reporting is accurate and unbiased. 8: Receive a community newspaper and website named No. 1 in CA. 7: Don’t tell anyone, but you still enjoy reading words printed on paper. 6: News, sports, event and entertainment updates every day. 5: Outstanding photography and design lives on. 4: Expanded photo galleries and videos are linked to our stories online. 3: It gives Claremonters with diverse opinions a voice. 2: Our staff is committed to help Claremont businesses thrive. 1: In print, online, mobile, Facebook and newsletter. We deliver.

WHY SUBSCRIBE?
Call us at:

909-621-4761
Check us out online at: claremont-courier.com

ourier C
Claremont

claremont-courier.com

909.621.4761
Friday 10-11-13

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

36

REAL ESTATE
(909) 260-5560

Claremont Real Estate Market Snapshot

www.callMadhu.com
500 West Foothill Boulevard Claremont
DRE#00979814 Now representing... Call me for a FREE Market Analysis of your home. I have many buyers looking for homes in Claremont.

September
Number of Homes Sold Number Sold > $750,000 Number Sold < $750,000 Highest Sale Price Lowest Sale Price Average List Price Average Sold Price Average Days On Market

2013 29 6 23 $1,800,000 $326,500 $659,524 $653,103 68

2012 32 1 31 $1,070,000 $175,000 $471,611 $453,629 64

Change From Previous Year -9 500 -26 68 87 40 44 6 percent percent percent percent percent percent percent percent

REAL ESTATE

(909) 626-1261
www.curtisrealestate.com

Visit www.curtisrealestate.com for MLS, community info and more!

September was the first slow month this year. However, that doesn’t mean the market isn’t still hot. As schools get back in session, and people prepare themselves for the holidays ahead, the market typically experiences a slowdown in sales activity. Prices are still holding strong, with continued (though now more modest) gains. Interest rates have dipped back down just over four percent, which should keep buyer demand strong and make for an interesting holiday season ahead.
Information provided by Ryan Zimmerman, Wheeler Steffen Sotheby's International Realty. Contact Ryan at ryan.zimmerman@sothebysrealty.com.

OPEN HOUSE SUN 1-4 PM

2576 SAN ANDRES WAY, CLAREMONT Outstanding Claraboya pool home. This single story, three bedroom, two bathroom home is perfect for entertaining. It features a large sunken living room and family room next to the kitchen with a breakfast nook. The spacious back yard is a private oasis with a pool, spa, patio, fountains, planters and views of the valley and city lights. Over-sized, detached, two-car garage with storage. $799,900. (S2576) 1660 KENYON PL., CLAREMONT Quiet cul-de-sac location near shopping, Claremont Colleges, freeway access and Chaparral Elementary School. Entryway with double front doors. Freshly painted inside, updated with smooth ceilings, new tile flooring and carpeting. Newer double-pane Milgard windows and sliding doors. Open living room and family room with fireplace that open to the back yard. Dining area opens to kitchen. Newer stamped concrete driveway. $447,000. (K1660)

NEW LISTING!

795 W. TENTH ST., CLAREMONT Custom Village home with brick walkway and original curved-top door and windows. Built in 1942 featuring two bedrooms, two updated bathrooms, a grand living room with real plaster, crown molding, built-in bookcases, beautiful hardwood floors and a fireplace. Backyard has brick patio. Corner lot location. $650,000. (T795)

5776 PARKCREST ST., LA VERNE HEIGHTS Luxury two-story Mediterranean home in prestigious gated community. Soaring 18 ft. ceilings in the living and formal dining rooms. Curved grand staircase. The kitchen has a granite island and sunny breakfast area. The backyard features a custom patio cover, built-in BBQ with sink and a waterfall. Community tennis and basketball courts, playground and a park. $975,000. (P5776)

Open House Saturday & Sunday 1-4 p.m. 2290 Forbes Ave., Claremont.
For sale by owner. Gorgeous, single story, 2024 sq. ft., four bedroom, two bathroom home in sought-after Condit Elementary School area in North Claremont. Newly remodeled contemporary open plan with great light. New gourmet kitchen with custom cabinets, quartz countertops and walk-in pantry. New bathrooms, new flooring and double-pane windows. One bedroom used as artist studio. Three-car garage. Laundry and mud room. Large, private, 0.35 acre corner lot with charming play house and fruit trees. Above Base Line and walking distance to parks and Thompson Creek Trail. $688,888. 909-268-8810 by appointment.

NEW PRICE!

446 STANFORD AVE., CLAREMONT
Single story home near the Village. Two bedrooms and 1.75 bathrooms plus a den/guest room with built-in cabinets that could easily be converted into a third bedroom. Large eat-in kitchen with classic tile counters. Refinished hardwood floors. New carpet in the large master bedroom, which features many built-ins and a walk-in closet. Private back yard with covered patio area and rose garden. Newer concrete driveway and HVAC. $490,000. (S446)

REALTORS! Place your ads in the most
widely read real estate section in the area.
Claremont COURIER Classifieds Call JESSICA at 621-4761

Sales Associates: John Baldwin, Craig Beauvais, Maureen Mills, Nancy & Bob Schreiber, Patricia Simmons, Corinna Soiles, Carol Wiese

Carol Curtis, Broker

Continuing the family tradition in the Claremont Village since 1947

(909) 626-1261 www.curtisrealestate.com

107 N. Harvard, Claremont CA 91711

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, October 11, 2013

37

M ALKA RINDE REAL ESTATE
1876 Morgan Avenue, Claremont CA 91711

EXPERIENCE MATTERS...
Celebrating Over 25 Years Selling Real Estate in the Area

MALKA RINDE Broker - Owner

Bus: 909-625-2407 Fax: 909-621-2842 www.malkarinde.com

2312 N. Indian Hill Blvd., Claremont

Single story Henderson-built home. Three bedrooms, three bathrooms, approximately 2374 sq. ft., three-car garage, pool and spa. $745,000.

9 09 - 228 - 8 8 6 2 9 09 - 8 21 - 3 26 9

www.exploreclaremont.com
Expertise in Claremont since 1978 Complete Professional Confidential Service

Mason Prophet
Mason@MasonProphet.com
DRE# 01714034

Broker Associate, CRS, GRI, ABR, e-PRO, SRES

LISTING
HISTORIC VILLAGE

NEW

NEW LISTING! $645,000
Four-bedroom home with stunning grounds

(909) 621-3944 (909) 709-3944
JOLI GORDIEN & AILEEN GORDIEN
Lic.#00837223 Lic.#00667324

N

NORTH CLAREMONT

estled nicely into a quiet North Claremont neighborhood with lush landscaping in the front and backyard. This two-story house features an open floor plan of over 2000 sq. ft. with upgrades throughout, including recessed lighting, updated cabinets, counter tops and flooring. Backyard has multiple patio areas (some covered) and is a very pleasant setting for outdoor dining, entertaining and relaxation.Spacious three-car garage. (E219)

909.447.7708
NEW PRICE! $635,000 Sprawling garnet model home NORTH CLAREMONT

T

his sprawling single story home features the coveted “Garnet Model” floor plan. Formal living and dining rooms and a kitchen open to a sunlit breakfast nook. Oversized master suite with walk-in closet and oversized shower. The house and grounds have been upgraded in recent years, including wood laminate floors, granite counter kitchen, smooth ceilings with recessed lighting, dual-pane windows, plantation shutters, sliding glass doors and steel tile roof. The backyard is beautifully landscaped and includes a recently updated in-ground spa and covered patio.Three-car garage. Fantastic north Claremont location near Jaeger Park. (S209)

CHARMING CRAFTSMAN COTTAGE built in 1921, situated on a huge, over 10,000 sq. ft. lot. At present, it has two bedrooms and one bathroom, but with vision it could be that special home that you dream of owning in the historic Claremont Village. What would you pay for this size lot in the Village? I think you will agree that this is a chance of a lifetime. Offered for sale: $495,000.

GORDIEN & ASSOCIATES • IN THE VILLAGE • CLAREMONT, CA 91711

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, October 11, 2013

38

D.R.E. #00997900

Please call today for a FREE complimentary market analysis of your property.

GEOFF HAMILL
BROKER ASSOCIATE ABR, CRS, E-PRO, GRI, SRES

Geoff is #1 in Claremont Sales & Listings since 1988

“Best Possible Price Achieved, Every Time”
909.621.0500 Geoff@GeoffHamill.com

We represent buyers and sellers with expertise, professionalism, technology and personal service. Neighborhood knowledge is a top factor for successful sales. We know and serve Claremont and the Foothill Communities.
Residential – Investment – Historical – Green – Short Sales CARLOS, 909-964-7631 PAT, 909-214-1002

www.SamuelsonRealEstate.com

Check out our reviews!

BRE# 01326104 & 01733616

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, October 11, 2013

39

REAL ESTATE

Curtis Real Estate. Claremont’s longest established Real Estate firm. “Corinna is the perfect combination of efficiency, honesty and friendliness. Above all, she was the consummate professional and we would not hesitate to use her services in the future or recommend her to others.” —Mr. & Mrs. Althorp

Connecting people with homes they love.
Corinna K. Soiles Broker Associate
107 Harvard Ave. Claremont, CA 91711 (909)263-7378 • cksathome@aol.com
DRE# 01227205

SELLING, BUYING OR RENTING? Advertise in the
Claremont COURIER! Call Jessica at 621-4761.

NEW LISTING! OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 1-4 2691 KING WAY, CLAREMONT - $600,000
Prime northeast Claremont locale. Open floor plan offers well-designed living and entertaining possibilities. Updated kitchen. Nearly 1/3 acre sweeping corner lot boasts a sunken sports court, patio and grassy yard areas, plus beautiful mountain views. (K2691) Geoff Hamill www.GeoffHamill.com - 909.621.0500

NEW LISTING! OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 2-5 2650 N. MOUNTAIN, CLAREMONT $1,250,000
Gorgeous Claraboya hillside home enjoys spectacular views. Newly renovated inside and out with high quality materials. Professionally landscaped large flat lot. (M2650) Geoff Hamill www.GeoffHamill.com - 909.621.0500

MID-CENTURY MODERN IN THE VILLAGE 561 BAUGHMAN AVE., CLAREMONT
Circa 1950 - Walls of glass blend the indoor and outdoor living spaces, designed for casual and sophisticated living.Artfully landscaped, new driveway, sparkling pool and studio. (B561) Bernadette Kendall bernadette.kendall@sothebysrealty.com - 909.670.1717

CLASSIC RANCH - OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 2-4 861 KENT DRIVE, CLAREMONT
California living, spacious single story home in Condit Elementary School locale, offers an open floor plan, remodeled kitchen and energy efficient upgrades. Citrus trees, specialty cactus gardens, sun shades, seating-wall and fire pit create the ideal setting for relaxing and entertaining. (K861) Bernadette Kendall bernadette.kendall@sothebysrealty.com - 909.670.1717

Gloria Alvarez 909.670.0322

Susan Emerson 909.447.7710

Jeannette Ewing 909.670.0322

Diane Fox 909.447.7709

Sue Gold 909.447.7714

Geoff Hamill 909.621.0500

Rose Ishman 909.624.1617

Bernadette Kendall 909.670.1717

Cheryl Knight 909.447.7715

Betty Leier 909.262.8630

Chris Macaulay 909.227.0162

B.J. Nichka 909.625.6754

Heather Petty 909.447.7716

Mason Prophet 909.447.7708

Madhu Sengupta 909.260.5560

Maria Silva 909.624.1617

Rob & Amy Titus 909.450.7415

Sally Tornero 909.447.7718

Eurydice Turk 909.447.8258

Ryan Zimmerman 909.447.7707

Paul Steffen Broker/Owner

909.624.1617

500 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont

wssir.com

Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered service marks used with permission. Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated. Equal Housing Opportunity.

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful