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196535

THE

OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
PART
VIII

HUNT

^

1

PA

EGYPT EXPLORATION FUND
GRAECO-ROMAN BRANCH

THE

OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
PART
BY

VIII

EDITED WITH TRANSLATIONS AND NOTES

ARTHUR
HON. PH.D. KOENIGSBERG
;

S.

HUNT,

D.Litt.
;

HON. LITT.D. DUBLIN HON. lUR.D. GRAZ LECTURER IN PAPYROLOGY IN THE UNI\'ERSITY OF OXFORD, AND FELLOW OF QUEEN'S COLLEGE CORRESPONDING MEMBER OF THE ROYAL BAVARIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES

WITH SEVEN PLATES

;

i.l•

'' ''\\\

196535
LONDON
SOLD AT

'-'0-/0;U'

Offices of the EGYPT EXPLORATION FUND, 37 Great Russell St., W.C. AND 527 Tremont Temple, Boston, Mass., U.S.A. KEGAN PAUL, TRENCH, TRUBNER & CO., Dryden House, Gerrard St., W. BERNARD QUARITCH, 11 Grafton St., New Bond St., W. ASHER & CO., 13 Bedford St., Covent Garden, W.C, and 56 Unter den Linden, Berlin AND HENRY FROWDE, Amen Corner, E.G., and 29-35 West 32ND Street, New York, U.S.A.

The

191
All rights reserved

OXFORD
HORACE HART, PRINTER TO THE UNIVERSITY

PREFACE
must beg the indulgence of subscribers, in prethe publication of this volume, is chiefly due to the lengthy production of two of the new liminaries which were necessary for the fragments of classical texts, the Meliambi of Cercidas (1O82) and the papyri, with 1091-2, are an anonymous Satyric drama (1083). Those

The

delay, for which

I

in 1906 derived from the second of the large literary finds made which was at once year, p. 12), (cf. the Archaeological Report for that more scattered, and in worse condition than the first. more extensive, thousand Before any text from it could be dealt with, some thirty a task which pieces of various sizes had to be flattened and examined, Possibly some further small occupied several weeks of last year. fragments may yet be identified but the great bulk of the find, at
;

any

rate,

serious

now been prepared additions will be made is a
has

for sorting

and copying

;

and that

contingency not sufficiently probable

to justify a further postponement.

more In editing the new classical fragments (1082-7) I have once assistance of Professor U. von enjoyed the great advantage of the Wilamowitz-Mollendorff, to whom I am deeply indebted, especially Professor U. Wilcken was again kind with regard to 1082 and 1086. enough to look through the proof-sheets of the non-literary section Occasional contribute a number of valuable comments.
and
to

with suggestions received from other friends are recorded in connexion including the Proof-reader of To all my helpers, the texts concerned.
the University Press, I here return hearty thanks. Another instalment of Oxyrhynchus papyri next volume, which I hope to issue early in 191 2.
is

designed for the

ARTHUR
Queen's College, Oxford,

S.

HUNT.

May, 1911.

CONTENTS
PAGE

Preface
List of Plates
viii

Table of Papyri Note on the Method of Publication and List of Abbreviations

ix
.
.

.

xiii

TEXTS
I.

IL in.
IV.

Theological Fragments (1073-1081) New Classical Texts (1082-1089)

I

20
121
:

Extant Classical Authors (1090-1099) Documents of the Roman and Byzantine Periods
(1100-1108) {) Declarations to Officials (1109-1116)
[a) Official
(/)

Petitions (1117-1121)

(d) Contracts
(e)

(1122-1134)

Taxation (1135-1138)

(/) Orders (1139-1142)
{g) Accounts (1143-1147)

.... .... .... .... .... ....

164 180

200
214

238
242

()
{{)

Oracular Questions, Amulets, &c. (1148-1152)
Private Correspondence (1153-1165)

249

254

INDICES
New
Literary Texts:
(a)

1082

(Cercidas)

.

.

271

II.

{) Other Texts Emperors
Consuls, Eras, Indictions

275 283

III.

IV.

V.

Months and Days Personal Names

285 286
287

VIU

CONTENTS
PAGE

VI.
VII.
VIII.

Geographical
Religion

.

.

.

294
297 298

IX.
X.
XI.
XII.

Official and Military Titles Weights, Measures, Coins

Taxes General Index of Greek and Latin Words
Index of Passages Discussed

298 313

LIST OF PLATES
I.

II.

III.

IV.

1074 1082 1083 1087
1073
1114

recto,

1075, 1077, 1080 recto

Frs. 3, 4

Fr.

i,

1084
y at the end.
ix,

V.
VI.

1090, 1092 Col.
verso,

1100

.

1097

recto,

1098

verso

VII.

.

TABLE OF PAPYRI
A.D.

PAGE
.

1073.

1074.
1075.

Old Latin Version of Genesis v-vi Exodus xxxi, xxxii

4th cent.

3rd cent.

Exodus

xl

.

3rd cent.
ii

1076.
1077. 1078. 1079.

New

Recension of Tobit
:

6th cent. 6th cent.

Amulet

St.

Epistle to the

Matthew iv Hebrews ix
iv
.

.

... ... ....10
. .

i

4
5 6

.

4th cent.

.

.

.11
.

Revelation

i

Late 3rd or 4th cent.
4th cent.
. .

13 14

1080.
1081.

Revelation

iii,

Gnostic Gospel

Early 4th cent.

.

16

1082. 1083.

Cercidas, Meliambi
Satyric

2nd

cent.
cent.

.

Drama

.

2nd
i

....20
.

60
71

1084. 1085.
1086.

Hellanicus, Atlantis

Early 2nd cent.

.

.

Pancrates,
Scholia

Hadrian and AntinoUs

2nd
Late

cent.

73
77

1087.

on Iliad ii Scholia on Iliad vii
Alexandrian Chronicle
.

ist cent. B.C.

.

.

ist cent. b. c.

.

100

1088.

Medical Receipts

Early
.

ist cent.
.

.

1089.
1090.
1091.

An

3rd cent.

.

.110 .115
.121

Hesiod, Opera

Late

ist cent.
.

.

Bacchylides, Dithyrambs

2nd
.

cent.

.

1092. 1093.

Herodotus

ii

.

.

Late 2nd cent.

.

Demosthenes, Contra Boeotum Demosthenes,
[Isocrates,]
Isocrates,

2nd

cent.

.

.

1094.
1095.

Be Falsa

Legatione
.

5th cent.

.

.

Ad Demonicum

4th cent.

.

.

1096.
1097.

Panegyricus and

Be Pace

4th cent.

.

.

Cicero,

Be

Imp. Cn. Pompei and In Verrem
ii

.

i

5th cent.

.

.

1098.

Vergil, Aeneid

4th or 5th cent.
Vergil, Aeneid

.

1099.
1100.
1101.

Greek Paraphrase of
Edict of a Praefect

5th cent.

206
.

Edict of a Praefect

1102.
1103.

Report of Legal Proceedings
Proceedings of the Senate
.

367-70 About 146
360

.... ....
.
.
.

.123 .127 -135 .145 -147 .151 -153 -158 .160
164
.

166 169
172

.

.

.

TABLE OF PAPYRI
A. D.

PAGE

1104. 1105. lioe.

Application for Payment

Notice to the Agoranomus
Letter to Paulus Letter of
.

306 81-96

.

173 176
177 179

.

6th cent.
.

1107.
1108.

Eudaemon
.

5th or 6th cent

List of Officials

1109.
1110.
1111.

Selection of

Boys

{)
.

Late 6th or 7ih cent
1

60-1

179 180
182

Census-return
Census-returns
.

188

1112.
1113.

Purchase of Acacia-trees

203 188
203
237

184
187

Return of Unirrigated Land
Declaration of Inheritance

189
192

1114.
1115.

Reply

to a Strategus to

284 363 About 178
Late
ist or early

196
198.

1116.
1117. 1118.

Nomination
Petition to

an Office
.

Petition to a Praefect

an Archidicastes

2nd

cent.

200 202
203 210
211

1119.

Petition to a Strategus, &c.
Petition

254
Early 3rd cent.

1120.
1121.

Petition to a Beneficiarius

295 407 158-9
26

.

1122.
1123.

Engagement of
Lease of Land Lease of Land

Services

.

214

Devolution of Domain-land
.

.

215
217

1124.
1125.

Lease of Land and Loan
.

2nd
183
173

cent.

218

1126.

5 th cent.
.

220
221

1127.

Lease of a Pigeon-house
Lease of a Dining-room
Lease of Dining-rooms

1128.

223

1129.
1130.
1131.

Loan of Money
Promissory Note

.

449 484

224 225 228
229
231

.

5th cent.
.

1132.
1133. 1134.

Repayment
Receipt
Official

of a

Loan

About 162
396
.

Receipt for Rents

421
3rd cent.

233

1135.

Receipt for Anabolicum
Receipt for Anabolicum.
Receipt for Dues on

1136.
1137.

Land

420 562-3
5th or 6th cent

235 236 236
237 238

1138.

Receipt for Money-taxes

1139. 1140.
1141.

Order from a Logistes
Order
for Vegetable-seed

4th cent.

293

Order
Order

for
for

Wine

.

3rd cent.
.

1142.
1143.

Purchases

Late 3rd cent.

239 240 240
242

Temple-account

About

I

TABLE OF PAPYRI
A.D.

XI

1144.

Temple-account

1145.
1146.

Account of a Sitologus
Account of Payments
.

1147.

Account of Arrears
Question to the Oracle

1148.

1149. 1150.
1151.

Question to the Oracle
Christian Prayer

Christian

Amulet
Amulet

1152.
1153.

Christian

Letter of Apollonius
Letter of

1154. 1155.
1156.

Theon

.

Theonas Letter of Anubion
Letter of Letter of Pathermouthi
Letter of Lucius
.

1157.

1158.

1159.
1160.
1161.

Letter to a Wife Letter of

.

Trophimus
.

Christian Letter

1162.
1163.

Letter of

Leon Letter of Heraclammon
.

1164.

Letter of Theodosius

1165.

Letter of Victor

.

;

NOTE ON THE METHOD OF PUBLICATION AND
LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS
method followed in this volume is the same as that in Parts I-VII. Of the new literary texts, 1082-3 and 1086-7 are printed in a dual form, a literal transcript being accompanied by a reconstruction in modern In the others, and in the style; 1088-9 are given in modern form only.

The

general

fragments of extant authors, the originals are reproduced except for division of words, capital initials in proper names, expansion of abbreviations, and

supplements of lacunae.

Additions or corrections by the same hand as the

body of the text
type.
tion

are in

Non-literary

small thin type, those by a different hand in thick documents are given in modern form with accentua-

additions and symbols are resolved text and their occurrence is and corrections are usually incorporated in the recorded in the critical apparatus, where also faults of orthography, &c., are Iota adscript has corrected if they seemed likely to give rise to any difficulty. been printed when so written, otherwise iota subscript is employed. Square brackets ] indicate a lacuna, round brackets ( ) the resolution of a symbol or

and punctuation.

Abbreviations

;

[

abbreviation, angular brackets < ) a mistaken omission in the original, braces letters, double square brackets [[ ]] a deletion in the { } a superfluous letter or placed within brackets represent the approximate number of original. Dots
letters lost or deleted
illegible
letters.

dots outside brackets indicate mutilated or otherwise Letters with dots underneath them are to be considered
;

doubtful.
in this

Heavy Arabic numerals refer

to the texts of the

Oxyrhynchus papyri

volume and

in Parts I-VII, ordinary numerals to lines, small

Roman
are

numerals to columns.

The
P.

abbreviations

used

in

referring

to

papyrological

publications
viz.
:

practically those adopted in the Archiv fiir Papyvusforschung,

Amh.
A.

=

The Amherst Papyri

(Greek), Vols.

I-II,

by

B. P. Grenfell

and

S. Hunt. Archiv = Archiv fiir Papyrusforschung. B. G. U. = Aeg. Urkunden aus den K. Museen zu Beriin, Griechische Urkunden. P. Brit. Mus. = Greek Papyri in the Bridsh Museum, Vols. I-II, by F. G. Kenyon Vol. Ill, by F. G. Kenyon and H. I. Bell Vol. IV by H. I. Bell.
;

XIV
C. P.

LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS
Herm.

= Corpus Papyrorum Hermopolitanorum, Vol. I, by C. Wessely. Corpus Papyrorum Raineri, Vol. I, by C. Wessely. P. Cairo Cat. = Catalogue des Antiquites egyptiennes du Musee du Caire, Papyrus grecs d'epoque byzantine, by J. Maspero. P. Fay. = Fayiim Towns and their Papyri, by B. P. Grenfell, A. S. Hunt, and D. G. Hogarth. Vol. II, by D. Comparetti. P. Flor. = Papiri Fiorentini, Vol. I, by G. Vitelli P. Gen. = Les Papyrus de Geneve, Vol. I, by J, Nicole, P. Giessen = Griechische Papyri zu Giessen, Part i, by E. Komemann and O. Eger Part 2, by P. M. Meyer. P. Grenf. = Greek Papyri, Series I, by B. P. Grenfell, and Series II, by B. P. Grenfell and A. S. Hunt.
C. P. R.

=

;

;

P.

P.

P.

P.

= Griechische Urkunden der Hamburger Stadtbibliothek, Part i, by P. M. Meyer. Hibeh = The Hibeh Papyri, Part I, by B. P. Grenfell and A. S. Hunt. Klein. Form. = Griech. Papyrusurkunden kleineren Formats, Stud. Pal. iii and viii, by C. Wessely. Leipzig = Griech. Urkunden der Papyrussammlung zu Leipzig, Vol. I, by
Hamburg
L. Mitteis.

P.
P.

P.

P.
P.

Leyden = Papyri Graeci Musei Antiquarii Lugduni-Batavi, by C. Leemans, Oxy. = The Oxyrhynchus Papyri, Parts I-VL by B. P. Grenfell and A. S. Hunt Part VII, by A. S. Hunt. Par. = Les Papyrus grecs du Musee du Louvre. Notices et Extraits. t. xviii. 2, by W. Brunet de Presle and E. Egger. Reinach = Papyrus grecs et demotiques, by Theodore Reinach.
;

Rylands
Vol.

=
I,

P. Strassb.

=

in the Rylands Library, Manchester, Hunt. Griech. Papyrus der K. Universitatsbibliothek zu Strassburg im

Catalogue of the Greek Papyri
S.

by A.

Elsass, Vol.
P.

Tebt.
J.

=

I, Parts 1-2, by F. Preisigke. The Tebtunis Papyri, Part I, by B. P. Grenfell, A. S. Hunt, and G. Smyly; and Part 11, by B. P. Grenfell, A. S. Hunt, and E. J.

Wilcken, Ost.

Goodspeed. = Griechische Ostraka, by U. Wilcken.

I.

THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS.

1073.

Old Latin Version of Genesis
17x5-4 cm.

v-vi.

Fourth century.

Plate

VI

(verso).

A
made

small fragment from Egypt of the Bible in the Vulgate has recently-

its appearance at Aberdeen (Winstedt, Class. Quarterly, J 907, p. 366), and Oxyrhynchus now contributes the following specimen of the Old Latin version, a specimen which is not only more extensive but of much greater value, since the Old Latin is imperfectly known and the present text is for about half its

a book

It is written on a portion of a vellum leaf from well-formed uncial hand, which is probably not later than the fourth century. The ink is of a reddish-brown colour. As is common in early Latin MSS., the columns, of which there were no doubt two on each page, are narrow.

contents the sole authority.
in a

Rulings were lightly made with a hard point. The text was divided up into rather short paragraphs, of which the first lines were made to protrude slightly into the left margin and are further rendered conspicuous by enlarged initial
letters.

A

medial stop

is

occasionally employed,
;

and points

in

the

same
is,

position are placed before and after numerals

the

first

of the pair of points
line,

however, omitted when the numeral stands at the beginning of the

and the

second when at the end. It may be also noted that when representing a figure d has the minuscule not the uncial form. Contractions and abbreviations were sparingly used, at the end of a line is sometimes denoted by an oversince the regular purpose of written horizontal stroke with a dot beneath it

m

;

this dot

in the same was to distinguish m from «, it may be inferred that position was also represented by the horizontal stroke, though no actual example is preserved, doininus deus appears as dm ds in 1. 31. Traube considered the former of these contractions to be not older than the fifth century

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
pending fuller evidence the script is a better criterion of the date of this codex than the occurrence of a particular compendium. Textually the fragment is of considerable interest. As has been already
167), but

{Nomina Sacra, p.

stated, several of the verses here preserved are not otherwise extant in the

Old

Latin version, though since they tend to follow a definite formula they could to

some extent be correctly reconstructed. Others among them were already known from patristic citations, with which, however, the new witness does not
Minor divergences may easily be attributed to inexact always coincide. quotation but some of the peculiar readings of this manuscript point rather to a different recension, of which a prominent characteristic may have been its 38-30 and the note. variant noted by cf. 11. closeness to the Greek
;
;

A

Augustine makes
a

its

appearance

in

1.

46.

Sp\eciosae in
loc),

1.

48, in the light of

comment by

the

same Father

(cf.

note

ad

looks very like an interpolated

gloss.

Recto.

Verso.
-dec
v. 4.

Plate VI.
v.

genuit Se\th aniii

[men

eiti^^

Noe

dicens

29

et gemi[it filios etfili

[iste req7iies]cere faciet

as et fu[e\rtm[t omnes
dies
5

5
30

[nos

ab o]per[ib]us nostris

Adae

qiio\s

vixit

[et tristi\tiis

manum

nos

annis •dcccc[xxx• et

[traru\m et a terra cui
[maled]ixit
[xit

mortims est [vixit ante Seth annis •c^cv et ge
unit Enos- et [vixit
Seth• postqtca[m genuit
10

6

Dns

Ds• et vi

30

Ld^mech annis •dlxv
omnes
dies

7

[et gen\tdt filios et filias [et fuer]zmt

31

[A\enos annis

•[dcccvil• et

35

[quos v]ixit

Lamech
et mor[tt(.

gen uit filios [e t lias et fuerunt o[mnes di
es Seth• an7i[i -dccccxii et
15

[anni
8

•'\dccliii•

[us est]

[Etfuit N\oe annorum
[quinge\ntorum et ge
9
40

vi. i

mortims

[est

Et

vixit Aeno[s annis -xc

[nuit N\oe tres filios'

et genuit

Cqjnan

et vi

10

[Sem Cha]m lapeih
[Et factu\m
est postqua

xit

Aenos pos\tquam
et ge\jtuit filios

genuit Caind\fi annis

\coeper\tmt

homines

dccxv
20

[midti fie]ri super terra
II
45
[et filiae]

et filias et ftiej^tint

om

natae sunt eis

nes dies Aen[os annis
dccccv• et m[ortuus est

[vident]es

autem filii

a

[Dl filias] homimim

;

1073.

THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS
i3 13
{quia sp]eciosae stmt
[sninpse]r7mt sibi iixo
50 \res

Et
et
25

vixit

Camc^n amiis gemnt M\aleleel
Cain\an

et vixit

ex o]mnibiis quas

is preserved in Jerome, Quaest. Hebr. in Gen. 313, where septingenti anni 12-14, note. For Adae cf. e. g. Gen. ii. 16 pracepit Dominus 3-6. Verse 5 is not extant elsewhere. Deus Adae (from Augustine). Jerome in verse 4 has dies Adam, annis should be anni. Augustine, De Civ. Dei, xv. 1 5. Augustine has quinque et ducentos annos, but 6—7 the ablative is attested in verses 3 (Hilary) and 25 (Jerome) and is no doubt correct

I.

This verse
cf. 11.

is

written;

=

cf.

1.

10.

8-1 1. Verse
.
.

7 as far as dcccvii is preserved only here;

Augustine,

I.e.,

gives et genuit

.filias.

Augustine, /. c., where duodecim et nongenti anni is given ; cf. note on 1. i. 12-14 15-25. These five verses are not found elsewhere. 26 sqq. The verse is extant in Jerome, Quaest. Hebr. 314, and part of it in Ambrose, De Noe et Area, i. 2 (227 d). The former has iste requiescere nosfaciet, the latter hie faciet nos It is useless to attempt to decide whether iste or hie stood in our MS. ; ovtos requiescere. is the Greek. 28-30. Jerome, I.e., has ab operibus nostris, Ambrose, /. c., omits nostris and continues ipyav It the Greek is et a tristitia et a terra is noteworthy that manu{u)m nos[traru\m, which is absent in Ambrose's version, appears in and that the preceding word is not tristitia. our MS. as the equivalent of What replaced tristitia is, however, doubtful. In 1. 28 either ab o'\per\ib\is or a ld\bor\ib\us can be read, but the former seems preferable both in itself and on account of the patristic If a ld\bor[ib'\us were substituted, operibus would be available for the next line (cf. evidence. the Vulgate ab operibus et laboribus manuum nostrarum, and "^us is a possible reading ; but tristi\liis would be a literal rendering it is unconvincing, and ^tiis is really more suitable. the difficulty is that [et tristi\tiis is a longer supplement than is expected in of ; Perhaps tristiis was written, by a lipography but i and / are both narrow the lacuna. letters and on the Avhole the reading suggested seems to be the least objectionable, though At the end of 1. 29 os was written as a monogram, it is adopted with no great confidence. being utilized as the lower curve of the s. the and the first part of verse i in the next chapter 31-41. Verses 30 and 31 of chap, In verse 31 there is nothing corresponding to are found here only. and postquam genuit Noe must have dropped out. If the length of the lines were Noe would just about have filled the same in the archetype as in this copy, postquam
;

=

,

\

.

;

6,

^

-^^

.

.

.

one

line.

Augustine, De Civ. Dei, xv. 23. 45. eis : so Tertullian, De Vel. Virg. 7, where also coeperunt and plures for viulti; Augustine, /. c., has illis.

42 sqq.

=

cum
In
1.

coepissent appears iox postquam

44 multi

suits the space

much

better than//«rii.

46. \yident\s•. Tertullian, /. c.
filii:

so

Augustine,

I.e.,

and Jerome,
;

Quaest.
/. c.,

Hebr.

314;

conspicati

so Jerome and Tertullian,

//.

cc.

angeli Augustine,

remarking

LXX quidem

Dei dixerunt istos et filios Dei ; quod quidem non omnes codices habent, nam quidam nisi filios Dei non habent; cf. Aug. Quaest. in Heptateuch, i. 3 quamvis nonB 2
interpretes et angelos

4

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
viol

nulli et Laiini et Graeci codices non angelos habeant sed filios Dei. support both in MSS. and the versions and citations.
:

has considerable

/. c.

bonae Augustine and Jerome, //. cc, pulchrae Tertullian, /. c. Cf. Aug. 48. sp\eciosae consueiudo quippe Scripiurae huius est etiam speciosos corpore bonas, id est pulchras.

bonos vocare. The Greek is sunt: so Augustine and Jerome, //. cc. ; essent Tertullian, /, c. f.) or [accepeYunt (Tertullian, 49. Either [sumpseYuni (Augustine,

.

/.

f.) is possible.

1074.

Exodus
2-7

xxxi, xxxii.
Third century.
in Plate I (recto).

X 5-1 cm.

The

following fragment of the
is

book of Exodus
is

the version of the

probably older than any of the known is of about the saiTie period. 1074 is written in a neat round hand, displaying some tendency towards cursive forms, among which the is the most pronounced. This hand could not be referred to a time later than the reign of Diocletian, and might well be placed quite at the beginning of the third century or even earlier. The fragment may thus be reckoned with 1, 2, 208, and 656 as one of the most high stop ancient examples of the papyrus codex that have been preserved. is the only lectional sign occurring. The character of the text cannot be gauged from so small a sample.
Septuagint
of insignificant size but

MSS.

of that book, with the possible exception of 1075, which

A

Agreements with

AM against

are noticeable in

11.

2

and

7.

Recto.

Plate

I.

\tlv\


yo*^

071

5

[ )[€ ? €€[€€
iCy

[€

ev

•^\(

^
eiy

^

y^vea^

iva yvoa

xxxi. 13

14

oy

€v

ep

Verso.

y(tp]

9

]

,

? ^^

[

xxxii.

1074.

THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS

5
8

[? [<\
[yey

2. SO In ]. 3 ; has farai for tariP 6-7- The vestige of a letter remaining in 1. 6 is insuflScient to determine whether the tPTevOep before (B) or after (AM) papyrus placed ovs so ; ov B. (Holmes 75 Bodl. Univ. Coll. 52) ; tavrois BAM. 9. avTois : so
:

€] <.
€U€€l\

?

?]•

•?
e<

?

AM

.

=

.

.

:

AM

1075.
15-1

Exodus
X
9-8 cm.

xl.

Third century.

Plate

I.

1074, remarkable for

This fragment containing the conclusion of the book of Exodus is, like its early date. The MS. was in the form of a roll, not a book, and the sloping uncial hand does not seem to be later than the third century. is sometimes given the cursive form with a nearly horizontal crossbar. stop in the high position apparently occurs in 1. 8. Kvpios is abbreviated in the usual way, but not vioi (1. 15) or (II, 15, 2i). On the verso is 1079,

A

have been written in the third century. which is of a mixed ^ type, is of some interest. It shows an agreement with BG against AFM in 1. i, but on the other hand two agreements with against in 11. 13-14 and 18. In 1. 4 b4 we obtain very ancient testimony to a reading otherwise dependent on mediaeval authority (cf. e.g. 656, 847, 1007, and 1078). A new variant is found in 1. 10.
itself

which

may

The

text,

*

AFGM

?

[k€

? €\\\?
(?
5
Se

] ] [? ??
[? [€]€[

xl.

26

?

[ €\€€ \ ^^^ ?• 8^ €[€\ [ ([
epya
8o^\y]?

? [
€?

28

39

6

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

[\
15 yvvaav

yap cw

^?
Se
ol

( ^[ ?
^^
9

[€

viol
[ei]

[

20

[ € € ?? [? €? ? ? ?[? ? [?
[]

Se

[ave

31

€'\€
e[7r

ey

3*

['\

ev

>

>

>

AF1M add . After 2—3. *"• omits : SO the cursive w (Athens, Bibl. Nat. 44) ; cf. the Lyons Octateuch cum 4- 0)5 auiem consummaret ; other MSS. 7-8, 1. At thc end of 1. 8 either or (AFM) makes a rather long supplement. 10. is peculiar to the papyrus; on MSS., though the cursive r (Holmes i29 Rome, Vat. Gr. 1252) has and (Brit. Mus. Curzon cf. Arm. Boh. Eth. Lyons Oct. obumbravii.
. , .

, . (.
!
eAoSo?
be'.

€[•]( =

12.

13-14.
.

'. (,
.
'.

(^
€'\ ,
AFM
1

8[ 8[

6)('.

.

8. After add ; the papyrus by G, several cursives (including x), Aeth. Syr. is the subscription in adds 24. ;

:

8

AFGM SO AFGM om. .
SO
',

SO g (Par. Reg. Gr. 5)

w

and

Cyril of Alexandria

,
;

others.

which
e|

BFGM A

{)\
ii.

.
is

omitted as in

1076.

New

Recension of Tobit

95 X

3*9 cm.

Sixth century.

fragment of the book of Tobit, in a text not otherwise extant. Of the this popular apocryphon there are two main texts, the one represented by the Vatican and Alexandrine codices (BA), the other by the

A

Greek version of

codex Sinaiticus (^), the latter being the longer, though this greater length is due more to verbosity of style than to the incorporation of fresh matter. On

1076.
the question which however, for chaps,
is

THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS
the earlier critics are
9
still

7.

divided.

Besides these two,

found in three cursives a third Greek recension, which may be said to occupy an intermediate position between BA and fc^ from chap, viii onwards this text agrees closely with the Syriac.
vi.

xiii. 8,

there

is

;

Now
then

the present fragment from the second chapter

is

clearly to

be

dis-

tinguished from
arises,

BA

on the one hand and

t^

on the other

;

the obvious question

partially preserved in the it belong to the third recension This view appears to be highly probable. The relation of 1076 and C to BA and i^ respectively is closely similar. Both 1076 and C belong to the t^ type, but are more concise, while at the same time they occasionally add points of their own. In ii. 3, for instance, the elaborate forms of address in i^ disappear in 1076, just as in vi. 11 they are omitted in C (cf. note on 1. 15). On in 1076 the other hand, the insertion of

Can

cursives (C)

?

32-5 (.
origin
;

8)

has parallels in C, e.g. in

These like characteristics strongly suggest a common and and corroborative evidence for this theory is supplied by the Old Latin

\.

•<
vi.
is

15 the addition of

^^
to

version.

A

peculiarity of that version

that while generally following

occasionally reflects C.

Thus
and

in vi. 15 ^oc

daemonium corresponds
It therefore

diligit earn, to

significant that just in the

same way

.

t^

it

seems highly

in

ii.

8 the

reproduces the phrase
perdidit substantiam stiam.

Old Latin alone of the versions of 1076 with ei
on which the text

The fragment
was written
e.g. in
in

consists of the lower part of a vellum leaf,
in carefully

two columns
II,

formed, large round uncials, which

may

date from the sixth century.

Amh.
is

Plate 34.
letters are

Hands of a similar type on papyrus are shown One side of the leaf has shrivelled, with the conhere considerably reduced from their original
size.

sequence that the

The

ink

of the brown colour

Rulings were made in mark upon the surface. accompanied by a short blank space in 30 the dot was omitted 11. disappeared. A new section is indicated by a marginal sign at
;

commonly found in the Byzantine period. the usual way with a hard point, which has left a dark Punctuation was eff'ected by dots in the medial position,
1.

or has

,

curved marks resembling circumflex accents do duty
(11.

for

Small rough breathings
1.

5,

,)

as well as diaereses

(11.

34, 36).

Verso.
Col.
i.

Col.

ii.

.

ii.

2

10

>—

8

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

5

€ €9
Col.
i.

7

CTTopiv

? €€
€€
e

"•3

e

15


eh

aSeX

9
Recto.
Col.

.

11.

4

20


Teias ety
€v

€€ ,
30 veiv

aneSpa•

^€
25 35

^[
, ,
N.

[•]
For the purpose of comparison it will be convenient to give the new text with the corresponding portions of the two extant Greek versions in parallel
columns
:

ii.

2

],

1076.

hv kav

\ ? ?
.
3

?

€ , - ?
€.

B.

(
.

(
.
.

).

^

6

]9

'

,

us

?. ^

1076.
€1$•

THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS
yivovs

'iOvovs

^ .
una
timv

Aeyci

.
ei'

ISov

€,

(,

awoKpiOeh
ISov

«y

.

4

us
coy

^,
(?

€v

,
^

e/y

- {€ € [] ')€ , ^- ){€€ ^€€ , ' ,
.
8
;

aneSpa

The

old Latin runs as follows
et

:

(2) complura, fratribus nostris

dixi Thobiae filio meo Vade

et

adduc quemcunque pauperevi inveneris ex

(3) venias. et abut Thobias quaerere altquetn pauperem captivum ex fratribtis nostris, et reversus dixit mihi Pater; et ego dixi Quid est fili? et ait niihi Ecce unus ex fratribus
nostris

(4) et sustuli ilium de platea in domum apud me, donee sol occideret, ut ilium sepelirem. et (8) {quomodo non timet hie homo ? iam enim) inquisitus est huius rei causa ut occideretur,

The words et perdidit substantiam suam occur . etfugit etperdidit substantiam suam et iterum in Cod. Par. Reg. 3654, but are omitted in the St. Germain MS. and by Lucifer of Calaris who quotes the passage.
. .

Dr. Charles informs me that the Aethiopic (Dillmann, Vet. Test. 7-9. €< Aeth. v) shows the same construction. II. For the marginal sign marking a new paragraph or section cf e.g. 851. i, 1011. 233. 15. Cf. the passage in vi. 11, where the similar verbiage of t^ Xeyet einev fhev is altogether Omitted in C, which simply it will be . has einev ayyeXoy. Even is there fuller, ttnev 6 ayyeXof ; noticed that in the present verse also retains the vocative uanp, which 1076 discards. 26. Dr. Charles points out that this resolution of an infinitive into a finite verb (cf. t^ is a common Hebraism and may be taken as a sign of translation from a Hebrew or Aramaic original. Noldeke, in Monatsb. d. K. Akad. d. Wissensch. z. Berlin, 1879, pp. 45sqq., maintained that the original language was Greek, but there are not a few arguments on the
.

.

.

-

:

(
)

8€€.

.

.

\

'8
. .

other side

;

.see the

evidence adduced by Marshall in Hastings, Diet, of the Bible,

iv. p.

788.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
1077.

Amulet:

St.

Matthew's Gospel

iv.

6X11-1 cm.

Sixth century.

Plate

I.

This curious relic contains verses 23-4 (both, but especially the latter, reduced by omissions) of the fourth chapter of St. Matthew, written out most probably as an amulet. Verse 23 'And Jesus went about all Galilee', &c,,is cf. Berliner preceded by the title The gospel of healing according to Matthew
* '

;

Klassikertexte, VI.

vii.

i.

17-20, where this

same twenty-third verse

is

incor-

porated in an amulet containing the opening words of the four gospels besides other biblical citations, and 1151. In the present case the words are inscribed on

an oblong piece of thin vellum in five columns, and are so arranged as to assume the form of a series of small crosses, which in the first and last column are emphasized by a surrounding border. Each column contains three such crosses except the central one, where in the place of the second cross a human bust has further attempt at ornament has been made by cutting been roughly drawn. out small rectangles between the columns and by notching the edges in such a way that the spaces on which the crosses stand are given on octagonal shape. The disposition is not quite symmetrical, for the first cross has a line more and the last a line less than the others. The date may be as late as the sixth

A

century.

Col.

i.

1077.

THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS

ii;

^

12

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
notable reading
is

remains, the text had less than 657 in

A

found

in

1.

7,

common with the Claromontanus (D). where a variant known from two cursives

has apparently been interlineated.

€ [] [][]
€0
eis

€€/09
5

[/ ^ [[ [8
Recto.
:

ix.

12

3

tovs

[7]

7[

][ [\[( ][

][^ [
[;[][]/

[^? [?
[

14

15

[ ]? ]€ ] [ [€ € ] ? ^^

[
[€7

[
Verso.
;

[

.5 6
[

2

[ [ [
[^

[

[(
[
:

] ]€ [ ][
otc]

17

[

ey
[

[

j

8

:

epio.v

] ] ] \. [
[ [€
[
[

jg

][070'

:

]

2.

3•

((5

ayi[a

:

]

Blass adds SO Bfc^A
:

;

SO Bt^AD,

, (

with

,
;

D.

W-H

KLP, T-R.

1078.

THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS

13

recognized the variant found in the 7. In the insertion above the line is probably to be It may be due to the same hand as the body of the text; cursives 14 and 17 But the of Avas cancelled or not cannot be certainly determined. whether the being of a curiously rounded shape. decipherment is doubtful, the first supposed (i-^cD*). (Bt^*ADcE) suits the space better than 8. (AD*) or 10. It is of course impossible to say whether the papyrus had

]
Tort
:

.
:

\.

(«DcE).
15.

16. Evidently
18. (so

lacuna, unless

8 :
or
ffOTf,

with t<i°ADcE. did not follow

^cACD

om. i^*DcE)

be inserted before

no tendency

to agree.

,
is

^

as in

D*E*.

in order to fill up the required before as in D*, with which MS. the papyrus shows

is conjectural, but without it the supplement is rather shorter 19. The colon after than would be expected from a comparison of the preceding and following lines; cf. 1. 21,

note.
20.

.
it

and SO Blass. I had already inserted is again desirable to fill the space. colon after and both here and in 1. 19 before noticing that Blass makes a metrical division at in 1. 4 But the colon does not always occur at his divisions ; it is absent after

t^cKL omit

21.

A

]'[

,

and

in

1.

6.

1079.

Revelation
151 X
9-8

i.

cm.

Late third or fourth century.

The

verso of the

roll

containing the book of

Exodus

(1075) was utilized for

a copy of the Apocalypse, the writing travelling in the contrary direction, and the end of the one work thus coinciding with the commencement of the other. The script is a clear, medium-sized cursive, upright and heavily formed, which should perhaps be attributed to the fourth rather than to the third century, though the latter is not at all impossible. Both a high and medial point were a form of used for purposes of punctuation, 'i^aovs Xpiaros is written Trj

,

abbreviation which

Traube,
not

Textually the papyrus shows little consistency it has, however, two agreements with the Codex Alexandrinus against the other two chief uncials (11. 11 and
;

^

Nomina
(1.

unusual in literary texts but is found in inscriptions cf. 0eoi is contracted in the ordinary way, but Sacra, pp. 1 15-16.
is
;

12).

14),

while supporting none of the peculiar variants of

or

t^.

\l<uavvr\s r(i\C^^ enra]

[

iv

]

9

€[]9

^

1.

4

14

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

[
5

[]
[vos
[r]oi;•

]€ €[]
?

]

€€

9
[](

[] €

[
i'epeis

[€
15

] € ^^ [(€] [ €\
[ ]€
; ;

[][]€ []•

0[[;]]

7r[a]rpi

7

e|e
(t^A).

5. 9.

(BC)
:

suits the

space better than

. «:
:

so
is

W-H «AC, W-H
SO t^AC,
;

, T-R.
W-H

, T-R.

t^* OmitS the following

.

it

assured by the remains of the stroke above the line representing the final ». for err. B. C. that of ^B, W-H, T-R ; is the reading of A, T-R. SO i^*AC, 12. ; {(), but altered {() : this is the reading of the MSS. The scribe first wrote of before proceeding with the line ; he did not delete the
11.

[]

SO

BSC

om, A.

[][]€'

:

,

.,

J^.
1 6.

14• Tolur

8'.
:

MSS.
SO A,

W—

o\//e]rat
:

so

BAG
t^*.

;

17.

om.

^
;

(^5) is

t^*) C, Bt^ unsuited to the size of the lacuna.

. {

R.

1080.

Revelation
9*5

iii,

iv.

X

7-8 cm.

Fourth century.

Plate I (recto).

from a vellum codex of the Apocalypse. The upper corner 33 and 34 respectively, from which it is clear that the MS. began with the book of Revelation unpreceded by another work. Indeed, the dimensions of the leaf would not be well

A

practically complete leaf

two pages are numbered

in the outside

1080.

THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS

suited to lengthy matter, unless the script

was very small, which is here not Books of these miniature proportions, of which other examples are 842, 1010, 1096, and P. Rylands 38, seem to have been designed for carrying in the pocket. The hand is a good-sized upright uncial, fairly regular and having a certain amount of ornamental finish it may date from the fourth century. Marks of elision and a sign of similar form to separate two mutes were added by the original scribe a rough breathing (if it be a rough breathing) in 1. 12 is due
the case.
;
;

to the corrector

who has introduced

several textual alterations.

No

stops occur,

and instead a short blank space marks a pause (11. %, 6, 14, 19). Some of the usual contractions appear, ovvo§ among them, though the word is written at length in 1. 19. The text is usually in agreement with B, but seems to have been rather inaccurately copied a substitution of a reading of t^ for that of A
;

is

noticeable in

1.

i.

Recto.

Plate

I.

Verso.

^/^]]

ovv
i'Sov

5

TOS

9 €

^ (^

Ay

XS m. 19
20

«

2

(
€v

?

€ € []
?
Wps

[]

€€

21


25
'*]9'V

\9 ( ^/
€€ € []
[]
[ejj/

^

ev

[€]([
[(]€9
[.

^^€€^'^ [] ^^

€[]

]€

.]

[6]

VOS

\aaTyu

15

9 €7 [ €
]

22

IV.

[ €9

which

6[

([] [{]

[<^'];

[

.

(€ ( AC,

W-H)

was the

original reading, for

\ou

(t^,

T-R) was

subsequently substituted. which have been supplied at the bottom 3. The omission of the words of. note on of the column by the original scribe, was due to the recurrence of ;
.
. .

,

i6
1.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
A
8.
1.

16.

at

15 above

accordance with the MSS. the reading of the first hand, is not otherwise attested. 9-10. it might be regarded as a kind is doubtful 12. The supposed rough breathing over from the previous sentence. of paragraph-mark to divide in B^^ (om. A), stood here is indicated by the character which follows 16. That to eiae^fvaopai the eye would more readily pass from the first of the copyist's error Line 1 6 must then have been was also followed in the archetype by if the second carried some way beyond 1. 15, unless the insertion was continued in a third line which has been broken away. and following have is by the second hand, and the preceding 18. a in It looks as at the end of the line too there has been some alteration. also been retouched Between the tops of the two alphas there if the original hand wrote avemy. B, i^A. is a horizontal stroke (by the corrector ?) which seems meaningless, 19. The last three letters of this line are again due to the corrector, and no trace had been Avritten, as in i^. remains of the previous reading. Possibly A. SO B^ 22. A. SO Bi^ 23. 25. Some vestiges in the margin in front of this line are perhaps to be interpreted as

,

sign of the usual form marks the place where the omission occurred; the symbol is of a different shape. which was originally omitted, was inserted by another hand ; the addition is in

€(.

(,

;

,

;

.

((
;
;

.
room
20-3

€.

:
:

;

],

which
is

is

26. Before

there

no other authority

28. 30.

(

1.

.

added before

{) (
there

in

is

(T-R). for two or three

letters.

Perhaps

preceded, but

for this.

\,

which was subsequently inserted above the

line,

has no support.

1081.

Gnostic Gospel.
X
10• 7

cm.

Early fourth century.

This interesting fragment of heretical literature consists of a leaf from
a papyrus book, copied probably in the earlier decades of the fourth century. The bold, slightly inclined script is in its general aspect comparable v^^ith that of

40e (Part III, Plate i, and must be referred
lectional signs occur.

third cent.

(?) )

and 847 (Part VI, Plate

to approximately the

same

period.
for

The
is

use of the contraction
^eos

-

6,

fourth cent.),

No
in

stops or other

side

by

side with

the

commoner

noticeable.

and

Kvpios

appear

the ordinary

and perhaps (1. 3o) are unabbreviated. is broken away, and it is uncertain in what order the two pages should be placed. The recto opens with a question addressed by the disciples to the Saviour how they were to obtain faith, and the answer is made that to those who pass from darkness into the light, the way to faith
compendia, but

The

lower part of the leaf

1081.
is

THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS
consciousness.

17

revealed

by the operation of their own
and the Fore-father
essentially

unfortunately mutilated passage in which a distinction

Father

{)
is

{-).
it is

is followed by an developed between the In the verso, which is again

This

is

occupied by an address of the Master,
corruption
perishable,
essentially eternal,

laid

down

that the offspring of
is

while

the

offspring of incorruption

and that failure to recognize this truth has been the cause of error. Such a warning might naturally call forth the question of the disciples, how they in contradistinction to those who had been deceived were to find the true belief; while the abstruse theology with which the recto concludes might well have been continued at considerable length, whereas at the commencement of the verso a different subject is under discussion. For these reasons the verso has been selected as the prior of the pages, though the arrangement is admittedly
hypothetical.

doubt.

But the most unambiguous indication is provided by the distinction in 11. ^6 sqq. and which is embodied in the well-known Valentinian between was the first of the Aeons, the and Marcosian theory of Aeons. The cf. e.g. Iren. primary principle from which all other existence proceeded TeXeioy yap eivai C. Haer. i. I. I The first emanation from the

, , ,45
Regarding the

circle of ideas represented in this
yv5icn.s

A

claim to superior
hvoia,

underlies
all

11.

20-30

document there is and the words
;

little

\<,

are

characteristic of the Gnostic school.

(
€,
it

)

eyo
. .

^;
oircp

-:

was NoOy,

.

Now
i.

similarly

12. 3

' . ,' (^
;

.

.

.

and i. 11. . In chap. 19 Irenaeus specifies certain passages of Scripture by which this particular doctrine was supported. He also tells us (i. 11. 5) that
took

many

forms:
]

-ncpl

(=

IIpoTraropos)

hia<popoi

and its precise shape in the present document can hardly be Trap* avTols gleaned from so mutilated a passage. It appears equally idle to speculate upon the identity of the work of which only this tattered leaf has survived. Dr. Carl
Schmidt,

who has endeavoured without
class,
',

success to trace the fragment in the
it

Coptic literature of the same
fectly preserved

suggests that

(cf. 11. 6-8, 27» 35) ^^^ ^^^^ found in might be said for example of the Pistis Sophia, and the combination in question can scarcely have been rare in the Gnostic writings. That the work from which 1081 is derived was in the form of a Gospel is, however, sufficiently evident and probably its revelations were placed, as often in the later apocryphal Gospels, in Possibly, as Prof. Swete has suggested, it the period after the resurrection. C
;

.

'

Gospel of

Mary

observing that the expressions

might belong to the imperand But the same that work.

i8

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
'

comes from the Valentinian Gospel of Truth which is mentioned by Iren. in tantum processerunt audaC. Haer. iii. ii. 9 Hi vera qui sunt a Valentino ciae, titi quod ab his non olifu conscriptuvi est, Veritatis evangelium titnlent^ in But the fragment is best left anonymous, niJiilo conveniens apostolorum evangeliis. body of Gnostic literature which Irenaeus describes as as a remnant of that large (op. cit., . 2. ), and which was still
',
.

.

.

further swelled in the third century.

Verso.
[.
.
,

25

[

€€9

5
vei

[.

.

.

[][ / ' \
[

[.

.

.

(?) (?)
(?)

[9
[€]
30

]] €[ [ €]€
Recto.

6[

[

[€]

[
[

[]9

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1081.
6-22.
'

THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS
. .

19

hath hearing beyond his ears, let him hear: I speak also to those Again he said to ., Everything that is born of corruption perisheth, as having been born of corruption; but that which is born of incorruption abideth incorSome men have been deceived, not ruptible, as having been born of incorruption. knowing

He who

who watch

not.

.'

.

.

in 1. 4. (dative) in 1. 3 and \ Swete, who further proposes and is hardly filled by an , but no other supplethe space between ment suggests itself. By the ears that are beyond the ears is meant the faculty which perceives the inner significance of the spoken or written word. which is proposed by Perhaps 10. is too much for the lacuna.
5. Tvyxa\vfi
7.

[][]

\

:

'

'

[

7[ ,
i.

Swete.
15.

There was a syzygy of Christus and Aphtharsia
cf.

certain Gnostics;
24. Probably

Iren. C.

or

\

{Incorrupteld)
13.

according

to

Haer.
.

i.

29. i, Theodoret,

Haer.

.

The Saviour 25-39. 'The disciples [ask him,] Lord, how then can we find faith? unto them. If ye pass from the things that are hidden and into the light of the things that are seen, the effluence of conception will of itself show you how faith that appeareth from(?) Father must be found. He who hath ears to hear, let him hear. The lord of all the is not the Father but the Fore -father ; for the Father is the beginning of what shall be
saith
.
.
.

25. If

But the
2 0.

]i
1.

may

\
)
:

is

right,
e. g.

€]^.
[]

belong to the verb,

\-\ or {],
instead of
is

some

equivalent expression
sc. 01

.

.

.'

.

is

to

be supplied.

27.
1.

The

use of the term

expressly mentioned by Irenaeus,

I. 3,

as a Valentinian characteristic,

is very doubtful ; the first visible vestige is quite indecisive, and a rather 29. [ei]s TO There follow the bases of a vertical longer supplement before it would be more suitable. stroke (e. g. t, and of a round letter (e. g. e, o, ). The restoration suggested prebut Dr. Bartlet takes and supposes a direct opposition between is required before exception to this, and thinks that something like luminis in Pistis Sophia 134 sqq. cf. the 30. []77[] could 33-4. The intention of the adscript is not very clear. The words or they may be a marginal indication of the contents of be inserted in the text after ; but there is a speck of ink over the passage. It is not certain that any letters preceded is rather obscure, partly the and the margin above is imperfect. r\ is followed by a straight vertical stroke which owing, perhaps, to the loss of the adjective, may be or instead of . and the letter before is consistent with , , r, or ; cannot be read. Bartlet suggests ay[y€\i]Kov (faith tn the Father ?). is similarly abbreviated in e. g. a third-century fragment of Philo at Paris; 37-8. is used below, 1. 46. the more usual form cf. Traube, Nomina Sacra, pp. 56, 96

[]/»

;

.

[£]

,

.

.

, {){)
.

{/]

;

c 1

20

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
II.

NEW CLASSICAL
1082.
Height
1

TEXTS.

Cercidas, Meliambi.
8•2 cm.

Second century. Plate
Megalopolis,

II (Frs. 3, 4).

Cercidas, the

philosopher and poet of
lines

has

hitherto been

represented

by about a dozen
is

gleaned from a few scattered citations.

This

shadowy

the authorship

some substance by the remains here published, not only by two coincidences with fragments already extant, but also by the title surviving at the end of the work. This papyrus, like 1083, comes from the second of the large literary finds
figure
at length given
is

of which

established

of 1906.

It is unfortunately

much

broken, and the results of repeated efforts

to as

fit
it

the pieces together have been rather disappointing.
is,

The

fifth

column, such

of Fr.

1

has been built up from several scraps, and probably enough

other portions of that column remain
their right position could links

among
it is

the

many

be found

;

but

to be feared that

unplaced fragments, if some connecting

are

missing.

The
is

papyri belonging to this find were scattered over
pieces

a wide area, and possibly further small

may

eventually

make

their

no ground for hope of material additions. The slightly inclined columns are carefully written in well-formed upright uncials which approximate to the oval type, the round letters e, , 0, being has sometimes a rounded, sometimes an angular loop. decidedly narrow; I should attribute this hand to the second century, a date which also suits the cursive marginalia. These consist of both explanatory notes and variants on the text, and seem to have been for the most part added by one person, who
appearance
;

but there

commonly used a
other notes.

rather larger

and
ii.

clearer script for the variants than for the

A third hand
abbreviations,

has perhaps to be postulated for the more straggling
for

letters of the adscript at Fr. a.

the

first annotator also fall most and to him are probably due many of the accents, breathings, and other aids to the reader which it is natural to find in so difficult a work. Some of them may have been put in by the actual copyist, but the subsequent origin of others is seen in the somewhat lighter shade of the
%lc.

common

,

16.

As usual, To the

the scholia include several of

of the alterations in the

body

ink.

The system of accentuation resembles that in other papyri of the period, 841 and 862. Unaccented syllables are sometimes marked with a grave Oxytones receive a grave on the accent, e.g. Fr. 3. ii. 6
e.g.

penultimate, Fr.

i.

iii.

15

.
of the text,
;

if

an

enclitic follows

the final syllable

is

1082.
accented, as Fr.
i. iv.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS
ii.

6

ns, Fr. 3.

8-9 ovhiv

,
;

and the same accent
2

may be
stroke
is

used in the absence of an

enclitic, e. g. Fr. 3.

ii.

,

sometimes drawn under compound words, as in 841 and 852, e.g. Fr. i. ii. 18. On the other hand, in several places words are separated by commalike marks at the bottom of the letters, e.g. Fr. i. ii. 17 a similar diastole occurs in the Bacchylides papyrus xvi. 102, and in later texts, for instance P. Rylands 10. For punctuation both high and medial dots are employed, the latter commonly placed well above the line. Of the four principal fragments which have survived, the relative position of the first three is undetermined the fourth contains the final column of the roll. Fr, I is given priority as the most substantial piece. This comprises five columns, three of which are in good preservation. They are divided between two poems, distinguished by a large marginal coronis (iv. 5). The first is a discussion concerning the gods and divine providence. How are the facts of life to be reconciled with the view that the so-called gods are at once just and all-powerful ? Zeus the king of Olympus is really impotent. He may hold the scales, as Homer says, but he merely registers Fate's decree. Why, if he is the father of all, are some of us treated in such a step-fatherly fashion ? The poet professes unable to answer these questions. Let us leave them, he concludes, to himself and in opposition to the fictitious gods of heaven he sets up the astrologers as objects of veneration a remarkable triad of earthly divinities, Paean, the god of healing, Giving, and Retribution, under the figure of which he commends the practical duties of succour for the needy in body or soul, and punishment Antagonism to the current polytheism was a salient for the doers of evil. Antisthenes is reported to have said feature of the Cynic philosophy.
;
;

.

21

A

curved

elvai

Oeovs,

€va

(Philodemus,
gift to

Ilepl

Gomperz), and his contemptuous refusal to make a also on record (Clement, Protrept.^ p. 64, Potter

€€,,

p.

72,
is

a priest of Cybele

Oe&v).

Similar tendencies, in conjunction with a real religious feeling, are traceable in his disciple Diogenes (cf. e.g. Diog. Laert. vi. 57), and Cercidas carries on the

Bemays {Lucian und die Kyniker, pp. '>JS sqq.) has drawn attention tradition. to this characteristic as a point of contact between Cynics and Christians ; in
extolling
'
'

Christian doctrine.

?

Cercidas shows himself in

harmony with another
is

side of

The second poem,
subject of love.
It is

of which Col. iv gives the commencement,

on the

addressed to a friend

a reference to a passage of which Cupid is represented as having two kinds of breath, one making the course of love smooth, the other stormy. The choice rests with the individual.
;

named Damonomus, and opens with Euripides (formerly anonymous cf. note on 1. 5), in

22

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
is

who

counselled to prefer the gentle breeze and, aided
there
is

by temperance,

to

make

a break, and the following column is a safe and easy voyage. Here unfortunately mutilated but it contains a few significant verses which advocate Cercidas adopts the the simplest and cheapest satisfaction of animal instincts.
;

attitude expected in a follower of Diogenes,
vi.

who

decried marriage (Diog. Laert.

and described love as the occupation of the idle (id. 51) and a painful Love is again referred to in Fr. 4 see below. pursuit of pleasure (id. 6']). Frs. 3 and 3 differ in appearance from Fr. i in being more worm-eaten,
54, 7a),
;

especially Fr.

3.

In Fr. a there are remains of three columns,

all

more or

less

damaged. Of the first no more is left than two imperfect marginal adscripts. This fragment might be conjectured to form the continuation of Fr. i, the broken marginalia referring to Col. v, and Fr. a, Col. ii making the sixth successive, column. The subject of the latter is not clear; but so far as they go the
contents would not be inconsistent with such a combination. Expressions like pain-shunning (?), 'shadow-fed races (of men)', 'pleasure-stricken mortals'
'
'

harmonize well enough with the foregoing theme. But this phraseology might of course occur in many other contexts, and the fragment more probably comes from a different part of the roll. At any rate the edges of the papyrus do not It should also be join up, and a gap of some centimetres must be supposed. noticed that the hand in Fr. a. ii is slightly larger and less compact than in Fr. I. V, and, what is more significant, that there is a junction between two
selides at the

bination of Frs.

end of this second column, whereas, on the hypothesis of a comI and a, the junction would be expected to occur at a point more to the right. At Col. iii. 10, which was within a line or two of the rather end of the column, the poem, whatever it was, is brought to a conclusion. No such tentative combination with any of the other main pieces has to be considered in the case of Fr. 3. This, comprising one nearly complete column, with scanty remnants of those which preceded and followed, is particularly
interesting, since
it is

in

some degree
cling to

autobiographical.

After a reflection upon

the tenacity with which
spirit,

men

life,

the poet speaks of his

own indomitable

which had shown him the way to all that was best, and of the ardour with which he had devoted himself to the pursuit of the Muses. His hair is already It is grey, and the poem must have been written comparatively late in life. a retrospect of his declining years, and from that standpoint he contemplates with satisfaction the path which he had followed. Perhaps it is his farewell
to poesy.
Fr.
title

4 contains the

final
'

column, below which

is

the subscription giving the
'.

of the manuscript,

the Meliambi of Cercidas the Cynic

The

verses here
filled,

are disfigured by small lacunae which at present remain imperfectly

and

1082. the subject the
is

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS

23

not clearly defined.

mind with the endeavour

to attain something, but

Lines 5 sqq. contain a warning against fretting what exactly is meant is

obscure.
'

A

reference follows to Zeno, presumably the philosopher of Citium,
'

and a Zenonian love of man for man is apparently contrasted with an unequally balanced passion. Wilamowitz suggests that these last four lines form an independent whole, a little poem or skolion which has been relegated to the end of the book. But there is no sign in the margin of a coronis, which marks the termination of poems in Frs. i. iv and 3. iii, and which should be partially visible opposite 1. 10 and in the absence of any such indication the internal evidence is hardly cogent enough for the proposed division. The concluding reference to love is a point of contact between this fragment and Fr. i. iv-v. If so, it in 1. 4 be of the same kind as that in Fr. i. v. 15? Can the would be a natural hypothesis that Fr. 4 contains the end of the incomplete second poem in Fr. i. So far as the appearance of the papyrus goes, this but the broken column might even be the immediate successor of Fr. i.
;

^

;

edges do not directly join, and the combination can thus be at best a possibility. The remaining smaller fragments call for little notice. Fr. 5 mentions the

name

of Sphaerus, which has an important bearing on the date of Cercidas
Fr. 7 coincides with one of the

(see p. 26).

two quotations from our author

in

Stobaeus.

The metre used in these poems is what is commonly known as dactylo-epitritic. This assumes different forms, of which the normal elements are the enhoplius

— yj yj — '^^ and the epitrite - yj —-. It is seen at its simplest in the poem of Fn i, where a large proportion of the lines are Prosodiaci of the - -- «^ — kind described by Hephaestion, p. 51. 10, as \j \j

second

,^^i:i_.^_k!|

in

1.

16 the epitrite stands

Monotony is avoided by occasional trochaic rhythms. Greater freedom and variety are displayed in the first poem of Fr. i and in Fr. 3, where there is an
admixture of Adonei {- ^ ^
tetrameter
(i.
ii.

, ^{^
first

).

fixed to a verse.

- ^), with a rare Choriambus (i. iii. 5) or dactylic extra syllable, either short or long, is often preWilamowitz remarks that the nearest parallel to the metrical
3).

An

structure of Cercidas

is

to be found in the Aiiirvov attributed to Philoxenus

(Bergk, Poet. Lyr.
intelligibly

iii.

pp. 601 sqq.).

This structure has not been brought out

by the

writer of the papyrus.

Only here and
i.
ii.

there do the lines

23(17), iv. 10-1(8-9)). copied in what seems to have been the usual fashion For the most part the text is with the later dithyrambists, in lines of fairly even length, very much as if it

correspond with the natural cola (e.g. Fr.

8 (7),

iii.

were prose.

Hence

in the reconstruction

given below

it

has been found necessaiy

to discard the stichometry of the original in favour of a division indicating

more

24

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
When, however, owing
4,
is

clearly the metrical scheme.

to mutilation the
is

scheme

is

uncertain, as in Frs. 2

and

the arrangement of the papyrus
rare,

reproduced.
in

Resolution of a long syllable
Fr. 4. II

but

is

found in a trochee apparently
i.
ii.

and Fr.

32. 3.

The

shortening of a final vowel or diphthong before
6,

a following vowel occurs infrequently (Fr.
Fr.
I. iii.

Fr. 3.

ii.

4, 8, 10,
ii.

possibly

14), hiatus before

an original digamma once only

(Fr. 3.

2).

In the matter of dialect also slight confidence can
tradition of the original.

be placed

in

the

Cercidas uses a Doric speech

;

but there are degrees
is

and

varieties of Doric,

and

it

is

not very clear which of them

recognized.

^,, ,
have the
for
ei?
v.

The broad a, infinitive in -^,
Xfjs,

?^

naturally, takes the place of the Attic

and are other well-defined and
or
eipiey

=
'

etyat,

, , 9, , (,
,
verbs in

here to be

6,

characteristic forms.
for ov

did the poet employ the vowels of the

stricter

'

Doric and write
is

But and
9

original scribe as the genitive singular of the second declension (Fr.
ii.

Fr. 3. 17 19 previously extant fragments of Cercidas (see p. 50), Bentley's emendation of is plausible, though unto bvaeKviTTTiu
is
. .
.

,

Here the papyrus

is

inconsistent.

Occasionally

given by the
i.
iii.

),

,

but ov

much more common.

In No. 4 of the

.

.

.

necessary.
in

Of an

original accusative plural in

? there

is

no

clear instance, but
3.
ii.

one place
is

has been inserted above ov by the second hand (Fr.

3

$).

and the corrector leaves this untouched (Fr. i. ii. 15, 20, iii. 5, 11, The question then arises whether uniformity should be obtained by 22, iv. 18). or the many of ov. It is hard to believe that eliminating the few instances of That should have been gradually the sporadic is not a genuine survival. replaced by ov is natural enough, and such weakening of dialectical peculiarities in the process of transmission is too common to need illustration. Other instances of violation of the dialect are to hand in this papyrus Fr. i. ii. 5 ei for al first perhaps Fr. i. v. 18-19 ]{€). The choice between et hand, Fr. 3. ii. 11 and in infinitives is more difficult, et is written in ten places by the copyist,
constant,
Fr.
I.
iii.

70€[^6,

which (Fr. ample of

, €
8
i. iii.

&,
»?

:

8 Xeyeiv, 19

(,

iv.

19

Fr. 22. 3 opeiv, Fr. ^6. 2

,
11.

22

fvOvTiXoeLv, Fr. 4. 3

]€,
;

7

19)

has been interlineated
i. v.

b]aaLv, Fr. 48. 2 ]0€;, in one of by the second hand the solitary ex;

=

ehaL (Fr.

19) similarly has this alternative
ii.

as in the Paris papyrus of

other cases

may be

correct.

for the traditional

observed, would be

much

.

Alcman

^

is

above the line, perhaps preferable and in the

In Cere. Fr.

2.

3 Bergk following Froben gives

assisted

which

is

common

is not very a frequent cause of corruption. But the infinitival is found in the Paris Alcman papyrus iii. 20, in literary Doric,

^

The natural tendency towards ci, it may be by the palaeographical similarity of 6 and H,

-

1

1082.
ibfjv

NEW
-eiv

CLASSICAL TEXTS
and

25

in

8.

7.

The MSS.

of Theocritus have

passages are divided between

-

in xxiv. 92,
is

and

in other

;

the reading of the

Codex

Ravennas in Aristoph. Lysist. 1004. In both Aristophanes and Theocritus -etz; follow. is commonly preferred by editors, whose example I should be inclined to Purity of dialect is certainly not to be expected in poetry of the age of and an instance of the epic genitive -olo (Fr. i. v. 16), which was Cercidas
;

also used

by Theocritus

language.

(e.g. i. 68, ii. 8, iv. 17-18), betrays artificiality in the But, while naturally the author himself cannot be credited with all

the incongruities of the papyrus, the preferable course in a first edition, at any Similar rate, is to leave these for the most part as they have been handed down. notable example in the inscriptions. inconsistencies are to be found in plenty

A

of the dialectical fusion of this period survives in the

poems

of Isyllus (C.

I.

G.

to I have accordingly allowed is constant. 950), where not even the Doric from the context and with et. Where it is not clear stand side by side with Of is genitive or dative, no iota subscript has been added. whether a final

,

specifically

Arcadian influence there is no clear trace the use of the non-Doric already been admitted 9, iv. 8) does not prove it, since av had by Theocritus in his Doric poems. few words must be added concerning the personality and literary
;

av (Fr.

I.

iii.

A

qualities of the poet.

The former has been a subject of much uncertainty. Two politicians of Megalopolis who were named Cercidas are known, one a contemporary of Demosthenes, who accuses him of having betrayed his countrymen ' ... cf. Harpocrat., to Philip {De Cor. 295

\

;

ey

le'

a friend of Aratus and an actor in the war with Cleomenes towards the close of the next century (Polyb. ii. 48-50, 65). Can either of these personages be If the Grammarians are to be trusted, he too identical with Cercidas the poet ?

? ,
.

^

Polyb.

xviii. 14),

the other

played a part

in public affairs.

the city of Cercidas aptaros

word used by Ptolemy

pbv
tovs

Probably the same tradition
B, p.

Trj

the Iliad

.
199
of

(cf.

Homer
p. 130)

after death,

poet with

?

In view of the alleged partiality of Cercidas to the second book of his aspiration recorded by Aelian, Far. Hist. xiii. 20, to meet

^ ^,
6
is

^ ' ?

6

Megalopolis, says Stephanus of Byzantium, was is also the

-,
?

ap. Phot. Bibl 190

(p.

151 Bekker)

to be recognized in the statement of Eustath.
.
.

. ? (,
€€€.
//.

Tivh

Kepbias

and

to

65
Fr.

i. iii. is

2 below), Cuper's emendation {Apoih. Horn. Meineke proposed to identify the convincing.

the philo-Macedonian

denounced

by Demosthenes

{Anal. Alex.

;

26
pp. 385 sqq.)
Fr. a
(cf.
;

OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
but this view did not well accord with the mention in Cere.
p.

50) of the death of Diogenes, which occurred in B.C. '^2'^ and does not seem, when that fragment was written, to have been a quite recent event.

Stronger objections are

one

(Fr. 4. 14) to the Stoic

now found in two fairly certain allusions of the papyrus, Zeno, who is said to have lived as late as the 130th
vii.

Olympiad (Diog.

Laert.

6)

and cannot have become famous before the
5. 4).

beginning of the third century, the other to Zeno's disciple Sphaerus (Fr.

These references bring the poet down well into the third century, while on the other hand he cannot be placed very much later, since there is good reason to believe that his works were used by Aristophanes of Byzantium, who is supposed to have succeeded Eratosthenes at the Alexandrian library about B.C. 195.
has been pointed out by Strecker {Hermes, xxvi. pp. 276-7), the explanation citing Cercidas in Phot. Bibl. 279 (Cere. Fr. 8 cf. p. 51) is likely to rois iraXaiois be derived from Aristophanes' Hept
of
cf.

As

'

Eustath, Od.

,

p. 1761.

.,

be (sc. 34 and Pollux vi.

5)
83,

;

;

.

81,

To

the very plausible suggestion that the citation of Trarpows (Cere. Fr. 9 cf p. 51) comes from the same grammarian's Uepl Our author's
;

floruit will accordingly

fall in the second half of the third century, and it becomes natural to identify him with the Megalopolitan Cercidas who appears on the political stage at precisely that period. But it will not follow that, as Leo inclines to believe {Hermes, xli. p. 444), the statement that he was a rests upon a confusion. Die Gesetzgebung hangt mit der Griindung (von Megalopolis) zusammen.' Not necessarily constitutional ordinances are by no means limited to the period of a city's foundation, and a well authenticated The absence of any hint in tradition is not so lightly to be set aside. the narrative of Polybius that he was speaking of the well-known writer
'

.
this

on

rrji

Wilamowitz adds

4

;

will
tion.

hardly be regarded

as

a serious objection to the proposed identifica-

That the philosopher-poet, besides being a lawgiver and a practical politician, should also have been a general (Polyb. ii. 6^), is more surprising but evidently he was far removed from the typical Cynic sage, and there is no great difficulty in adding some military capacity to his varied accomplishments. How it comes about that he is described by Diogenes Laertius as (vi. 76) remains unexplained on any view of the poet's personality. S. Bochart wished to remove this complication by the not very happy expedient of substituting 'ApKUs for Kprjs. Cronert {Rhein. Mus. Ixii. MeyaAoTroXiV?]?, or MeyaXowoXirTjs t^s pp. 311-12) proposes the emendation 'ApKabCas, but makes no attempt to explain how a phrase of this kind became corrupted to If the passage is to be corrected at all, it would be better

?

$.

1082.
to follow

NEW
KpTjs

CLASSICAL TEXTS
as an interpolation.

27

Cobet and delete
Sotades.

But, as Wilampwitz

remarks, conflicting statements of the same kind occur about other celebrated

Perhaps the family had some Cretan connexion. There are no independent grounds for supposing Cercidas to have lived elsewhere than at Megalopolis and he may reasonably be regarded as a kinsman of
individuals, e.g.
;

his

namesake the statesman of the Demosthenic
Cercidas
is

period.
first

expressly described as a Cynic for the

time in the

title at

the end of Fr.

4.

That he was an adherent

of that school of philosophy had,

however, been rightly inferred from the extant fragments 2, 4, 5 (p. 50), and the phrase KepKibav (Athen. viii. 347 e) in the mouth of the Cynic Cynulcus (Kaibel, Athen. iii. p. 561). His wish to meet after death

Hecataeus and Olympus, as well as Homer and Pythagoras (Aelian, Var. Hist. 30), implies that besides philosophy and poetry, he cultivated history and music and the comprehensiveness of his intellectual interests is directly witnessed by Fr. 3. Nor did he confine himself to one class of poetry, for Athenaeus quotes his Iambi (Cere. Fr. i) and that there is no mistake in the name is proved
xiii.
;

by

.
called
literary

the metre of the quotation.
as combining lyrical

But no doubt
critical

it

was upon the Meliambi, so
satyrical matter,
is

forms with

or

that

his

fame

chiefly rested

;

to Ptolemaeus, ap. Phot. Bibl. 279, he
is

simply
to us,

No

other representative of this class of composition

known

and

to that fact rather than to

any conspicuous

literary merit the discovery of

Oxyrhynchus fragments, from which a fair idea of the poet can now be obtained, owes its particular interest. In the matter of style they confirm and emphasize the impression given by the few verses already known. An outstanding
these
feature
facility
is

the frequency of unfamiliar compounds, in which Cercidas displays the

a distinct vigour and aptness

His possessed a feeling for the picturesque, as well as a faculty of expression. The most pleasing versification is accomplished, and the syntax usually simple.
specimen of his work is the exordium of the poem on love (Fr. i. iii. 5 sqq.) which, though the leading idea is not original, has a grace of its own. That

6,

and boldness of a dithyrambist.
:

5 ,,
Some
the

of these

are

among

^^,
or

have

more

striking.

The poet clearly

on the subject of the gods

(Fr.

i.

ii-iii)

is

but the points are well put, and reinforced

by novelty or depth, by some happy phrases and lines.
not marked

The fragments

of Cercidas reveal a cultivated man, of no great originality,

perhaps, but well qualified to expound and popularize his philosophic creed,

and endowed with

at least

some of the

qualities

which go to make a poet.
is

My

debt to Wilamowitz in the reconstruction of this text, as of 1086,

especially large.

2
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may

be convenient to add here the previously known fragments of Cercidas, which I transcribe from Bergk, Poetae Lyrici, ii. pp. 513-15.
Iambi.
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xii.
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ya Bergk; yf Cobet, y ea vulg. 4. This line was bracketed by Cobet. 5. placed here instead of at the beginning of 1. 6 by W-M. The reference is to the death of Diogenes. The language of this fragment is reflected

.

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opjj vois . The preceding line (= Epicharmus, Fr. 117) Kfv 2. Meineke; iSoter B, fplBoup \u]g. assigned to Cercidas. with Bentley would prefer the genitive . . avfpes vulg. 3.

is

not to be

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14.

1. i. 12.

as a proper name,

cf. Etym. Magn. 724. and Hesych. nvpovs. The word occurs in Paton-Hicks, Inscr. of Cos, 39. 11, CoUilz, Gr. Dialektinschr. 4736 (Thera), Dittenberger, Sylloge, ed. 2, 938. 23 (Epidaurus).

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I.

probably a variant; G. 169.
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which evidently occurred
tovs

in the text of the poet,

Xeyti

on

^ '

.
occurs

and incontinent Xenon, [Why did not Fortune] reduce to penury the ii. i-iii. 17. and bring us his money that was running to waste? What was to prevent, supposing some one should ask her ? For it is easy for a god to accomplish everything whenever it comes into his mind, and to empty of his swinish wealth the dirty usurer and hoarder or this outpourer and ruin of his substance, and to give the squandered means to the man who takes his bite in season and shares his cup with a neighbour. Is then the eye of Right blinded like a mole's 1 Does Phaethon see crookedly with a single orb, and is the
'
.

.

.

2

.

;

52
vision of fair Justice

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

dimmed ? How can they who have neither hearing nor inlet of sight be Nay, the august lightning-compeller sits on mid Olympus holding yet taken for deities ? even the balance and in no wise signifies his will. And so said Homer in the Iliad; For why does not he who controls the it sinks when the fated day comes to noble men. weights, if he is upright, incline them to me, or to Phrygia at the ends of the earth? Of a truth I fear to say how perversive is the scale of Zeus with men. To what sort of
lords, then, or to

what children of Heaven can one go

to find

how he may

get his deserts,

when
and
she

the son of Cronus, the begetter and parent of us all, is found to be a father to some a stepfather to others? Better to leave these questions to the astrologers, for they,

have no manner of trouble. For us let Paean and Giving be our care, for While, then, the deity sends a favouring a goddess, with Retribution, on earth. and you may then utterly rid yourbreeze, hold her in honour, men, and pursue her selves of the reprehensible [desire for] wealth and for [the other gifts] of fortune.'
I expect, will
is
.

.

.

is only found here. or some deity is the subject of the sentence, and av, and nem^rvXiSav, although short syllables are required between palaeographically unconvincing, satisfies that condition and is a tolerable word, is, as W(ilamowitz)-M(ollendorfF) remarks, in harmony with the style, (cf. e. g. of course would be satisrecurs in 1. 7 and the termination For the first damaged letter factory, if the problem of the next word could be solved. a mark of elision followed by an t is much less it is difficult to read anything but a ; The second, if not , can be or a, possibly v. With v, there would be only one suitable. more letter before av ; with , 8, or a, there are probably two, and the slight vestiges seem is, I think, just possible. but is hardly admissible. most consistent with The marginal note evidently refers to Xenon, who is not, apparently, otherwise known to fame. gives inferior sense, and is abnormal in syntax. Tis 4. {)' W-M. 6-8. These three opprobrious compounds are all new. The first two go together and 1. express the opposite character to that of the intemperate Xenon 9) ; the miser is perhaps not makes no better use of his wealth than the spendthrift. in the verse impossible for such a bold coiner of words as Cercidas ; cf. There is below. The idea it expresses is that hoarded wealth is dead and unprofitable. really very little doubt about the first syllable, and though the vestiges of the supposed The mark of length above the t must in any case be are slight they suit that letter well. erroneous. The variant oKedpov inserted in the margin is obviously right. fmraStoTpaiKTas, SLud are three more Otherwise 9-10. 1

2.

Two

)

-8

.
,

(

,

A

€[]

, ,
unattested compounds. 11. The diminutive

!
{,
;

&:
unfa'milia,r

and

Fr. 39. 7.

from which the novel 12. The marginal note gives a definition of cf. Soph. Fr. 11, Dionys. Fr. 5, Fr. Adesp. 421 Nauck, &c. formed. For AUas observes that the introduction of Phaethon, i.e. Helios, between 13-14. and ©e/its is not unnatural, the sun as all-seeing being regarded as the avenger of the innocent is Hesiod's epithet of hence the practice of calling the sun to witness, Theog. 901. napavyup and which are found here only, are glossed in the adscripts. The form avyelv occurs in Job xxix. 3 ; cf. Hesych. 15. The marginal variant, with the slight alteration of roi for oi, is no doubt right. ovToi Toi would be unmetrical. here refers especially to the sense of vision.
is

W-M

:

banawWa

is

anothel•

word

for the

form

cf.

e.g.

,
6

.

,

;

1083.
i6-iii. 3.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS

53

here seems to be that Zeus does not actively intervene in the only holds the balance and observes its indications ; the weights 70-2 iv ' eV/^it are determined by Fate. Cf. Iliad be pene ' As an alternative to the supplements adopted G. Murray proposes \6'(, which is a more difficult order, though not more involved than e.g. Aristoph. Thesm. 811. He would also prefer to read But doeS Homer Say this ? is more likely to have been altered to than vice versa the shortening 5, of the V, which is long in Apoll. Rhod. iv. 330 Scymnus 433 Bpvyoi, 470 occasions little difficulty cf. BpiyesSufficient regularity is restored to the metre by the transposition suggested by M. is a variation of the common proverb to indicate an insignificant or unknown person ; cf. e. g. Plato,
interests of right.
'

The complaint

[€\

.
ovbe)s

He

^ \
.

.

.

'

'

.

.

.

,

, 8 8(). [, !, ,
.
.

.

.

.

.

8, \

;

;

The

This poet would have justice rewarded even in the most obscure and humble of men. seems a more suitable interpretation than to make the 8e adversative but inclines them
' . .

'

TheaetetUS

209 b

( 8 ' ( '8'(€.8^ * .
ovv
eaff

W—

on

(

;

which the Scholiast remarks
Mivavbpos

eVt

6

instead to

.'

has been cancelled by the dots An erroneous accent on the first syllable of placed on either side of it; cf. 841. vi. 88 and ix. 17, where we wrongly supposed the two accents to be alternatives. 6. [napajyei ; the letter after the lacuna could equally well be r. airoh refers not to but Vaguely to people in general•. would naturally 9-10. evpoi, as emended by the corrector, is evidently right, and

W-M

follow, as

e. g.

in Plato, Cri'f.
'.

45 b
iii.

12.

cf.

Pollux
9)•
:

27

(=
13.
is

Cerc. Fr.

The

allusion

'
may

well be to the present passage.

found only here.
Iboi
.

1 4•

.
ov(pe)
is

cf.

AristOph.

PaX

92

8

For
,
.

this sarcastic allusion cf.

Diog. Laert.

(
vi,
.

.,
;

ei

\
Substantive

The
.

24 eXeye
.

he {sc.

')
is

alternative remedy.
15.

a substantive formeid from (Opera 354), to which passage the has no doubt some speciousness in view of the passage adscTript of the papyrus refers. and are described as leaving the earth for in Hesiodj Opera 197-200, where Olympus. Cercidas might be held to be directly controverting that statement Hesiod was
as

,
otiose,

is

restored by

W-M

on metrical grounds

;

(Murray)
cf.

an

The

corrector's

may be
is

the original form;
for

W-M

points out,

probably

on the analogy of

in Hesiod's

- ?,

introd. p.

24..

But, besides the objection to this is that the marginal note becomes quite irrelevant on the other hand, would and must be supposed to be a mistake. The corruption to be easy, apart from the possible influence on the copyist of Hesiod*s conjunction of as an interpolation from the verse seems also right in regarding and in the following verse the of Hesiod cited here by the annotator. With
still
1.

wrong; they are
metrical

on earth

{,

/»?

:

1 6),

and are the

.
The

difficulties,

,

true divinities.

W-M

6

epithet

is retained, it must be removal leaves the metre normal. If being elided before the following short vowel, which would be scanned as an anapaest, proposes the transposition Murray, keeping in accordance with the later practice.

and

its

;.

?,

inclusion of

Paean among these

deities is

noteworthy, though hardly surprising

'

;

54

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
vi.

both Antisthenes (Diog. Laert.

6) and Diogenes (Stob.

xiii.

25) are reported to have

who

the fact that Diogenes, spared few, seems to have respected medical men {Lucian und die Cyniker, p. 95 thinks, here has a wider meaning than Perhaps, as of. Diog. Laert. vi. 24}. cf. Arist. De Mundo 7 Ne/ieCTti* 5e retribution, and is rather the principle of ius suuni cui'que and the similar explanation of Cornutus, Na/. Dear. 13. There in this sense. seems, however, to be no parallel for the actual use of 17. Tt/iSrc: strictly the dialect requires n/x^rf, but this need hardly be pressed.

compared

their office to that of doctors,

and Bernays remarks on

W-M

8(,
€,
;

;

iv. 1-4.
to

The supplements adopted

are for the

most part due

to

W— M.

(\€
W— .

is

be taken with

erroneous.

A

the circumflex accent, which is inconsistent with the diaeresis, being complementary clause, specifying the contrasted objects of aversion, followed;

could be the termination of e.g.

*[/
.

is the paraphrase suggested by but is recommended by NeVe^is in 1. 16. is also doubtful, and alluding to an injunction given earlier in the poem, is Owing to the mutilated is rather too long for the space. a possible alternative condition of the text, the correct division of these concluding lines remains uncertain, e^e/icVat another . ovv and v^— maybe separate verses, and in the same rhythm.
. .

'
A

, ^ ([
([,
.

'

.

.

[^

'

.

.

5-18. 'It has been said, Damonomus you are not devoid of knowledge that the dark-winged son of Aphrodite blows on us from his mouth two kinds of breath. The man on whom his right cheek breathes softly with gentle breath steers in calm weather the ship of love by the sane rudder of persuasion. But they on whom he looses the left cheek and stirs forth the storms and wanton blasts of desire have their course ever set on a surging sea. Well said Euripides. Is it not then better to choose of the two the favouring
breeze, and wisely using the rudder of persuasion to Aphrodite's waters ?
sail straight

while our course

lies in

new poem, as is indicated by the coronis, begins at this point. 5. as Trag. Gr. Frag. Adesp. 187 alluded to was identified by oiras from Hermias on Plat. Phaedr. p. 76; cf. Lucian, Amor. 37
attributed the line to Euripides

The

by

1.

15 below.
6.
7.

not Otherwise attested. it is implied that he was sufficiently well-read to recognize ; the allusion rather than that he was experienced in love. 8-9. The restoration of this passage is a Uttle doubtful. It is not clear in the first place whether yap, which has been added above the line, was intended to replace or to supplement with would ignore the punctuation of the original and connect yap But yap the beginning of the fresh sentence. or making seems more naturally taken, as marked in the papyrus, with the succeeding relatives, and At with [] I prefer to suppose that the inserted yap is slightly out of its proper position. but is indicated by the grave accent on the third «; the end of the line the juxtaposition of two words in -Ttpa is not satisfactory, and since other instances of for which there mistaken accents occur in this MS., I have adopted W-M's €((\1. nvels, there is no objection is just room in the lacuna. Since Euripides had written
is

Damonomus

(
6

W—
be

",
Cf.

ivos

[Com. Frag. Iph. Aul. 543-57.

€.

,',

passage

Meineke had already
is

iv.

p. 171),

a conjecture which

now

verified

is

unknown

.

W-M

[]

[]

\

€,

^^]
.
. .

\,

to the repetition of

Trvevar}.

The

verse

is

then a trochaic tetrameter, for which

1082.
cf.
1.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS

55

instead of the usual — v^»^ — v-» v^— ^ for the first This will leave 9 ; but other examples of an Adoneus are not wanting in these poems, e. g. ii. 5, Murray makes Fr. 3. ii. 3-4, II, and there is no particular objection to one at this point, be^ia may be the original text, being due to the the suggestion that influence of the preceding word ; this would not be unattractive, were assured. 10. is probably to be connected with vavv rather than with in spite of the absence of the article, for which passages like Xen. Cyrop. viii. i. 8 ra? 6vpa% may be compared. Or a more normal construction can easily be obtained by the transposition
15.

part of

1.


For
.

(
cf.

—^^
\

8(€

vavv

,

adopt in the second part of the verse the slight Another expedient for which would give the favourite rhythm —<^\j — \j\j would be to substitute ; looks right, and is unlikely to have displaced an original but
15.
1.

alterations suggested

8

,

(€((€

note on

by

W-M

,

5.

I

in order to restore the dislocated metre.

V. II.
limited.

[

Dialektinschr

might be a derivative of the Doric form KoOuipuv for (cf Collitz, Gr. The choice of words beginning with is very 1646 1156
this

,

.

).

commendation of a cheap and easy love I owe Diog. Laert. vi. 46, Horace, Saf. i. 2. 119 namque A dot before ;7 is presumably accidental there is parabilem amo venerem facilemque. In 1. 16 {19) the high stop after (ipev might be another superfluous dot after interpreted as one of the dots enclosing the insertion above the line.
13-16. In the restoration of
several points to

W-M.

Cf. e.g.

.

;

(-.

Pr. 2. ii. 1-3. Fr. 31 might be placed at the top of this column so far as external appearances are concerned. is another novel compound. 4. suggests or . 6. A vestige from the top of the letter following though the cross-bar of the must be supposed to have been Perhaps 'J. is more like another drawn abnormally high; cf. however in 1. 15. The letter after occur, but none with than anything else, but an t is also possible. Compounds of Or should we combine ayatv(e) ? occurs only here. 8. 9. The letter between the two lacunae is represented by an upright stroke which (W— is quite suitable ; cf. may well be one of the limbs of a , and which was used by Timon. The supposed rough breathing above the initial may be a mark of long quantity. yap. The letter after may be . 12. this passage describes the physical condition of some one 13 sqq. As restored by suffering from self-indulgence; the first person is used in 1. 16, but the poet cannot be which cf Homer For here speaking of himself. 510 ayavovs Hesychius explains The word would here of. Oppian, Cy«. iii. 283 is included in a list of words signify useless fat which in by Theognostus (Cramer, Anecd. Ox. ii. 132), and does not merit the suspicion with which it has been regarded (Lobeck, Paralip. p. 108). According to Erasistratus, might therefore mean an inflated pulse. is comprised in the arteries, and

,
»
.
.

6(
[
:

)

8\,

[]{]7[](

W-M

(8,


.

^, ,
'\

:,\(.
For

^, :

;

]

\€ [].

xliii. 405 occurs in Nonnus, aj is there possible, but or or ] ] not be an unsuitable context for Cere. Fr. 7.

.
.

vya

s

. . [€ ](5

-

cf the gloss below,

cannot be read.

— This would

56
iii.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
20. Perhaps

that

the occurs in Cere. Fr. 7.

\\•,

letter
6.

before
line

is

more

like

than

,

but

it

is

noticeable

This

ended the poem.

'Many a mortal to whom death comes closes his eyes unwillingly. 3. ii. 2-14. thy heart within thy breast was stubborn and unconquered, making a rich meal of every care. Therefore nought goodly ever escaped thee. All the dainty prey of the Muses, my soul, was deep in thy afifections, and thou wert a most skilled fisher and hunter of the But now when white hair plain to view hangs about the head . . and the Pierian maids. chin is hoary, and life, if it seeks any good thing suited to its age and years, uses flattery, looking to the broad threshhold of its end, now . .*
Pr.

And

3.

Of

the three variants
is
is

suitable,
5.

(\•.
The metre
is

best scanned as a short syllable,

another

G. 2556, 15 2557. 26 For the accus. 6. () [] W-M. the remains of the cf. Theocr. xi. 39, &c. the reading of the corrector, is shown by the first letter are quite consistent with . metre to be right. To the same hand is due the deletion of the final of where the
a Doric contraction of
eo for
cf.

which

,, , ,
.

.

and

the last seems the
;

most
-S>v,

—^<u

—\j\j

cf.

1.

11.

new compound.
e.g. C.
I.

The

termination
;

is

apparently

[]

((9.

€,

justice of the alteration
7.

is

questionable.

unsatisfactory, the
rectified.

vrro is easily restored by the slight modifications proposed by W-M. occupying too wide a space ; but perhaps some mistake had to be

keep up the metaphor of passage. In the first place the indicative here and in 1. 12 after is extraordinary. It would be easy to write neptatap&vrai and but the past tenses in 11. 4 and 8 and vvp in 1. 9 show that the reference is to the present rather
8.

9-1 . This

[]

and
is

a

difficult

. ,
[\.

than the future, so that the indicative is really more in place. Possibly, since could govern either mood, a similar licence was extended to the longer form. Then is the subject of the sentence ? And what is the case of Trepiauopevvrai seems probable, ? and the first three letters are consistent with the very slight vestiges. But the preceding lacuna would then be so short as practically to involve the dative If ^[], which is also quite admissible, were read, there would be room for another narrow letter, e. g. The middle of 1. 10 is much damaged ; may be read for the doubtful , or a for , and or for f. The next letter looks like , but x(f)iXea (not -) is not quite

[].

impossible.
11. notes that Cercidas as a Cynic philosopher did not conform to the fashion of shaving the beard. suits the sense as well as the palaeographical conditions, but the 12. is perhaps a false Doricism is the Theocritean form (xx. 19, Epigr. xix. 3). complication is, however, introduced by the apparent interlinear insertion, which remains There may be merely a dot before the supposed . unexplained. appears to have been wrongly accented; if ^torSy be read, is left 13. suspended, unless, as Murray suggests, be emended to i7Xt>ct'a. lacks an object, is only moderately satisfactory ; the vestige of the letter after n- rather points to a, , or perhaps t or irtpi could well be read if they fitted the context. The marginal adscript is too much damaged to be of much assistance evidently refers to Possibly there was another line below
;

W-M

A

.<

8(

;

.

;

^^.

Fr. 4.
here.

I. is

The
in

A

letters are on a detached fragment which appears to be rightly placed any case wanted to precede of ., a novel compound presumably

:

1083.
formed from

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS

57

Or perhaps the termination may be ov, or, or ot[r]. and ; The circumcould be read ; the supposed accent on the first is hardly certain. which, to of av seems to have been intended as an alternative to the acute, flex above the two last letters judge by its position, was the original accent. It is not clear whether they should be read of the line belong to the text or to an adscript. If to the text,

\\5

preceded by a medial stop. is another unfamiliar compound, 3. and Hesych. Cf.

\vape,

, .-' \5,
\(.
5-1 0. These
lines

^,

may

TUf

room in the lacuna for Ktt{tas] and perhaps Kevas was mistakenly a tiny vestige of the first letter ; suggested exemplt gratia by written. Xh/xV \} which does not mclude the remainder of of 1. 9 is consistent with a , but no restoration could be p, and In the latter part of that line the verse can be considered satisfactory. of broken letter following might be the may be or ; the the doubtful that is the right word. ,,.,., r reference to 11-14. The conclusion of the poem, where in all probability there is a stands somewhat to the the first the Stoic Zeno, unfortunately remains obscure. In 1. 11 allowance for the slope of right of the initial letter of the line above and, with a slight
In . 6 there
is

€ 8 . ^^ \]5
be arranged thus

\ۥ
Kfv[eas\

in

which

^,

,

-

is

a
id.

\(,

\('

r r form ot

[\
barely
is

noieia6[ai
(vpjis

\]

\] —w^—

,
^,—

W-M

is probable, apart from the the column, a lacuna of one letter at the beginning of the line would be contrary to the dialect. Moreover, near the top ot consideration that 5r' or At the the lost letter. there is a very small speck of ink which may be a survival of the and with little end of this line, at is on a detached strip, which was found folded with Fr. 4

doubt belongs to of the preceding
In
1.

it,

though the combination adopted

letter

is here very attractive. Perhaps do not suit , nor in front of the and a repetition of that word in some is probable in 1. 13 after the article, is not impossible for the fourth seems to be indicated, or form, e.g. it; a letter having a perpendicular letter, though the very slight trace does not suggest In 1. 14 the first letter may be y or '", and we stroke like » would be more satisfactory. the latter accords better with ixoQov (or y') ?[p>9 have the choice between ye'[X]a,s and tuMpoi' just above. and , . see On the meaning of these lines and their relation to the foregomg passage have p. 23. been relationship which seems to It is not necessary to assume that the masculine to which Zeno, as the fragments snow ordinary here commended was the been addicted. The poet was possibly (cf. Frs. 247-53, V. Arnim), was supposed to have The adjective ' love. sentiment of a more spiritual order as the true Zenonian upholding a f. is used by Sopater, ap. Athen. iv. p. 160 the accent according to is the common spelling, that being I . nep\ pou. \^. lo. 30 (though the MS^ ^^^'\^^^ Arcad. 21. 19 and apparently Herodian, observes, as as in Harpocration, Stobaeus, and others is, But hypocoristica Doric nomenclature and to a period prior to the vogue of better adapted both to
is

12,

if

Hot

but not or are consistent with e.g. above is right, three letters are expected before

&,

^ ^

is

uncertain.

The

,

;

^.

?[]

exiguous remains
is

possible.

The

vestiges

:

.

^,

: «5 ,
€/,
in -as.

W-M

Stobaeus makes the genitive

-a,

as here, in

Iviii.

10, -ov in iv. 43.

.

.

58
Pr.
5.
2.
;

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
cf. e.

comic poets

may be the Philo-Macedonian orator ridiculed for his gluttony by Athen. iii. 104 c-d. should by Empedocles, but no doubt was a form used of the 4. here be taken, with W-M, as a proper name, and the Stoic philosopher (Diog. Laert., vii. 6) This allusion is of cardinal importance in the question of the poet's date is meant. Sphaerus had been an (cf. p. 26), and has a secondary interest from the fact that instructor of Cleomenes, the enemy of Megalopolis (Plut. Cleom. 11). ypepovai. may be the participle or 8.
g.

]('
.
7.

Fr.

2-3- Restored by

.
a
is

=

W-M.

For

1.

2 cf.

Callimachus, Fr. 46

,
Iviii.
:

rt

Ft.

1.

dark

fibre

a lacuna of one or two letters dividing
directly join.

running down the verso would suit a combination with Fr. 9. 6, [; but the edges of the papyrus do not [ from ]
. .

2-4.

The

identification of these lines with Cere. Fr. 3 (Stob. Flor.

W-M.

Meiueke's emendation of the reading of
Vulg.

Gaisford,

or perhaps ]s (bf(v•, Ft. 8. i. I. ]a6tSe Archytas in Gaisford's Stobaeus App. p. 46. is probable. 2. Some case of cannot be read. 3.

Fr. 9.
5.

^:(
4.

.

^
.

10)

is

due to
Bergk,

AB

is

found

in a citation

from

W-M
An

suggests

\(.
cf Moeris,
:

p.

343

ev

\_

[ might also be

,

iv

'.
read.

. .

Fr. 10.
7.

4.

eVreXfti is

interlineation at the

10.
1 1

Perhaps
is

/,—

a variant for awTtkiis. end of the line is perhaps a mark of short quantity. unless it is Xaior [. possible or the division may be ]

].

Fr. 11. This fragment might well be from the top of Fr. i. a convenient combination. 2. Some form of the Doric future of pe» seems probable. or TovT [. is excluded by the accent. 4.

v.

[( would

be

[:
5.

[

Fr. 13.
there
is

A

dot between
. .

and

half-way up the letters
p[

is

probably accidental, since

no word

.

6.

The

preceding

is

against the division avUa

Fr. 20. 6. In the interlinear insertion the supposed may be a rough breathing belonging to the a below ; there would then be a dot between the breathing and [.

Fr. 22.
but

the form is comparable with e.g. Theocr. xxvi. 14 3. If opeir would also be a good Doric form (Fr. i. iv. 5 &c.).
2.

Fr. 23.

by the marginal

^ \[
]^\ W-M.
;

=

»,
is

;

This word, which
is

not found elsewhere,

is

explained

unsuitable.

1082.
Pr. 24.
4.
2.

NEW
cf.

An

ink-spot above the line before
is

unknown, but

.
]p tOos

CLASSICAL TEXTS
«

^
v.

may

represent a high stop.

Fr. 25.

1.

The
]

letter

before the lacuna
likely

may be

r;

it is

probably not
1.

Pr. 28.

2.

peBos

is

more

than

on account of
11.

3. 2 there is

Pr. 30. 2. At the left edge of the papyrus between which may belong to some insertion.

i

and

an ink-mark

Pr. 31. Cf. note on Fr.
Pr. 32.
affected
4.

2.

ii.

1-3.

The

acute accent on

by the

alternative termination.

[
W-M

is

singular

;

but

perhaps

it

has

been

Pr. 34. This fragment has a deeper margin at the top of the column than is found elsewhere in this papyrus. Frs. 34-41, 43-4, 59-61, 64-5 are much worm-eaten, % circumstance which dissociates them from Fr. i.
Pr. 37. The hand of this fragment is apparently identical with that of the rest, but the coronis is rather different from those in Fr. i. iv and Fr. 2. iii, and the paragraphus below 1. 3 is unusual in this papyrus.

Pr. 39. 7. Possibly the latter
Pr. 40. 3.

]\\was word
is

suggested by

on

the analogy of

8\\
is

in Fr.

i.

ii.

1 1.

originally written here

by mistake.

:

or

yf (^-).
letters.

This apparent insertion immediately below 1. 4 be lost after the , but there is no sign of other from the bottom of a column.
Pr. 41.
5.

A

letter

may

not easy to interpret. The fragment i^

Pr. 43.

2.

]ip(9er

perhaps ended the

line.

The

attribution of this fragment to

1082

is

somewhat

doubtful.

Pr. 46. 6. The interlineation could perhaps be read •.. from the and may be a high stop.
Pr. 47
is

The

first

dot

is

rather far

apparently from the top of a column.

Pr. 49. It is hardly certain that this fragment, which seems to be from the top of a column, belongs to the MS. ; the letters are slighdy smaller and the lines rather closer together than usual.
Prs. 68-69. These two small fragments are doubtfully assigned to the

MS.

6

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

1083.
Fr.
I
J

Satyric Drama.
13-1

8-5

X

cm.

Second century.
Plate III (Fr.
i).

The

following fragments of a Satyric

drama are

written in upright uncials

and of rather heavy and ungraceful which are slightly above the appearance. They may be assigned to the second century, a date to which the cursive notes, added in Frs. 15 and 19 by a hand perhaps not to be distinguished from that of the text, would also seem to point. The names of the dramatis personae in the margin of Fr. i are more clearly original but a different hand is probably to be discerned in one or two of the corrections, and may also well be responsible for some of the accents and other signs which occur. Punctuation, however, is to a large extent at any rate due to the first scribe. For this purpose both high and medial dots are used, though without any clear differentiation of Marginal paragraph! as usual denote alternations of dialogue whether values. a colon in Fr. i. i marks the division of a verse between two speakers is
size
;

medium

;

questionable

(cf.

note

ad

loc).

Both the nature of the plot and the authorship of the play are unfortunately
matters of uncertainty.
designated
in

Besides the chorus of
i.

Satyrs, which are

is

expressly

the adscript to Fr.
is

6,

two other characters
4. 6,

mentioned,
19-20, and

Oeneus, whose name
Phoenix,
in

entered in the margin as the speaker of Fr.

i.

who

is

twice referred to in the text (Frs.

just possible,

an explanatory note (Fr, 19. 8-9). It though not at all satisfactory, to read the name at Fr. i. 19 as Phineus instead of Oeneus, and Phineus and Phoenix would be a very natural But there seems to be nothing known of Phineus which suits the conjunction. situation of Fr. i, where the daughter of the person in question is being sought in marriage by the Satyric chorus, evidently as one among several suitors (cf. 1. 20}. Oeneus, on the other hand, is said to have promoted a contest for his daughter Deianira, in which the river-god Achelous was defeated by Heracles and with these two figures a chorus of Satyrs would be thoroughly in keeping. But who then is Phoenix ? Possibly he was introduced as another There was, indeed, a tradition unsuccessful aspirant to the maiden's hand. for according to the Epic poet Asius actually connecting Phoenix with Oeneus, and it {ap, Pausan. vii. 4. 1) Phoenix married Perimede, a daughter of Oeneus
; ;

14.3) as well as, probably, would perhaps be palaeographically

1083.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS
in this story

6i

would not be very far-fetched to suppose that
the loss of Deianira

he was consoled

for

by a marriage with her sister. That the drama from which these fragments are derived was of an early period is indicated as well by the considerable use of the choral element (cf. Frs. I and 18-20) as by the language, which is not inconsistent with a fifthcentury composition. Can the piece be attributed to one of the three great tragedians ? The style is not that of Aeschylus or of Euripides but to exclude Sophocles is not so easy. The anaphora of in Fr. i. 9 sqq. has a good
;

parallel
*

Soph. Fr. 855. '^-^. Moreover, Sophocles wrote a play called of which practically nothing is known, and an Oeneus has also been ', assigned to him on doubtful evidence. It is, then, conceivable that Sophocles was
in

Phoenix

'

'

the author.

On

the other hand the repetition of

some

lack of polish, and WilamoWitz

would

prefer, if

is to be made, to refer the piece to Ion of Chios. two plays named after Phoenix, the both of these a few short citations have been preserved, but their plots are quite obscure. It is nowhere stated that either of them was a Satyric drama, though

^
;

in Fr. i. 3 and 19 betrays any conjectural attribution That poet is credited with and a 6evrepos; from

'^

this silence
is

does not justify a contrary conclusion

the character of Caeneus,

who

said to have been turned

by

iPoseidon from a

woman
all

into a

man
there

(Nicander,
Satyric
not even

ap.

Anton. Lib.

17, Schol. Apoll.

Rhod.
is

i.

^,

&c.),

would lend
reserve
;

itself to
is

treatment.

The

suggestion, however,

made with

any certainty that the play was a product of the classical period. Of the order of the fragments but few indications are obtainable. Fr. i, in which Oeneus asks the Satyrs who they are and they give an account of themselves and their occupations, presumably stood early in the play, and on
that account as well as in consideration of
its

superior size takes precedence of

is for the most part Three in which a metre other than the iambic is more or less certainly to be recognized (Fr. 18 anapaestic, Frs. 19 and 20 metre doubtful) are placed together near the end. In a few other cases, to which attention is called in the notes, the grouping has been influenced by the rather hazardous

the

rest.

The

position assigned to the smaller pieces

arbitrary.

evidence of script or colour.

62

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

5
3*

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Fr. 2.

Plate III.

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1

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1083.

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Fr.
I.

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63

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Plate III.
.
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Kvp€iv

. . /09 •)(^\[
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[]

ye

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8'

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86,
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686,

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(^,

15

S>v

XPvCv^y ear

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Fr.

2.

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THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
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7.

Fr. 6.

Fr. 8.

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.

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][
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][
Fr. 10.

Fr. 9•

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[

]

.

.

[

1083.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS
Fr.
3.

65

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[2^

-]

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[^
6

— ]• —]

,][ [
tCvos T€

0[9

Fr. 4.

(.)

66
Fr. 12.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Fr. 13.

Fr, 14.

]'[
]/3oXi7ifXi»[

][.]6'/[

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1083.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS
Fr. 13.

67
Fr. 14,

Fr. 12.

'[aval

68
Fr. 20.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRT
Fr.

0,1.

Fr. 22.

];€[

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]/'€7[

]..

Fr. 23.

Fr. 24•

Fr. 25.

;[

>

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1

Fr. 26.

Fr. 27.

Fr. 28.

Fr. 29.

];[

'\[

]/[

Fr. 30•

Fr. 31•

Fr. 32.

Fr• 33•

]/[
]

1 1
1

Fr. 34•

Fr. 35•

Fr. 36.

Fr. 37•

6;5[

€[

](

].

..[

1083.

;

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Fr. 1. 1-2. In papyri of dramatic works a colon regularly denotes a change of Possibly then the colon speaker, but such a division is objectionable in a verse of this kind. a purpose for which it is sometimes employed, though here indicates a metrical division Above the colon is an oblique mark which is that explanation too is quite unconvincing. probably to be interpreted as a rather carelessly written accent on n. Either

implied by the following marks the transition to another metre.
or
is
'

8
:

[{ ?) Kvpeh some similar word
. .

.

8'

8(

?) Kvpe'iv

^^.
. .
.

WOUld be

^

intelligible,

epvfneiv
1.

A

small coronis below

2

But first I wish to know who ye are and from 2-20. {Oen.) Well, I will tell you. what stock ye are sprung ; for as yet I have not learnt. Chorus of Satyrs. Thou shalt hear all. As suitors are we come, sons of nymphs, and we are supplied with every fitting servants of Bacchus, fellow-dwellers with gods art we are equipped for the spear-fight, ours the contest in wrestling, in horse-racing, running, boxing, biting, ours twisting of testicles, we have the strains of music, ve have oracles fully known and not falsified, and medicines to put to the test, we know the meting Is our study fruitless? out of the skies, and dancing, and lore of the nether world. And it is thine to take of these whatever thou wilt, if thou givest thy daughter to me. Oeneus. There is indeed no fault with your stock ; but I wish first to see this man
;

who

is

coming

.'
.
.

16.

An
To
The

acute accent was mistakenly placed on the
the

of ^ewpta and not afterwards

cancelled.
17.

of this line there are slight remains of a marginal note. incomplete, but fairly secure, the stroke below it not being in the is clearly out of the question. right position for the tail of a
left

19.

Fr. 2. I. rubbed, is clear, and the

8
of
oti/evf is

.

^

is

unexampled but can hardly be avoided;

the

p,

though

is

nearly as certain.

It may be are printed exempli gratia. 3 sqq. Restorations suggested by in 1. 4 must be for j?, supposed that the flame of an altar or torch had been extinguished, or rj, since of course a star or the moon could not be said to imvuv not a proper name is rather expected here, but is not easily obtained; the first . There is no doubt about the accent. letter might be y or r, the second is possibly .
r;

W-M

^:
3.

[.

8.

eus[.]tas is

again

difiacult

;

the

may be

o.

papyrus and the comparative compactness of the Perhaps the writing suggest that this fragment came from the same column as Fr. 2. broken letters in Fr. 2. 9 and Fr. 3. i belong to one line, but I can find no satisfying
Fr.
of the

The appearance

combination.

Fr. 6. This and the following five fragments are grouped with Fr. 5 on account of a certain similarity of colour, which however may well be deceptive. 5. The letters of this line are rather smaller and closer to the line above than usual apparently the scribe wished to keep the end of the column even with its neighbours.
Fr. 7.
Fr. 8.
Fr. 9.
to
3.
6.
2.

The
To

vestige after

suits e.g. a or
is

.
verse.

enclosed between two dots

an interlineation referring to the next

the right of the circumflex accent there are

some

further

marks of ink

which

I

can attach no meaning.

A junction

between two

selides occurs in this fragment.

1083.
Pr.
11.
3.

NEW
W-M,
the

CLASSICAL TEXTS
left

71

The

accent

is

placed slightly to the

of the

v,

which therefore probably

formed a diphthong with a preceding vowel.
Fr. 13.
2.

TfJrpafDyets o)^ovs

Pr. 18, Pr. 20.
TovTi
2.

2.

]
:

comparing Eurip. Hel. 1039
line.

\

I.

Perhaps
or

.[
was perhaps

^.
'
measure.

end of the
.

]€

.

.;

cf.

Aristoph. Fr. 498 (Kock)

ervos

.

.

.

]

Fr.

20

like Fr. 19 is apparently in a lyric

IlvXiov.

Fr.

Fr. 30. This and the two following small pieces 34 is from the top of a column.

may well

be from the ends of columns.

1084.

Hellanicus, Atlantis

i.

'' ' ^ ^, /, ^ , ^ ^ ^, '
cm.

•5 X 7-9

Early second century.

Plate III.

The

origin of this fragment

is

demonstrated by a citation
Fr. ^6):
be

in the
kv

Venetian

Scholia on

Homer

tols

^

€4, (.

'Tpievs,

') , ' ",
( <^'

486

= Hellan.

ml

{sc.

Qioi<s

',

-

',

(

Aapbavos,

be

ovtl,

This passage alludes so patently to the text before us as to assure beyond any question an identification which the subject and dialect would of themselves naturally suggest. References to Hellanicus are not infrequent, but .quotations
of his ipsissima verba are extremely scarce and the present addition to them, though regrettably small, is very acceptable. Its handsome appearance indicates with sufficient clearness that this manuscript contained the Atlantis itself, and not merely some commentary or grammatical treatise in which the Atlantis was excerpted. The rather narrow column is written in a round upright hand very similar to that of 844, though still more calligraphic. Of the two 1084 is perhaps slightly the older but they no doubt belong to approximately the same period, probably the earlier part of the second century. Dots in the high and middle position, as well as
;
;

paragraph!, are used for purposes of punctuation, the medial point

a briefer pause

(1.

15).

Short lines are

filled

marking up by small angular signs turned in

the opposite direction to that in which they are usually found.

72
Col.
.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
i.

]

vt[.

5

€ ' \[9 €\'
ii.

Col.

€v

8e

•[ [
[

> ^'\
XaLvoL Se

AvKos

8' €
70€

[[9 '
[€
< <

15

[€

2
toe]vv.

€] ' € [
<

€v
.

Se

[€]9

.

.

2. The sentence may be restored Matat 8e Zevs This simple construction, as Wilamowitz remarks, is better suited to the style than a sentence containing a genitive such as Cf. Apollodor. iii. lO. 2. I

an Epic form which is out of place here ; aneei or is expected. Hom. ff. Herm. 292 vU, 446 Eurip. J^^s, 217 ye The Spelling is a common error which the grammarians try to defend, e. g. Eustath. p. "781. 1 1 ro Se ye eVn* (Hesiod, Opera 373) °^ ^'^ '''"^ ^ ^^' iv toIs and Helladius, ap. Photius, Bt'iL p. 535. 6, where the derivation from is advanced, as in the text here
is

.

3""4•

' ,
Cf.

',

.
\

,
:

]^
.
.

.

.

8

Xeyovaiv,
cf.

olovf).

first

Choerob. in Cramer, Anecd, Oxon. ii. p. 271. in the present passage seems at sight guaranteed by the following sentence but may well be a gloss which has become incorporated into the text. As an interpretation it is no happier than its rivals, for should have an active, not a passive sense.
;
.
. .

'
10.

,

( '• ' , ([ ;
''"'7''

,

^3~I5• Cf. Apollodor.

.

iii.

I.

3

^, (

Avkos kyiviTo, ov

iv

:

1085.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS

73

1085.

Pancrates, Hadrian and
19-6

Antinoiis.

X

14-2

It is related by Athenaeus (xv. 677 d-f) that Pancrates, an Alexandrian poet and an acquaintance of his own bv suggested to the Emperor Hadrian when at Alexandria that a certain variety of lotus resembling the rose should be called after Antinoiis, saying that it had sprung from the blood of a famous lion \4ovtos) which had been killed by Hadrian in the neighbourhood of the city. This fearsome beast, we are told, had long ranged over Libya and terrorized the inhabitants. The emperor was so pleased with the idea that he rewarded its originator with free maintenance at the Museum. Athenaeus proceeds to quote from the poem of Pancrates four not inelegant hexameter lines in which the lotus of Antinoiis was referred to

(

(,
cm.

Second century.

^ €),
'
'

(

'

Pancrates, therefore, embodied his idea in a poem which, it may be presumed, was recited to the emperor. Now the fragment of which the text follows below describes in epic style a great lion hunt the heroes of which were Hadrian and Antinoiis. The inference is obvious, and will hardly be called in
question.

4 4€ € .
'

ipTTvXkov, k^vKov

rjb^

re xekLbovioio

pobov kapivoiaiv

yap

avOos

the

inspired Pancrates; and none other than that from which Athenaeus quotes. further sample of that poem is an interesting acquisition, although its recovery is not likely to add to the literary reputation of Pancrates. His versification is sufficiently good The but his style is diffuse and turgid.

Here evidently we have the episode which

poem

is

A

;

(11. 10-25) is a laboured performance, exaggerated but undistinguished either by force or originality. It will be felt that the rather faint praise bestowed upon his contemporary by Athenaeus

long description of the infuriated lion

was the utmost that he deserved. The sheet upon which the verses are inscribed had been used as the cover of a glass bottle, about the mouth of which it was found wrapped. They are written in an upright and rather small cursive hand which does not look subsequent to the latter part of the second century, and can therefore be removed by but few stages from the author's autograph. Marks of elision and stops in the high position were added by the original scribe.

74

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Col.
i.

About 27

lines lost.

]

5

] 8[\ ^ ^ €€9 /[] [] €€[] " € ? ? '?€
Col.
ii.

'

oy

[.

.

.

.]ooy

[]/

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6/

8'

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e|

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€9
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ovTaaev

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[€.

[\-^ € []€ €[ ]' [] €?
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[? ]€[?] ' ?
15

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[']\'\

[]
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[.

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2

[ [€€€ [] ][] ? [ [ [? [] € €€0' € [' [ €• [?] ? ^ [?
[

]?'

[€

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rjv


i\rr

€ ?

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.

['\?• € [? ]€

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€?

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[?
25

[]? [][] ?€€[]€ € ? [] [
67

€]

[\

[ [?
]9[

re

[

€[

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[€?

1085.
av^eviov9
3o

NEW
.

CLASSICAL TEXTS.

75

35

[

[ ]] [€ / ]€ [ 7€[ \€ ^ €[€ ]
^Oovos
[

[
[

]

.

]

€v

]

]/€9
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7/009
.

4

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[

neaev

eais

f[.

.

.

'^^

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•][

Col.

iii.

One

line lost.

a-

•]

[

Unplaced fragment.

]«r

.

[

and swifter than the horse of Adrastus which once saved the king as ii. 1-25. Such was the steed whereon Antinoiis sat in wait for the he fled ... in the battle-throng. deadly lion, holding in his left hand the bridle-rein and in his right a spear shod with adamant. First Hadrian hurling his brass-fitted spear wounded the beast but slew him not, for of purpose he missed the mark, wishing to test to the full the sureness of aim of beauteous Antinoiis, son of the Argus-slayer. Stricken, the beast was yet more aroused, and tore up in his wrath the rough ground with his paws, and the dust rising in a cloud dimmed the light of the sun ; he raged even as the wave of the surging sea when Zephyrus [Straight] he rushed upon them both, scourging is stirred forth after the wind of Strymon. while his eyes, beneath his brows, flashed dreadful with his tail his haunches and sides
' .

.

.

.

.

.

fire

;

and from

his ravening

jaws the foam showered

to the earth as his teeth

gnashed

76
Avithin.
it

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
On
his

mighty head and shaggy neck the hair stood bristling; on his other limbs and on his back ... it was like whetted spear-points. In such wise he came against the glorious god and upon Antinoiis, like Typhoeus of old against Zeus,

was bushy

as trees,

slayer of giants.'

Arion in the expedition of the Seven Se buamaev In 1. 2 ], which is quite clear, is no doubt the termination of an Homer 346-'7. then remains indefinite, but this causes no difficulty adverb qualifying in the Ih'ad {n 331, 713, 789, in view of the recurrence of the phrase 422) and the familiarity of the allusion. The first a of has been converted apparently from an e, i. e. the scribe at first wrote unelided. which was Suggested by W-M, is a new compound. 3. is very doubtful ; the remains of the initial letter suggest rather . 7. cf. Kaibel, falser. Gr. ltd. 978 (a), where Antinoiis is described as g. i/e'os ^eoy In a coin struck at Bithynium in his honour Hermes is figured on the
ii.

1-2. Adrastus

against

Thebes

;

.
cf.

was saved

by

his
iii.

horse
7

e. g.

Apollodor.

6.

"8

,

\. ^^ ) (
reverse (Eckhel,
10. 12.
vi. p.

[ []€/ //.
7)[],
For

:

532).
:

cf.

the passage quoted from Hesiod, Scuf. in the note
cf.

(W—
:

Q. Smyrn.
605.

xi.

248

'

(5

2) €€'
11.

on

15-17.

13.

?

ore

cf

Homer

suitable, but that word cannot be read. I5~I7• Cf. Homer /xaanerat, whence 170 oipfj 8e nXevpas T€ ' is adopted in 1. 16, and Hesiod, Scu/. 430—1 buvbv re ovpfj perhaps refers to the belief that the lion's tail carried a sting; cf. Etym. Gud. 36. 13 yap {sc. 6 eVi rrj At the end of 1. 1 6 propOSeS which is quite possible. is followed by a small vestige which only shows that the next letter was 17.

5• Some

adverb such as

would be

,
by

\ -.

? 8.

€€?
W-M

/)

,
e. g.

)

{[,

-

a rather tall one, e. g. or and better taken adverbially than as an adjecdve.

,

[€(( (W-M)

Homer 168 [e|awet], which waS suggested can of course be replaced by several other words, e. g. es or [aiav at the end of this verse is not very satisfactory, and it is likely enough that the verb stood here, but 6;^[ei;ei' is unsuitable. is The initial e is hardly to be avoided, and
18-19. Cf.

W-M,

.

gives the requisite sense,

bfivov is

thus excluded.
2 2.

23.
JI. Apoll.

[]'7;
64

[] W-M.
.
. :

. 8[
is

may also be ], i. e. some epithet of (\€, would be Weak and hardly sufficient for the lacuna,
.

]

[(](
is

[€\].
(Callim.

\],

25.

26.
suitable
;

'[][] and [] were proposed by W-M; (([] doubt , and
there

eyeipeiv) is also Unlikely.

the lacuna

too small for

hence
is

it

seems

likely, as

unexampled

perfect form,

'[}?
vincing.
28.

27. It

33.

[[
[
:

uncertain

who

'
is
is

little

W-M
;

/os,

is very about the first the preceding suggests, that Pancrates ventured on an otherwise besides having a short v, is adjectival.

the subject here.

suits the vestiges at all well

The supposed

[]

Neither
or

[]

nor

[].

for -0010 is possible, but this too

nor uncon-

before the lacuna might be

W-M.
or

,

and

][ can be ][.

or

[.

1085.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS
1.

77

Unplaced fragment.
doubtful.

The

third letter in

i

is

clearly

not
1.

cannot well be placed at the beginning of

11.

19-20.

In

2 the

, and so this small piece mark of elision is very

1086.

Scholia on
23-2

Iliad

ii.

X 41 cm.

First century b. c.

This considerable fragment of a commentary on the second Book of the Iliad is written in a sloping semi-cursive hand which may be assigned to about the middle of the first century B. c. Certain Ptolemaic characteristics are evident,
but these are not so marked as to r\ to the succeeding letter; render probable a date prior to the first century. Palaeographical material for some resemblances may, however, be found that period is still very scanty between the present script and 236 {a)-{c) (P. Oxy. II, Plate V) which are dated
e.g. the linking of
;

in the reign of

same type

earlier specimen of the Demosth. Ep. 3 {Classical Texts The verso of 1086 contains a series of cf. also 1087. in the B. M., Plate III) A remarkable feature of early first-century A. D. hand. medical receipts in an breadth of the columns, which measured about 16 cm. the recto is the great

Ptolemy Auletes.
;

A

probably rather

is

to be seen in P. Brit. Mus. 133 of

across.

The
is

letters are usually rather

small, but there

is

much

unevenness,

due partly to a tendency to enlarge
the scribe
letter,
is

initials

of clauses and even of words, which
;

rather inclined to separate from each other

is

often a conspicuous

appears.

accent

commonly of the uncial form, but the cursive h-shaped character also The head of a final frequently slopes upwards above the line. An and a mark of short quantity are once used (1. 49). No stops occur,

pauses in the sense being marked by blank spaces which are here and there accompanied by marginal paragraphs Shorter blanks, as has been said, are sometimes allowed after individual words when there is no real pause an attempt
;

has been made

in the transcript to indicate the

more noticeable

divisions,

but

it

Several of the conventional is impossible accurately to reproduce the original. infrequently found in works of this kind are employed cf. e. g. abbreviations not
663, 856, and the Berlin Didymus.

-=, =

in the margin and which stands for the p. A monogram of considered to be of special and calls attention to passages stands for Such corrections as have been introduced into the text are probably by value. the original scribe, who, however, has not succeeded in eliminating all the errors.

\=

, , , /=
;

y =

=

€',

etz/at,

while

Ttpo's

is

represented by a

semicircle

{=

-n)

enclosing a short

vertical stroke

;

78
For
the

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
history of

Aristarchean tradition, this

the Homeric scholia, and more especially of the new commentary is of no little interest and importance.

Exegesis plays a considerable part, the less obvious Its scope is comprehensive. words and phrases being briefly explained more or less in the style of the Certain coincidences with those Scholia Minora or the Lexicon of Apollonius. two authorities are pointed out in the notes appended below. Geographical

and mythological references are also elucidated;
class of

cf. e.g. 11.

1-9, 49-51.

Another
Thirdly,

comments

deals with differences of reading, e.g.

11.

26-7, 119.

the critical signs of Aristarchus are frequently prefixed to the lemmata and their

grounds are explained. This is the feature that gives the treatise its significance. As is well known, our knowledge of the work of Aristarchus is largely derived and Didymus, from the extracts from Aristonicus, Ilepi rStv

which have been incorporated together with of the Iliad. But the papyrus the signs themselves in the Venetian Codex must on account of its date be independent alike of Aristonicus and Didymus, who both flourished under Augustus. In it, therefore, the tradition of Aristarchus The anonymous commentator is to be regarded is carried a stage further back. as a representative of the Aristarchean school, and upon such writings as this, along with those of the great critic himself, the work of Aristonicus may be taken to have been based. Speculation concerning the author's identity is not likely to be profitable. The most obvious name perhaps is Ammonius, who was probably But the field is too the successor of Aristarchus at the Alexandrian library. large. Suidas puts the number of the grammarians who were disciples of and there are several even among Aristarchus at about forty {s.v. of whom might have been the author. those who are known to us any one certain similarity in 11. 2-3 to a passage of Strabo provides no trustworthy clue
riepl TTJs

^?,

,

A

),

A

cf.

the note

ad loc.
see the notes on are often in close agreement But the two authorities by no means coincide. An
;

The papyrus and Aristonicus
11,

II, 29, 63-7, 98, lao-i.

interesting passage of some length (11. 11-18), describing Aristarchus' defence of the poet against the criticism of Praxiphanes, does not here come into account, since the reference is to the Odyssey^ not the Iliad^ and is only brought in by

way

of illustrating a principle. Apart from that, however, Aristarchean signs and their explanations which are unrecorded in Venetus A occur in the papyrus, and vice versa cf. 11. 46-7, 54-5, 86-7, 93-4, 107, 114-16, 120-1, and the notes. In one place (1. 83) Ven. A has the but lacks the explanatory scholium, which is supplied by the papyrus. Similar discrepancies have been observed in some other papyri (445, P. Rylands 51, P. Brit. Mus. 128, and the Hawara papyrus, on which cf. the notes below) with regard to the use of the critical
:

^

1086.
signs,

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS

79

which tend to be more frequent in the mediaeval MS. In the present however, the advantage is rather the other way, and it is plain that Ven. is not exhaustive. The Aristarchean seems to have been thinned down by a process of eclecticism. Its details would appeal differently to different minds, and what might be rejected as of comparative unihiportance by
case,

A

one

critic

would be retained by another.

Some

allowance must also be

made

for accidental omissions.

The
lends no

presence of this large 'Aristarchean strain in so early a text naturally little weight to the other elements in it which have less definite

authority, though

how

far these

Aristarchus
attention

of course open to question. be found in the various extant sources ;
is

elements are likely to represent the teaching of To some extent they are already to new views and explanations to which
11.

may be

called are
is

recorded in
also

due to the textual evidence of the papyrus, although the presence of Aristarchean symbols does not at all necessarily imply an Aristarchean text. This is evident from e.g. the Bodleian papyrus from Hawara (2nd cent.), in which not only diacritical signs but also occasional Aristarchean variants are entered cf. Ludwich, Homervttlgata, pp. 42 sqq. On the other hand the text of that papyrus did not coincide with the vulgate, to which reference is sometimes made,^ and does embody certain readings of Aristarchus. As much may be expected of 108, in spite of the fact that in two passages (11. 75 and 83) it diverges from the Aristarchean reading. Several agreements are noticeable between the lemmata here and the exceptionally well written Hawara papyrus; cf. notes on 11. 62, ,, Other lections of y^, 75. interest occur at 11. 26-7, 38, 61, and 119 the last named passage mentions the
consideration
; ;

A measure of

^-6, 42-3, 49-51, 58-60, 75-7.

otherwise unrecorded variant 'Avbeipoio for in 825. In supplementing the large lacunae of Cols, i and iii, the number of letters lost has been estimated on the basis of the passages containing citations, where

the extent of the loss
in

is

exactly determined,

i.e. in

Col.

i,

11.

19, 28,

and

34,
is

and

Col.

iii, 11.

97 and 102.

No more
iii,

than an approximate accuracy

often

obtainable, especially in Col.
well as variations of spacing
either
^

where inequalities

in the length of the line as
;

and script have to be reckoned with a few letters above or below the number adopted would here be generally admissible.
adscript at
1.

The

769

e. g.

should be read

{)

fefrrepos

Cf. 445, 685.

,

not

. . as given

by Savce
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opei were not a restoration, that Strabo was acquainted with coincidence, even if eV If he were here utilizing any Homeric commentary, his source might present scholia. the well be the often quoted work of ApoUodorus on B, which was not concerned with textual

criticism.

5-6. (e'rat) in I. 6 appears to imply that the construction of 1. 5 was continued and But the shadiness of the Peneus can that therefore alternative reasons were proposed. nothing to do with the phenomenon referred to in 11. 3-4, and hence it is probable, have as Mr. Allen suggests, that 11. 5-7 are concerned with the supposed derivation of the Peneus from the Styx (1. 755), and the restoration proceeds on that hypothesis. Cf. 841. cf. the passage from Strabo cited in the note on 1. 3. For Frs. 129-31. 4, Schol. At the end of 1. 6 the reading of the papyrus gives no sense, and I have adopted an

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The sign is afiixed because he has dealt first with what comes second. This The latter is surprised the basis of Aristarchus' defence of the poet against Praxiphanes. at Odysseus because in his soothing intercourse with his mother he asked only at the end about Telemachus and Penelope, since he wishes above all else to hear what has happened
' . .

-8.

But Anticleia, he says, with great intelligence at once proceeds to this very Aristarchus therefore points out that . Anticleia. The passage is marked with a sign because it is the peculiar habit of the poet to deal first in this way vith what is secondary.'
in his absence.
subject.

II,
bevTtpov
1

Line 763 has a diple in Ven. A, the scholiast similarly remarking

The passage of the is in the main due to W-M. 164-203, where Anticleia deals with the questions of Odysseus in There is no parallel to this note in the the inverse order to that in which they are put. tos extant scholia on the Ih'ad, but points of contact occur in Schol. 177 el8o)s 6
1-18.

The

.
is

The

diple

is

absent in the

Hawara papyrus.

restoration of these lines

Odj'ssey referred to

fKvpas

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Praxiphanes is presumably the Peripatetic philosopher, whose name has recently occurred in a contemporary Delian inscription; cf. Wilhelm, Jahresh. d. Ost. Arch. Inst. 1905, pp. 1-5, Cronert, Kolotes und Menedemos, pp. 69-74, 179. He was a pupil of Theophrastus, and wrote a dialogue ilfpt in which criticism of the kind here mentioned may well have been incorporated. The Praxiphanes cited in the scholia on Oed. Col. 900 is probably identical. It was natural to give credit for to Anticleia as the daughter of Autolycus. Lines 16-17 St' remain
nep\

. :
pvovs
nfp\

€.

,

.

.

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obscure.

19-20.
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fi

The

restoration

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at this period
;

W-M.
cf.

was

particularly

,
2

21—2. Restored by
22—3. Cf. Scholl.

26-7.

. The A

supplement was suggested by
note on the
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1088, and

cf. Schol. Schol. Did. has

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on

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which is preferred by most modern editors, is found in the Bodleian Hawara* papyrus and two other MSS., besides Eustath. and Steph. Byz., and is confirmed, as Mr. Allen remarks, by the occurrence of oi in Inscr. Gr. ix. 2. 205 Dittenberger, Syil 425. Schol. A has niepifi in the note on was suggested by W-M. The beginning of the 383. line, he thinks, contained a reference to the service of Apollo to Admetus ; cf. Schol. Did. and Schol. A Perhaps, however, there was merely 3^3• some phrase like So we should read or So the best copies '. 27. The diple is prefixed to the lemma; cf. 11. 54, 61-2, &c. Ven. A also has a
iJiepij]

comment.

the

(, common
name

W-M.
Uiepirj, is

reading, and

on which the extant scholia retained by Leaf, but

), make

no

'
29.

\[
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=

.,

'

dipl^ here^

W— .

Cf. Schol.

A

on

ev

((,

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(. (,
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("
Schol.

30-1. This curious explanation that the horses' heads were branded
TO bopv, 6 yap dneiv
1.

\

\

(

supplement in

31 32. Cf. Schol.

is

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Cf. Eustath.

"Apeos

iv Something of the Same is an intractable termination. was no doubt said in the papyrus, but The may be y, e, or . Perhaps, as suggests, doubtful should be read. to on, which, however, is hardly necessary. At the end of the line he would alter 222-3. 33-4. The quotation is from re

,
:

W-M.

.

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is

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which compares Schol. Nicander, Ther. 597). In the does not seem to have been cancelled, and the two readings following lemma the a of and ev were therefore intended to stand side by side as variants, fv is the usual lection, but is found in several MSS. 40. The restoration is due to W-M. d en\ yrjv vepoiTO 42—3. Cf. Schol. Did. The vieW that ot Se means the horses of Achilles (1. 770) is remarkable. Other commentators take
for
11.

W-M

780-5 more

parenthetical

, (€€
"EXXiji/es•,

naturally as referring to the Hellenic host in general;

and Eustath.
I

(\

. ,

.

cf.

Schol. Did.

fira

\

'•
'

The

can find no other instance of the word. is a well represented variant. SO ABF, &c., Eustath. 44. e in the papyrus is coarsely written, but the letter is sufficiently clear. (AB, &c., edd.) seems more probable than which is found in 45.
' ;
:

;

€€

apparently means

is

several

Eustath. in 46-7. These notes do not appear in the extant scholia, nor is there any Ven. or apparently P. Hawara at 1. 782. Cf., however, Schol. on *• 603 ^ig, 3^5) ^C., Apollon, Lex. is an error, and 47~8. Cf. Schol. the accusative is unexpected when the dative and genitive stand in the Homeric text. in 1. 782, and perhaps that variant is reflected But the Hawara papyrus has here also. in the same sense as Schol. 49-51. Our commentator evidently interpreted The location of Arima in Pisidia is new ; Schol. and Eustath. place it in Cilicia, others in Mysia, Lydia, or Syria. For the reference to Etna and Pindar cf. Eustath. (^SC. . The quotation . is also found in Strabo, p. 627 (= Pindar, Fr. 92). lav refers to vtan-epoi', it is unnecessary to write The two short strokes after in 1. 50 were apparently added for the purpose of filling up the line. At the beginning of this line the letters seem to have been divided from at on account of a flaw in the papyrus. was recognized 54-5. ' The diplS marlts the absence of the preposition by W-M. There is no dipl6 nor accompanying note in Ven. A, but the diple is found here in the Hawara papyrus. or needs alteration. 56. Either 58-60. This note referring the mission of Iris to the time of * the dream (b i sqq.)

MSS. and

A

€,

A

^

]^ '

[]

( (,
A
.

([],

.

( (.
\

€€.

) .
.

.

.

.

.

(

.'

.

.

(^

'

=

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
seems to be quite novel. L. 58 needs correction, for the second on is plainly superfluous, or and avT€ must be meant for 6o-I. So Schol. Did. 6i. An obelus, which on the analogy of the succeeding verses is expected before The papyrus supports the better tradition in reading fie and not has been omitted. vet is an Attic spelling. (Eustath. and a number of MSS.).

«,

62.
really

yepovTos

:
:

'. .
But
it

SO the
e.

avaicros

Hawara papyrus 20 (sccond Cent.) and one
;

is the accepted form. or two mediaeval MSS.

The

final

is

more like an Line 794 a mere oversight in P. Hawara, and
;

8(
cf.
1.

92.

is

has been Omitted, possibly by noticeable that this verse only of 791-5 is obelized

the omission here
It

may be
is

from the
P.
:

text
(e).

of Aristarchus.

taken to indicate that the line was absent found accompanied by an additional verse in

Hibeh 19

so

20

(which no doubt also had

MS.
Harl.

in the library of "Victor
1

Emmanuel

at

Rome, and one
(cf.

^

later in the verse), the ninth-century

77 1, which also agrees in the reading SO the Hawara papyrus, v. 1. A^, 63.
: '

or two later copies, including note on 11. 26-7). and many other MSS.

Aristarchus athetizes these lines on the ground, first, that when Iris is sent by never made to resemble some one else, but always appears in her own person. Secondly, her pretence is unconvincing ; for if Iris is brought in merely for the purpose of announcing their approach, Polites could easily have done this ; if, however, it is in order to make the Trojans go out when they were afraid to do so, then let Iris speak as the messenger of Zeus. It is also clear that, when Homer makes one person resemble another, he also puts in their mouth the appropriate language. Now the commencement is not like He says " Old man, interminable words are ever pleasant Polites, but goes beyond him. If Iris is the speaker, this is appropriate, but if the son is addressing his father, to thee ". for he ought to say, "My father." And "interminable words are it is inappropriate; pleasant" (that is, continuous, for to determine is to separate) is also unlike Polites addressing his father (for he should speak with deference) but is more like Iris.'

63-73.
is

Zeus she

The

adverse criticism of Aristarchus on

where the same objections are put rather more concisely,
fl

(inep

.

which do not support the argument of Aristarchus, but rather the opposite view, have no counterpart in The concluding sentence corresponds to 11. 84 sqq. below. the papyrus. in 1. 65 is inapposite, since the speech of Iris is not an ' answer ', and
It is

(.
f

.

ener^ptt.

€ '\ :
tl

.

yap
utols

5e (vfKa

", \

8e

W-M's

!
'

to be observed that the

emendation

8e oi Schol. Did. 71—2. Cf. e.g. Schol. cf Apollon. Lex. A similar idea was probably intended to be conveyed by are faint, and it might be supposed The letters of that they had been partially erased ; this, however, would imply that was taken for a predicate, words are inseparable from you,' which is not a likely interpretation. In the

\

' , ; 8, . 8.
.
is clearly

, ,€« €.8, 8 ( ) ", "
11.

791-5 was already known from Schol, A,

",,
f8ei

6

anoXmeiv

fis

?

irpos

Se

words

eWi

.

.

.

an improvement.

1086.
latter part

NEW
is

CLASSICAL TEXTS
and perhaps
eV most MSS.
. .

97
.

of

1.

72 some emendation

necessary,

toiKev

should be

rejected, as

W-M

would
'.

prefer.

73. &s re

SO the

combination of the two readings, re be a corruption of

[
:

(sic) Apollon. Lex. : so Schol. Did. ; reference is to A 349, 8o. p{ev) the ordinary view of Homeric editors (e.g. Ludwich, Allen) that the 75. is supported by a partially effaced note in reading of Aristarchus in this passage was (so probably, as in several MSS., not the Hawara papyrus beginning It may nevertheless be questioned whether the passage in Schol. relating to the

\.
'

Hawara papyrus; ? re «.

74.

The

/

[?

re

^

20

has an unmetrical
1

in P.

Hibeh

9

is

likely to

8

).

Aristarchean reading has been correctly interpreted.
follows
'.

'

and the combination is not in the original text, but an editorial insertion confirmed by the comparison of 184, which with Dindorf's reading loses I venture to suggest that the note should stand unaltered either in the form
;

or

,
'

5
tern

, ^ ,
^\\){)
A

8, ^

,

This

is

given in Dindorf's edition as

ev toIs

(

\

1

84).

But

after

seems
point.

.

between Schol. A and the Hawara papyrus. in the lemma owing to an inadvertence. the former transposed pev and But it should be observed that the note in the papyrus is incomplete ; it was continued in a second line, which may have modified in some way the statement of the first. IS also found in the text of the Hawara papyrus as well as in AB and the is superscribed in A and is otherwise well majority of MSS., Hdn., Eustath. supported. In Schol. A was written. 75-7. The commentator's opinion is directly opposed to that of Leaf, who thinks (note ad loc) that 798 is rather suited to a human warrior than to a goddess '. y]{ap) e[rSe ][' was Suggested by W-M. I have been much inclined to 79. assign the first of the unplaced fragments to this position^ reading TroVe >() «toe but the difiiculty then is, without assuming some corruption, to find a suitable combination with what follows. To add \aov would make the line too long. 80. A synonym of apparently followed ov, though the sense would be complete
17

^.
iv

.

iv

4, € '

its

'

\. \. If this is right, there will be a conflict A possible explanation is that the copyist of
;

(

;

. 6\

\

\,

without further addition. 81-2. The supplements only aim at giving the general sense, Avhich is evident. so MSS. (including 20), with the exception of the late Ambrosianus 83. a reading also inserted as a v. 1. in A, with the note 35, which gives

\

supports the usual inference that
TO

(.
there

', . (
"
is
:

, ^, ,
the Supplement
is
;
.

&

Aristarchus

is

not here directly named, but analogy strongly

,
A
'

.

\

.
:

was

:

his reading. derived from 1. 55

^,
;

cf.

Eustath.

and Schol. Did.

diple

is

inserted against the verse in
VV.

as well as in the

Hawara papyrus, but

',
,

no corresponding note. so most MSS. 84. Ue Se

11.

2)€

ye, 2)Se Ti.

86-7. TovTo preceding
is

[]$

[

seems to be a paraphrase of SSe and the word should then be a verb meaning I command ', but neither nor suitable, and a future would be out of place. The remains suggest not and is therefore improbable, in 1. 86 may be followed by any round letter,

[]

.

.

7[]

,

,

U

;

98
Line 802 in
also a diplS in P.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
A
has a diple prefixed with the note on nepiaaevei
6 Be

^!

Hawara.

88.

there

€€ The
:

The obvious [e]i'e/f6i' is very dubious, but I can find may be no loss before the traces of the supposed first v.
Or

8g.

90. hv

'
1.

92.

('

807

has a dipl6 against 93-4• erepov p{ev) y{ap) and enos olov were restored by W-M. eVn (so too P. Hawara) with the accompanying scholium on led to the interpolation of 11. 791-5). (i. e. a misunderstanding of

. . ' . '^
(
lost
TTJs

[,
bu&nap
cf.
:

nothing more appropriate;

not note probably referred to noXvcmfpeav;
Schol. Did.
. . .

The lemma

^. , \( ' .
cf.

[.

Schol. Did.

nep

hv

has dropped out.

Cf. Schol. Did.

^ ,
A

;

there

is

in\

(.

those proposed by W-M. hardly necessary to suppose an fim must have been preceded by some word meaning ' he recognized her or omission, * (W-M) or but neither of these will fit the she was recognized ', e.g. e| and is of course to be supplied from the preayvouadai vestiges, is found in late prose (e. g. that of Philodemus ceding sentence. The vulgar spelling cf. Cronert, Mem. Gr. Hercul. p. 140) and in papyri of the Roman age (e.g. B. G. U.

95-7•
in

The supplements at the ends of 11. 95-6 are is a much compressed phrase, but it is 1. 95

=

,
,
'

•€, '

,
(^(,

A

'

8\

423•

3. 7)•

For the diplS cf. 1. 54, &c. ; but the decipherment is uncertam and the vestige before The diple is also found in Ven. and the lacuna would also be consistent with a P. Hawara. cf. Schol. waS Suggested by ; 98. and the similar remark on the parallel
97.

.

58 Herodorus and Apion. 99—100. The restorations, which are due of 1. 100 cf. ApoUon. Lex.
tense in

,
able,

\-] '

passage

W-M ,. (€
to

A

( »
?« ^[\
that the present

Eustathius attributes this note to
are

W-M,

'

made exempli gratia.
nr

.

consistent with the vestiges, but they are extremely slight.

The remark

[
For

that
is

1. 811 proves the poet to have been an eyewitness of what he describes is remarkthough not cogent, for the description might depend on hearsay evidence ; it would have been more exact to say a contemporary '. loi. The quotation is from 41. 8e Strabo, p. 573 103—4. Cf. e.g. Schol. A

. , ..
elvai

^,
seems

105.

[6!

6.
e.g.

It

.
is

Eustath.

Cf. Apollon.

adopted from Schol. Lex. S. V.
as

, ' (,
\

,

:
.
.

A

'

.

likely,

W-M

suggests,

that

was followed by an example,

A

lacks the

..'
16, the verse cited for

610. 107. Restored by

W-M.

There is no comparison in the next

109—14. Schol.

A

has

'

line,

nor corresponding note in A, though at the remark is made

yap

yfviK&v

,

.' ,'
.
Hawara

Similarly
iv

W-M. The meaning clearly is that the two lines of Alcaeus, which are not elsewhere extant, combined the alternative explanations of given above, expresses t6 and the second verse, as indicates, was more or less equivalent to proposes after
^^°^

ori

: •[ ? . ^^
I •

\ ,. m ,. . € {[ 8 ,
avu€xe7s
TOii

interpretation

exactness.

the papyrus,—where the restoration of course Eustath. is nearer rhv
: .

.

^
The
is

?

1086.

NEW
fj

CLASSICAL TEXTS

eVepye/ay .

6

\
is
. .

third of these explanations

. 8\

iv

6

III.

" ^"^^:

is from 185. ^^^ supplement of

4-6•
IS
1.

Line 819
is

marked with a

Alveias

\

Ihe papyrus

more

6
cf.

&>v

explicit;

Eustath.

-:
<{),.
at

, , ^ : :, . ^
the
first
,

more akin than

? , ,.
. .

99
}
eV

to the

second
to n.pt-

makes no pretence
6 alSKoi

,

tU

-

6€\
'

W-M
701)

diple in Ven. A, with the not very illuminating note

etf
1.

()<6.;
;

\

66

Spa

an

easier

emendation than

caop^v In P. Hawara
II.

,
the diplS
:

avijp

\

(

is

819
. .

is

the papyrus is defective. The rest of the scholium relates to the construction of It is noticeable that there is no further remark .^ on 1.
^
'"'"'

at

820

absent at

.

819 sqq.
;

Tw-'Vr''^^"^'^"'"
KoXou/xer,

117. For and Plutarch,

,
^

'^^^^ variant

u^^' Strabo, p. 602

though the precise wording is and it is therefore inadmissible to restore [Sti] the rather wide' space after [. .^ may be partly due to the junction of two selides here. To read would make 1. 119 abnormally short. The long blank interval in 1. 121 indicates that the sentence was complete at that point.

,
•^
^, Schol.
IS

jrepl At the beginning of the line e'v be a possible reading, but the vestiges are too slight for any confidence. 1 19-21. A dipia is prefixed to 1. 827 in A (so too P. Hawara), the note being

\ '- ( - ,. ':
^^^ supplement
cf.

820
1.

A

'The sequence has a diple and the
substantially that

the

end of

116

(W-M)
'

Schol.
ii.

Be

ViL Horn.
for

20

is

\
(

els

' \^/ \ ,
.

more elaborate
.

:

.'

105).

' .
,

6

",?? ', not otherwise recorded.
m'aroi/
.

, ,.'
Cf.

is

vpus

Demetrius op.

.

.

<[
'\

^
would
Sti oi
1 1

,
6
'*

yovv

,

Sti

Similar interpretation was evidently given in the papyrus, uncertain. There is no trace of writing between ]v and

(\],

;

? 5, \
'

\

,

6:

6

,
oi

( .^.
?•
(
'

).

?\]

.

Fr.

1.

See note on

1.

79.

2

TOO

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
1087.

Scholia on
24-3

Iliad vn.
Late
first

X

17-1

cm.

century

b.c.

Plate IV.

The
chus,

following text belongs like 1086 to an elaborate

Homeric commentary,

but one of a rather different order.

1086

is

a product of the school of Aristar-

and is a more or less direct exposition of his teaching. 1087 on the other hand shovs but the slightest traces of the Aristarchean tradition, which is perhaps to be recognized in no more than a single passage (11. 85-6, note). No references occur to the and it is significant that one of the citations from Homer contains a reading of Aristophanes and Zenodotus (11. 32-3). Another feature of these scholia, which in 1086 is much less conspicuous, is a tendency to learned disquisition. A long note, which might have been most interesting, on the subject of burial is unfortunately mutilated beyond recovery but a large part of the two more or less complete columns is occupied by a list of paronymous words, illustrated by citations and references, and it is to the presence of this list that the papyrus owes its importance. Not only does the writer adduce several forms for which there is no other testimony, but he commonly supports his instances by stating where they were to be found, and thereby adds to the fragments of a number of Greek authors. Quotations for which the papyrus is the sole authority are given from Pindar, Euripides Temenus and Aegeus, Aeschylus Phineus, Sophocles Phineus /, Cratinus Malthaci, Archilochus, Xenophanes Silli, Antimachus Thebais, Leandrius (cf. note on 11. 44-5), Eupolis, Stesichorus Oresteia, Alcaeus, Hesiod and the Hesiodic Rtjukos Leucon Phrateres, and Ananius. The or derivative words here discussed are forms of the second declension having a nominative which is the same as the genitive of a cognate form belonging to the third declension, e.g. which is parallel with Treatises on by Tryphon, Habron, and Apollonius Dyscolus are mentioned by Suidas, s. v. eavbpvs, and are cited by Stephanus of Byzantium, s.vv. Several of the examples found in these excerpts appear also in the papyrus (cf. notes on 11, 23, 37-8), and from some similar theoretical treatise our anonymous author presumably drew his information. It is, however, doubtful whether any of the three grammarians named was his actual source. Tryphon, who flourished in the latter half of the first century B. c. (Suidas, s.v.), might perhaps have been utilized if the composition of these scholia were very little anterior to the date of the papyrus. But Tryphon may well have had his predecessors in this
; ;
'

'

'

'

?,

.

, , ', .

, -

1087.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS

particular field. Coincidences in the examples of do not occur in connexion with him, and even if they did they would not really count for much There was no doubt a good deal of repetition in grammatical works of the type under consideration, and the instances and quotations

-

loi

lean over considerably to the right are written in a clear and neat semi-cursive of medium size. Archaic characteristics are less marked than in 1086, but the present papyrus is probably not much posterior, r and especially are formed on an early pattern, and though some of the letters, e.g. v, would be consistent with a later date, they do not demand it. There are several points of similarity in this script to that of P. Brit. Mus. 133 (Plate III in Classical Texts from the British Museum), which Kenyon attributes to the second century B.C. There too a approximating to the form found here
I do not think that 1087 is subsequent to the reign should be inclined to place it before rather than after the turn of the century. Besides marginal paragraphi, both high and medial stops are used, but without any clear differentiation of value, and it is not always easy to be sure which position was intended. At the end of a note double dots commonly appear, as in 856. Accents are added in some of the words quoted in the long grammatical note, and occasionally elsewhere. Abbreviation
is

some extent stereotyped. The rather short columns, which

would tend to become

to

employed.

On

the whole

of Augustus, and

I

less frequent

than in 1086

;

^^), ,(,
if

and

'[\

forms occurring.
letters into the left

)

is

much

are the only shortened
project

Lemmata, when they commence a
margin
;

line,

by about two
is

they occur within a

line,

then the line following

made

to project.

T02

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

5

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THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Col.
ii.

35

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€•€ -^'' 8•€.€
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1087.

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Col.
ii.

105

35

^^, / ' , 89, 9, []9
ev6[<i]v

k[]r|vvv

-4[]

kv

apnayoi

kv

a

4

'? ?,
8os,
'dvOev

45

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{•)

?€?,
€[]€
kv
'ivOev

8? 09

,? ,,
kv kv
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?, 9,€09 {) ^'
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kv

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€,

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[?] €-

77

o^ei

?

86-

79

k\

ۥ
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THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Col.
[
iii.

[ [
7

85

8[

[
[

'^ '\•)(€\ '[ /[
h^H

T0VT0\

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75

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[

8
. .

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^
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[

8[
is

€€[
reconstruct from the

damaged
2.

1-5- This note, which apparently refers to 1. 74, The extant scholia do not help. remains.
is

difficult to

unusual in
3.

this

not satisfactory, apart from the fact that the omission of iota subscript is could be read, but not papyrus, nor cannot be read. At the end of the line seems to not

be clear.
4.

. , ,
be

][

:

the doubtful
is

can be any round

letter.

]v

.

may

]./ (-^?),

following

very uncertain. avrinaXos is 5. The supposed point after the second lacuna may be the tip of a letter. which is usually explained as equivalent to hardly the natural synonym for e. g. in Schol. and ApoUon. £ex. ; moreover a supplement of five letters would be better than one of four. But there is no room for a suitable word if avA ... is read, and that phrase would be likely to have been abbreviated, as in 1. 7. It may be noticed that Eustathius uses the word in his discussion of the passage (p. 666), be tw

A

!,

7. 8.

Cf. Schol.
eno[i]eiT

A

For

U7r[ipo];^>ji' cf.

9-10. 10-12.

8 The name ' /'
Schol.

does not seem admissible, and
of Zeus
is

.! .
Ib'uus

[

,
The

and the

6

:

21-2;

expected somewhere in these two lines. is similarly quoted in illustration in Schol. B.

(

[]€[]
fKoKfafV,

is

hardly adapted to the context.

1087.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS
Col.
iii.

107

85

[
7o

'

[ €[
coy

^
.

{()
S[

K[

Scot]

So

[ [
75
vo[
eiV[

01[(
Si

go

ey[cb

eu^oy
€[

[6
tou

$i

81

8[

8

[ [

95

[
.

[

Se

[ [

? ? 7€'[ ^[.
8
[

[

€6
€1/

83

[

2

letters

€UL

[

TOIS

8\

supplement [epvaaiy is slightly long and perhaps the initial letter stood in 1. i o. The sup^ posed point in 1. 12 may be a vestige of the a of but this is hardly consistent with the remains, 13. Wilamowitz suggests fi\s (W— suits the lacuna rather better than 14-17. The quotation is from 254-6. f I7""l8. Cf. Schol. A on 21-2. The separation of inl from is indicated by 1. 22, and so Cramer, (st'c) em 8e Anecd. Par. iii. 135. 15 Zeis ' but irXrjpes would Overload the lacuna, while irX^(pef) proposed 6 would not quite fill it. remarks, seemg 23. The vestiges do not at least suggest ]eviK, but y]eviKfj, as

(\\\

)

. W-M

indispensable here.
'

.
26-7),
25.

Cf. Steph. Byz.,

('
:

iv

11.

(cf.l. 37).

847• 25-6. is not found in the extant works of Pindar, in Py^k. V. 104 and Fr. 139. occurs e.g. in Homer, 2 7• 672.

\'^

,. ', ', ' [ " . ' ,"^ " ^' '
(\\.

\

]€,
S.

v.

'

,
:

6

W-M

fvuela,

ev^eiat

hnep

iv

iv

'

(cf.

11.

24-5),

"^

(cf.

;

who

uses the form
256.

509,

io8
28-9.
citation
is

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
known
as a Euripidean form from Ale.

980 and

Fr. 472. 6, but this

from the Temenus is new. 3i-2 = Simonides, Fr. 32.

The scholia state that Aristophanes and Zenodotus here read €\/€, 32-3. 38. and Buttmann was no doubt right in his inference that they also read hiAnropov, which is other MSS. and edd. found in Vat. Ottob. 308 and Vind. 307. was known only from Schol. Dorv. Aristoph. P/u/. 800 and 33-6. The form Arcadius, p. 102. 9, whence Dindorf describes it in Stephanus T/ies. as forma recentioris Graecismi. Only one certain citation of the Phineus of Aeschylus (Fr. 258) and one of the first Phineus of Sophocles (Fr, 641) were previously known. is a well-supported variant in Homer, S 307, and elsewhere; it is also 36. read e. g. in the H. in Ven. 54 and is found in Hesychius.
2^.

4
6

' \8 ,"
iv

37—8. Cf. Steph. Byz., S.V.
e

Kock). If the papyrus is to be trusted, there must be an error here, and It is true that the also has occasioned difficulty. should be emended to ; and form is not Otherwise attested, and not a little remarkable that But to attribute the confusion should have occurred in actual juxta-position. to the papyrus and bring it into conformity with the text of Stephanus by some such Perhaps, is hardly justifiable. alteration as would be a very uncertain however, a has dropped out after being rather cramped and the vestiges reading apart from the passage of Stephanus, of some of the other letters exiguous ; but as it is, little doubt remains. Heysch., Eustathius, Od. p. 1750. 62, and is found in 38-9. The form

:" '" " .
(^)

"" '

.8 ?
(

iv

=

Fr.

"

", ()
,

6 AmmoniuS, S. v. who says that it means That the word occurred in Archilochus was unknown. Was he the source of the anony? mous citation in Hesychius on which has hitherto rested on the support of Soph. 0. C. 195 eV 39-40.

^ ^
\

". []

\]
8,

\

(^ )
the Schol. in

L

remarks

Jebb foUowS Dindorf and Wecklein in substituting for and hazards the guess that Herodian had perhaps no warrant besides this passage (of Sophocles) '. Grammarians had better information than what is commonly credited to them. The traditional should in future be allowed to stand. notes that the word is probably to be also recognized in Hesiod Fr. 115. 3 Rzach with Et. Gud. Et. Angel., Strabo vii. p. 322, Villebrun ; cf. Cramer, Anecd. Ox. i. 264. 27 8
ev
e
'

.

'8 ,

(,

,

(. , .

,

W-M '

40-1. is not a known form but the first letter is most probably « and The present the occurrence of the name in the works of Xenophanes is eminently natural. is the first reference to separate books of the Si//i, the attribution of which to Xenophanes

"

(

',

'^

,

by Strabo

careful review of the (p. 643) and others has occasioned much discussion. evidence is given by C. Wachsmuth in his Sillographi Graeci. He arrives at the sensible conclusion that the Silli of Xenophanes were a poem or series of poems in hexameters wherein various philosophers and poets were attacked and that they were so called by grammarians on account of their similarity to the Silli of Timon. Only one line is quoted expressly from the work (Schol. Aristoph. Equit. 406), but eleven other fragments are assigned to it by Diels, Poet. Phil. Fragmenta, pp. 39-41.
;

A

41-3. "AiSoy:

this is

another

new

form.

in Cramer, Anecd. Oxon ii qo found without explanation in Suidas. Who this Leandrius may be is uncertam. C. Keil has shown good reason {Vindiciae onomaL, 1843) for correcting Mavbpos or Aea.Spto. number of passages, e.g. Diog. Laert. i. i. 28, to Macavbptos, i.e. the Milesian historian whose name is guaranteed by C. I. G. 2905. 8 ; and Meineke goes

44-5.

and

, ./5
IS

gen.

,
1087.
occurs

NEW
is

CLASSICAL TEXTS

109

cited

by Theognostus

ma

^/!? ?/cc^' oi the Mbb.
respect.
,

^V^l"^'"^ Ihe best evidence

«...

in Steph. Byz., for a

S.

v.

", for

the Aeav8po, or Nea.Spoj
is

writer called
error,

Leandrius
its

this

very possibly has fallen into a

common

though

early date entitles

45-7•

ptV'aaTTiSos

only here.
fp

Tf

8\

^9

and the Schol.
list

• «.

Cf.

Aristoph.

is included in a 47-8. Anecd. ii. p. 783 (z= Bergk, Fr. 31)

the Uresteia.

,

50-1. is not otherwise attested. It is noticeable that the name of Hesiod does not accompany the K^v^or yapo^, regarding the authenticity of which doubts were entertained in antiquity ; cf. Athen. ii. p. eV 49 b yap<o-Khp yhp ypappairaibjs

and on the^other
IS

poem

also cited as
it

^, ,
,
'

-

is

roh 6 of words in -okos by Arcadius, p. 51. 7. Bekker's the only other express citation of the second book of

.
,'

Nud. 353

(8
papyrus
it

which

to

some
top

,

ra

side Plutarch, Afor. 'jsof

rjadup, as 6

6

Hesiod's in

yapop ds Schol. Apollon. Rhod.
is

, '-.^ ^
ipoi

,^,
6
i.

o5.

elpai— nip t^p

1289;
form.

:( , €
^
?,,

The
are

six

attributed to

to 01 the correctness of the reading.

by Rzach. 52. KOKKvyo,, which I owe
53•

fragments
is

W-M,

another

:• !
agreed;
55•
\

^^^od' ^^^« 470.

cf.

Choerob. in Bekker, Anecd.

,

y(a The
P*

Whether the word should be accented 6 p. 1181 and Etym. Magn. p. 77°. 35 ^<^rL

'/

Aristophanes.

yepiKif us . papyrus makes a small addition to the three existing fragments of Leucon "^^^ ^parep(s were produced on the same occasion '^°'^^• as the Peace of

\

. . , , \, : ,, : ]
or

unknown

There

little

doubt

was not

,
.

55-6. For the form cf. the note on 1. It must of course be a nominative 53. and IS apparently equivalent to the mythical king of Troy, as in Malalas iv. Tros was the great grandson of Teucer. does not occur in the extant remains of Hesiod but the name of the author, though quite suitable, is by no means certain. 56-7. is otherwise unexampled. The scanty remnants of the lamboRrapher Ananius are mostly derived from Athenaeus. 58-60. is given by Hesychius as an Aeolic form cf. Phot. Lex.

?,

^

;

&!
20,

The quotation from the Aegeus is new. which was suggested by W-M, is right, it would be equivalent to .> ^°-\-J^ has come into vogue.' This is very suitable, since is a common form and the use of the simple verb, though unusual in this sense, seems quite possible'
[tr.

Bergk).

: ^' : ': :&! :
;

^[],

:

€1/

I

...

IS

less likely.

to the accent, Theognost. 67. 17 and Etym. Magn. 470. 35 agree with the papyrus, while Herodian, ap. Eustath. p. 1825. 12, writes iWi.oi, which is commonly

With regard

adopted.

61-2. Cf. Schol. Did.

,

,

,

^

and


a, o,

no

Apollon. Lex.
64.

A

.
stop

S. v.

is

] ' -]
86—9. Cf. Schol.

Schol. A 65 sqq. The nvpos o?Se merely remarks ort 73-5. These three lines project slightly into the margin, though not so much as the Homeric lemmata. Perhaps the indentation was unintentional ; or these lines may be a quotation from some other source.

an Otherwise unknown commentator. likely to have disappeared after loss of this long note concerning burial is very unfortunate.

Menis

^
is

THE OXRYHYNCHUS PAPYRI
ore
.
.
.

11.

.

Xeyei

( ,

.

and

[[{ [[€
.

A

are

restored by

W-M, who
88-9.

^'.

stood in

suggests that something like 8e The letter following may well be

^
Early
first

\(\.

or

instead of

90-I. Verse 81 seems to have been divided into two lemmata, separated by a very comment; or the scribe might be supposed to have made a mistake and to have written several letters which he had to delete. Unless some such hypothesis is adopted 1. 90 will be about ten letters shorter than those of Cols, i-ii, which there is no reason to suppose and 11. 85-6 tend to disprove. 96-9. so most MSS. and Eustath. edd. with Vind. 117 and a Breslau MS. Kptpou» For which was restored by W-M, cf. Eustath. ad loc.
short

:

, (
1088.

,

;

\

.
first

Medical Receipts.
23-2x41 cm.
century.

The

following series of medical receipts

is

written on the verso of 1086 in
century.

a cursive hand probably dating from the earlier part of the

Three

and therefore was presumably the the Homeric scholia having been subdivided before these prescriptions came to be inserted in it. They are a miscellaneous collection, including local applications for vounds and sores, leprosy, flow of blood, polypus, and to induce sneezing, and potions for quartan fever, liver-complaints, dropsy, insomnia, and convulsions (?). Papyri of this class are not infrequent cf. e. g. 234, P. Tebt. 273, P. Rylands 39-29 (d), Berl. Klassikertexte, iii. pp. 32-3. The writer, who was rather inaccurate, shows anoticeable fondness for r\ instead of et before another vowel he also has a curious datival
; ;

columns are nearly entire, and there are nothing of it remains. Col. i is preceded than the margins between the columns commencement, the roll which contained

traces of a fourth, but

practically

by a blank space considerably wider

form

in

I.

To

/ \{) '
32.

Col.

i.

5

15

2

' ^ {) () {) . {) ^ , {) ^, , . .'
apfOTTrji

8{)

1088.

NEW
,
S,

CLASSICAL TEXTS

(8)

{8\)
,

. ^^

(•) {^) (^^) , (), {^) () ,

()

iii

,

{), , ^? {), , , 6€{9) , , , {\{) €{), {^), ? ^.

25

€is

npbs

.^^ 9?
€€9' {),

^^. ^
, ^' ^^,

.

Col.

.

?, ^}

35 €iy Toi>9

,

kav

{), {)' €9 {) \

112

\ ?' ^ ? )• /{) (/) () {^) () , 4 €{9) (^) () (^)
< 7]
Tovs 45

. ? ?€? [) , [\ ? ? ^,
rbu

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

(/3$•),

{6\6$).

^

,

,

,

^'

?,
€(?)

?? ? ? ^^
kv

?

kv

?.
).

5

? [][]?' (?), (?), (^), \?\ (^ [? • ^(), ,[?. {^) , (^) (?)• € {?\

55

?? ? ? ) ? () () () ||
{€)[]€
kvepyk?

? ?
,
"*

Col.

.

?•

? €.
[.
.

,

6

? €[] €€^ [?] \•()

^

<^,

€(€)€[?

€[?

.

['\

kv

€[<.

(?) () ,
65

() () (?) ()
.

'[

6{]{)
.

[.

,

,

.,

;

[9).
4-

'^«^«^'^«^^^'for
.

^ {) {) ()' ^
1088.

NEW
a,

CLASSICAL TEXTS
/ie/'^[ay
. .

113
56y.

32.

1.

added above the
40.
1.

.
/.
:

.

.

(

)

€VTo{

)

{)

a,

[.

Fap. and so passim.
34•
line.
«

22.

52.

.'.

of /)€\//•? and of e/x0Wui/ COrr. from corr. from e ? 43. t of 44. 1.

.

.

[

24.

1.

^^.

6.

1. /ci'a/Lioj'.

. ^.. {) .
.
39.
1.

45.

1-67. 'The yellow salve for discharges, wounds, bruises, and weals; calamine 4 white lead 8 dr., fine meal 4 dr., purified schist 1 dr., saffron i dr., opium 3 ob., gum 4
water.
:

dr.,

dr.' '

A good remedy for small discharges and wounds fine meal 8 dr., antimony 2 dr., opium 3 ob., flake of copper 3 ob., white lead 2 dr., gum 2 dr., water. For leprosy cantharides i dr., ammi, rocket-seed, . nigella, mustard, cress, raw pitch. Apply locally. Styptic use pounded rock-alum, and it will stop, (the blood) at once. To stop nose-bleeding mix frankincense with onion-juLce and apply the juice inside. To cause sneezing pound fresh some white hellebore and blow it into the nostrils, or use soap-wort or castor in the same way. For sores in the nose rub yellow orpiment smooth, then lay the man on his back and treat him, or use black hellebore in the same way. For polypus growing in the nostrils baked soda 3 ob., cummin i dr., orris-root i dr. rub them and blow into the nostrils. If the sore is rather dry, rub smooth some dry bark of fig and blow in. For quartan fever juice of silphium i ob., myrrh i ob. Another dose hemlock dr., 3 henbane 3 dr., opium 2 dr., castor i dr., black hellebore i dr. pound and wotk them up separately with water and make pastilles of the size of an Egyptian bean, then dry in the shade and give them to the patient to drink fasting, rubbing them in half a cotyle of raisin wine, having previously given him a bath two hours before taking ; apply a warm bottle to the feet, and cover him up with blankets. Draught for liver-patients: sweet flag i dr., opopanax i ob., spikenard i ob., parsnip to be drunk slowly with raisin wine or honey. 2 dr. Another receipt opopanax 2 dr., sweet flag .2 dr., .parsnip i dr., spikenard i ob. ; give to drink with raisin wine and honey and pine-cones mixed. Another, tolerably strong cinnamon ., myrrh 10 dr., spikenard 6 dr., Aethiopian seseli 6 dr. rub smooth separately with egg and work up with juice of centaury, and give a dose of the size of an Egyptian bean in warm honey and water. Draught for dropsy-patients mountain-parsley ., myrtle 8 dr., bitter almonds 4 dr.,
:

.

.,

:

:

:

:

:

:

;

;

:

:

.

.

;

:

.

.

seed of parsnip 6 dr.
Soporific
:

henbane

.

.

.,

anise

i

dr.,

opium

4 ob.

;

I.

scriptions are given.
Kippas,

He

are dealt with in Galen, xiii. pp. 503 sqq., where a number of pre' tdos iarl rots larpois says xXcopas

perhaps
5.

(^) For

rf

!

\

should be read. cf. Galen,

.
mix and
v.

administer.'

At the end of the
is

line

xii. p.

196.
I

7,

Diosc.

144.

It

said

by the

latter to

4
come from Western

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Iberia,
e. g.

and
in

bi

,

,

.

\
>//•,

Galen, xiii. p. 407. is very doubtful, but I can find no other reading that yields any sense. 8. or is comparable to the supposed of (^ The letters are more like ) in or but neither of those letters has a taller first stroke than usual, like that of a 1. 69 is unsuitable, nor would such a distinction be likely. seems admissible, irpos cf. Galen, xii. p. 363 epi^apfv fie {sc. ras 14. For i. and Diosc. 1 28. The initial was probably added owing to some confusion with Was meant ? Dioscorides is fairly clear, but is not a known word. 1 5.

({]

is

used of

:

,

.

.

ivepyet.

;

\(
1

says that
6.

, !€
'{)
1
it

-nphs

for

({^, DiosC. .
:

For

^

. ..
o|et Se

.) \
(.
.
.
.

>\ \

be

napeipfva
cf.

here

83

»

e.g. Galen, xii. p.

It is

cf. e.g. Galen, xii. p. 241 1 9• a common remedy of modern barbers. 21—3. Cf. Diosc. ii. p. 178

, € -/
70

^'

and

for

. , .
and Galen, and
36.

((,

Galen, xiv. pp. 337-9, 416-18. 24. Cf. Diosc. iv. 148 27. Diosc. ii. 192 says of

and are specified e.g. by Diosc. i. 159, 160, 28-37. Remedies for xiv. 336-7, 416-17. is prescribed by the latter, p. 337 ; white hellebore pp. 416, 417. At the end of 1. 28 a horizontal stroke might be interpreted ks the sign for i obol, but the amount seems immaterial here, and a rather smaller dash at the end of the next line clearly has no such meaning. the use of the Aeolic dative is remarkable; cf. C. P. R. 242. 10 32.

€ , ., , .
;^

€.
{sc.
Kipe'i

(jT.

number

)

ib. 1

( . .
^)•
f'oTt,

84

\

o^fi,

of Other receipts are given in
3.

(. (.), and
\

i.

8e

and of

be

\

pevv

pev
{),
ore

:

of

might be for but that word is only used in the sense of a decoction Possibly is meant. and 38 sqq. In a prescription of Harpalus for quartan fever in Galen, xiv, p. 167, are included ; other remedies are given ib. pp. 524, 561, Diosc. ii. 21. which has been inserted here, is used by Galen, xii. p. 1004, in 39. connexion with the feeding of infants. 43. The Egyptian bean was a common measure of magnitude; cf. e.g. Galen, xiv. Ai'y. Its equivalent weight IS given ib. xix. p. 780 as p. 462
figs.

(€),

.

i^ ob.
44.

Mirab. 51

The

-(

termination of (for was probably affected by that of for -eo is frequently found in later Greek; cf Lobeck, Phrynichus, p. 247. cf. e.g. Hippocr. Ilep\ ii. p. 571 Kiihn, 46.
:

: € €,
cf.

Moeris,

p.

270

Berl. Klassikertexie,

,

"Eve
iii.

p.

31.

2.

i,

and e.g. Apollon. where read
;

Jiis/.

-)

.

cf.

I.

22.

..
,

epaivv,
their

(earov.

They were

SO called

On aCCOUnt of

shape.

48. If ^7i[a]riit[o](;s is right, the letters the remains of which are scanty, were rather widely spaced, occurs as a heading in Galen, xiv. p. 454, and it appears to suit the character of the prescriptions of 11. 49-62. Cf. ib. pp. 374-5, xiii. pp. 198 sqq., Diosc. ii, 58-9. seems to have been written for there would barely be room for 55•

.

4•.

1088.
k\a'i\

NEW
For
.

CLASSICAL TEXTS
cf.
irepi

even

if

Were a word.
.
.

DioSC.

\

i.

88

57~8.
not a

The letter before known variety, it seems

the lacuna

may be

«,

but since

* ( .
Se
.

115

.

.

is

apparently

likely that there

(Diosc. iii. 54) was meant. the remains of the last letter before the lacuna suit a rather better than v. are given in Galen, xiii. p. 205, xiv. 462, xv. 912, np6s 63. Various are mentioned by the latter. and ii. 63—5 ; Diosc.
68.

this word seems more intelligible than is perhaps meant for before suggests rather than . inier alia. For the marginal note of which according to Diosc. iii. 26 approbation, written as usual in the form of a monogram, cf. 1087. 43 ; it was repeated in the margin of the lost fourth column. might be read 69. The letters after ) is possibly ), i. e. Iv vh{aTi).

.

-^

does not occur, but

' !

was another lipography here and that aeaeXi At the end of the line is not impossible, but

^[

TiKOs,

and the

letter

,
[].
14•
I

' ,

(

(

1089.

An Alexandrian
25

Chronicle.
Third century.

X

cm.

The recto of this papyrus contains a fragment, too much mutilated to be worth reproduction, of a second-century land-survey. On the verso are remains of three columns, written in upright uncials, which may be assigned with probability to the third century. The hand is sufficiently well formed, though
marked by no great
regularity
;

towards the ends of the

lines there is

a rather

strong tendency to compression and reduction in the size of the letters. No stops occur nor other lection signs beyond the diaeresis. In one or two places

marks

of doubtful significance are inserted in the

margin

(11.

26, 32).

Of Cols, i and iii only a few disconnected letters have survived, but the intermediate column, though also much damaged, is in its upper portion in fair
belongs to a narrative of certain events in which the principal The actors are, on the one hand Flaccus, on the other Isidorus and Dionysius. Flaccus is no doubt identity of the first two of these is immediately evident.
preservation.
It

the praefect L. Avillius Flaccus, the subject of Philo's diatribe and Isidorus must be the well-known Alexandrian gymnasiarch, one of the instigators of

,
as

;

Flaccus in his oppression of the Jews, subsequently his accuser, and eventually, Dionysius also may now be the papyri have proved, himself a victim. recognized in a hitherto obscure passage of the Adversus Flaccum. Philo
ivperai,

describes the abettors and tools of Flaccus as

, , ,^ , , €9,
2

ii6

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
ii.

with an on the very insufficient ground that, while Lampon and Isidorus were familiar names, the history of the period had no record of an Alexandrian Dionysius. This criticism, which the structure of Philo's sentence is itself enough to condemn, is finally disposed of by the appearance of a Dionysius in the company of Isidorus and Flaccus. He, too, was obviously a prominent figure in local politics, and may be presumed to have
p. 520).

(Mangey,
allusion

Mangey

here proposed to read

^?,

to

the

Sicilian

tyrant,

been associated with Lampon and Isidorus in the anti-Semitic movement. Unfortunately the situation disclosed by the papyrus is not very clear, and our knowledge, which for the most part depends upon Philo, is too limited to throw much light upon it. According to Philo's account Isidorus, after having been in close relations with Flaccus, became estranged on finding himself less He therefore endeavoured to stir up odium influential than he had imagined. against the praefect, and by means of bribery brought about a demonstration against him at the Gymnasium. Some of the demonstrators were arrested and confessed that they were agents of Isidorus, who thereupon found safety in flight {Adv. Flaccum, pp. 537-8). No doubt he disappeared from the scene until the fall of Flaccus, which was not long delayed, enabled him to return. The episode described in the papyrus therefore belongs to the period prior to the exposure of Isidorus. Flaccus is represented as going to the Serapeum, i. e. the famous Alexandrian temple, having previously given certain secret instructions. Isidorus accompanied by Dionysius and a woman named Aphrodisia, who is not otherwise known, then enter and are accosted by a certain yipaio^^ \v\io prostrates himself before Isidorus and begs him not to insist on making his
into the presence of Flaccus (/x^ irpos II. 27-38). Dionysius declines to be deterred (11. 38-42). Flaccus, who seems meanwhile to have been in concealment, thereupon approaches and engages with Isidorus in

way

[]

[],

a conversation which the mutilated condition of the papyrus renders obscure
(11.

42

sqq.),

but towards the end
It

(11.

56-9) relates to the payment of a

sum of

would appear from the narrative that Dionysius was supposed to be in danger (cf 11. 48-9), and that Flaccus was setting a trap for him or Isidorus or both of them. But who then is the yepatos and what is the meaning of his intervention ? His own reference in 1, ^6 to the yipovm strongly suggests that the term yepatos here, as occasionally elsewhere (e. g. Dittenberger, Or. Gr. htscr. 751. i), has the technical meaning of 'elder'; and the body of elders to which this yepatos belonged was presumably the council which at this period presided over the Jews of Alexandria, and of which Flaccus, as Philo relates, had thirty-eight members publicly scourged {Adv. Flaccum, pp. 527-8). If the yipaio^ was a Jewish elder, the emphasis laid by him on his presence
five talents.

1089.

NEW

CLASSICAL TEXTS
:

117

in the temple of Serapis (11. 33-4) is readily understood that was not the place where he would be expected to be found. But the part which he here plays becomes very surprising. He does not seem to be acting as the tool of Flaccus, but to be animated by concern and regard for Dionysius. Is it possible that a common opposition to the praefect brought about a temporary reconciliation between the party of Isidorus and the Jews ? In subsequently becoming the

may in a sense be regarded as fighting the battle But the truce, if truce there was, did not last, for it was as an anti-Semite that Isidorus was himself sentenced by Claudius. There is indeed small chance of success, without further and less ambiguous data, in following the tortuous paths of Alexandrian intrigue during this stormy time. But the interest with which the policy and fate of Isidorus and his fellows were evidently regarded by their compatriots, encourages the hope of
accuser of Flaccus, Isidorus
of his former enemies.
fresh accessions to the evidence.
is

An

account of his

trial

together with

Lampon

preserved in the well-known papyrus fragments at Berlin and Cairo of which
in

a revised text has recently been published by Wilcken

Abhandl.

d. Phil.- Hist.

Kl.

d.

K.

Sachs. Gesellsch. d. Wissensch. xxvii. No. 23.
allusion

was kept green is clear from the Appianus, when he was himself in a

similar

memory made by another Alexandrian, position, as reported by 33. The
That
their
is

present text deals with an earlier stage in Isidorus' career, and

not necessarily

and sentence or that of other Alexandrian citizens. The relation between those various documents is itself still a matter of uncertainty. Deissmann suggested that they belonged to a history of Alexandrian anti-Semitism {Theol. Literaturz. 1898, 602-6), Reinach to a chronicle of the vicissitudes of Alexandrian gymnasiarchs [Rev. des Etudes juives, xxxvii. p. 224), while others do not regard them as parts of any single whole. So much, however, seems agreed, that these heathen acts of Martyrs (Bauer, Archiv, i. pp. 29-47) were written from the Alexandrian-Greek point of view, and it is highly probable that their real motive was hostility to the Roman Government rather than to the Jews. The Alexandrians were antiSemitic because the Jews were pro-Roman (cf. Wilcken, /. c, pp. ']^6- and 825, where further references are given). It is natural to refer 1089 to the same class of what may be roughly described as nationalist literature. Perhaps this is even some of the setting in which an account of the martyrdom as recounted in the Berlin and Cairo papyri, was embedded. That, however, is quite problematical, and a negative answer would leave unprejudiced the view that this new Isidorus text represents ideas and interests similar to those of its predecessors, and that it originated and was current in similar circles.
trial
' ' *
'

connected with the documents concerning his

'

',

ii8

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

Col.

i.

va
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..[...]
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8 letters „

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34. 35.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
[]•[],
traces.

which was

suggested

by Wilcken,

sufficiently

accords

with

the

ambiguous

is very insecure, but appears on the whole more suitable than ovv or ovs. 36-7. With the reading adopted, the sense would seem to be What do we gain by your going ? ', but I cannot identify the principal verb. The termination may be (not ). « may be read in and before this there is probably a or -(, hardly In 1. 36 could well be , and is not satisfactory. but after place of might serve. may be . If is right, [?]^«] the preceding cf. 33. II. 38. ., hardly eu df\{e)is. 39. 65€(€) or possibly ev deo'is or secms less appropriate, since the presence of Dionysius (1. 51) 42. (]\€•. indicates that the encounter of Flaccus and Isidorus took place on the same spot, not at
'

,
:

-/

-^,

'/]:

]7\(

(

.

.

some

later time.
is

43. ["[' recognizable.

suggested by the context and the space, but the

traces

are

barely

ov or the 45. Between e and tvdv are two upright strokes vhich would suit ti, €, or are doubtful e may be read by the help of one of these strokes as , possible in place of the preceding «. 47. Apparently not (\[€^/. and v, is not satisfactory ; if there were two letters between the supposed 48. The size of the lacunae at the The may be they must have been narrow ones.

.

;

[8'\

.

beginnings of the lines from

There is a tendency in point onwards is doubtful. this column for the commencements of the lines to advance not, as often happens, to the left, but to the right ; and if the slant shown by 11. 34-48 was continued uninterruptedly, would be the first word of 1. 61. But it is not easy to restore 11. 55-60 on that hypothesis,
this

have therefore assumed that the progress to the right was arrested. If is correct, the tendency must even have been slightly reversed. 51. fh(v is of about the right length, but it is not at all clear that Dionysius here intervenes, and Flaccus may still be the speaker. 55. There is perhaps nothing lost before [.

and
in

I

[]£

1.

55

][,

Frs. 1-3. Fr. i. 6-7 and 2. 2-3 might perhaps be combined so as to read It but the appearance of the other side of the papyrus is rather against this. certain that Fr. 3 belongs to 1089.

]fiv[

and

is

hardly

;

1090.

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS

2

III.

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS

1090.

Hesiod, Opera.
X
1

32-3

1-4

cm.

Late

first

century.

Plate V.

originally containing from ^^ to 40 lines, written in a goodhand probably towards the close of the first century. There is much similarity of style between this hand and those of 220 and 844, 1090 being perhaps rather the earliest of the group. A more or less definite terminus ante

One column,

sized round

quern

is

provided by a fragment of a mathematical treatise inscribed

in

second-

century cursive on the verso.

No

accents, breathings, or

marks of
(1.

elision occur

the one example of a stop, a point placed well above the line

268),

may

be

due to a second hand which has added a few corrections or variants. There is a deep margin of 7-4 cm. at the top of the column that at the bottom is also partially preserved, but the last few lines have disappeared owing to the decom:

position of the papyrus.

(cf. 11.

Notwithstanding inaccuracies, which the corrector has not always eliminated 269-71), the text, as might be expected from its early date, is of some

(11.

Three small emendations proposed by modern critics are supported and there are some other novel readings, which may be correct (11. 257, 284-5). An agreement with the Rainer papyrus of the fourth century and several ancient citations against the other MSS. is noticeable Erroneous iotas adscript are ignored ia the collation below. in 1. 278.
interest.

263, 264, 268)

;

\KvBp\y]

26

[]€
[]? [;]

[] []

re

?

?

([^ \\ [/ ([]€ [€ [][] []([] [] €[€?
[o]i

[

[]

SiKas

/3[]7^

?(

[]0

€€[€9
[

122

265

^^ \[ ]€ ][ [/ [ [ ] [ ][] [ [^ [][]
THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Se
CTTi

[8\•
[
8e]

270 [vw]

2 75

28

( €9 [ [] [] [? [ ] [ €[9 ] ^ ] €[ ([ [] [ ^ €[€] [ ]] €[€ ]? €] [7 [ [€ ][ ] ][] [\ [ ] €[5 ^ [ ][ ^ []^[ [] [^ ^ ] []6[ [ €[
Aios

[
e

••

[]

.

[e7ri]5[e]p/ceTat•

§€

e[€/)yei

eu]

[€]

e/ioy

i{ios

emi

[€]€
[
['^c•'•

[€( []

ye

i§ei

^^

[5ie]ra|e

€]

285

[] [ ][ € [€
€]

ewei

([]

[]^
€[]

[os

[][

Zev?

[ [? [ €

iv

[€]<[

^\

!
257•
260.

[ ^€ ^ ] €] [

[
^^°'^

]] € [^ €€ ^ €[
epeo)

€]([]

[
etioi/ere

[eyyy^i vaiei

^^'^^

MSS.

Genitives of this kind are familiar in such phrases as bla

,

av8pa>u,

&C.

^^]!/ (GILMQ

(CFHDKENOP). the space than 262. biKas, as originally Avritten, is the reading of the
commends
as an alternative. IK, so Schaefer; 263. It is unfortunate that the papyrus breaks off at

[[]
:

and

v.

1.

in others,

Proclus 184. 8 g) seems better adapted to

[]5

itself

,

MSS.

Neither

8!

nor bUn

CDE,

&€., Rzach. and leaves unsolved the crux

1090.

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS

123

The MSS. are divided between hUas, which is corrupt, of the final Avord of this verse. Rzach prints Avhich is not convincing. and 8e 8i had been desiderated by MSS. 264. There is a light mark through the e of perhaps Kirchhoif and is adopted by Rzach. is certainly inserted by some one who wished to cancel that letter; but the c of untouched. in the line above may possibly be meant for 265. A mark through the tail of the but an accent would more naturally have been written to the a circumflex accent on right of the 2 68. which has been interlineated by the corrector, is the traditional reading;

,€[ ^
€:
:

^.

:

, ^[
(,

,
A

.

\,
;

is

corrupt.

so Heinrich
1.

there does not
V

269. 270. Se: so 271. apa: 1.

TTokis.

\.\

is

seem to be room for the damaged but is suited by the
ap Bentley, Se

€([ of the MSS.
remains.

FGH;

CDE, &c., Rzach, ' with the MSS.

seems meaningless. slightly inclined stroke above the 273. not 278. It is clear that the papyrus agreed with the MSS. in reading (Rzach with Clement), which is too long for the space. per SO the Rainer papyrus, Plutarch, Aelian, Sextus Emp., Orion, also Clement iv the mediaeval MSS., Rzach. and Porphyry with the genitive ; [ay]opft;e[ii', which is the reading of most MSS., besides Pseudophoc, 280. Orion, and Tzetzes, is equally possible.

[
.

Gerhard.


have

[]

'.

[][

:

284—5.

7[^€

.

.

.

289. Faint indications remain of two been continued for five lines further.

[ ^
4\
'.

.

.

MSS.

more

verses,

below which the column

may

1091.

Bacchylides, Dithyrambs.
Fr.
I

19.4x9-3 cm.

Second century.
(xvii).

Remains

the top of the column

/.

of one

column containing part of Bacchylides' Ode xvi
is

To
title

afifixed
roll

a vellum

or label bearing the
to the

This

was therefore limited

Dithyrambs and

did not include the Epinician or other poems, a fact which supports the view of
Blass {Bacchyl. pp. v-vi) that the British

Museum

fragments were derived from

two rolls, rather than, as Kenyon supposed, from one. The corresponding column of the British Museum papyrus () has some small lacunae, and the present second copy is not only an independent witness to the existing text but in a few passages usefully supplements it. Lines 50 and ^-^, are now
completed, the former in accordance with a conjecture of Jurenka, the latter not
quite corresponding with
1.

any

editorial restoration.

An

emendation of Blass

in

6a and his transposition of that verse are confirmed, while on the other hand one or two further slight alterations adopted by him do not receive support

124
(11.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

and 1091 is In general the agreement between extending to the arrangement of the verses, in regard to which only one small discrepancy occurs (1. 51) and there is but a single difference of reading for -navhipKia). is the more that amounts to a serious variant (1. 70 careful and accurate, the writer of 1091 being rather liable to small graphical
51, 58, 66, 69, 75, 116).
close,
;

^
It

errors,

though some of these have been subsequently eliminated.
is

His semi;

cursive script
upright,

also in strong contrast to the formal uncials of

it is

round,

and clear, but makes no pretence to calligraphy. It may be dated to about the middle of the second century. Punctuation, accents, and other aids have been freely inserted by a second hand, which has also made some corrections in the text. A few of the signs, however, seem to be original, the diaeresis in 1. 71, the mark of elision in the same line and perhaps that in 1. 64, and the short curved stroke placed above the letters instead of, as usual, below them (cf. e.g. 1082. ii. 18) to connect the component parts of the compound in 1. 51. The accentuation is similar to that of 1082. Examples word of intended both for literary and non-literary rolls have been previously

found

(e. g.

301, 381, 957), but the present, so far as I
its

am

aware,

Avhich has survived in

primitive position.

measures 2•

is

the

first
is

cm. and

stuck on to the verso so that the edge of the papyrus coincides with the
letters of the title,

initial

which

is

written on the outer side.

When

the

MS. was

rolled

must have been concealed, but enough would remain uncovered for easy identification. This label seems to have been attached at a period rather later than that to which the manuscript itself belongs, the sloping
up, these
initial letters

uncials of the title suggesting the third century.

It

is,

moreover, a palimpsest,

and the original hand, again a sloping uncial, which is visible on the side inscribed with the title, is unlikely to be earlier than the latter part of the second century,
if
I

indeed so early.

Portions of three lines are legible, apparently hexameters, but

have

failed to identify

them.

[]6

[]
[]?
[]€

(€

[^]apa[o]y•

[] €€(
[6]76' 7ۥ

^
re

Fr.

J.

[]/?[][]^ [](9

re

ۥ

^^

[

iinep

[

1091.

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS
t€K€v.
[

[]'
55 i^]^^

^
[[/]]

125

[]€€
[]/'

[

[]€

[]€€ 6 )(€
[rjoj/^e

[x]fi/3oy

ayXaou

62 €v[€]yK€

?•

[

64 [^]"^[] 5

6

[]9

€9

ev)(^ds

[][]€'

[
*]

S]

[ ^^^ ^
€'['
[[f]]ii'[u>

[]
[]

[Zevs

v]iripo)(^6v

€€

\8\ [^-^^
Tepas
€5

6[
Se

[]
75

^^?]]

6[ [€
[

€[€€?
[]] cy EpoviSas
reXei

?

[€€] €• [•^

[€

€€ [9 ['] [ [])[ [][ ]
o]f)[eas

91

[

\\

\

^€
Fr.
2.

Label attached to top of column

126

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Remains of a previous text

]
]'

...

'

room

so rightly B(lass), 49- [\<>!> for avb in front of the supposed
:

[;][]

50.

)[

(P. Brit. Mus.),

)['

K(enyon). As (which was in fact a r).

.

observed, there was not
Keap

.,

Jcbb,

[^?;

.

who

into K.'s sponding verse of the second epode (1. 116) altered pobois reading proves to have been nearer the truth, and the tradition of the MS. at 1. 1 16 is upheld. and the subject must be There is no analogy for the intransitive use of which is readily understood from 1. 47. needlessly In stands in 1. 52. so 51. [v\pmvt ^[e Confirms Jurenka's conjecture, with ., [' 53. Palmer; was correct in reading the vestige of the final letter of the verse as a. t€k[ Since the corresponding syllable in the second epode is short, the 54. T(K(v The supposed low stop after V is better omitted. is just above the dot referred to in the next note, and may be due to accident. A misplaced mark of elision after the 55. The correction is by the second hand. and has perhaps been partially erased. of is rather fainter than that after the would have stood ; it does There is an unexplained dot above the line where the a of not suit an accent, and is probably accidental.

,

\,

.

[
:

;

.

]

]
^.
.
St/cav

in the corre-

:

.

(
58. 02.
[e]s

after 1. 62, thereby and put These obtaining a closer metrical correspondence and improving the construction. Line 63 has been accidently alterations, which were accepted by Jebb, are now confirmed. left out, but by reading the iic restored by B. 1091 shows that 1. 62 corresponds to 1. 128, not to 1. 129. The probability of Jebb's suggestion, that the dislocation was caused by an omission of 1. 63, which was subsequently supplied in a wrong position, is also demonstrated. remarking SO K., B., and jebb all substitute 66. [ai/a]^[i]/3pfi'Tai It is now in the papyrus. that the MS. reading is an example of the confusion of e an There is evident that the t is no individual vagary, and the spelling is quite defensible. and e in Aeolic, e.g. edvvas for oBvvas (Greg. Cor. p. 597, analogy for the interchange of is directly according to Joannes Gram. 244 b moreover, Schaefer) and npes for attested by Hesychius, a fact which the editors of Bacchylides appear to have overlooked. for for ., ., whose reading is proved 67. The facsimile does not support Jebb's assertion that the sixth to have been correct.

( :.
is

the spelling of
inserted

.

, which between this verse and
(
before

;

B. writes

.^ / . : 8
( ^
.
'

reads

:

.

,

.

:

,
',

;

'

letter is clearly

'.

68-9.
, ,
.

8.

The

readings of
navbepKea

are upheld.

a more difficult reading (and therefore perhaps preferable), only an active sense. Aeschylus calls Darius {Pe/'S. 855) In cf. Hesych. 6 the present passage the word would mean all-sufficient and would be apposite enough.
:

7.

,

since

has elsewhere

'
'

B. in his second edition adopted

Housman's

• .

1091.

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS
,

.

The diaeresis over of 1. ff. : 71. is unintelligent. 72. xeipas, the original reading, is that of which also gives As thus written the verse has a long syllable more than the three corresponding lines, an irregularity which K. removed by emending to while others have preferred niraJ'e in his first edition considered the metre of this ode too obscure for a departure here from

[ €
4(,
metre

127

'.

€~.

the tradition, while in his second he transposed xelpas and neravae. But it is now seen that tradition was not stable, and the corrector's deletion of the final f of xecpas anticipates in some sense the emendation of K. x^'pe would give a closer strophic correspondence. arose from a lipography ; 1. with 75. The emendations by which it has

((
is

been sought
76.

to give regularity to the

Richards) receive no support, though Piatt's

an error

for

,

^ '

(()
{ipa)

. . with Jebb,
is

.

ed. 2 with

correctly written in

.

not excluded.

For

be preferred as
76-8.
fill

the rarer form.

{)

has opvv, which

may

It is not quite certain how these lines were divided, but and would the space at the beginnings of 11. 77 and 78, and the probabilities are that the arrangement coincided, as elsewhere except in 1. 51, with that of n.

barely

[]

[]

rightly identified.
it is

small detached fragment from the bottom of a column seems to be Both the hand and the texture of the papyrus are closely similar. If correctly placed, the height of the roll was about 30 cm.

91-2. This

last

The mark of elision word may be ///. In 1. 2

.
The

^

in the first line

of the original text

can of course be divided

(

is

doubtful and the

.

1092.

Herodotus

ii.

Height 23-1 cm.

Late second century.
Plate

V

(Col. ix).

Book of Herodotus is respectable compass than the Herodotean papyri which have hitherto been published, whether from Oxyrhynchus (18, 19, 695) or elsewhere
of rather

following group of fragments from the Second

more

Rylands 55, and a Munich papyrus in Archiv i. p. 471). It extends from chapter 154 to chapter 175, though some of the pieces are very small and the
(P.

Perhaps more scraps of this roll will eventually make their is derived from the same large find as 1082-3, and moreover was in the company of another fragmentary text written in a hand which in the minor samples is practically indistinguishable from that of the Herodotus. Meanwhile I print so much as I have up to the present been able
appearance, since 1092

gaps extensive.

The extremely mutilated state in which this papyrus proves to be not of happy augury for the numerous other MSS. which have still to be dealt with from the same source.
to identify.
is

The

small neat uncials are of the sloping oval type and

may

be referred to

128

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
;

the latter part of the second century

they are more careful and regular than

those of the Oxyrhynchus Hellenica (841), and are perhaps rather earlier in Though of no great height, the columns, which are strongly inclined to date.
the right, contained about 41 or 42 lines each.
stops, inserted

Punctuation
;

is

effected

by high

perhaps by the original scribe

blank spaces and the usual paragraphs

A

they are accompanied by short second, but no doubt practically

contemporary, hand
of Col. ix,

is

apparently responsible for a semicursive entry at the top

where a different version of a passage has been copied at length. may be due a few other small corrections and insertions, but since there is no difference in the colour of the ink no certainty is here attainable. The MSS. of Herodotus are divided into two groups known as the Florentine, which is headed by AB, and the Roman, represented by RSV. As might be expected from the analogy of other papyri, 1092 does not consistently support either family, but agrees here with one and there with the other. Readings of RSV occur in v. 6, vi. 6, viii. 24, ix. 32, of the Florentine group in i. 2, 3, vii. I, 5, viii. 22, ix. 44, x. 5 in viii. 7 the papyrus occupies a position midway between the two. The text thus exhibits a stage prior to the differentiation of

To

this writer

;

the families as

'

But there were already divisions, for, as has been mentioned, an alternative version of several lines in chapter 162 has been inserted from certain other copies at the top of Col. ix and occasional variants have
'

we know them.

;

been recorded elsewhere (cf. v. 5 and notes on viii. 3, 12). In omitting in V. 8 the papyrus is in agreement with the MSS. as against some other authorities. Readings apparently not otherwise attested are found in vi. 15, viii. 3, 12, ix. 1-5 (cf. ix. 12), 46, xii, 11-12, and xv. 4, the last confirming a commonly
accepted correction of Abresch.
Col.
i.

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ii.

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Col. ix.

Plate V.

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irpo(rra]|ai.

(5)

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1092.

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS

133

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5

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lines lost,

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Col. XV.

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THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
5
i.

]
to
:

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oia

€^[€€

MSS., om. RSV. H(ude) prints re in brackets. This fragment comes from near either the top or the end of a column, but since the papyrus is broken immediately above and below the letters of 11. i and 3, the point cannot be definitely decided. My numeration of the columns proceeds on the second alternative, and if that is correct, 1. 3 was probably the last of the column.
2.

re

:

so the older
:

3.

RSV.

V.

Only the bases of
2 sqq.
5. 6.

Others, and H. so PRSV before so the MSS. H. inserts 8. Anecd. 418, Schol. Aristoph. Plut. 388, Suidas, s.v.
: ;
:

, \
I.

The papyrus seems

have agreed with

C

in reading be (so H.)

;

^ other
than »;

the letters remain, but these

on

the whole suit

eXo[ better

A

[

MSS.

hypothetical division of the lines is adopted. the MSS. here apparently agree V. l.

on

the latter spelling.

on

the authority of Bekker,

vi. I.
5. 6. 7.
9.

is unlikely.

15•

vii. I.
3.

4.
5.

.8: ( ][ 8]: ^: [\( (\
This
2)1'

line

PRSV.

other MSS., H. so RSV; could also be read with ABCP. (SV) is equally possible, but

( ^
RSV,
S.

was probably the

first

of the column.

Other MSS.,

is

omitted in RSV. SO H. with most
:

MSS.

;

:

'
.

7]

(R Lex. Vind. 165)

RV.

;

ovte

RSV.

viii. 3. The Jv at the end of this line is preserved on the edge of the papyrus in the margin of Col. ix. It is too close to the beginnings of the lines of that Column to be the normal conclusion of a line, nor is there in the text an available final followed by a stop. I can therefore only suppose that ]v represents an alternative reading enclosed, as often, between medial dots perhaps was a variant on or vice versa, though no such would be the regular Herodotean form. variant is known, and e of is represented only by an ambiguous vestige, which could 7. just as well belong to an i, but this would leave no room for the e. R similarly has / Other MSS., SV is Certainly the natural preposition here, may have come in from and just below, though the analogy of expressions like Xen. Cyrop. i. 4. 18 pivnv might be used in its 'support. tpe Nearly all MSS. have in Hdt. viii. 140 with ). 12. What appears to be a final ]e stands, like ]i^ at the end of 1. 3, in the margin of the

[^

'

^
;

;

:

(((
'

(

.

^ "'

',

(' .

next column.

rather further out than

not so near to the beginnings of the lines as the ]v is, but is nevertheless would be expected, even in a line of more than the average length and since there is no e in the text hereabouts with which it can be readily identified, this may be another instance of a marginal variant. 22. avTos : so H. with the older MSS.; RSV. Te SO RSV ; ( € 24. [(K Other MSS.,
It is

]

:

-

.

1092.
ix; 1-5.
it

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS
an alternative version of
for
' ;

135

These
*

five lines give

was found

in certain copies

{) ^)
ev

11.

a[XX(oiy) cf. e. g.

9-13, with the remark that 874. The second

version differs considerably from the ordinary text, which coincides with what stands in In one respect it seems 11. 9-13; it has, however, left no trace in the mediaeval MSS.
clearly wrong, for

does not harmonize with
in
11.

isolated slip, but the accusative participles certainly produce rather longer supplements than

\.
is

This

may

be merely an

would be expected
80VS

that at the beginning of the line below.

could not be justified. 9-13. See the previous note.
in the

][ [ , . , ,
and

1. 4, where the lacuna is of the same extent as Perhaps, therefore, the writer was consistent and followed, though unless something essential has been omitted this construction

3-4, especially in

an inversion of the order found

MSS.

Cf.
:

1.

4.

30.
32.

SO

CPRSV
is

;

1.

\vhich has
likely

(,

though

it

may be merely a misspelling of been corrected from enough that the letters were understood to be divided

^^

as in

RSV.

42.

€£[:
:

so

MSS.
&c.,

;

€[ H.
;

other

MSS.

44. 46. X.
5.

(•. SO AB,

H.

om. RSV.

I.

][
yap
:

8

INISS.
suits the space better

than

t[ovs

so H., with

AB, &c.

;

om. RSV.

8]

(SV).

The division of these lines, which is calculated on the basis of the following 8-16) is likely to be approximately correct. with RSV. or perhaps 3. Tfws] There IS ai JVISS. Se earV II— 12. \\ has been followed in the supplement to its and not room for [], still less But of course may have been no more than a clerical error, and logical conclusion. have succecded. No safe inference can be drawn from the size of the lacuna The plural is used e. g. in iv. 71, v. 63. at the beginning of 1. 12. 14. The papyrus may have had eiaiovrt, with RV. 38-9. Line 38 is slightly shorter than the average and the point of division is uncertain, which is read by most MSS. but no arrangement will admit of the addition of after The two words are also omitted by Athenag. Legat. 28.
xii. 1-5.
(II.

fragment

:

\,

I

[],

[]

/

].

.

RV,

\

.
4.

€(,

\

S.
;

XV.

confirms the correction of Abresch

oi

MSS. There

is

no

indication

how the

lines of this

fragment were divided.

1093.

Demosthenes, Contra Boeotum.

These fragments of the

remains of seventeen consecutive columns, covering §§ 7-23 of the speech. They are written in an upright semicursive hand, clear but by no means elegant,

?

Height 29-1 cm.

^

Second century.
are comprised in the

136

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
The columns, which
is

dating from about the middle of the second century.

are

very narrow, vary

in

length from 27 to 31 lines

;

a deep margin

left

both

above and below them. Short lines are filled as usual by a conventional sign, which here has the shape of the figure 7. The text has been revised by a corrector, and to him are probably due one or two accents and in considerable measure the elaborate punctuation, for which stops of three kinds, high, medial, and low, are employed, as e. g. in 844. Their use, however, is not invariably accurate, for a medial point sometimes appears where one in the high position symbol would be expected there is a clear instance of this, e.g., in xv. 34.
;

A

resembling the letter
(xii.

s is

placed after the word preceding the entry

or
others,

19, xiv.

ii).
;

The
there

text of this papyrus, as of so
is,

many

shows mixed relationship

by common consent the
at V. 5-6,
set iv. 7
(

best

MS.
28

of Demosthenes.

however, some tendency to agree with S, Coincidences with S occur
against which have to be
xiii.

viii.

14, ix. 2, x. 6,
vi.

20-1,

xi. i, xii. 26, xiv. 13,
xii.
(v.

= Q),

21-2,

viii.

(= FQ),

10-11,
7-8,

10

(

= FQr),

xiv. 15,

XV. 23 (=r).

Of
;

the few peculiar variants

ix.

6, xii.

17, 21, xiv. 5-6)

none are striking

two of these

(xii. JJ, xiv.

^-6) proceed from the second hand.

Col.

i.

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5

8

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1093.
Col.
ii.

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS
Col.
iii.

137

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1093.

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS
Suvov
25

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1093.

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS
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8

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141

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xii.

Col. xiii.

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Col. xiv.

Col. XV.

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1093.

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS
Col. xvii.

143

Col. xvi.

About

\ [
'

12 lines lost.

ayvoiiv

22

15

\ [
8 or 9 lines lost.

8

About 14
15
7(uv

lines lost.

ov [roifw iK

\

\

23

i8(.iv

Unplaced Fragments.
Fr.
I.

Fr.

2.

Fr. 3.

Fr. 4.

[
Fr.5.

]

^^?[

]07[

144

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
viii. 14. [fy>]pa^at:

SO S;

the cross-bar of the following . ^ It cannot short horizontal mark over the u of eanv has no evident meaning. 27. satisfactorily be explained as intended to represent the i> and then replaced by that letter.

(
8\

FQ.

The Supposed

high stop

may

be part of

A

28.

was apparently omitted
2.

after

,
is

as in the text of

FQ.
S
(Se ft);

ix
(1

0ipe

ft,

as

emended by

the corrector,

the original reading of

others,
6.

.
:

MSS. \\ vvv yap r). should have been struck out as well as the v. and part of the are on a small fragment which is placed here letters with some doubt it does not join up exactly on either side, and its colour is rather lighter than would be expected.
Kat vvv
(cm 7.

The 17. The

of

/

;

X.

6.

^[77X01/;
[o]

20-1.
25-8.

.^ ^[\\ .
;

so Sr, B.

pe

]
;

others.
:

SO S and vulg.

;

6

FQ,

and
its

in
is

11.

25-6 and the

initial letters

the position of which

hardly certain

that of the

of 11. 27-8 are on detached fragments, second fragment is more particularly

doubtful owing to
xi.
10.
I,

colour.
slip

omitted by
20.

]
FQ.
:

yeyoms was a

due perhaps

to the influence of the next

two words,
tovs.

ovtos

is

xii. 3. V of
9.

10— II. S corr.
17.

/ (€((
SO the SO

[:
:

MSS.

Q

J

Other

has been converted from
;
:

SO B. with S

SO mOSt
is


MSS.
13.
;

Harpocration seems to have read

,

by which hand
f

Others.
(e/x«)'

MSS.

Q

(€(
1.

is

uncertain.
flTSt

S

and B.
variant

The marginal
is

prefixed
26.

like that
:

21. ai/Sper

8( MSS.;
so

sometimes used

in supplying

apparently new, but S records an omission, e.g. 844. 114.

cf. xiv.

The papyrus
:

agrees Avith Sr in omitting BeaptiTe after

.

]

h&nd, fpf

f

-

the symbol

xiii. 10.

FQ

text

r

;

S and as

v.

FQ,

B.

26.

is

also the spelling of S

.
is
i.

Cf. xiv. 21, XV. 15.

xiv. 5-6.

fpni

['], as

Originally written,

the usual order.

For the use of the figures

and
1 3.

to effect a transposition cf. e. g. 16.

15.

8( :

26, 1018. 38.

so S, so vulg.
:

.
;

19. TovTovi

XV. 23.
Fr.
1.

(
:

(.
;
;

Others.

with S.

SO ]\ISS.
:

ToCroi/

B.
Other?, B.
e,

SO

r

;

tnpa^e

The

first letter is

possibly

but the fragment does not suit
ix. 14.

vii.

28.

Fr.

2.

This fragment cannot well be assigned to

Fr. 4

may come from

x. 29,

but does not directly join.

,

1093.

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS
)
[(

y\ap Pr. 5. This fragment might be supposed to be part of § 14 but this cannot be reconciled with the (or of the next column, which would belong to about the twentieth line from the end, and there is no initial or within two lines of the twentieth from the end of Col. viii.

\,

145

Pr.

.

Apparently not

vi.

8-9.

It is hardly certain that the Pr. 8 does not appear to suit either x, 26 or xiv. 5. fragment belongs to this MS., or even which way up it should be read.

1094.

Demosthenes, De Falsa Legatmie.
17x6
cm.
Fifth century.

fragment from the upper part of a vellum leaf, containing on the verso portions of §§ 274-5, on the recto portions of §§ 279-80, of the De Falsa LegaIt is clear from the extensive lacuna between 11. 23 and 24 that the leaf tione. included more than one column and we have the alternatives of supposing that there were two columns, implying a tall and narrow page of about ^^ (^t least) 20 cm., or three columns, which would give a squarer page measuring some
;

A

28 cm. across and, if the lower margin was as deep as the upper one, of approximately the same height. The former is perhaps the likelier shape, but The script is a sloping in any case this was a large and handsome codex. uncial of medium size, carefully finished and with rather strongly marked conStops in it may date from the fifth century. trasts of light and heavy strokes two positions occur, inserted apparently by the original hand. There is a well;

defined vertical ruling

down

the margin of the recto, but traces of horizontal
inferior in quality

rulings are only to be distinguished in places.

No

particular

aiiiinities

are traceable in the text, which
is

is

to that of 1093.

A

conjecture of Dobree

supported

in

1.

38.

Verso.

5

€ \ ^^ \
npoT€p[ou
ovSeis

^€

[9

374

[emiLv eyoL

[

146

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

[ri/i

[
T01S

15

'€[€9
6[
([

[ [ [^ [9 €€ ) [€
[(^

([

?

275

2

€€[[ (?
[€

25

€ ] €€ ]€ []

[€
[9
Recto.

[
[

ayo

\]

e^eXey

€€
a

[ •]€• [ ]? [€(]
[t€s
01

[ ]€ [ € €]€
35

^ ]

€9

8

€€
Tiv(S
>

]€ [ €]€

[] [

1094.

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS

4

[\ [ ] ]9 [ \?

147

[ ] [ [€ ]9
ovs]

[] €
]?
(V

[

45 [evepyeaias

[?
[(
Q—

A

the abbreviation of avbpes cf. 1. 28 and e.g. P. Rylands 58. 92. stop probably followed but it cannot be distinguished. 22. SO ks ; /i6ep^therS. SO MSS. except S, which has 25. (^€\ey[xfiv and this is adopted by Butcher.
26. 27. 28.

.[ . For
12.

, : , € , ]
(€]
SYO
:

]] ?
room
for

9
eiy

i'cpois

MSS.

MSS.

\\•
(

€.
30.

] ]: (
(('.
:
:

SO

;

there

is

not

Xotjn-oj/,

which

is

found
is

in other

MSS.
with

SO

L and

vulg.

SQ,

Blass, Butcher.

SO k;

Other

MSS.

The

present

tense

consistent

in

1.

27.

37•

with most
38. 40.

\] . .
:

apparently stood in the
there
.
.

is

clearly
is

MSS.
:

.

omitted by the

instead of
Tivas
:

ineivov

]

so Dindorf with
:

Dobree;

om. MSS.

{

42. 43.
46.

]!

SO S^L text
:

A

;

cf.

Libanius
;

.

.
text,

not Dobree's
for

commonly accepted emendation
eKeivov

no room

which
;

is

first

hands in

SY

L

read byedd. has

The words perhaps came
'ApiaToyeirovos Others.

\ \

MSS.,

Blass, Butcher.
in

from a marginal note.

S, &C.),

:

om. A om. MSS.

[]

iv.

737. 27

.

ay. elpy.

^

mOSt MSS.

BlaSS.

105.

[ISOCRATES,]
25-6

Ad

Demonicum.
Fourth century.

X

8-5 cm.

a leaf from a papyrus book, complete at the top and bottom but broken at the side, so that about half the letters in each line are lost. It is inscribed in a clear semicursive hand of medium size, and probably of Ihe fourth
is

This

L 2

148
century.
to

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
a rough breathing in
;

Stops in three positions occur, apparently added by the original scribe, but a few accents are 1. 47 also seems to be due differentiated by a rather darker coloured ink than that of the text, which is of

whom

a brownish shade. Isocrates papyri have not as a rule been distinguished for good qualities

and in particular their chief representative for the Ad Demoniaim, P. Berlin 8935, which is attributed to the second century, displays an extraordinary divergence of tradition. 1095 follows the normal type of text and is on the whole a creditable witness. As might be anticipated, there are occasional
(cf. e.

g. 844),

(11. 3-4, 17), but agreements group of MSS., of which the chief is the Codex Urbinas (), the collation appended below, which is based on E. Drerup's include unsupported readings of the eccentric Berlin papyrus. at Strassburg is available for comparison only in § 45.

coincidences with the deteriores

with the superior

predominate.
edition, I

In

do not

Another papyrus

vovs

5

[\]

[€]peiv.

[]9
[€€]

[]• [€]

] [] [)( [ [] €
ovSe

^ [ [[ €[] [€ ^ []€[ ( [] [
Recto.

[]<6[]

/[€][]^
(u

[yap ^v

40

)( [][
[]
t

[(]

€'[

€ €€

Se

41

[€

Sia

15

[] ( []€[]•
[ev]

p[o]vois

[]

[^ [
[Aeyeir

€ €€
e

42

[

[]
[

Xeyeu'.

] []

[ [(
e[v

p[ev

1095.
20 \o^'

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS
aroTTOu

149

yap

[€]
25

awo[K]pvnT€LU

€€' []•
[]
Kiv8vv€veiv

T0L9

3

/

^ 9 [9 ? ^[
eav 5e

'

€€€.

^ [9 ? ?- [€ €[ €€ \

[]
tols

[ [? [9 [ [][ [
Se
<5e

[ [€€

[^

rais

Siauoiav

9
eivai

Sei

€v

70€

35

4

[] ]
[€

[ €€€
[

[ €]]9 [ ] [
Verso.

]€

e/xe

] [€]9

7]6'[•]

[ [ 5 [
45

[]] [ [] [ [
?]
]

]]( [[ [ [? [
[ [
[

^' []

]

[[ 7[

[

^.e

]

[[ [ []
[

]

I50

[
[tol9

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

\ov

55

[€9

[€

[
['
[ei

[? 6 [€9

[ [
'•

65

[ ]9? [^
€v6v9
[v€tv

[ ^] € ^ 9
nepi

]9' [ ^^ [ ]
ae
S]e

yap

T0V9

ctti

^ ] ]
]
^]

\ ^
ov
ev

€lko9

[

[

[

^6

[€
so
.^
;

]
5e
aei

]^ €€• ]?
;

]9

?]

€€ €9

. ](]
be
5. 7.
[f]p(iv
1.
:

3-4• ^0

fL*]" ^^l••"^

P. Berl.

:

€} .
:

SO

P. Berl. so probably the papyrus, not [Xejyftf with stands in this position in all MSS. and is sentence . . Xtytiu, an arrangeH. Wolf transposed it and 11. 12-16 retained there by Drerup.

9-1

The

[]

.

.

.

!
&C.
:

.

.

^
.
. .

.

Dieiup, wiih Blass, writes

..

Berl.

.

ment adopted by subsequent
1 1,

editors.

12.
17.

inconsistent with
30.
.

[ [] ; .
:

:
1.
',

ovTe,

:

Kaipovs
be

StobaeUS.

SO

,

The remains

of the

are slight, but they are

The

would clearly overload the line, Stobaeus) after add two words were no doubt omitted as in r P. Berl. They are retained by Blass and and other editors, but not by Drerup. 33. The angular paragraphus below this line marks a new section.
40—1.
42.
/uier

31 32. these

? €( ( (]
grave accent on

,

should have been a circumflex. StobaeuS.

evvoia9

Xot7r[a

:

SO

;

44-5•
in
1.

44. 55.
57,

47. <;

/. [
:

It is possible that

preceded

e

€ .'
as in

evv,
eV.

,
;

evv.

and

.

. Berl.

Berl.

(«').
may
have stood

the syllable

:

SO
;

P. Berl., P. Arg.

;

naibeiav

aWovt

P. Arg.

.

;

1095.
61. (k:
66. eavTOv

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS
The supplement
it

151

(.
'.

would be expected, but, as
the SCribe

at the beginning of this line is rather longer than includes four iotas and two omicrons, may be passed.

first

Vrote

(.

StobaeuS,

.

.
De
Pace, separated
leaves.

ISOCRATES, Panegyricus

AND De

Pace.
Fourth century.
leaf of thin

10x7-3 cm.

A practically complete
by the

though much wrinkled and discoloured
titles

vellum, containing the conclusion of the Panegyricus and the beginning of the of the two orations.
;

The measurements

of

the leaf are similar to those of 1080

it

bears no decipherable number, but this

must have been a rather bulky

little

volume, consisting of at least 150 such

The handwriting is a well-formed upright uncial, of medium size, belonging to the so-called biblical type and attributable to the fourth century some accompanying cursive documents ranged in date from the third century to
the fifth. Corrections have been made in blacker ink by a second hand, which has also added stops in three positions, occasional breathings, &c. Textually
there

remark beyond the usual absence of well-defined affinities to in 1. 14 is immediately followed in 1. 19 by mediaeval MSS.: an agreement with a vulgate () reading. No comparison is possible with the British Museum papyrus of the De Pace, since the commencement of that copy is lost. My collation depends on the edition of Blass.
is

little

to

*

'

Verso.

aWois
€iuai>>>
> >
> > >

[]
> >

<

5

<

( ^^

€8€

\€

^

1

152

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Toi

eiw

15 neiv.

€ ^
rrpoei

[]

[]\
6
irepi

SoKei

nepi

[]
20

[] []• (€(
Recto.
evTevOiv
nepi re

2

[\\€

€ €[\^
nepi


€v

TOVS
25

^^?.
fieye^oy


^'[[e]]

3

3

?•
;

[] []
Se

[e]|

?

51
.

(

1

4•

( '
:

ovSe

'.

;

\((,
ntpi
(-e)
;

nep\

MSS.

(
and

]^[^^

^

Vulg.

SO

vulg.

16. 22.

:

vvvL vulg.

19. Tept Te

The

24.

33. deleted here.

SO Dionys. Hal. Jsocr. 16 and vulg.; om. re . is that of the MSS. DionyS. SO MSS. was perhaps repeated by an inadvertence on the next page and
:

corrector's reading
'.

therefore

A

thick ink-mark between

may have come

through from the

other side.

1097.

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS
De
Imp. Cn. Pompei
15.4

153

1097.

Cicero,

AND In Verrem
Fifth century.

II.

i.

X

8.4 cm.

Plate

VI

(recto).

fragments from Egypt of the Pro Plancio, on vellum, were published last year by S. de Ricci {Melanges Chatelain, pp. 442-7)^ to be followed a few months ago by a papyrus of the Second Oration against Catilina (P. Rylands 61),

Two

and
It is

still

more recently by another of In Verrem

II.

i

(ed.

F.
its

Ramorino

in

Papiri

d. Soc. Ital.).

A

fourth Ciceronian fragment

now makes

appearance.

a portion of a leaf from a papyrus book, containing the conclusion of the speech De Imperio Cn. Pompei and the commencement of the Actio Secunda
against Verres.

The

script

is

a

small and

upright half-uncial,

with some
;

the tendency to a more cursive style, especially towards the ends of lines to form the base linked form of / with the cross-bar at an angle and continued Greek of the next letter is occasionally employed, e. g. in 1. 22 anctoritate, documents of the fifth century were found in the company of this papyrus and

With the commencement of the it is itself suitably referred. Verrine oration the hand becomes rather heavier, and very likely the new speech was begun on another day or with a different pen. The ink throughout is of the brown colour common at the period. The lines are long, and the leaf when complete must have measured some 18 cm. across, the column of writing having
to that century

a width of about 13-5 cm.

With an allowance of 5 cm.

for the

margin at the top

and bottom, the height of the leaf

be estimated at some 29 cm., the proporgreat deal can be got tions being thus very much the same as those of 1011. and a into a page of this size, with small writing and closely packed lines

may

A

;

further

economy of space was
words.

common

by the abbreviation or contraction of certain For punctuation a single high point was used, accompanied by
attained

a short interval before the next letter, e. g. 1. 62. In the text of this papyrus the chief point of interest is its relation to the Harleianus (H). Noteworthy agreements with that manuscript occur in 11. 12,

and 31, in the two latter passages against all other authorities. On the The affinity are opposed in 11. 18, 21, 4^, and 44• other hand 1097 and and the between the two, therefore, seems to be weaker than that between Turin palimpsest. Readings peculiar to the papyrus are limited to two slight variations in the order of words (11. 1^-6, 42-3)» an apparently erroneous addition in 1. 29, a fairly evident interpolation in 1. 58, and the insertion of viri, which is of very questionable value, in 1. 13. The collation given below is based
28,

on the Oxford editions of Clark and Peterson, supplemented occasionally by

154
that of Baiter-Halm.
are not noticed.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Orthographical details such as adgue, optume, inprobari

Recto

(§§ 60-65).

Plate VI.

adq> Hispdniense ah uno imperatore ee confecta duasq> urbes potentissimas

quae huic iniperio maxime min[i^ta[b^id[fttiiy Cartkaginem adq> Niimantiam ab eodem Scipione ee deletas

visum ut in uno C. Mario spes imperi poneretur ut idem cum lugicrtka idem cum Cimb[ris idem cum Teutonis bellum administraret in ipso Cn. Pompeio
nuper
ita [vobis

commeinorabo patnbusq> vestris

ee

in quo novi constitui nihil volt Q.
5

Catulus qua[m] in[ulia sint nova

summa

Q.

Catuli voluntate

constituta

recordamini quid tam novum quain adul[escentulum privatum exercitum

difficili

r p tempore

conficere

confecit huic praeee prae fuit rem optume du[ctu suo gerere gessit quid tam praeter consuetudinem

quam homini peradtt
lescenti cuius aei\as

a senatorio gradu longe abesset imperium adq> exercitum

dari Siciliam permitti
adq> Africam bellu[mq> in ea provincia administrandum fuit in his provinciis
singulari innocentia
10

gravitate virtute \bellum in Africa
deportavit qidd

maximum

confecit victorem

exercitum

vera td\m] inaudit^im
inodo vidit

quam eq R> triumphare sed omnium etiam

at earn quoq>

rem populus R>

studio vis{e]ndam et cdjicelebrandam putavit quid

tam inusitatum quam ut

cum duo

consules cla

rissimi viri fortissim[iq> essent eq

R> ad bellum maximum for midolosissimumq*

pro consule mitte
retur missus est quo q[uidem tempore
oportere
15

cum

esset

h nemo in senatu qui diceret

hominem pr[i]y[atum pro consule L. Philippus dixisse dicitur h se ilium sua senientia pro consule sed pro cons> mittere tant\a in eo r p bene gerendcLe spes constituehatur ut duorum consulum munus unius adulescentis virtuti committei'etur quid tam singulare quam ut ex scnatus
mitti
'

consulto legib> solutus consul ante

1097.
f[i]eret

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS

155

20

quani ullum ql[mm magistratum per leges capere licuisset quid tarn quam tit iterum senatus consulto t^iumphavet quae in omnib> hoininib> nova post eq R> ex hominum memoviam con stituta sunt ea tarn imdta [n sunt quam haec quae in hoc uno homine vidimus
mcredibile

adq> haec
tanta ac tarn

tot

exempla

nova p\rofecta sunt in eundein

hominem a Q. Ca[tuli adq> a ceterorum eiusdem dignitatis amplissimormn hominum auctoritate qua re videa[nt ne sit periniquum et h ferendum illorum auctoritatem de Cn.

Pompei dignitate a

vobis c[onprobatum semper ee vestrum ab

illis

de eodem

homine indicium populiq> R>
auctoritatem inprobari p[raesertim

cum iam

suo iure populus

R>

in hoc

homine

suam
35

auctoritatem vel

contra omnes qui dissenti\iint possit defendere propterea quod isdem istis
reclama7itib> vos ilium

unum
parum

ex omnib

deligisti^s

quem

bello

praedonum praeponeretis hoc

si

vos

temere fecistis et r p
considuistis recte [isti studia vestra suis consiliis regere

conantur sin
huic imperio

atitem vos plus turn in r p
vidistis vos istis re[p]ugnan[tib>

per vosmet

ipsos dignitatem

salutem orbi terrarum
qucty^e aliquando
i[sti]

attulistis

prindipes et sibi et ceteris poptdi R> universi auctori-

ta ti parendum ee fatean tur
30

adq> in hoc bello Asiatic[o] et re[gio Quirites
est in Cn.

solum militaris

ilia

virtus quae

Pompeio singular is
et

sed aliae quoq> animi virt[utes magnae

multae requiruntur

difficile est

m

Cilicia Syria interiorum nat\ionum ita versari nostrum imperatorem ut nihil regnisq> aliud nisi de hoste ac de moderatiores laude cogitet delude etiam {si qui sunt pudore ac temperantia

Asia

tamen

eos ee tales propter

mul
difficile est

titudinem cupidorum h[ominum nemo arbitratur

dictu Quirites

quanta in odio simus apud
35

ifM^J^i [nationes

156

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Verso
(§§ 70, 71,

In Verrem

II.

i.

1-4).

]

eor\t4\m qui

ad
ciiius-

[rem publicani adeunt maxime perspiciunt me hoc neq> rogatu facere quam neq> quo Cu.] P[o]m[p]ei graltam
\mihi per Jianc causam conciliari
tudine
[periculis
ati]t praesidia

putem

neq> quo mihi ex

cuiusquam amplitit

aut adiumenta honorib> quaeram propterea quod pericula facile

k[o]minem praestare
40
\oportet innocentia tecti repellemus

honorem autem neq> ab uno neq> ex hoc
consequemur quant
stiscepisse

loco

s]ed

eadem

ilia

nostra
o\b

[laboriosissinia ratione vitae si vestra voluntas feret

rem quidquid

in hac causa

[mihi susceptum est Quirites id ego

omne me r p causa

confirmo

tanttimq> abest u^t aliquant mihi gratiatu

[bonam quaesisse videar tit mtdtas me etiani simtdtates partini obsctiras par]tim apertas intellegatn
[mihi
necessarias vobisn intitiles suscepisse
tantis vestris beneficiis
45
[adfecttirn statui Qtiirites

sedegomehoc honore praedittini\
et

vestram voluntatem
et rationib>

r

p

dignitatem et salutem]

provijtciartim adq> s[ocio]

[rum meis omnib> contmodis

praeferre oportere

]

»»

<«[

]>

,

>]>

«««««««««« »»»»»»»»»»
[nemittem vestrtim ignorare arbitror iudices htmc per hosce
volgi adq> h[anc
50
d\ie[s\

sermonem
e\e

[opinionem poptili
[quae fam^

R> fuisse C. Verrem ad iudicium adfuttirum
[

altera actione responsurum h

neq>

ft

idcirco soltim
[

emanarat quod
tarn

iste certe statuerd\t

ac deliberaverat

adee ver[u]m
[etiam quod

nemo quemquam

audacem tam amentem t]am inpudentem

fore arbitr[abatur

1097.

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS

157

[qui tarn nefariis criminib> tarn multis testib> convictus] ova

iudicmn aspicere
u\t

aut

\os

[suuin populo

55

\sic

R> os tendere auderet audendum proiectus paratus ad audiendum praesto
reliqui faci[t
reb> tiirpissimis

est

idem Verves qui fuit semper

ad
sibi

est respondet defend{\tur ne hoc

qd

[nt in

aim manifesto

teneatur si reticent et a\bsit tamen

inptidentiae suae p\iidentem

[exitum quaesisse videatiir patior iud> et
virtntis v\estrae

moleste fero\

me

laboris

mei vos

[fructum ee latnros
verat nt
[adesset
[

nam

si iste id fecisset

quod

priiis sta]t7ierat ac delibera-

minus aliqnanto qnam inihi opus
accusatione

^

esset cognosceretur]

quid ego in hac
pl^-ne

6o

[paranda constituendaq> elaborassem vestra vero
obsctira iud> [esset
{neq> hoc

laus

tetiu]is

atq>

a vobis populus R> exspec tat neq> eo potest
sit is q[ui

ee content]ns si

condem-

natus
vero
[adsit

[adee noluerit et si fortes fueritis in eo quern
[

nemo

sit

au]sus defenders

immo

respondeat

summis

opib>

summo

studio potentissimoru\m

homimim

defendatur ce\rtet

65

[mea diligentia cum illorum omnium cupiditate ves]tra integritas cum istius pe {cimia tesiium consiantia cum illius patronoriim minis ad[q]> p[oten]tia'
turn deii{\ii7n
{ilia

omnia

victa videbnntur

cum

in conientionem certamenq> vefierint absens

si e]ss[et

6. The abbreviation of res publica is nowhere preserved commended by considerations of space here and elsewhere.

in

the papyrus, but

it

is

10. virtute gravitate

.

12. et co\ncelebrandam: so 13. viri'. 17.

HE;

om.
is

others.

om. MSS.
in this line
1.

The supplement
:

of unusual length and perhaps senatus consulto was

abbreviated, though written out in
18. <2/[/«m

19.

om. H.
:

may have disappeared above the q oi eques. hominem so MSS. except H, which has eodem homine\ this is adopted by The omitted words were added by the original hand. Clark. a Q. Ca[tuhQ) so ET a/que Catuli H, a Q. Catulo dett.
19.

A

stroke indicating abbreviation

21. eundem]

:

;

;

158
25-6.
28.
illu7n\
:

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
unum
: :

unum
T,

ilium

MSS.

deltgistis is also

the spelling of T.

istis

so

its

his

dett.

29. qua[r\e'.
that

om. MSS.

The

Avord

may have come

in

from a

failure to recognize

or perhaps, as Clark suggests, it is a corruption of Quirites, the abbreviation of which was frequently misunderstood. inserts in 1. 30 stood earlier in the papyrus. might then suppose that the Quirites which
vos
. .

.

attulistis

belonged

to

the protasis;

We

is probable in view of the size of the lacuna, but 30. The addition of Quirites with of course not certain cf. the preceding note. so H, Clark; virtutes antmi oihox^. 31. animi virtues 41. quidquid: so MSS. with the exception of H, which has si quid (adopted by Clark). bonam gratiam MSS. It is improbable that bonam was left 42-3. graiiam \bonam That in out entirely, since this would leave the supplement in 1. 43 abnormally short. the other hand, is rather longer than would be expected, and perhaps ego was 1. 42, on
;
\ :

omitted, as in one of the dett.
is omitted in H. 47-8. The title of the speech following as well as of the one preceding seems to have been given here cf. e. g. 1096. 4-5 and 1011. 90-1. 52. The apparent shortness of the supplement may be explained by the repetition of the letter m. of aut is considerably enlarged. 53. 55. It seems clear \}c^\.paratus was not omitted as in D, &c. 58. ac deliberaverai, which the MSS. omit, has doubtless come in wrongly from 1. 51. plane was written above the line is not clear. 60. Why the a 61. The supplement is quite long enough without enim after neque (so D, &c.) even if

44. vesiris

;

popuhts was abbreviated. Schol. Gronov. and dett. ; illius others, Peterson. so 64. isiius ment is four or five letters shorter than would be expected.
:

The

initial

supple-

1098.

Vergil, Aeneid
5-2

ii.

X 20•8 cm.
Fourth or
fifth

century.

Plate

VI

(verso).

Examples of Latin MSS. in square capitals are scarce, and this small fragment from the second book of the Aeneid, though textually of no value, has a palaeographical interest. The script is not particularly large, but it has Hands of this kind are the roundness and breadth characteristic of the type.
attributed to the fourth or fifth century,

and there

is

no reason to put

this

specimen any
cf.

later.

Wessely, Stud.

They may indeed go back Pal. App. The fragment is
i.

to a somevi'hat earlier period

part of a leaf of thin vellum,

which was ruled horizontally and vertically in the usual

way with a hard point. been fairly tall, the column consisting of some When complete the page must have twenty-three lines. The text has been revised by a corrector whose blacker ink is

1098.

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS
brown of the some stops
first

159

easily distinguishable from the

marginal notes

(1.

4a), inserted

in

hand. He also added occasional the middle position, and touched

there. He was not, however, responsible for the marginalia on the recto, which are inscribed in small half-uncials in an ink of the same colour as that of the text and may be attributed to the original

up others which he already found

writer.

Recto.

\aedificaut sectague intexunt abiete co\stas

\yotmn pro rediiu s\pmdanl•
[kite delec]ta

eafama

vagatur•
"

P'vtnri'^
f^•"?"?

virum

sortiti corpora•

furtim

[inchid\iint caeco [laieri pemt]iisq' caver?ias
20

[ingentis

uterumqne armato

m{\lite co7iplenl•

[est in conspectii

Tenedos noii^sima fama
reg7ia maneb[atit

[insula dives

opum Priami d\nm

[nunc tantum sinus et statio] male f\ida carinis

Verso.

Plate VI.

[s]cindi[iur incerttim studia in contraria volgus

40

primus
Laocon

ibi

ante omnis m[agna comitante caterva

ardejts•

summa

dectirrit a[b arce
c[ives

Laocoontis

et procul•

mise[ri quae tanta in\sania

credii^e^s avect[os hostis aut ulla putatis

dona carere
45

[dolis

Danaum

sic nottis

Ulixes

aut hoc

iticlusi

fjgno occultantur Achivi

[aut haec\ in nos[tros fabricata est

machina muros

1 7.

18.

The supposed / in the adscript may be a, but aeras is Some further letters of the illegible marginal note may
is

hardly suitable. have disappeared.

42. It
clear.

possible that three

or four letters
inserted

meaning of the curved mark, which was

by

preceded Laocoontis, e.g. haec. the second hand below this line,

The
is

not

i6o

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
1099.

Greek Paraphrase of Vergil,
25-2

Aeneid.
Fifth century.

X

14-1 cm.

broken diagonally on one side, from a Latin-Greek vocabulary to analogous text is P. Rylands 61, which contains part of Cicero's the Aeneid. II with a paraphrase in Greek. There, however, the Latin is In Catilinam The Latin words transcribed continuously, whereas here it is only excerpted. in parallel columns, both written by one copyist and their Greek equivalents are
leaf,

A

An

a well-formed uncial hand of medium size and dating perhaps from the fifth century. The vocabulary extended over at least two books, of which the explicit and incipit, inscribed in capital letters and enclosed in an ornamental border, are
in

work on so large a scale and preserved near the end of the second page. executed by so practised a hand is evidently not to be credited to a young and it is surprising to find it so full of blunders. Not only are there learner
;

A

frequent errors both in the Latin and the Greek, but the Vergilian order is not always maintained. Words from different verses are sometimes ranged in the

same

line (e.g.

11.

16, 21)

and

in

two places

(11.

1-6, 27 sqq.) there

is

a conless

siderable dislocation.

Some

of the mistakes have been eliminated

by a

cultivated hand employing a darker ink, but a good many remain, and no The corrector is attempt has been made to amend the disturbed order.

responsible for the accentuation, which in order to assist pronunciation has been applied to the Latin as well as the Greek, stressed syllables receiving an

acute accent

;

in

one case

(1.

6)

a mark of long quantity

is

used instead.

These

accents were often very lightly written, and were probably inserted in many The leaf, which is of stout places where they are no longer really visible.

vellum, was ruled on the recto with a hard point which has left a light brown mark the horizontal rulings are doubled so as to regulate the size as well as
;

the line of the writing.

There

is

no trace of pagination.
Recto.

aspiciunt

auriat
sparsasq-

co7ilapsam

Hi
moriemtir

1

1099.

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS

16

ab alia
cojicussam

?

ra

lamentis
10 itluldto

imnissis

ruqt
C\arf^q{go\
[per ai\f\mi]tiq
1

5

[volvuntuY
\exaniinis u]ngtdb•.
[foedajis]

[pugnis]
[fratide

20 [peiebas
[rogus querar

[sprevisH
[morietts

[ad fata
25 [eadein vocasses

[ambas
[evaserat fove
[

batq-

[

30
[

102

THE

1099.
5.
til'.
1. 1.

EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS

163

it.

7.
I

ab:
It

ad.
:

o. ululato

15.

written,
17.
1

other letter was originally written in place of the first of should be oxytone, and possibly the accent, though actually nearer to the t, was intended for the a. The aecent on in 1. 45 is similarly somewhat misplaced. was written is not easy to see. 22. Why the imperative and probably a defect in the leaf caused the Greek 25. Nothing is wanted before line to be begun further to the right than usual; cf. 1. 26. Several other flaws occur in this would be an unnatural order. leaf. (€ 26. ]oTfpos here can hardly be anything else than the termination of for But the accented e being a survival of the correct termination. does not account for the space, and since would more than fill it, this line tends to confirm the hypothesis suggested by 1. 25 of a flaw in the vellum at this point. 27-8. The remains of the Greek appear to suit nothing in the Latin nearer than
2
.

]
Some

ululat^o\u. cf. perhaps be inferred from that volvuntur and not volvantur was volvuntur is the original reading in Pc and was inserted by the second hand in y.

may

,
11.

\
]
The
first

.

(\

]

](

,

](5

685-6.
29. If
11.

was very probably a disturbance in the 1-6, and 11. 29 sqq. may return to one of the earlier verses. however is rather intractable unless we go back as far as 1. 675 ^oc illud fuit, which might perhaps be represented by e/ceti/o rovrt This would be of about the right length, but is not particularly satisfactory. 35. Clearly marked rulings terminate three or four lines below this one, but there are faint traces of further rulings lower down, and the column may have continued some ten
rightly reconstructed, there
11.

27-8 are

]

order of the entries, as in

.

lines

beyond
37.

ol toro has been converted from a u. and / were written by the corrector over 39. quaesivii'. 43. 1. The Greek shares the error. 44. 1. nexosqiue).
46.
\.

The second

.
1.

35.

/

and

5 [quaesitt's).

:

peribat.
:

was

necdum Py. 47. nondum possibly amended.
55.
1.

of

is

rather

damaged and

the misspelling

hunc.

a

i64

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

IV.

DOCUMENTS OF THE ROMAN AND
BYZANTINE PERIODS
{a)

OFFICIAL.

1100.

Edict of a Praefect.
i5-7Xii-8cm.
a.d. 206.
Plate V.

addressed by the praefect Subatianus Aquila to the strategi of the Heptanomia enclosing a copy of an edict which they are directed to post up in conspicuous places for a period of not less than thirty consecutive The edict is unfortunately disfigured by extensive lacunae which render days.
circular
letter
it difficult

A

to follow the sense at all closely,

that the object aimed at

and not much more can be said than was the repression of official extortion,

^?.
the

Complaints of
P.

this

Amh.

81. 6),

are not rare in the papyri (e.g. 240. 5, 284. 5, 285. 12, and prohibitions of it go back to Ptolemaic times (cf. P. Paris

61, P. Tebt. 5. 138-43, &c.).

What
had

particular class or classes of

oflficials

view is not apparent. The text, which is on the verso, is copied in a hand approximating to the literary type, and so, being accurately dated, has a certain palaeographical
praefect on the present occasion
in

interest.

' ,
On
the recto
[[;]]

is

1110.

vpeis

€9 ,
5

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Tfj

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1100.
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OFFICIAL
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Pap.
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of
line.
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written
19.
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^

5. added above the line. added above the before

of

ms

added above the

Pap.
extent of the lacunae at have supposed. The loss of the supplement adopted in 1. i. on account of 1. 23, but Alexandria

For Subatianus Aquila cf. the note on 1111. I the ends of the lines is uncertain, but can hardly be the basis in 11 2-21 has been roughly calculated on '2 might be preferred If is the natural place of promulgation. presumably have to be added in 1. i cf. e. g. B. G.

'^^:
elbi,\ois

3

eWt^e-Tf», Dittenberger, Or.

;\
1086.
4.

TOno]u

For

the supplement at the
ii.

^
:

^
cf.
ii.

3-5•

The
I

less

than

;

P.

Hibeh

Gr. Inscr. 665. ir-13
line
cf.,

end of the

, [,]
29. {a) recto 9

were supplied, U. 484. 9-10.
^

\:

would

«

rh

.^ []\
eis

p[e\Ya\ois

roi

«"^
13.

Kaff

[/,]5^

[\,{i\^n\a)y€vr,Tm

besides that inscription, ibid. 664. 4-5,

U. U.

18 the period specified is three months. the and also used in the analogous circular B. G.U. 646. 7, is the F. Zucker in Silzungsb. der K. Preuss. Ajad. 1910, letter of Subatianus Aquila published by is 'ganz gegen die Kegel in place of Zucker's remark that -713. have been preferred in the praefects bureau. seems to is somewhat misleading; are and may be for if rightly read, 10.

3-4• In B.

G;U.

372.

word

^,

,^

^ ^ €;

m

unlikely here.
1 1.

was meant ; the writer was clearly not very accurate. Perhaps cannot be read, but perhaps the second is a mistake for e. 1 4. fifth letters might be read as is a remarkable word ; the fourth and 10 of coHa/io is hardly however, does not improve matters, r, not , is clear. A Grecism which,

^

,

likely at this date.

i66
2 2. If the verb
is

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
line.

previous

The number

[^^,
of

the

first

syllable

letters

lost

at

the

would probably belong to the beginnings of 11. 11-22 is not

precisely fixed.

1101.

Edict of a Praefect.
28-7

X

17-7 cm.

A. D.

367-70.

Copy
Statianus,

of an edict prohibiting recourse to military praepositi on the part of

civil litigants.
i.

The name

of the praefect issuing this decree

is

given as

.

.

.

Imius

no doubt Flavius Eutolmius Tatianus (Dittenberger, Or. Gr, Inscr. 733), who held office in A.D. 367-70; cf. Cod. Theod. xii. 18. i, Cantarelli, La Serie dei Prefeiii, ii. p. 34. He begins by stating that the illegal abuse of military jurisdiction was a matter of his own personal knowledge (11. 2-12). Jurisdiction over civilians belonged to the praefect (11. 13-15) and their recourse to praepositi was only permissible when justice was required locally against a soldier (11. 17-21). Nothing else justified neglect of the proper civil courts, and future offences in this regard would be punished by deportation or confiscation, according to the rank of the delinquent (11. 22-5). The text breaks off in an incomplete sentence ordering the local riparii to report any cases which they might detect probably only a few words were wanted to conclude the copy of the edict, and if they were added it must have been either along the lost left-hand margin or on a separate sheet of papyrus, for this one is complete at the bottom and on the right-hand side, and there is no indication of a second sheet having been joined on. The encroachment against which this proclamation is directed of the
e.
;

military authority in judicial matters

is

illustrated

by the frequently recurring
In Cod. Theod.
xii. i.

imperial constitutions on the subject during this period.

was ordained Militaribiis viris nihil sit commune cum curiis ; nihil sibi licituvt sciani, quod suae non subiectum est potestati; cf. id. i. 21. i Numquam omnino negoiiis privatorum vel tuitio militis vel executio tribuatur (a. D. 393), ii. I. 9 Si quis neglectis iudicibus ordinar iis sine caelesti oraculo causam civilem ad militare indicium crediderit deferendam, praeter poenas ante
128 of A. D. 392
it

promulgatas intellegat se

),

deportatio7iis
et

nihilo

minus
i.

tione feriendum, Cod. Just.

sortem excepturnm (cf. 1. 24 below advocatum eius decem librarutn auri condemna46. 2 Praecipimus, ne quando curiales vel privatae
(cf.
11.

condicionis homines

ad militare exhibeaniur indicium

24-5 below). Military

1101.

OFFICIAL

167

arrogance and aggression form one of the main themes of the oration of Libanius De pairociniis (cf. §§4-5, 23, &c.) and a concrete instance is provided by P. Brit.
;

Mus. 408, where a complaint is brought against a praepositus that he had prevented certain criminals from being brought to justice (about A. D. 346).

[ ^ 88
6]09
]

89.
6

.

.

f>ii<Ti.i

[^

ojXtycoi/

6€]?,

-

6i]y

[]

ya\p e^ kv\](v^iv $•
av]ev
tcty,

^

kvopiav

1

5

25

[<»}

] € ] , ]\ . ', ] , • \ ] ] . ']. , ] [] , -[] , ,
5e

[]€(€ ]? ], €]€ ' .]

erre

\

^, , ,
',
.

.

.' 8-

' /

Xeyei*

[[/]]

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(

d \

€]
,

.
2.
t.

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from

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4•

g.

SeCOnd
is

[
of

14.

Tovs

23.

s

of ovs

corn from t. added above the

for -ras.

^/
22.

corrected
I.

line.

24.

1.

.

i68

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
.

' Copy of an edict. Proclamation of Flavius Eutolmius Tatianus, most illustrious praefect and from a few first comers, of Egypt. [My orders are] not based on information gained by I learn but on instruction in a way derived from what occurs in every city and district. from petitions that some persons of civil status, without [excuse ?], whether from malice or from perversity of judgement, in their desire thoroughly to worst their adversaries at law, have recourse to the local praepositi, presenting petitions to them and procuring exactions by their means from persons, as I said, of civil status. That this is forbidden by the law is For a praepositus has authority over soldiers, but not over civilians ; it is enjoined clear. on the praesides to [govern] them and to receive their applications. This, therefore, is for If any civilian has a difference with a soldier the future made clear by this proclamation. and relies on the vengeance of the praepositus and is confident of receiving assistance from him, let him apply ; for he cannot obtain requisite assistance on the spot from any one else. For should If, however, it is with a person of civil status, let him not attempt to do this. any one ever be discovered leaving his proper court and having recourse to unauthorized persons, if he is a man of common rank, I order him to be deported, and if he is a senator, I therefore command the local riparii, if they I subject him to confiscation of property. .' catch any civilian who has left his proper court and had recourse to praepositi .
.
.

.

suggests, that

3 sqq. This construction is not very satisfactory, preceded ov in I. 3 and that there is

on

that

and it is quite possible, as Mitteis no full stop at the end of 1. 5. But ov], and to keep e| view of the passage I should prefer to write as a parenthesis instead of substituting, as he proposes, something like

[?,

Neither
5. ei]i

pijo-ei

nor
this

suits the

(<[]:
2i.Ke\iav,

use of
xi.

els

fls

Luke

7

i""

'

remains
. . .

after

]

.

[]
?
xiii.

\\>.
12

for fv is frequent in the Koti»^, e.g. Diodor.
fls

dalu.

For

64.

457
7.

-noKis Koi ai

ivopLas,

and on the

significance of this conjunction of

ivop'ia,

Gelzer, Byz. Verwalt. Aeg. p. 62.

The

illegible

word

after av^ev

may

begin with

But such a recognition of the principle of with the very slight remains. patrocinium seems inconsistent with the quite general terms of the prohibition in 11. 17 sqq., as well as with the trend of contemporary legislation (cf. e.g. de Zulueta, Be Patroc. Vicorum, would be Gelzer, Byz. Verw. pp. 69 sqq.), and a vaguer expression like av\iv preferable. however, cannot be read, and the letter after is more probably or than p, of which part of the tail should be visible. av]eu too is uncertain ; ev may produces a tolerable antithesis to but belong to the following word. is highly conjectural. 13-14. By Cod. Theod. ii. i. 2 (a. d. 355) military jurisdiction was limited to criminal cases in which the defendant was a soldier; in Cod. Just. iii. 13. 6 (a. d. 413) it extends to differentiation of suits in which one of the parties was civil cases of a like character. No distinction is, however, drawn between a soldier is recognized in 11. 1 7 sqq. below.
reconcilable

,

and

(,

[(()']

! (,
ivop'ia
cf.

P. Leipzig

and

would be

.
criminal
coerceri.
cf.

A

and

civil cases.
:

cf. 6.

g. Cod. Just.

i.

5• An

infinitive is to

be supplied before
iii.

19-21. Cf. Cod. Just.

13. 6 (a. d. ^i•^) praesertim

.
4•

3^

''"'J''

"^^^

€(
;

cum id ipsum

videatur constetque miliiarem

reum
1.

nisi a suo iudice nee exhiberi posse nee, si in culpa Juerit,
is

The supplement
xi.

in

19

somewhat long, and perhaps
used by Plutarch, Pomp. 51.

Daniel (Theodot.)
21.

34.
Sianeipav is

,
e

re esse litigantium

was written

The

active

form

in ifisulam deporiari ; cf. e.g. Dig. xxxii. i. 3 deportaios auieni eos 24. accipere debemus quibus princeps insulas adnotavii vel de quibus deportandis scripsit, i. 12. i. 3 cf. P. Leipzig 65. 12 For relegandi deportandiqtie in insulayn . . . licentiam habei.
817/.

:
:

1101.

OFFICIAL

169

[][].
25•

^\\

the final letter

is

possibly

v, e.

g.

bi\

^,

.
A. D.

1102.

Report of Legal Proceedings.
20'4X25-5cm.
About
146.

report of a judgement delivered by a hypomnematographus, Cerealis. There are very slight remains of the column preceding that printed beloAv, and perhaps the earlier history of the case was originally prefixed. It was evidently a complicated and difficult matter, for references are made to decisions already given concerning it by the praefect Valerius Proculus (1. 7) and the juridicus Neocydes (11. 16, 24), familiar names which supply an approximate date for the present proceedings. The principal parties to the suit were the representatives

A

of a city (Oxyrhynchus

?)

and one of

its

citizens,

a certain Eudaemon, the

question at issue being the ownership of some property to which Eudaemon was the successor and the city asserted claims. Cerealis re-affirms a decision of the

Eudaemon to hand over to the city for the gymnasiarchy a quarter of the property, with exception of a part which had been bestowed as a dowry (II. 7-1 1). He ordains a further investigation by the local
praefect Proculus directing

strategus of the question whether certain land was included under the will presumably that under which Eudaemon had inherited the property and

if

the answer should be in the negative, that the land was to belong to the city The ownership of some furniture and slaves had already been (11. 11-15).
request was then made by the citydetermined by Neocydes (11. 15-16). keep the revenues of the above-mentioned land, and delegates to be allowed to Eudaemon these were awarded to them apparently for one year (11. 16-18). and Cerealis replies that they complains that his revenues had been impounded,

A

should be released when the terms of his judgement had been complied with, and declines to reconsider further questions raised by the delegates (11. 18-24).

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KepeaXcf.
.

.^. .
().
1 7•
1•
.

(^
. .


'(
€7*
/ceXei/:

-

... and and their associates and Copy of a judgement. year, Hathur 21. being present, Cerealis, priest and recorder, having considered with Eudaemon and
.

.

.

.

those in attendance dictated a judgement which was read out as follows " In accordance with the decision of the most high and gracious praefect Valerius Proculus, 1 think it right that Eudaemon, without taking any of his brother's properly, having once entered on the inheritance, should contribute the fourth part of the estate to his native city for the gymnasiWith regard to archy, with a deduction of the dowry previously given to the daughter.
the amount, seeing that in answer to my question he made no clear statement, the strategus . of the nome shall hold a more exact inquiry in the place where he lives, and if the arourae appear not to come under the testamentary covenant according to the laws and
. .

1102.
. .

OFFICIAL

171

ihe decisions read to me, . these arourae shall go to the city. With regard to the furniture and young slaves, a decision has been given by Neocydes, ex-juridicus." The delegates

having requested to remain
said
:

income of the arourae, the priest and recorder income of one year." On Eudaemon's declaring through his companions that his income had been impounded, and requesting that it should be released, the priest and recorder said "As soon as my orders have been carried out, and
in possession of the

"

The

city shall receive the

:

the city has received its proper share, it shall be released." The delegates having made a request for delay and also concerning the property standing in the name of the wife of Apollonius, the priest and recorder said " Neocydes has delivered judgement . . about this. Sarapion, assistant of the praefect, Trogodyte, went out. Read by me." '
: .

Perhaps [•][»^^«['. \i may be ^t, but the remains do not appear to suit O^vpvyany form. 3. ](>»'[], though commended by 1. 8, &c., is not very satisfactory, the first three letters being too cramped. cf. P. Tebt. 286. 1 5, where our restoration of Upevs is 4. [ii]pei;i Koi
2.

in

:

confirmed. On the rank of the see the note ad loc. Cerealis is perhaps identical with the Claudius Cerealis who was strategus of the /nfp/s in a.d. 138-9 (P. Brit. Mus. 1222. i &c.). 5. Cf. P. Tebt. 286. 15-18, which should be restored on this analogy as follows:

now

\} \
7.

proposed by Wilcken, Archtv v. p. 232. and no doubt also in C. P. R. 18. 24-5.
dei Pre/eiii, pp. 49-50.

[]
(Is
:

(or -iav ?)
Xe^[ii']

1 ] [^ |^][|'[1' [^(€ [1([(\\ . (] [] •/(

L. Valerius Proculus was praefect in the years
cf. e. g.

\\\ ([, []
9.

76. 22
is

but a past tense
is

rightly preferred

^ ,
a. d.

.
,

.

.

. had already been occurs in B. G. U. 592.11. 4-5,

145-7

>

cf.

Cantarelli,

Za

Serie

}

and 907.

5•

I

had read

by

Mitteis.

II.

Tji

more

cf.

1.

8) than Eudaemon's
:

sc.

Eudaemon.
14.
ii.

(8[]
}

.
.

likely to

own

mean the daughter of the testator (Eudaemon's brother ? daughter. The subject of eS^Xa)[a]f[i'] might be the strategus instead of
cf.

is

less suitable.

For

this intransitive

use of iiroartWeiv

Philo Uep\

p.

357)

''pos

suggests and perhaps a limit of time was here fixed, eras, which would not be inconsistent with the very slight vestiges. e. g. 16. Other references to Claudius Neocydes occur in P. Fay. 203 (= Preisigke, P. Cairo i), P. Brit. Mus. 196. i, B. G. U. 245. ii. i, 378. 17, 1019. 5; cf. Archtv iii. p. 104. 18. iviavyTov] is very uncertain. 23. The wife of Apollonius may be identical with the mentioned in 1. 11. 24-5. Cf. e.g. B. G. U. 592. ii. 9-10 and Gradenwitz, Einfuhrung, pp. lo-ii; [>']/[£«() is a doubtful reading, but seems justified by analogy. For the spelling which is correct, cf. Wilcken, Theb. Bank. p. 58. Aethiopic slaves are mentioned in P. Flor. 50. 62, 94.

].

(,
iv (tbti

.

ad fin. (Mangey,
Gen.
1 6.

^

^,

172

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

1103.

Proceedings of the Senate.
25-5

X 6•3 cm.

A.D. 360.

minute of a report made to the Oxyrhynchite senate by Eutrygius, formerly a logistes, concerning the payment of certain recruits. The dux, or commander-in-chief, on visiting the city had received a complaint from these Eutrygius states that his department recruits that they had not had their dues.

A

had satisfied the dux that the complaint was groundless, and that the recruits had as a matter of fact been paid more than they were strictly entitled to. The payment in question is apparently to be brought into connexion with mentioned in several Leipzig papyri of about the same period the xpvaos 8 (c. A.D, 373) an In P. Leipzig as 1103 cf. 34. verso 7, 61. 14, 62. 3, &c.
;

^^,').

quoted limiting the sum payable to recruits to 10 solidi, and in A.D. ^y^ it was fixed at 6 solidi by Cod. Theod. vii. 13. 7. 2, where the payment is described as an allowance for clothing and expenses {gratia vestis ac siimptuum). At the time when the present document was drawn up no such general regulation can have been promulgated, since according to 1. 7 the amount was determined by the Treasury. Mitteis has raised the question
imperial ordinance
is

(Introd. to P. Leipzig 54) whether this

upon the municipalities where the

burden was borne by the State or fell were raised it is now sufficiently clear that the latter of these alternatives is to be accepted. This text is written on the verso of 1104, which is over fifty years earlier For other records of proceedings in the local senates cf. B. G. U. 925, in date. C. P. Herm. 7, Archiv iv. pp. 115 sqq.
recruits
;

...

09 )
5 i'eoXeAcrcuj/

^ ?, ^{)\{){9)
,

'Tnareiov

(€),
ci7r(ej/)•

\{)

' 9 ^^^
k^ovaias

() ^^
\{-

(^

Trpos

,

]€

^

1103.

OFFICIAL

173

\^ []
[

,
35
letters
5.
]

avfvc/

Pap.

after the consulship of Flavius Eusebius and Flavins H}'patius the most Mecheir 17. At a meeting of the senate, the prytanis being Asclepiades son of Achilleus, ex-gymnasiarch and senator, Eutrygius, ex-logistes, said His highness my lord the most illustrious dux, Flavius Artemius, having auspiciously made a visit here, ve advised his excellency that the new levies raised by us for military service had falsely represented themselves as not having received the sum agreed upon with them, and that we had previously paid them not only the amount fixed upon by the treasury but a further consideration and his highness accepted [this statement].'
illustrious,
:

'The year

;

the titular use oi ex

, , : ^
3.

Fl.

Eutrygius

is

mentioned
see

in

.

5,

where also he

is

and

893.

2

5. 8.

cf.

P. Leipzig 35. 8.

:

cf.

P. Tebt. 311.

9.

An

object for

lacuna.

,
1104.

Mommsen, Ephem.Epigr.
Mus. 233. 5
note.

P. Brit.

(,
v. IS

described as pp. 128-9, "^^^
P. Flor. 7
1

e.g. 133. 4 passivi.
cf.

.
a. d.

On

27-9 and

e. g.

,

probably to be supplied in the

Application for Payment.
25'5Xi6'3cm.
306.

A

letter

from Aurelius Hieracion, prytanis, to the

logistes,

requesting

payment of a sum amounting

to over fifty talents of silver in order to

meet

expenditure on the public baths.

Repairs of the baths of Oxyrhynchus figured
;

conspicuously in the municipal budget at this period

cf. 53 and 896, which are noteworthy that the present outlay is stated to have been authorized by the praefect Clodius Culcianus, whose period of office is brought down a year later by this allusion. At the end is an endorsement showing that the money was duly paid over and an acknowledgement given for it by Hieracion. Cf. Wessely, Stud. Pal. v. 66 sqq. The document is a good deal rubbed, and is difficult in places to decipher on the verso is 1103.

dated ten years later than 1104.

It

is

^,

^ \'\ ^

(\\'\

^\\ ]
;

[
<j•.

[^][[)

174

Avp-q\io\s

5 TTpurayei?


[]
]
.

]( ^) [€()
9 {^)
?
.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Novivos

[-^).

€7[^]'

[

7)^

^
[.]/[.
.

[8][] ^?
.]$•

,
.

8
i/y

?) ^^) ?
k^o8Laa\6rivaL
e|_r;[

(^) {)
[9 [
7re[

\

[e/c

[ ()[-() , [€ y

15

[7]
[]

3rd hand

()

,
[8]

[} 9

(and hand)

2
4th hand
.]
• •
.
.

[] [' ]
.[...].
^]T^y
. .

^

^
.
1.

()

[ ,
()
. .

[].

()

(<)
.
.

(

)

,

.

,

(

)

[

[/^]

25

() (

() () () ' () () ( . )() () [)
[..]....

,
[]

()
(<)
. .

()

[,]

?)

.

/3

.

.

()

?)

[]
1 6.

Tois

aWois.

'

The

sixth consulship of our lords the

his dearest Aurelius Seuthis, also called Horion, logistes of the Oxyrhynchite

Emperors Constantius and Maximianus. To nome, from

Aurelius Hieracion also called Noninus, ex-gymnasiarch, ex-prytanis, senator, prytanis in office of the illustrious and most illustrious city of Oxyrhynchus, greeting. I request that

1104.
orders

OFFICIAL

175

the city's funds from the sums publicly accordance with the letters of his highness my lord the praefect Clodius Culcianus which 1 lately handed to you ... a further sum of I think fifty talents and four hundred and fifty denarii of silver, total 50 tal. 450 den, this payment to me, so that it right that the curator of the civic chest should be sent to make there may be no obstruction to the interests of the public baths or to the other interests of my prytany. 1 pray for your health, dearest friend.' Date by the regnal years of the

apportioned

may now be given to pay me out of ... to be used for the expenses in

emperors, and declaration of the curator a receipt.
3.

(?)

that

he had paid over the money and obtained

For Aurelius Seuthis

are rather cramped, but the reading, which three letters of suggested by Wilcken, is doubtless correct; cf. e.g. 55. 6-7. cf. P. Leipzig 63. 6 7.
6.

Gelzer, Byz. Verwali. Aeg. p. 40. or of course 8. «s is perhaps for

^
The
last

cf.

895.

[]
3.

',

,

^^
.

,
('!
',

was

it

may

be a genitive termination governed by

e'^,

or an

adverb.

new date is here supplied for the praefecture of Clodius Culcianus, who according 10. He is known to have been to this passage was still in ofiice on May 29, a. d. 306. praefect in Feb. a. d. 303 from 71 ; cf. 895. 8 (a. d. 305), P. Amh. 83. i (about a. d. 303,

A

Archiv
B.

v. p.

268).

cf. is USed instead of 1 4 the title C. p. Herm. 94. i, and note on 1. 21. The or of his father. 21. Apollonius was presumably the name of the is possibly before remains do not suggest ( ) preceded or 2 2. Some such word as apy{vp'iov) as in 1. 11, but the vestiges are very ambiguous. 23. Perhaps but I cannot reconcile this with the remains. suggests 24. The apparent 1 3.

In 55.
3,

G.U. 934.

( ,

7//[];.

.

:

[). /^.

1105.

Notice to the Agoranomus.
14-2x10 cm.
A. D.

81-96.

description of this papyrus was printed in Part II, 339 (= P. Brit. Mus. but since some scepticism has been expressed concerning the accuracy of 805), the interpretation there given (Manigk, Gldiibigerbefriedigung durch Nutzung, cf. Z. Sav.-St. xxx. p. 283), and I have ascertained, as I think, the nature p. 23 of the yearly payment, previously described as obscure (cf. note on 1. 21), it is The formula of this document, which desirable to publish the complete text. papyri of the end of the first century, is common to a number of Oxyrhynchus

A

;

was discussed in the introd. to 241; cf. Archiv p. 194, Wenger, Stellvertretung, There is, however, still some doubt whether in such authorizations to the p. 80. means * to register or to draw up a contract. agoranomi the verb
i.
*

'

'

176
It

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
originally interpreted

pp. 307-8, 423,

by us in the former sense (cf. Preisigke, Giroweseii, 446 ^), but the latter, which was advanced by Koschaker in Z. Sav.-St. xxxviii. p. 289 is, as I understand, now preferred by Mitteis.
was

5

TTJ

] 68^ ? ? ^
€0'

.>9 ^ 9 [] ^ ^ ^
6

9 ?

/€€9

15

[]6 []? ? €[]?

^ {\? ^
en

7€€

€i9

()€,

?
enl

^lepaKo?

*],

1.

[ .
20
9•
1•

({). ([?

? ,€^? () ^\\? ^{)
[e]0'

)(6

?? ^?
%?
.

.

.

.

.]

[? ? ^

'

.

.

.

.

.

COTT.

from

cop,

Phanias, nominee of Phanias son of Sarapion, to the agoranomus, greeting. Register a contract of mortgage for Thoonis son of Thoonis son of Thoonis, of the city of Oxyrhynchus, of the property of the mortgager situated at the Serapeum at Oxyrhynchus
'

(?)

1

The

occurrence of KaTaypa<peiv in these

verb seems to have been regularly used where sales were concerned. rather than be expected ?

'/

is

more frequent than Preisigke supposes On his view would not

'/
;

that

1105.
in the quarter of the

OFFICIAL

177

South Square, namely, three-fifths of a three-storeyed house, below a cellar, and the courts belonging thereto, and a stone well and other fixtures and the entrances and exits to them and appurtenances, being joint and indivisible, which Tbekis daughter of Hierax son of Thoonis, of the city of Oxyrhynchus, has mortgaged to him for a capital sum of 400 drachmae of silver for a period of three years, with the right of inhabiting the said three parts of the house and the rest of the property in lieu of interest, on condition that he shall pay annually the charge for the renewal of the mortgage, being of the value of 30 talents of copper. Good-bye. The . . . year of the Emperor

which

is

Caesar Domitianus Augustus Germanicus
1 8.

.'
. .

Other examples of occupation of house property instead of

interest are P. Brit.

Mus. 1 168 and B. G.U. 1 1 1 5, which were discussed at length by Manigk, Glaubigerbe/riedigung, In those two documents, however, there is no technical mortgage of the pp. 21 sqq. property, as there indubitably is, notwithstanding Manigk's objections, in 1105. For a later instance (a. d. 608) see the papyrus published by Wessely in Wiener Siud.wn.'^^. 130-1
TTpbs 8e
.
. .

Tf[Xos] cf. 274. 21—2 Naber, Archiv i. p. 314, had already suggested that this was an annual of the terminaimpost, avavi is the most probable reading of the first five letters, and the tion is also fairly clear ; I am, therefore, confident that the payment to be made by Thoonis was connected with the More doubt attaches to the identification of the figure In the original description of this papyrus 8 was adopted at the end of the line. but that sum is larger than would be expected in view of the fact as the object of ; that the tax on mortgages is known from 243 to have been only 2 per cent. At the normal ratio between silver and Ptolemaic copper of i 450 (242. introd.), 4 talents of copper are 1 3^ per cent, of the capital sum of 400 drachmae. Quite possibly the actual tax was but it can hardly be supposed not the only expense involved in the process of Mr. Bell, who has kindly that extra charges could raise the percentage so high as 13^. looked at the passage, agrees with me that a, which would be 3 J per cent., instead of is and to regard palaeographically unsatisfactory, and hence I prefer to read the figure as At this, not as the amount of the TeXos, but as the amount on which the reAo? was paid. a ratio of i 450, 400 drachmae of silver and 30 talents of copper are equivalent (cf. 331, where these identical sums again stand side by side) and, as is clear from the numerous examples (242-3, 327 sqq.), it was the rule in documents of this class for the capital is accordingly not to be amount to be expressed in terms of both copper and silver, altered to but some word like must be understood. [For the literature on which must now be reconsidered, see B. Schwarz, Hypoihek, p. 118.]

21.

\^\€
&C.
;

(
'.

^^

xp^eo^vs

!

Flor.

.

6,

.

( : ,
.

.

.

.

,

.

oIkIos

,

.

//€[]?

,
.

.

{^)

:

;

:

;

,
raided

,

iioe.

Letter to Paulus.

9•53•2

cm.

Sixth century.

The writer of this letter, apparently a military officer of rank, instructs his correspondent, probably a subordinate, to go to a certain village which had been
by some neighbours, and
protect
it

from further molestation.

Armed

178
intervention
is

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
threatened, in case of a repetition of the offence.
their
'

Both the

sender and the scribe add

vise

'

{legi) at

the foot of the document.

)[.

5

9 [9 9 €€,
aypoyehovas
.

+

oi

[] [
[

Si^^ctypi

)

€{) ^,
]

.{]

Tavp{

)

(2nd hand)

.

]6€9

kBiSa^av

.]

.

^. , , .
]
/[
]

ro?s

yevov

(

?

Ti\y\as

Tives

€[)(]€

Toh

\^[^

/
10
1st

hand

On

and hand
7.
1.

(=

( ).
+
'

the verso

^. { ^(
(^rd hand)
legi scribus.
)

+

/e£;t.

+

)

€()
.
.

€{]

[

or

«Vt/xctVatf»'.

.

g.

of

corrected from

1.

(or -at€v)

1.

SCribaS.
.

son of Taur ... to Paulus son of (?) Sillagr . brother of Narroous, people of have come and informed me that certain neighbours have again attacked them and ventured to [carry off other objects belonging to .] and the people of the said village. Go to the said village and preserve their inviolability, and if any persons attempt to do any lawless action to them or even to contemplate it, instruct their leaders to abstain from any such outrage. For if they persist, a troop of soldiers will come on them and seize and hand them over to a tribunal to be punished for the lawlessness upon which they may venture. (Subscribed) Read by me. Read by me, the scribe.' Address on the verso.

Kommon
23.

Pachon

The

.

.

.

.

.

A similar local feud is referred to in B. G. U. 1035 (Wilcken). For the endorsement legt at this period cf. e. g. P. Cairo Cat. 67030. 6. 67031. 17 I would suggest that the subscription is + proronatur for proponatur \ cf 1. where Wilcken's [Archiv v. p. 445) is no doubt right.
2-4.
9.

In
16,

1107.

OFFICIAL

179

1107.

Letter of Eudaemon.
6-4

X 3•4 cm.

Fifth or sixth century.

An order to an assistant from an official, whose status is not mentioned, not to permit the removal of the produce of a cultivator until he had paid the rent due to the landowner, who is described as a nurse. The handwriting suggests the fifth century rather than the sixth.

+

*€8

€9

[]9
avTrjs

Tov

Kvpiov

€€

? ,
5

,

8

,
{)
;

€,
the verso

On

+
3.

€{)

)
Pap.
1.

^'.

}€

8.
5. 5• ^

xofirov.

4•

»'"

^.

SO in

1.

of ^l^f corr.

Since the nurse of the lord Sophronius is owed rent by Pstheious son of Phutos who cultivated her land, allow no one to touch what is left at his threshing-floor or the green crops until she has received her rent in full. I have to direct this letter to you, and if that I learn that any one has taken any thing of his, I shall demand from you personally all (Addressed) Deliver to John, assistant, from Eudaemon.' is owed her by him.
*

1108.

List of Officials.
34.ixi2-2cm.
Late sixth or seventh century.

A

short

list

of persons bearing various
2

minor

titles.

The names

are

throughout

in the accusative,

but the purpose of the

list is

not stated.

i8o

+

{) ^ , €(€)
+

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

5

^^{) €[] [)

€{) {) [€)

, (
^(),
[

{) (),
?),

,: {)
3-

) ^
6.

{)

Kvp{ias)

^,
€{)
13.

^(^)^
{
),
[

'AXe^a[vSpov),

'Afj{

}.

Pap.

of

COTT.

e.g. P. Brit. Mus. 409. 12, P. Flor. 36. cf. WeSSely, Al/erswdlZ. im Philogelos, p. 23 cf. e.g. 126. 23. 6. cf. 6. g. 127. 5, 144. 13. 7. For 10. There is probably no loss at the end of the hne. 11. ab acHs \ cf. P. Flor. 71. 509, where an

•{)
:

-.

19,

B. G. U. 931.

i

=

a

jrptyict7r(aptor).

:

immediately follows
23. 4.

13.

;

cf.

43. recto

ii.

26,

942.

6,

1139.

2,

P.

Hamburg

(0)

DECLARATIONS TO OFFICIALS.
1109.

Selection of Boys
io.3Xio-9cm.

((.
a.d. 160-1.

An

unaddressed application requesting that a boy
list

who had
cf.

arrived at the age

of thirteen might be placed on the

of persons paying a reduced poll-tax of
also

12 drachmae.

The formula

is

the same as that of 258;
11.

478 and 1028.

The

'past 23rd year' mentioned in

9-10 and 13 probably

refers to the reign of

Antoninus.

fragments of the adjoining sheets adhere to each side of
\TI'\apa

*/2/[]/9

[][9]
5

\\] []1
15
[•

, (€6) €() {^) , {) [€] () 6{) ' {€ ) {^) {6€)
6€

^

[]? §[]

§?[•]

[]

€6 (9) {) " [€]{) []() []
€//€

•]

{9)

? () ^ ? () *9 ?
1109.
e/y
et
I'ioy
' '

DECLARATIONS TO OFFICIALS
roll,
it.

i8i

This document was made up with others into a

and small

-

e^

yovkcav

-

in

€[€8€\{\-

['

•]®^°5'

e/y

{pLa8eai)

(eVet),

eivai

[\.

(eroi/yj

en'

jfjs

.

.-

[]9
Pap.

(^)
more
so in

e

.

[.

.

.

.

Vestiges of the beginnings of 3

lines.

3.
'

!

8. vios

Pap.

;

1.

14.

From Hermippus also called Harpocration, son of Horion elder son of Hermippus, his mother being Thais daughter of Pekusis, of Oxyrhynchus, through his friend Dionysius son In accordance with the orders concerning the selection of boys who have of Didymus. reached the age of 13 years if their parents on both sides are inhabitants of the metropolis daughter of A rated at 1 2 drachmae, my son Ptolemaeus by on was listed in the quarter of Teumenouthis as having reached the age of 13 in the past 23rd year wherefore coming forward for his selection I declare that he is a person rated at 1 2 drachmae and that I am similarly rated at 12 drachmae as registered in a poll-tax list of the past 23rd year at the Upper Camp quarter, and that the father of the mother of my son, A on son of Harpocration son of Harpocration, his mother being Heracleia, was similarly rated at 12 drachmae
.
.

.

.

.

;

.

.

.'

.

.

eni mv 258. 9—12, where similarly read e\la]iv, 6 v[los in accordance with Wilcken's correction, made on the analogy of an unpublished Leipzig papyrus, in Archiv v. p. 237. irayr] had been proposed by Wessely in Sitzungsb. K. Akad. Wissen. Wi'en, cxlii. 9, p. 36, but the remainder of his restoration is inadmissible. For the term cf. the phrase iv ^ (e.g. 79. &C. 11), 257. 23 [e]" aveniKpirois \a\oyp^{<pia5) 12. cf 478. 22—3
7.

:{),

Cf.

8

^

.

.

.

^,

',

' 6•^

.

(

;

l82

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

1110.

Census-return.

5•7 II-8 cm.
This census-return, which
is
is

A.D.

li

preseived on the recto of 1100, though mutilated,

of interest as being concerned, like P. Reinach 49 of the year A.D. 215-16, with Antinoopolis (cf. 970). It resembles the Reinach return in being addressed
to a board of three persons from one

,

to superintend the census in one of the districts of the city.

who had been chosen The

(by the senate)
return
is

made

by a
1.

citizen of Antinoopolis, apparently a

Incidentally it adds to and provides new evidence for the date of the praefecture of Aurelius on Papirius Dionysius (11. 6-7). Both the beginnings and ends of the lines are lost the extent of the lacunae can be measured by 11. 6-8, but it is uncertain how the lines should be divided, and the arrangement adopted is only hypothetical. Two diagonal dashes have been drawn across the top left-hand corner.
chiefly of slaves.
i),

young man, whose household consisted the list of Antinoite demes (cf. the note

^^ 2
2nd hand
5

20 letters

j/oou

....

[ [, '[ 2
(eroy)

letters
9

]
]
. .

^ ^
rfj
ei'y

'/9

}
{€€)

rois

{)

[ [] [ ]. €]\[- [ - \ [6
.
.

.];

letters

]

€9

^\^^
[]]

[]\
]
etV

k^v^aTos

[])([
]

]

.[.... ev

^

[

....].

]

10

[^
1110.
.]

DECLARATIONS TO OFFICIALS
kv

,
.,

(() [

[•)(
[.
. . .

? ]
1
]
.

6 letters

^[*

^9
[

7[
\
1

?
]
.

? [{)
[

15 letters
?

19 letters
1

]69
.

? ]?
npbs

183

€/€[>

hoi

?
,

'0|

{^)

,

2 letters

15

[

20

letters
«[

(^/)]

;

15 letters

[

17 letters

-?
]

?
i^'^^^)

[

[
24
30
.

5 letters

23 letters 14
letters

^?

^^>

?? ^?
{^)

??
. (/)
^

,

6

,

{)

[

^

letters
.

]€ivapovs

^ {) ,
'^^'

[

14 letters

[

2.

«..^.
corr.

[? [ € [€9 [^ ^ . ^
20
[.
.
.

€\
.....

letters

]?

(^'"^^ ?)

.

.

^]
14 letters

\

']
'^«^1

?'«^W«

32

letters

[.
6.

'^ ^''°^'

from epMtou. added above the line.
corr.

Fifst

e

n.

of eppitet ovet an erasure ? 18. iBu,. Pap. Pap.
.

r]a
.

21.

before of .c.ov.

from
I.

Hadrianian tribe also occvirs in 1. 4. 2-q Cf P. Reinach 49. 2, as corrected on
.p6. rv tr• O.V.W associated with the

«.

t.

and

•^..

(cf.

1.

2) are both

new deme names.
^

p. 240, ro.r

[>.
^
^

and should be restored in the present case also m the ongmal would'hTrdly fill the lacuna. It is not clear MarTsaipL r. being raised appreciably above the not abbreviation of roC was intended, the
;

a.oypa^h ^^

yp6,paro.

Perhaps the

,^, .^ ..
a.

A new deme
-m

of the

\'

•^.

n'.n.(i.7n-L a.p.dn^Tc

was

especial y

but

that an

,

i84

iv. p.

and

[ 4.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
:

556.

5•

\

this very appropriate supplement was suggested by Wilcken; cf. Archil) Clearly neither of the two known Hadrianian demes, Y>.akes (B, G. U. 301. 2) is possible in place of (. G. U. 709. 24), suits the remains, but is the termination of the name of some athletic festival, perhaps

which cf. B. Brit. Mus. 1164. (/) 14-16. may be read ; some such word as Either or ] probably preceded. For M. Aurelius Papirius Dionysius cf. Cantarelli, La Serie dei Prefeiti, p. 61. The papyrus provides a welcome confirmation of the inference that he was praefect in a.d. 188. (eroy) e]i/effTOs Fayum census-returns were not usually sent in until the 7. year after the census-year. From other districts, however, there are several examples, besides the present, dated in the actual year of the census ; cf. P. Reinach 49, P. Brit. Mus. The editors of P. Brit. Mus. 915, P. Hamburg 7, Wessely, Stud. Pal. ii. pp. 27-8, 31. 915 were wrong in suspecting an error on the part of the scribe, not noticing that the date in 1. 41 is confirmed by 11. 20—21. cf. P. Reinach 49. 7. For 9—10. Cf. P. Reinach 49. 1 1 [«']&) ([. .]) Rcinach, /3^[] Preisigke), Strassb. 34• 9> where similarly is probably to be not read; for ihe at Antinoopolis see also P. Brit. Mus. 1164. [c) 12-13. The demename has occurred in P. Hamburg 15. 3, 16. 12, P. Brit. Mus. 1164. {t) 23, &c. lo-ii. Koi is probably to be Supplied in the lacuna. 18. . (e.g. B.G.U. 123. 13, 137. 10, 15) is [ is apparently another name; improbable. 21-2. Cf. 480. 9-1 1. For the omission of y in i{f)iois cf. e. g. P. Par. 42. 2
vofi\a, for

6.

]'

(
:

[

([.

[/]

.

?^^^^^

(,

,

.

.

.

'

.

nil.

Census-returns.
10.2x13-4 cm,
A.D. 203.

returns for the census of A. D, 201-2, relating to the Oxyrhynchite Mermertha. They were stuck together to form a roll, but the first line of Col. I, owing no doubt to the relative shortness of that particular sheet, corresponds with the eighth of Col. ii in the left margin also there are some slight remains of the document (no doubt a similar declaration) affixed on that side. Col. i, of which the commencement is preserved, is unaddressed, like 479.
village of
;

Two

Col.

i.

^') \{)
7(€9}.

'^{)

[()

{) €(€) 7{)

nil.
5

DECLARATIONS TO OFFICIALS
SieX{e6uT09)
ev
(erofy)

7/

[)
[. .]

?

)( € () ? $ ^?)
€1'

-

[)

185

6{)
'

() 9 {?) [] [ () [^] ()
56(0$•)

[7'

{)

6{3)

.

[

6.

Pap.

e

of fv COrr. from

y.

Col.

ii.

€[€().
5

15

' "[ {) [ * €€{) '€[{) {) €
^
[

[ ^'(^ [ [ (6)' 6{) €{€) ()
kv Trj
?)
.
.

7{) {6€)

[() {) [

^ [^
,

] €()
()
(])

{)
-

{) €€{€) '4 '4 {)
[
[{ha>v)
. .

[
,

[

ar(exi/oy)

[

i86
i.
'

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

From Didyme daughter of Cephalon and Didyme, with her guardian Heliodorus son of Dionysius, of the city of Oxyrhynchus. In accordance with the orders of his excellency the praefect Maecius Laetus I register for the house to house registration of the past loth year the house belonging to me in the mid-eastern parts of the village of Mermertha together with my full brothers Asclas and Cephalon, formerly the property of our mother in respect of one half and of our father the said Cephalon in respect of the remaining
half
.'
. .

the beginning of

passage that Q. Maecius Laetus remained in office down to were commonly sent in when the year was well advanced, it is probable that his tenure extended into a.d. 203. Cantarelli is accordingly mistaken {La Serie dei Prefetti, p. 65) in dating the praefecture of Subatianus Aquila from the year 201-2 on the strength of B. G. U. 484, in which the census of A.D. 201-2 is referred to but which cannot itself have been written in that year, as 1111 proves. The earliest date for the commencement of the tenure of Subatianus Aquila is
i.

3-5. It

is

clear from September

this

a.d. 202, and, since census-returns

vi. 3. 3; cf. Archiv v. p. 418). statement of the text that the census of a. d. 201-2 was ordered by Laetus is of interest for another reason, to which my attention has been drawn by Wilcken. Rostowzew in Rom. Kolonat, pp. 209—11, seeks to bring into close connexion with the census the edicts of Subatianus Aquila and Valerius Datus directing people to return to their homes. It is now clear that Subatianus Aquila was no more the initiator of the census of a.d. 201-2 than Valerius Datus was of the census of a.d. 215-16, and hence their edicts at any rate formed no part of the original orders for holding the census. Cf. Wilcken's forthcoming

A.D.

202-3 (Euseb.

The

Chresiomathie, p. 235.
ii. ' ... of the village of Mermertha. In accordance with the orders of his excellency the praefect Maecius Laetus, I register for the house to house registration of the loth year the half share of a walled space belonging to me at the village, formerly the property of my

and formerly of his father Admetus at which we return ourselves as follows Admetus son of Heracleus, aged years, my mother being Tapontos daughter of
father
;
. . ,

:

.

.,

whom whom

have died in the have died long ago; no trade or distinguishing mark, aged
I declare to
.

.

.

I declare to

my
.
.

6.

For the
is

repetition of

()

.

year my son Heracles by daughter of ., son Admetus by daughter of . ., having .' years my brother Mieus
;
. .
.

.

.

.

.

.

.

;

.

.

cf.

i.

9-10.

is clear,

but whether

it is

the

numeral
be

or not
8.

doubtful.
cf.

For the supplement
4. 12.

171. 11 (Part II, p. 208).

I

suspect that

'

ol should also

read in P. Flor.
II.

They can

entries here and in 1. 13 concerning the death of the mother's father are unusual. hardly refer to the persons named in 11. 9 and 12, since it is the rule for the name of the person making the return to stand first cf. e. g. P. Flor. 4. 17. A horizontal stroke at the beginning of this line may either belong to a letter, e. g. , or represent yivoprai.
;

The

1112.

DECLARATIONS TO OFFICIALS

187

1112.

Purchase of Acacia-trees.
17-3

X9

cm.

A.D. 188.

Two

extracts from

the records of the idiologus giving the substance of
certain Apollonius concerning purchases
trees

declarations
acacia-trees

were evidently the property of the government, and were bought by Apollonius at the rate of 13 drachmae each, a very much smaller price than that found in the private contract 909, where 14 trees fetch 1,200 drachmae. That document, however, is some forty years later in date than 1112, which belongs to the reign of Commodus, and of course there may have been a considerable difference in the size and condition of the trees some of
;

(.

made by a

by him of

These

those here sold are described as

which are very cursively written and much abbreviated, are written across the fibres on the verso of the papyrus on the recto are the beginnings of some lines of a second -century
'

fallen

'

(1.

23).

The

extracts,

;

account.

( {6)). €) {) €{) ? \\
To
dv8pa
?)

\6[), a

()•

'AnoX(\6uiosi) kn{f,Ka\ovp^vos)

-

()

()

i{-

5

\ ? €€() cm ()
(erovy)

Xapd

'Ap6iTo(s)

15

{) {^) [) [{)]{€) {) () [^), / {) () {),
,

^^) -^() 9 ^€{ [) {)
Trjs

{9) € (?) € € ^€€{) ,
,
Se
ttjs

^^?)

^^

{nporepou)

67

Hcvto)
e

(^roi/y)

()
(€6£)

)

,

ve

i88

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
'ATro\\a>vLo\si\

^?)
20

? {€)
€(€9) 8()
kv
61/
.

[) 6{).
6

€\(/)

€{) ~ {)() 8)

portray

^{ OS)

9 ()[]
6
.
. .

€(
25

. 2.
'

^
Pap,

^}{) ^() {). , {9) [{)] ), /
)

{ €[) (^)
2 2.

^/) {) {^)

(€)

Pap.

[.]

2.

First

of

coTT. frotn >7.
2 5•

Pap.

'

Pap.

^)€
7•

(corr.

Second

of

department of the metropolis. I, Apollonius Individual list of the idiologus, volume i surnamed Horion, son of Apollonius, ex-exegetes, declare that I have been duly assigned the acacia-trees designated in the month Pauni of the 28th year, one by the comogrammateus of Nemera on the embankment formerly belonging to Saras son of Amois in the neighbourhood of Peenno, two by the comogrammateus of Seruphis on the embankment in the tillage of Conion in the neighbourhood of Senemeleu, and one by the comogrammateus of Sento on the embankment in the reclamation of the 5th year of the deified Vespasian for 52 drachmae and extra payments, in the 29th situated to the north of Senoikoth ., year, Hathur 10, the price being 52 drachmae and the additional charges 3 drachmae i^ obols, total 55 drachmae i^ obols. Likewise in the same volume. I, Apollonius the aforesaid surnamed, &c., declare that I have been duly assigned the three acacia-trees designated by the elders, being deputies for the and Thosbis, comogrammateus of Nemera, in the northern parts of the embankment of 29th year, which have fallen down ., for 40 drachmae and extra payments, in the Hathur 12, the price being 40 drachmae and the additional charges 2 drachmae 3 obols,
;
.

.

.

.

.

.

,

total

42 drachmae, 3
I.

obols.'

but not

SO e.g. P. Brit. Mus. 259. iii. 104; the third letter superfluous above the line (cf. the critical note) stood for without cancelling the suspended writer changed his mind and added cf. 11. 20—1. SC. 5• roC
TO

.

{
:

apbpa)

:

is

The

the

scribe seems to have at first intended to abbreviate on 1. i, and 1. 22 {)[]'. 2ev(p(\f{v): (((€{) (899. 7, 1052. 3, &c.) can only be read on the supposition that the e was miswritten, which would be natural were it not for the fact that Sew/xeXiu seems to have been the spelling in 482. 5. Possibly, then, 2fvfKf'\(v and were
7.

For

name

.

after neev; cf. the note

£)5 (
cf.

(),

(), but the
.

possibly

,

',

713. 26.

The

distinct places.

is the usual term for extra charges in connexion with government sales; cf. 14. As suggested in the note on 513. 12, they are not to be dis513. 12, P. Amh. 97. 14. on the amount of which see the next note. tinguished from the

€ 8(,

€(\(

1112.
16.
is

DECLARATIONS TO OFFICIALS

the

and 1. 25, where cf. 11. 20 and the Other instances of such contraction are P. Amh. 35 amount to 6^ per cent, of the cf. also 1. 22. The common price, both here and in 1. 25; the same proportion is found in 513. 15. here as in 1. 2, the foUoAving name, 19. e' is no doubt to be interpreted Apparently in 1. 2 also the scribe originally &c., being omitted for the sake of brevity. immediately after cf. the critical note. began to write ; 20. 8ia8€xo(jievuv) cf. e.g. B. G. U. 6. 4, 1 5. i. 8. 23. It may be doubted whether tv is the preposition or the first syllable of a villagein 721. 9. name. It does not seem possible to read ev Ten-ouei, a name coupled with 24. The two final letters of ) may be

For

this contraction

omitted.

{)(5)

^
({

189

{){() (.\)

;

7(€)(€/)

^

€{€) ((()
.

1113.

Return of Unirrigated Land.
i7'3Xi4'9cm.
a. d.

203.

Two
land;
P.
cf.

declarations, which have been joined together, concerning unirrigated
P. Grenf. II. ^6, P.
11.

Hamburg

One

is

Fay. S3, ?• Tebt. 324, B. G. U. 139, 198, 973, addressed to the comogrammateus of the village near

which the land was situated, the other, like B. G. U. 198, bears no address. Such returns were usually made in consequence of an order of the praefect in
office,

but

in P.

Hamburg

11, as in the present case, the authorization

is

stated

emanated from the procurator usiacus Claudius Diognetus, who is also known from P. Giessen 48. 25 and papyri published by Wilcken in Hermes^ xxiii. p. 593 (a.d. 197) and Comparetti in Melanges Nicole^ pp. 57 sqq. (Cols, i and iv, A. D. 203, not second century, as was pointed out by Stein, Archiv iv. 165).
to have

{() ^ 8^ {\)
Col.
i.

VOS
5 ev

^[] []€
\\[\^

^^^
ttjs

^€€[:]
66[]

€[]9

L4yOi[a]r[o]AcXei'aS'

^

I90
I

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

\'\8<

[]
7[]9
15

[] []?.

\[]
ety

,

-

iveaTos

[^^]

[]9 9 ()
[€]<
.

^) ^
(?)
^toTs

€€{)

[]0 K\iav8pov

(6€
'.

?)

20 (erofy)

9 []
[
(eroy)]

Heovrjpov

€[9]

[]
1

8.

'

Pap.

Col.

and hand

5

[(eroyy)

^€[ {)€{) 9 9 ^ €[ () [^ [ ^^ €\ ) [] [9 ^ €[[
[]() (ey)
y

[ ^^^) ^(€) ' '[()
ii.

-

(e)y).

[]

[\{)

[

XoveiKov

€ 6{) [€9 {^) € [ '
(apovpas)
. .

-

[]

€{€).

]

Se-

15

^ 8 '\ 4 [ ^
1113.

DECLARATIONS TO OFFICIALS

191

[] \'\^
'

[?

(2nd hand) Me^eZp

^([ 88.

[.

.

6

of Sento and other villages in the middle toparchy from Didymion, ex-chief-priest of the most august temple of Hadrian in the city of Oxyrhynchus, and from Diogenes and Sarapion also called Aristocles, both sons of In accordance with the Sarapion and Aristocleia also called Chaeremonis, of the said city. orders of his highness the procurator Claudius Diognetus we register for the current nth year the unwatered land belonging to us at Sento in the holding of Cleandrus with the adjacent ground standing in the name of (?) Dionysius son of Apion, namely ^ arourae of
the

comogrammateus

Didymus

also called

,

land previously unwatered.'
'

Date.

Sarapion also called Phanias, ex-gymnasiarch of the city of Oxyrhynchus, In accordance with the orders of is styled, of the city of Oxyrhynchus. his highness the Imperial procurator Claudius Diognetus I register for the nth year at the village of Psobthis in the middle toparchy in the holding of Philonicus, once belonging to nuptas, arourae of son of my mother and formerly in the possession of A arourae, and I swear by the fortune of Lucius Septimius Severus unwatered land out of Pius Pertinax and Marcus Aurelius Antoninus Pius Augusti and Publius Septimius Geta Caesar Augustus that I have made no false statement.' Date.

From

and hoAvever he

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

4^

This date is noticeable, since both B. G. U. 139 and P. Hamburg 11 refer to i. 14. 10th year, and evidence is thus for the first time obtained of the registration of The fact that such a registration took place unirrigated land in two consecutive years. in the year 202-3 is a slight argument in favour of the supposition that B. G. U. 108 is (cf. Eger, Grundbuchwesen, p. 183, note 3), in which case also concerned with This, however, would not necessarily a third consecutive year would have to be added. disprove our view that the returns of unirrigated land were not annual (P. Oxy. p. 177), for a succession of low Niles is quite possible; cf. Eger, op. cii., p. 184. or an equivalent cf. P. Flor. 50. 9, 86 (Ji napapios). 17. For phrase is probably to be understood before «is on the analogy of most of the other returns, etr 8ia ., B. G. U. 1 39. 13— 14 e.g. P. Fay. 33. 18-19 "' cf. the note els On the meaning of etf ., 198. 8-9 P. Fay. 33. 18-19, ^^^ Eger, Grundbuchwesen, p. 188, Lewald, Rom.-Aeg. Grundbuchrechi,
the

.

\.\

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

p.

79.
1

ii.

is apparently meant ; 17-18. 10. Considerations of space indicate that

8.

()
Cf.
11.

()

is

inadmissible,

I.

stood in this line and not in

1.

11.

192

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
1114.

Declaration of Inheritance.
26

X 56 cm.

A. D. 237.

Plate VII.

A Latin
inheritance,
sesterces

declaration

made

to the responsible

Roman

official

by M. Aurelius

Saras, a citizen of Oxyrhynchus, that his wife had died intestate, and that the

which passed to their two daughters, was of the value of 200,000 and free from the vicesima hereditatiwn or succession duty of 5 per cent. To this declaration is appended an affidavit in Greek, duly witnessed, of fact of intestate death, and a subscription in Latin of a notary of the office the
concerned with the tax.

and therefore subject to the vicesima and similar taxes, so we are told (Dio Ixxvii. cf. Archiv v. p. 429. On the 9), that the cotistitutio Aniojiina \v3.s promulgated history of the impost see Bachofen, Atisgew. Lehren des R. Civilrechts, pp. 322 sqq., Cagnat, Les Impots hidirects chez les Romains, pp. 175 sqq., Hirschfeld, K. Verwaltungsbeamten, pp. 96 sqq. Instituted by Augustus it was levied upon all inheritances and legacies except where the beneficiaries were near relations or the estate inconsiderable (ttAiji; Dio 1. 25}. Caracalla, who raised the rate to 10 per cent., abolished the exemption in virtue of close relationship (Dio Ixxvii. 9, Ulpian, Coll. xvi. 9. 3) but these changes Avere reversed by his successor Macrinus (Dio Ixxviii. 12). What degree of affinity is to be understood from Dio's phrases and is not clear (cf. Cagnat, op. cit., p. 184), but daughters succeeding to an intestate mother, as they were entitled to do by the recent Senatiis consultiini Orfitiamim (cf. 1118. 13), would doubtless be included within the exemption, and this benefit would extend to their father, who in such a case would be the de facto heir; cf. the note on 1. 9. niece on the other hand seems not to have enjoyed immunity, for in P. Amh. 72, a declaration by a woman of the value of an intestate uncle's estate to which she was succeeding (a. d. 246), there is no mention of any claim to exemption. Relationship and not poverty was evidently the ground of the claim in the present instance. The taxable minimum is indeed uncertain, but it can hardly have reached 200,000 sesterces Bachofen puts it at half that amount {op. cit., pp. 341-2 so Mommsen, Die Rom. Tribus, p. 1 20, Marquardt, Staatsverw. ii. p. 259). The tax no longer existed in the time of Justinian {Cod. vi. ,-^,. 3) and its abolition was perhaps one of the financial reforms of Diocletian and Constantine this papyrus appears to be the latest document in which it is
persons concerned were
all Aurelii,
;

The

it

was indeed

in the interest of this

;

;

-^

,
;

A

;

;

;

directly mentioned.

1114.

DECLARATIONS TO OFFICIALS

193

and the subscription of the notary are written in clear cursive hands rather similar in type to that of P. Grenf. II. 108 of the latter half Dots or short dashes are, as usual, commonly placed of the previous century. after abbreviations and occasionally after other words (11. 5, 37). Line 38 is in
pvofessio

The Latin

a smaller and

less legible writing.

Perpef\iw

et

Corneliano

co{n)s{ulibus)

anno in Imperatoris Caesaris

Gail luli Veri

Maximini

Pit

Germanici Max{imi) Dacici Max{imi) Sarm]atici Maximi Germanici Max{imi) Dacici M[ax{imi) Sarmatici Max{imi) Caesaris sancii]ssim[i AuA[tig{usii)

[Max{imi) et Gait luli Veri

g{usti) fili Aug{Msii)
[

].[

5

[A] pud

Geminium Val^niem
[

44

letters

procuratio7iis.

Marcus

Saras fa[cius\ gymnas[iarchus decurio civ]itaf^i\s C^xyrht^chitarum filius Marci Aureli Diogenis q{ui) e{t) Hel[iodori facti euthe'^n^Aureliiis

a]rckae ...[.,..],
civitatis

.[.]s

,.. ae
]

Alexandrinorum prof\iteor
e{t)

filiabus me[i]s

Aure-

liabus Stra-

10

tonice

q{uae)

Sosipatrae

et

Apolloniae

\q{uae)

e{t)

Dietitis]

k[er]editatem seu

bonorum possesfiliae

sionem Aureliae Ap[o]lloniae
q{ui) e{t)

Marci

Aurel[i] Apolloni

Demetri

Psammi-

gymnasiarchi decurionis civitatis Oxyrinchitartim, matris eorum uxoris autem suae, intestatae' defunctae civitat{a]e Oxyrinchitarum prid{ie)
dis facti

non{as) Iul{ias) q{uae) p{roximae}) /{uerttnt) hora diei tertia secundum testatiof£/\m de hac re factam cuius exemplufn subieci,

15

eamque hereditatem

2nd hand "Eroi/y

^' ^ ^'
exemplum

esse ducena[r{\qm et

inmunem a

testationis.

'

vicensima.

-

194

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

2

•)( 9
ToSe

€25

^€ 7[€]9

( ^ ^^ €$ .)( 9 ' )( - ^ ^^ -? - ^ ,
i^

Sapcis

^

Trj

([\

nepi

?

-

-

-

[
3
3rd hand

Col.

ii.

4th hand

[^]
(?)
[

6
[]
[

letters

][ €[] )(^€ [] {) €[€]][ ~
30
letters

][

]

.[

6(€)

..]•^..•.].•[

^

5th hand

[]€[
6(€)
secnndtmi

.

'[]\[] (€)
tabul{arius)

-

35 6th

hand Ivivilim^s Aug{usii)

lib{ertus)

intestatam

dec{e\ssisse

.

1114.

DECLARATIONS TO OFFICIALS
co{7i)s{nlibns)

195
et

adfirmationem insert am pr{idie) non{as) hil[ias) Perpettio
Corneliano

notavi pr{idie)

id{us) Iul[ias)

co{n)-

s{tilibus) sitiprd) s{criptis).

7th hand
17.

qctitim) s{

)...[

]

I[u]l{ias) Perpetno et

Corneliano co[n)s{tdibus)
Pap.
corr.
?

second
'

Pap.: SO in corn from p.

1.

1

8.

20.
iltos

'€
31.

.

.

.

SeCOnd

of

21.

Pap.

Second

In the consulship of Perpetuus and Cornelianus, in the third year of the emperor Caesar Gaius Julius Verus Maximinus/ &c., before Geminius Valens ... of the procuratorship. Marcus Aurelius Saras, ex-gymnasiarch, senator of the city of Oxyrhynchus, son of Marcus Aurelius Diogenes also called Heliodorus, ex-eutheniarch of the [most illustrious] city of Alexandria, declare [on behalf of (?)] my two daughters Aurelia Stratonice also called Sosipatra and Aurelia Apollonia also called Dieus the inheritance or possession of the property of Aurelia Apollonia daughter of Marcus Aurelius ApoUonius son of Demetrius also called Psammis, ex-gymnasiarch and senator of the city of Oxyrhynchus, their mother arid my wife, who died intestate at the city of Oxyrhynchus on the day before the succeeding (?) Nones of July at the third hour of the day according to the affidavit made on this matter, of which I append a copy, and certify that the inheritance is of the value of two hundred solidi
'

and

free of the tax of a twentieth.
'
'

Copy of the affidavit. In the third year,' &c., at the city of Oxyrhynchus. Marcus Aurelius Saras, ex-gymnasiarch and senator of the city of Oxyrhynchus, son of Marcus Aurelius Diogenes also called Heliodorus, ex-eutheniarch and senator of the most illustrious about to seal the city of Alexandria, and however he is styled, called to witness the persons present affidavit that on this day at about the third hour to the loss of our hopes Aurelia Apollonia daughter of Marcus Aurelius ApoUonius son of Demetrius also called Psammis, and however he is styled, ex-gymnasiarch and senator of the city of Oxyrhynchus, his wife and the mother of their daughters Aurelia Stratonice also called Sosipatra and Aurelia .' Signatures of witnesses Apollonia also called Dieus, who are under age, died intestate
.
.

and of Marcus Aurelius Saras
2-4.

in

Greek and of a notary

in Latin.

small fragment assigned to the middles of these lines is doubtfully placed, being unsatisfactory. D]add could be read in place of Sarm]aiid, but this causes greater difficulties in the next line.

The

sancti\ssim[t

5-6. Geminius Valens, if that was his name, was apparently an official in the office of procurator vicesimae, who was no doubt appointed for Egypt as for other provinces; cf. the r^s HirSChfeld, K. Verwaliungsbeamten, pp. 102-4. at Arsinoi'tonpolis is mentioned in B. G. U. 326. ii. 10. that the term am'tas was now used where 7. It is noticeable, as Wilcken remarks, cf. e. g. the Cairo the correct Latin word was metropolis before the grant of the the following note. diptych referred to in ,• u j the same abbreviation occurs e. g. in the cretiones hereditatium pubhshed 8. g{ui) e{t) and reprinted in Bruns, .by De Ricci from a Cairo diptych in Nouv. Rev. xxx. pp. 479 sqq319-20. At the end of this line decurionis darissimae is expected, but cannot be

A

;

:

ed. 7, pp. sp^en]d[i]d[i]sread.' Perhaps decurionis was omitted and some longer adjective used, e. g. was written s[i]mae, which is a possible though not very satisfactory reading ; or decurionis . ae. and* the adjective was quite short, decu[rioni]s s[.]s the lacuna after pro/[iteor is to be filled is unfortunately somewhat doubtful.
.

.

9.

How

196

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

daughters could only succeed iussu pain's, and he would at this period be the real ii. 87; modifications were subsequently introduced, Cod. Just. \\. 60): hence something like me adnuisse would be suitable. The construction of 1. 15 rather suggests that an infinitive had preceded, otherwise the more neutral supplement \pro duabus\ might be preferred. that />/'^/"[z/'(?i?r and not />;'^/"[z"/i'/«r preceded 13. suae: the construction demands ;
beneficiary (Gaius

The

^-

in

1.

9

is uncertain ; from their position and the run of the sentence they should refer in some way to the date, and the interpretation suggested in Or possibly p might represent praesens as an equivalent the text will give a tolerable sense.

indicated by suhieci in 1. 14. The meaning of the letters q. p./. here
is

cf. 1. 24. also found in C. I. L. v. 5067. 7 of a.d. 103, <1• p• f• is The letters have i\nfra scripti. \q. p. f. [. cur\aiores Saiur\. there been explained as standing for qui primi/uerunt, referring to the persons iJi/ra scripii; that, however, is very doubtful, and it seems likely that the day of the month preceded in the lacuna, and that the meaning of the abbreviation is the same as in the present passage. 30. If 1. I was the first of the column the loss at the top of Col. ii above 1. 30 would not be expected to exceed more than three or four lines. or some equivalent term is to be supplied at the end of the line. 32. is very doubtfully read. 35. Ivivilinus is a curious name, but I cannot read the letters otherwise; Iul{ius) Vilinus is inadmissible. Tabularii are frequently mentioned in connexion with the vicesima ; They were commonly freedmen, as here. cf. Hirschfeld, op. cii., p. 105. 38. If ac/um is right (cf. e. g. the Cairo diptych, ap. Bruns, p. 320), a place-name would be expected to follow, but the s followed by a dot seems clear. Perhaps s[upra) s{cripio)

',

of the Greek

hiarw;
[

ii cos.

.

.

.

.

[€]>

die

was

written.

1115.

Reply to a Strategus.
23*5

X

20-8 cm.

A.D. 284.

The
annona,

writers of this letter were three agents for the delivery of the military

who had been asked by
by them

the strategus, in consequence of representations
for the receipt for a large quantity

from the praefect and dioecetes,
delivered

of bread

to certain military and naval detachments.

They accordingly
in the sixth
is

forwarded the original receipt, enclosing at the same time a copy which they
request the strategus to sign.

The

receipt

had been issued

year of

appended as requested, is dated in Pachon of the second year, the reference presumably being to the reign of Numerianus. Pomponius lanuarianus, the praefect in office (1. 4), is a new addition to the list of Egyptian praefects.
Probus
(a. D.

281),

but the signature of the strategus, which

'

[] ^)(€[-

5

15

()

2nd hand

2
1.

^ ,^ [ . ) []€ [] 6^[ , ^) {)
e/c

\)(\
TV\y\

^ 8 ^^ 8[\
,
1115.

DECLARATIONS TO OFFICIALS

197

€9

^€€

8[€8] ^}^

\^\

88^

-]

[€]

['\[\\\ '^€

[-

{€[]€\ ^^€[].
'[-

kv

Trj

[-

.

.

[

€^,

() {)
6

;^-.

[^.
6,

of

.€€^
()
COrr.

[]{) '\
12.

.

.

from

t.

Pap.
1 8.

g.

Pap.

€'€

Pap.

1*].

Pap.

arpaf Pap.

To Aurelius Philiarchus also called Horion, strategus of the Oxyrhynchite noma, from Aurelius Isidorus, Aurelius AsclepiadeS; and Aurelius Plutinus, deliverers of bread. Having been asked by you in consequence of letters sent to you by his honour the praefect Pomponius Januarianus and his honour the dioecetes Aurelius Aristeas for the authentic receipt in our possession for the bread which we have delivered and distributed, we deliver to you the aforesaid authentic receipt and a copy of it which we beg you to sign in order that we " Miccalus, superintendent of the too may have the security of the said authentic receipt. distribution of the annona, to Isidorus and Asclepiades, overseers of the Oxyrhynchite nome. You have delivered in Panopolis in obedience to the order of his highness the dioecetes Aurelius Aristeas, in accordance with the certificates presented by you, to the mobilized (?) soldiers and sailors thirty-eight thousand and four hundred and ninety-six modii (?) of bread, total 38,496. The sixth year of our lord the Emperor Caesar Marcus Aurelius Probus Pius Augustus, Tubi sixteenth, Tubi i6." (Signed) I, Aurelius Philiarchus also called Horion, strategus of the Oxyrhynchite nome, have received the authentic receipt, which agrees with Second year, Pachon 26.' the copy above written, and have forwarded it as ordered.
'

9. eVi

88€5 !'.

,

cf. e. g.

and P. Giessen

B. G. U. IO25. ii. pp. 88-9.

ii.

1

5

: 2,

43. rectO

iv.

9

els

r^

lo.
12.

be a misspelling of 67051. 6. 13-14. ohi\ovs suggests itself as the measure (cf. e. g. P. Leipzig 97), but the vestiges do not appear to be very suitable, and moreover there would be plenty of room for so short But possibly had a word in 1. 13, so that its division between two lines is unnatural. an epithet (not
ig.

,
For

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

imf\ditpvyfi[o\v•. (=

^^ !
.
25
i.

43. recto iv. 2 1, &c., P. Giessen I.e. cf. 43. reCtO, e.g. ii. 28—9 aKo\ov6{(us) i(TTiV is more likely tO 8e Avhere {=/ormu/a) than of and P. Cairo Cat. 67050. 11,
cf.

[]/()

(^),

,

'

\). £:

e. to

Alexandria.

iiie.

Nomination to an office.
i5-8xii'3cm.
a.d. 363.

Nomination of a person
to the

to act for

one year as inspector of dues appropriated

Augusteum
to the

at Alexandria.

In what these dues consisted

bad condition of the papyrus. to the logistes, was made by the local
owing
5.
1.

Cf. 580, P. Flor.

'TnaTiias

' ^)
2,

&c.

,
f
.

is

not clear

The nomination, which
on whose
office see

is

addressed

'

^[
Upov

enap)(ov

[7]/[]
5

10

€ {) $ . €-[ € ^) '^{) [ ]€
TTJs

\\\ ? 69
€is

XoyiaTrj

^;7•[]

.[
'
€-

the note on

.

^
iOovs

.-

kv

UpZ

'AyovuToy

€va

«ay

\

15

]'() [€)

1116.

DECLARATIONS TO OFFICIALS

199

^^^^

ei'[y6]ypa/i/iei/oi'

20

and hand
3rd hand

4th hand
8.
1.

. ? []
Trjs
[ ]
. .

? )?
1•

, €

••

06
[

MeXava

a^fJ7f

[.
[.

ay

'4•

.

'/[9
1.

13•

1•

'.
cwoi^ti/.

9•

TapepfO/ieWi'.

1 6.

(8(.

.
. .

tepw

Pap.

12.

I.

.

.

.

^.

In the consulship of Julianus for the fourth time and Sallustius the most illustrious To Flavins Psoeis, logistes of the Oxyrhynchite praefect of the sacred praetorium, Thoth nome, from Aurelius Moses son of Theon, of the said city, delegate of appointments of
'

the quarter of the

I present and announce at my other quarters. provided as is the custom at the temple of Augustus in the most illustrious Alexandria, for one year from the first day of Thoth up to and the 9th year, including the fifth intercalary day of Mesore of the present 40th which the person whose name follows below, who is suitable for the office, namely Aurelius son of Zakaon son of Melanas, of the said city and said tribe.' Signatures of Aurelius Moses and

Gymnasium Square and
.

own

risk for the inspection of the

.

.

=

other

officials.

] .\^

rrjs cf. 86. io-ii,where 5. by Jouguet and Wilcken on the analogy of P. Flor. 39. 4
:

to XiTovpyiai; cf. 86 and P. Flor. 39. 6 At an earlier period, as appears from 1119, this function was For the tribal divisions at Oxyrhynchus performed by amphodogrammateis and phylarchs. cf. 1030. 8. The initial letter of the mutilated word could also well be .

tO
.

make nominations
.

.

8 .
letters
;

[}]
.

\\!
.
557•
It

is

rightly restored
XiTov[pye1v

;

cf.

ArcUv

\\\.

534.

iv.

was the business of the

are very uncertain, but the reading suggested is does not seem possible. The building referred to may well (Philo, Leg. ad (Strabo xvii. 794) or be the same as that known as the Gaium, 22); cf. Lumbroso, L'Egitio, pp. 188 sqq., F. Blumenthal, ArcMvv.f^. 318-19. The Caesareum was turned into a church under Constantine or Constantius II, but

.

The

following

sufficiently suitable.

,
is

cf. -i^ri-^/f v. p. 328. its old name 13-14. Cf. P. Flor. 39. 8, where the same phrase is to be read {Archiv iii. p. 534). It may be suggested that in the next line of that papyrus the letters following trovs, which are transcribed as ov [, represent the current years of the Oxyrhynchite eras, which in

retained

Thoth of
19.

A.D.

396 would be oy
:

e

6e is

cf. 1. 15 here. not allowed to affect the construction, which

[;

carried

on from

200
1.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
name

For 17. the common
20.

confirmed by P. Flor. only has been named above already and as such, the close connexion of the (11. 5-6) and not a noticed by Preisigke, Beamtenwesen, p. 18', is here brought out very clearly; cf. P. Flor. and 1110. 2-3, HOte. 1119. 13 39. 4
the reading of the
letters is

39• 5•

^ ',

[\5 may have been abbreviated.

/, [\\
cf.

P. Strassb. 45. 49
e.g.

and

P.

Th^ad.

Inv. 15.

iv.

2;

it

is

a variant of

1059.

4.

much damaged
Since an

\

,

(
1117.

PETITIONS.

Petition to a Praefect.
19-8

X

13-9 cm.

About

A.D. 178.

Draft of an appeal to an
peculation

unnamed

praefect from six persons described as

the superintendents of the golden statue of Athene-Thoeris concerning a case of

which he had recently decided.

The ends
11.

of the lines are lost

throughout, but, though the lacunae as gauged by

and 13 are too large to be restored with much certainty, the general sense is seldom obscured. Judgement had previously been given by an earlier praefect, Pactumeius Magnus (A.D." 176-7), and it was probably to his immediate successor Aurelius (?) Sanctus (a.d. 177-9) that the present petition was addressed. The statue of the goddess had lately been made, and a quantity of gold embezzled in the process. Magnus had decided that the loss, amounting to eighteen talents of silver, should be made good by the artificers and the municipal officials of the year (11. 4-5). His judgement was
i, 7,

substantially upheld

by the new

praefect,

who

distributed the

responsibility

between the contractor, the inspector, the officials who disbursed the money, and the overseers, who now apply for relief (11. 6-8). They make no profession of
place ask that two gymnasiarchs and a third official, all had been concerned in the disbursements (11. 9-15), should be called on to assist, and secondly apply for an extension of time, offering an annual payment of two talents (11. i6sqq.), and declaring that their existing obligation must reduce them to ruin.
innocence, but in the
of
first

whom, they

assert,

This draft is written across the fibres of the verso ; the recto contains remains of two columns of a list of persons, in which the word is apparently abbreviated in the same way as in 1112. 20.

7€
7€/
5

^,€€ ^ ,899€ €[5 € ?? «/ ^ {) ' ^^ € € [€ €
1117.

PETITIONS

201

.{)

{) {)

t{ivos)

^[^

Trjs

-^,

L• rfj

€();[

rfj

kv

[

eTOvs

)([6•

•nepi S>v

Kvpios

6)([€

6

€7[€\
[

TJj

€,

,

ovTes

)(^5

}

€[] € €)(€ ^)(^6

',

'[

15

,
ovT€S

()
<7

2

..
^
S>v

[.]

.

yhp

[ [^ [

.

€.[

[€

-

[

€€[€€
....

[

()
4•

.
added above the
line.

€[] h [
5.
II.

€{\

€[€ [€
added above the
line.
6.

\

[
10. 13.

19 letters

Pap.
the
line.

7.

of

€»7) corr.

\.

i^obiaaavrts] cf.

10, II.
line.

added above
«s corr.
14.


of oir

12. re before rexveirav

added above the

202
corr.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

24.

€€
I.
cf.

added above the COTT. from
T(tiOf)

-.
:

line.

i8. iV

Pap.;

so

in

1.

20.

22.

Pap.

ri(yos)

cf.

e.g. 509,

1034;

the second
1.

5

;

but it may have disappeared. is 579, Avhere the reading

,

5.
1.

it seems necessary to postulate a misspelling here, for a mention of very unlikely, there being no further indication that any other city than Oxyrhynchus was concerned. Something like might be restored, or preferably perhaps, as Wilcken suggests, 4• , if that is the right reading, is a figure, having a stroke above it. Perhaps ?« or €viavT<u followed, is derived from 1. i6, where it is implied that the amount had been previously mentioned,

3.

{)\[•.
is

[!

there is no \isible mark of abbreviation with The supplement is indicated by now confirmed, and 483. 3, note.

\

Letopolis

Wilcken adds Not

.

conjunction must have occurred in the latter part of this 20. vvo is Suggested by the figures if each of the six drachmae, the sum of two talents mentioned in 1. 16 would be produced.
15.
final
;

-^ ^,€ , ^ (
{)
:

(^)[ {)\{ 8.

^!

cf,

OemOSth.

^,
:

P. Par. 69,
Tri\y

ii.

17 C. , G, 2 3 30• 6 8 {Philologus 53. 82)
J^ei'd.
(1.

Aristog.

.

\\>^ «? -^^^.

6

&C.

',

7)•

line.

paid 2,000
P, Tebt.

22,

fv

Tjj

Trap[apeveiv

cf. 6. g.

488.
ii.

2 2 KivBvvevovaa evKOTakfiyj/cu

327. 27.
23.

\€€

:

cf.

PlatO, Alc.

142 a

wo

24 keeps up the metaphor.

\(.

^

I8]iav,

in

1118.

Petition to an Archidicastes.
1

1-7

X

1

1-4

cm. Late

first

or early second century.

A

fragment of an application, addressed no doubt to an archidicastes, for the

The request is made that the strategus of the Small Oasis should be authorized to forward a copy of the claim to the debtors, and probably
recovery of a debt.
this application

castes

485

;

was appended to a notification to the strategus that the archidihad sanctioned the claim, the arrangement being similar to that e.g. of cf, P. Flor. 86. 20-5, where the phraseology is very close to that used here.
[.
.

.]ooy

[]€?
[.

[]€
5

[]9

^^ ^-/
>^[]
.

9
.

.

vi

.

avrwu

[vol

[ € -^ €()
1118.
Tovs

€\€

PETITIONS

203

[ [
VI

//'€

6 - []€€€

10

,
(
[€'1

iripois

knircXiaovra
ov8ivi^\^ avrois ovSk

eav
ovS€-

\]€€
7.

ovS€\vos arrXoos

corr.

from

.
.
.

and to . ... I beg you to write to the strategus of the Small Oasis to present of them who may be found, a copy of this memorandmn, in Chenenoubis, through the one in addition and extras, or order that he may vet pav to me the debt and the interest due
*

mav know that I shall enter on the mortgaged propert}• and shall occupy I choose, without exercise ownership over it and alienate it and do with it whatever .' to them or to any one else for the future in any respect claim being left
else that they
.
.

and any

I.

Perhaps cmx7
t6kovs

-?.

\

wiW

;

of.
:

e.g.
cf.

TO

:8«']

what is here meant by cf. 1040. introd.. and e.g. 1130.
9.

[8}.

]» was

11.

»

U21. 23. P. Flor. S6. 19. t.• , mi barawas, which ShOWS P. Flor. 86. 2 2 rOKOxs ral sometimes practically synonymous with rom; is

probably influenced by die coming npi€i{a)orra.

111.

Petition to a Strategus, etc.
28-5

X

39-6 cm.

A.D. 254.

document consists of a petition from two citizens of requesting Antinoopoliswho had property at Oxyrhynchus, Theon and Arsinous,

The body

of this long

the strategus of the Oxyrh>Tichite

to notify the existing phylarch that they Their rights had been municipal offices. were exempt from nomination to strategus, and they give a narrative established ten years before under an earlier correspondence relating to of the course of events, and enclose copies of official Aurelius Sarapion, an amphodogrammaIts history was as follows. their case. contravention of the pri\-ileges of Theon and Arsinous

nome

teus of Oxyrhynchus, in
as AntinoYte citizens,

had nominated them as

collectors of

money-taxes

in the

metropoUs.
native
cit>',

of their receiving information of this they applied to the senate who sent a letter of remonstrance to the epistrategus Antomus

On

204
Alexander.
in
11.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

A copy of this interesting letter, which
It is

14-22.

is dated in A.D. 244, is given a vindication of the privilege enjoyed by Antinoites of immu-

(cf. note on 1. 16). That privihad been granted by their founder Hadrian, had been confirmed by his successors, and respected by a long line of praefects and epistrategi. Antonius Alexander is asked to follow this example, and to instruct the strategus of Oxyrhynchus to call the offending amphodogrammateus to account. He did so two months later in a letter transcribed in 11. 22-4. The strategus passed on the correspondence to the amphodogrammateus demanding explanations, and the reply of the latter follows in 11. 25-8. He acknowledges his error, admitting that Theon and Arsinous had the rights of Antinoite citizens, and apparently himself undertaking the duty which he had wrongly imposed upon them. In the upper margin a short note has been added by the strategus to whom the petition was addressed, forwarding the document to the phylarch, as requested by the petitioners (11. 2-5) and at the foot (1. 30) is the signature of the agent who

nity from public burdens outside their

own

city

lege

;

delivered

it.

The
ment of

lines are of great

each.

The

the general sense, which
1

2

[

3

[cTTiareXXerai

4

[ [) ()
()
[{eTovs)

5

6 3i*d

hand

[.

.

.

.

^^/ ^ , ? .? ] ?^ ,
length and there
for the
is

a large lacuna at the

commence-

restorations adopted often
is

aim

at

no more than indicating

most part

clear.

.

]

elaioi/Tos

S

[eTOvs).

\8

Qicovos

^) 6] , \
^^

€(),]

{)6€ (),
Se

.

(2nd hand)

]

^-

7

8

[

9

, [
5^ letters

( [ 69
6€ -

1119.

PETITIONS
Tore yevo/zei^o?
letters

)

, \,
40
rfjs

^^
eiVjyyjyeiXej/
17/^ay

205

e/y

[ &,
11
{

,, ,
[]
0,6

]

,
29 letters

]
]

rrjs

letters

],

12

[39
[]

letters

13

[

^

]

.
()
(2nd hand)

\
(3rd hand)

[]^

[]

'

. '

'

2o6
15

''^
[40
[31
[Vf^^^

1

6

?

€€ ^ ' , ^^ ^ €,
letters
]

, ^'^ ,
THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
€Tepo9

^'\€\'.
e/

^.

^

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&
re

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letters

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>
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LM'''

(?)

^6 letters

2

21

22

23

', ^ '^ [ .] • ''. [
23 letters

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re
1

</

€] [€]€
^

[

6

letters

'\

\^<

\^

1

8 letters

{)

.

-

[][]

.

[
^]

24

[17

25

26

27

28

29 4tli

hand

3

[ ^^ )'4 ? , €€ ' ]{ ^, €''^ € ' € -€ ] ^ & , 4 ^^. »
^

^ .< ^ (^' € [ € ^ \€ ^ . (
1119.

PETITIONS
eh

207

€<€\
«'

tj

iea

/

voXeiria

irape'ivai

€^6€,

letters

\€

eri

(ercvs)

'
a[vTois
Meyjeip

.

^ ?
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\.

--

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({^(&
€V€K€v

[€
[
/'W'

ly letters

€ty

Stv

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^-

.

\

avTovs

^

XuTovpyia,

cvv

cSpor

€\\

€0€

/)

.

5th hand

[

hand
<6
3- arrnroce»
vctts corr.

?)

(erow)

added above the

7.

«

of

of corr. 15• 113• "» Pap• 1. i/iits Pap. 9 o( eAnvs COIT. from o, 17. 1. Tovrm. 22. mikuem Pap. ; so in r of OM corr. from o; L cofT. from o. of
Pap.
12.

»5
.

.

^
which

.
is

^^.
] .

[

(

)

()
(6th
in 28.

line.

1.

ttJs

ph ^a{«^(s).

above

.
I.

^A.-njsif. crossed through.

^
11.
1.

«»•
24.

vuwiifaMAn
»o/ioty.

i6.
1 8.
1.

pMmts for

aTj^aJ^'rVnT.

20.

2^.

1.

or for «r.

' . . ., strategns of the Ox}Thvnchite nome, to Aurelius Heras, phjiarch for the coming I send you the petition of Aurelius Theon and Aurelius Arsinoos, both sons fourth year. of Theon, Aniinoftes of the Sebasteian tribe and Dioscurekn deme. enclosed in -which are copies of two letters, one written by the most high senate of the Antinoltes to Antonius

2o8

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

Alexander the most high epistrategus, the other by the said epistrategus to the then strategus, and also a copy of the reply made by the then amphodogrammateus. The third year of the Emperors and Caesars Gaius Vibius Trebonianus Gallus and Gains Vibius Afinius Gallus Veldumianus Volusianus Pii Felices Augusti, Mesore 23. strategus of the Oxyrhynchite nome, from Aurelius Theon and Aurelius To ., Arsinoiis, sons of Theon, Antinoi'tes of the Sebasteian tribe and Dioscureian deme. In the previous cycle of the persons about to serve in the quarters of this city, the amphodogrammateus then in office, Aurelius Sarapion, [ignoring our rights,] in the list of burdens submitted by him returned us for the collection of money-taxes in the metropolis, and we immediately on receiving information of it did not acquiesce but applied to the most high senate, recounting the audacity and illegality of the said amphodogrammateus. The senate was indignant and sent to the most high epistrategus Antonius Alexander, who, heedful of the rights especially accorded to our native city, sent to the then strategus Aurelius Dius also called Pertinax directing that the amphodogrammateus should be compelled either to present some other persons instead of us for the office, or [to pay the penalty for] his illegality. The strategus sent the whole correspondence to the amphodogrammateus, and he, being aware of the danger hanging over him in consequence of his illegal action ., himself promised in amends for his error, for which he pleaded the excuse of ignorance, to undertake the burden for the future. Now, therefore, in order that the present phylarch may not appear to be ignorant of these facts because one of us, Aurelius Theon, is there in our native city attending to the duties to which we have been assigned, since the turn has come to our senate in the present year to ... we submit to you the following copies, begging that they may be communicated for his information by means of one of your assistants to Aurelius Heras, phylarch of the quarters about to serve. The third year of the Emperors and Caesars Gaius Vibius Trebonianus Gallus and Gaius Vibius Afinius Gallus Veldumianus Volusianus Pii Felices Augusti, Mesore. The copies
. . .
.

.

.

.

.

.

.

,

are as follows
'

:

and senate of the illustrious city of the Antinoi'tes, new Hellenes, to Antonius Alexander the most high epistrategus, greeting. You are aware, highest of procurators, you who during your procuratorship have been especially concerned with the exceptional rights claimed by our native city, that originally the deified Hadrian . [distinguishing] it from the other cities in Egypt clearly established the law that we should bear office and burdens nowhere but at home, and we were relieved of all offices and burdens elsewhere ; and next ... his successors on the throne often confirmed our immunity in this respect, and they have been scrupulously followed by the praefects appointed from time to time and by you the most high epistrategi, who not only release us from all external offices and burdens but also punish the lawlessness of those who attempt to offend against the Imperial legislation and the judgements of praefects. Whereas, then, Aurelius Theon and Aurelius Arsinoiis our fellow-citizens have approached us in a petition accusing Sarapion, amphodogrammateus of the city of Oxyrhynchus, of having illegally nominated them both for the collection of money-taxes in the metropolis, ... we apply to your heedfulness in order that you may direct the strategus of the said nome to have one of two things done, namely that the amphodogrammateus, if he gives way, should nominate to the office other persons in their stead, or else [be compelled to] appear before you at your coming auspicious visit, in order that in accordance with the ancestral usages of our constitution he may render an account for his outrage upon the Imperial laws and the judgements of praefects ... We pray for your health. The second year of the Marci Julii,
officials
. .
. . .

The

Hathur 30th.
*

Copy of the

letter.

Antonius Alexander to the strategus of the Oxyrhynchite nome,

1119.
greeting.
this letter.

PETITIONS
me
by the
officials

209
and senate of the

I

have ordered the

document sent

illustrious city of the Antinoites,

the office defiance of the law,
his province.
'

new Hellenes, to be appended for your information to See that the amphodogrammateus whom they accuse of having nominated to of collector members of their polity appear ... to give an account for his
I
if he still attempts to subject them to the office as persons within pray for your health. The second year of the Marci Julii, Mecheir 3.

the report. To Aurelius Dius also called Pertinax, strategus of the Oxyrhynnome, from Aurelius Sarapion, amphodogrammateus of the city of Oxyrhynchus. I received from you on Phamenoth the ist a missive to which was appended a copy of a letter written to you by Antonius Alexander, the most high epistrategus, with an enclosure in the latter of the appeal made to him by the most high senate of the Antinoiles on behalf of Aurelius Theon and Aurelius Arsinoiis, twins who were nominated by me for the collection of money-taxes in the metropohs, one of whom, Arsinoiis, ., directing that I should go down to appear before the most high epistrategus, if I still attempt to subject them to the burden as persons within our province. I have accordingly investigated the matter and found that they possess hereditary Antinoite rights, and I immediately on learning this undertook the burden on their behalf; I accordingly make this report. The second year of the Marci Julii, Pharmouthi 1 3. Presented by us, Aurelius Theon and Aurelius Arsinoiis, sons of Theon. Delivered by me, 3rd year, Mesore 29 pages 25-27.'

Copy of

chite

.

.

.,

.

.

'

'

.

.

.

.

.

.

1.

does not seem to have occurred in other papyri of the period, but Wilcken informs me that it is found in a fourth-century Leipzig papyrus which he is editing in his Chrestomathie cf. the of P. Leipzig 65. 7. cf. 1. 2 2. This epistrategus of the Heptanomia is not otherwise 4.
2.

():
is

an

official

number;

cf.

1.

30.

this title

known.

'8
which
is

;

{)

:

It is at first sight surprising, because the Galli 5. For the date cf. 11. 13-14 and 30. only just reached their third year, and the accession of Valerian and Gallienus must have been known in Egypt long before the end of August of 254. The explanation probably is that the covering note of the strategus was, like the petition, written early in the year, and

that the month,

by the same hand as

that

which inserted

in

1.

14,

was

subsequently added without any modification of the regnal year. This will not account for the date in 1. 30, which, however, might very naturally be made to conform to those in 11. 2 and 5. 6. neptoSf cf. 1030. 2, where the word should be taken, as here, in a temporal and not a local sense. For the in connexion with Xeirovpyiai cf 1116. 5 and note, B. G. U. The initial supplement here is rather long, but 958. c. 11-12 roO vvv\ perhaps this first line projected slightly. is less likely. The division cm i.e. probably at Antinoopolis ; cf. 1. 12. 7. ttj 8. cf. G. U. I02 2, a petition to the Antinoite senate on a similar occasion. For cf. e.g. P. Flor. 57. 50, B. G. U. 908. 13, P. Tebt. 330. 8 but of course various other phrases are possible.
:

:
6

] ^](
:

8.
cf.
1.

.

;

10.

For the supplement
1.

20.

28; but why the amphodogrammateus himself undertakes the Xeirovpyla, as in 1. 20 only asks that he should be made to he apparently does, is not clear. The nominate other persons. The to which the petitioners had 12. Cf. 487. 15 Tjj yeopyia undertook been appointed at Antinoopolis was apparently some burden which the in turn. may be supplied instead of 8ia 6, in order that he may.'
11. Cf.

€(7.

'

;

2IO
14.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

€'\\•.

SO e.g. B. G. U. 102 2.

2,

Dittcnberger, Or. Gr. Inscr. 709. 4;

cf.

Wilcken, Archiv iv. p. 118. 15. Cf. B. G.^U. 168. 3 and V. Martin, Epistraieges^
is

\ۥ'\(,
p.

in a petition to

109.

It is

clear

an epistrategus, 899. 25, note, from these passages that the reference

imrponTjs at first suggests, to a previous office of to the present and not, as Antonius Alexander. The supplement at the beginning of the line both here and in 1. 25 is somewhat shorter than would be expected, but this may be explained by supposing that and or perhaps iotas adscript were written. spaces were left before perhaps ]{(). Cf. G. U. 1022. 6-10 16. The first letter is probably , , or

ovK

[]€€,
'7•

For

' , []
\
avdpes

](

]

;

[\ €€[ (5][6]<»).
is

on

[]['] {]((
:

.

^^^
of which
I

(Wilcken)
cf.

more probable than

Wvovs

1020.

etS.^? gives the sentence the form of an indirect question. 22-3. The insertion of use of Ws for ? is found in the N. T., e. g. Mark xiv. 36, Luke xvii. 8, as well as in papyri and inscriptions, e. g. 1155. 13, B. G. U. 822. 5, P. Brit. Mus. 239. 10, but is perhaps better avoided in a comparatively well written document hke the present. This fact has not previously 26. cf. e.g. B. G. U. 26. ID, 115. i. 12.

?

[8],

had thought.

5•

The

[•€

:

been

stated, unless

it

was

A

eTfp[o]v Oxyrhynchite name. cf. 1. 12 ; 27. hv [ scems to be some local verb to govern the accusative has to be supplied, but there is very little room for it

perhaps there has been some omission. is obtained from 1. 11 28. 30. Cf. the note on 1. 5.

]

.

in
:

1.

17.
.

;

cf.

the note there.

1120.

Petition.
Early third century.
;

27x9-5 cm.

This petition, like 1117, is no more than a draft it lacks address and concluand the name of the vi^riter, a widow, is not given. She accuses one man of an outrage upon her son-in-law and another of an act of violence against herself.
sion,

The document may have been
Ilepl

intended for the strategus.

rjs

5

TCLi^

^^

^ 8
9 6in

'

89,

ovtos e^ci-

/' ,
1120.

PETITIONS

211

]
e/s

aOe-

eneXevoTiKos.

15

20
6.

Pap.

corr.
'

from .

9€€8€ € , ./
yap

?. ^6\~

(-

?

€v

-

"''^

Pap.

II. After

a blank space.

18.

of

at his abode by my son-in-law Polydeuces I presented the perpetrator, Eudaemon ; but his influence procured the to the officials a petition against I accordmgly testify to his failure of the petition, so that he should not seem indictable. widow woman. For Thonis the curator of Seuthes rushed into my violence, being a feeble so that dared to carry off my slave Theodora, though he had no power over her,

Concerning the outrage suffered

house and

I

am

subjected to unmitigated violence.'
I
.

^f

:

SC.

(
:

',

cf.

1.

6. 3, note.

13.

cf.

888.

1121.

Petition to a Beneficiarius.
25.6x16-8 cm.
A.D. 295.

from a woman accusing two neighbours of having seized some The heir. property which had belonged to her mother and of which she was the asks that and writer announces her intention of proceeding against the offenders,

A

petition

they should be made to give security for their appearance.

.

{€){)
2

[] ?

^

MiKpas

212

5

^ .
iKeivoLS

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
kv

.

)
-

^i\€p5>s

€€

^. [] [][]€ ^
eis

.
2

, [] ^.
Trj

'

25

3

, {), [] [ . ^[] [] [] [] []] . [ ] [] []. [
[]

, ,,
[]

, [] , -, [] .
'

^

-e-

-

--

^]

.

On

the verso

2nd hand

{){)()

[] .

1121.

PETITIONS

213

and

at right angles

3rd hand
35

I.

iVaPap.

€€ / ^/
..[•].•(
Pap.

rrjs

)"^

irdpos €Tovs
7.

5.

Pap.

26.

. 6
,.

. ;€»;
28.

Pap.
COrr.

ig.

\.

(.
?

21.

Pap.

from

' To Aurelius Ammonias, beneficiarius of In the consulship of the present consuls. of Diodorus and Techosis, of the the praefect of Egypt, from Aurelia Techosis daughter No the illustrious and most illustrious city of Oxyrhynchus. Small Oasis, now living at give themselves over to small danger and no ordinary severity awaits those who lightly the victim of a most plunder and robbery of the property of others. I therefore, being upon me. Techosis, outrageous attack and robbery, approach you to testify to the assault nursed mother, was stricken with illness, and I in the goodness of my heart my aforesaid assiduous in performing what is owing from children to parents.

and tended her and was When a few days ago she died

me her daughter heir in accordance with did all that was fitting on the occasion of her death. the law I provided for her funeral and with what impulse, While i was occupied with my trouble, I know not on what ground or who are my neighbours in the same house where my mother a certain Sotas and Papontos, left by her, a considerable amount of lived possessing themselves of the extensive movables some very valuable clothes, and other things, lawlessly carried gold,' a quantity of furniture,
intestate, leaving

them

for this on what inducement I cannot tell. I am about to demand satisfaction and in order that they may put in an appearance I perforce present of the superior official, requesting that they may be compelled to provide this petition, testifying to the assault and having recourse to the security that they will stay and appear, since I am already written prepared through your grace for the praetect s official, and that a copy of this document be Agathodaemon. Date and signature of Aurelia Techosis, written for her by Aurelius
all off,

office.'

for The document is dated on Feb. 8 (1. 30) when the names of the consuls I probable reason for their omission year were very likely not yet known. This is a more the Upei&p than the desire for brevity which prompted the formula and Cf. the use of in the later Ptolemaic contracts.
'

(€)()
13.
cf.

2. Cf. P. Brit.

\\ ^:: «,.^
1114.
I
<;.
'.

. :
:

Mus. I157. 4
i.

€€
17
3

'' 8\€

8^€5,
20. 4, &C.,
xxxviii. 17;

and P. Leipzig

e.

the sena/us consultum Orfiiianum, Inst.

hUAvaTOi

is

Icss suitable.

18.

Cf.'e.g.

126.

aKiviircov

,
,
.

.,.

ui. 4,

Dig.

.

G. U.

8. U.

8
of

\]
Wenger,
3

Wilcken,
in P. Brit.
II.

who

points out that this passage confirms his restoration
cf.

Mus. 214. 20

Archw

Rechtshisi. Papyrusstud. p. 87.

154, and for Uauh For the technical
i.

^:
,,
,

= sails dare,
cf. e. g.

P. Grenf.

^^. , mistaken ; it was no doubt intended for another document. with the contents of 34-6. These three obscure lines have no apparent connexion
This endorsement
is

62. 10, 79. 7,B.

G.U. 581.8.

the recto.

214

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

(ci)

CONTRACTS.
Services.
A.D. 407.

1122.

Engagement of
13-2

X

14 cm.

of a contract for personal attendance and service, in return and clothing; probably a money wage was also included in the agreement, which breaks off before this is reached. Cf. P. Strassb. 40, where
for

Commencement

food

the ser\'ant

is

described as a

Archiv

v.

pp. 260-1.

On

the verso

M.iTCL

5

^ .
e/y

^' 86
is

khpalo^ KarahovKos "nah (a. d. 569),

and

a small fragment of a

money

account.

?

.

[)

{€^)

{9)

\{) {5)

MiXavos

[ ,

[]8
Sk

[][

cr[e

^
pe 22 letters
g.
I.

-

15

.

e

[

.
'

*

Pap.

e/ie.

II.

'

Pap.

14.

.[^[ Vap.

The year after the sixth consulship of our lord Arcadius, eternal Augustus, and Flavius Probus the most illustrious, Pauni 15. To Aurelius Didymus son of Theon, senator of the illustrious and most illustrious city of Oxyrhynchus, from Aurelius Phoebammon otherwise Lucas, son of Melas, of the said city, greeting. I acknowledge of my own free will that I have made an agreement with you to attend you and travel with you in other lands and obey you in all your commands, while you are to feed and clothe me
.'
.
.

1122.
11.
ev re
Trj

CONTRACTS

12.

'.
:

[]•5

SO P. Strassb» 40. 33.
cf.

P. Hernals xvi.

aypovs.

e.g.

. G. U.

I02I. l6

;

(P. Strassb. 40. 40),

would also be

suitable.

(
11.
cf. e. g.

215

11-12 {Archiv Lc.) has
(257. Il), or
14, B.

14,

13-14. For the conjunction of 1126. 22.

and

275.

G. U. 1021.

1123.

Devolution of Domain-land.
i2-3X9-4cm.
a.d.

158-9.

In this contract the incoming tenant of some domain-land guarantees the daughter of the late cultivator, who had died, against any future demands for dues upon the land, over which he is given full rights, while he apparently

promises to

make no

claims to any other part of the estate.

The

situation

may

be contrasted with that of 899, where the daughter and domain-land petitions to be released from the responsibility (theoretically illegal) of continuing the cultivation cf. B. G. U. 648, Rostowzew, Rom. Kolonat, In the present instance the heir was more fortunate and had found pp. 196-7.
;

heir of a cultivator of

somebody

willing to relieve her

^? []
[
]
.

by becoming the tenant

in

her father's place.

09

[

5

0S

^^^€ []
]

VLOS

[^ ]
.

[.

, ? ^. •)(^
.

')(

^Loyivovls]

.]9


eh

^? Ile-

-

avSpbs

TaneTadpios

^

ovpios kiTOLKLOv

15

'^•

^ €^[] []€ € €[

Uerev-

2l6

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

20

[ [ ][ \ [^ ]

]
Se

[€
[€
[€
TTJs

.
TTJs
7[.]

] ,]
iveaTa>Tos

€[
^,

eh

{) [€

'^^

yfjs

Sia

]^€[

On

the verso
.

( [
)

2.

Second

COrr.

from

.

1 4•

ei

(

COTI.

from

.

Apion son of Sarapion son of Ischyrion, his mother being Ammonous adopted daughter of Ballarus son of Pe is, of the city of Oxyrhynchus, to Ta. daughter of Teos son of Totoeus, her mother being Tsenaphunchis, of the village of Petenouris, with her guardian her husband Thonis son of Diogenes and Tapetsiris, of the city of Oxyrhynchus, greeting. I agree that I will henceforward undertake all the public land registered in the name of your departed father Teos at the village of Petenouris and Panechmothis, and that I will secure you against any trouble or liability in regard to all dues upon the said public land from the present 22nd year of Antoninus Caesar the lord continually ; while I make no claim to control any remaining part which may be foimd to belong to you of your father's estate, but only to have power to dispose of the land, since you have resigned
'

.

.

.

.

.

.

the cultivation.'
5.

nerevovpios

and
or possibly

letter suggests a,

is expected. The vestige of the first but there would hardly be room for x[p{e)ias], which is not a[ir]r^y could be read, but is also unconvincing. in itself very satisfactory. 1 9 sqq. Apion here seems to be renouncing claims to property other than the land, and the proposed restoration proceeds on that hypothesis. The desirability of such a stipulation is evident from a comparison of B. G. U. 648, where the claim to the petitioner's inheritance was based on the cultivation of her father's yrj. cf. e.g. 278. II 23. For fj^f]povs, Tebt. 380. 19—20

10.

Something
v,

like yewpyias

^

(^ ,

1.

1

2)

have not previously occurred.

vaypaov<:

\.

,

.

(]{^{
is

24•

[]()

Unsuitable.

.

1124.

CONTRACTS

217

1124.

Lease of Land.
16

X

i3«2 cm.

A.D. 26.

The

latter part of

a lease of land for one year, the rent to be paid partly

in

wheat, but on green crops in

money

, [8\
Svvov,
e/y

B\

5 ^
[8k

^ ]7€ \[\
yi7[y>

[]6

e[ai']

8i tl

[ } []9
e/y

(11.

13-15, note).

klv-

[€]co[y

\\, [] ' \6[] []9 86
[]
erou[y]

.Trjs

[>]

8e

15

[] [ ][ 8, 6[] € [() [] €][]
€[])(^[]
8])(^

[]
[]

kni

v€o[v]

[] 8 []
nepi
5'

kv

[.].., J^s 8'

, .

kav

,

2
and hand

, [.]
[]

[],

()(^)

[]

{)

[]
1,

8.

-

8

()

[\
II.

.

^) .

*\.

2i8
' .
. .

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
If any demand be made upon the lessee for the the rent being free of all risk. for any other purpose on account of Dionysius or the land, the amount

government or

shall be deducted from the rent ; and Dionysius and his agents shall retain the ownership The lease being guaranteed, the lessee shall pay of the crops until he recover the rent. to Dionysius the rent in the month Pauni of the said year at the threshing-floors of Isieum Tryphonis in wheat that is new, pure, unadulterated, and unmixed with barley, by the

4-choenix measure of Ammonius son of Ptolemaeus, or shall forfeit as the value of every drachmae of silver and double the rent of the land . artaba which he does not pay sown with green produce, while the penalty for abandoning the cultivation, in addition to the amounts aforesaid, shall be loo drachmae of silver and to the treasury an equal sum ; and Dionysius shall have the right of execution upon the lessee or anyone he chooses
.
.

and upon all his property as if in accordance with a Date and signature of Dionysius.
3-5. Cf. P. Tebt. 105. 48 and 277. 8-10, where
12.

.
and
lessors of

legal decision.

This lease

is

valid.'

\\

yijs is

to

be read, as here, before

For

similar measures
It

cf. e. g.

13-15. the land

may

be inferred from
that different
evKaToKine'iv

Tebt 376. 24, note, P. Strassb. i. 9, note. between the rent in wheat and that on categories of produce had been previously specified.
101. 40, P.
this distinction

are almost always used of green crops like

8' 15-16. pp. 154-6, 162-4.

.;

or

cf.

729. 20, P. Tebt. 105. 44, Berger, Strafklauseln,

.

1125.

Lease of Land and Loan.
9-2Xii-iocm.
Second century.

Part of a contract for a lease of some land, with an advance from one of the

aoo drachmae at the usual rate of

that of 101 and 501.

[

]

.

cci

8e

?
. .

interest.

The formula

is

similar to

[.

.]

%.TOS

^^?
tSkols

^^

9 [.
Spaerouy

SiaKoaias

,

aanep

9

\,
^€

vnepxpoveCas

€€ ? €€ -

10

.
^\,'\

kav Si

vo[y ye]t/?7Ta/,

npos

'
15

[] []
eW
S)v

^ €^,
ttjs

^.^
1125.

CONTRACTS

?

erovs

-

219

eroy

ovs

Kvpieveiv

^^ - •
6

-

eVoy els

20

[€][]6

[ [

]
tStais

^, tois

€09
]

22 letters

[
.
Pap.

[Pap.

7-

/
.
.

Pap.
18.

8.

xinepxpovnas Pap.

3•

\.

^KOrepov.

17.

of

COrr.

Pap.

19.

The lessee further acknowledges the receipt half an artaba of wheat annually. Dionysius singly of an advance of 200 drachmae of silver at the interest of a drachma from per mina every month, from the present month Thoth, which sum together with the interest he will return to Dionysius in the month Pauni of the present year or will pay for the overtime interest at the same rate of one drachma, all free of all risk. If any part of the The land is unirrigated from the present year, an allowance shall be made to the lessee. annual taxes upon the land are to be borne by the lessors in proportion to their share of the land leased and they shall have the ownership of the crop until they receive their dues. The lease being guaranteed, the lessee shall deliver annually at the public granary at his own expense the specified rent, while he shall place on deposit free of all deductions for of the first the lessors, for each the rent of the part leased by him, every year at the time
'

.

;

measuring
I.

.'
. .

eros was apparently not 31-2, Preisigke, Girowesen, pp. 74 sqq. should probably be restored in 501. 39-40. is in apposition with 20-1. Cf. 11. 13-14.

The word

before

(cf.

590).

19. Cf. e. g. 101.

hv\

[6
wo
.
.

S)v.

For

.

cf.

101. 33, P.

Amh.

88. 24, &c.

;

the same phrase, on the significance of which

cf.

Preisigke,

op. «/., p. 75,

probably occurred in 501. 41-2.

220

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

2.
of the document

Lease of Land.
i7'4

X

i6'5 cm.

Fifth century.

Lease of four arourae for one year at the rent of 53 is very erratic.

carats.

The

spelling

5

[ \^ 8€ [] ^^8 €, [], {) [) , ,[][ ]{), , 7;{}' €, {) € {) {),
[
[

aa letters

]

.

[]?

/

.

.

e[.

ev

,

.

eh

15

.[....

2
On
1st

[^
[

{) [ ^^ ]{) {) {){) [). ^1[\
kv

^€^ ) €()
{)
€7
TTJ
]

-

, , ()-

§)€

-

17 letters

the verso
[

hand

^[]
6.

,.
2.
1.

«ouJti'ws

. ^ [] () () {) . [, (. 8 .
(and hand)
]•[••]• f

{)

1•

]
[
1•

[]

.

3•

1•
,

Pap.

7•

.

.

,

4•

1• 'rcStoi'.
1.

5•

g,

.

1.

13.

1.

avriXoyias.

.. .
.

1126.
1.

CONTRACTS
1 5•

.

.

14•

Pap.; SO in of
I^.
1.

II.

COrr.

from
.

1

6.

1.

.

.

. . ^.
1•
^

12.

1.

e.

1.

I

^^ .
1.

21. r of

7?[] above the line.

)

221
1
.

SO in

1.

3.
.

.

my free will to lease from you, from the land belonging to your the fields of the said village in the holding called that of Tsabatoiis, four patronage being on arourae, total 4 arourae, by the measure of a fair measuring-line, the boundaries patronage, on the the south the land of the people of Tale, on the north that in your said kind of crop we choose, for the sowing of the ., to be sown with any west ., on the east oil the auspicious 14th indiction, at a fixed rent as agreed between us of 13 carats of gold making together 52 carats of pure metal on the pnvate private standard for each aroura, pubhc standard ; and we will pay the rent of these to you at the time of the collection of our indiction without delay or dispute of any kind, at the risk of all taxes in the 14th The lease is valid and guaranteed, and property, which is pledged to you for this purpose. and answer to the question we have given our consent.' Signatures of the lessees,
'

.

.

.

I

undertake of

in

.

.

.

.

in

endorsement on the
3.

though nothing is wanting for the sense. after The land leased clearly belonged to a considerable 1134. 7. more administrative area, and was perhaps of a similar kind to that concerned in 1134 but here means simply patrocinium, the parties to the contract being a probably patron and one of his dependents. ^ C. P. R. 4O• H» &C., 6-7. Cf. e. g. P. Amh. 95. 4, 12, 96. 3 of the Heracleopolite nome, cf. which was in the For or

4.

^
or
is

verso.

There are traces of ink
:

cf.

,
e. g.

.
P.
XiTTj

Hibeh 36.

3, note.

8-9. Possibly it

for

eiapi

9-1 0.
(Irous); els

So e.g. C. P. R. 41. 14-15 «'

.

8(
cf.

»;,

',
;

;

be distinguished from the Oxyrhynchite seems from its repetition to be a common, not a proper name. cf. Alexand. Aetol. ap. Athen. 296 c as an equivalent of ^/^t7} or
It is to

.
line,

^

-

12.

():

1138.
is

^
1127.

els

OCCUrS

in C. P. R. 42. 15-16.

5, note.
is

a misspelling for sense is fairly evident though the construction els TO 39-41 and elsewhere
.
. .

16-17. That

beginning of 1. 1 7 suggests v[ might be read in place of im[. (cf. e. g. B. G. U. 740. 9), which, however, is too long. restora19. 'E[p/ii]as is suggested by the verso, but the difference in the case makes the letter of the next name may be The third tion doubtful.
at the

(

\ veeea

os '.8 [

indicated

by the next
cf.

of which the

is

obscure

vkyaos
.

;

the phrase found in 136.

Lease of a Pigeon-house.
28•

7•5

cm.

a.d. 183.

Lease of an upper room with a pigeon-cote for four years at an annual rent Cf. the fragmentary P. Flor. lo, where two ireptorepecui/es and of 60 drachmae. are let for 400 drachmae in the middle of the next century, and for the a
formula 502, 911-12, 1036, 1128.

222

5

€' €/c€i

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

-

Aioyevet

e/y

{hov?) rhv

^
€-

?
-

€€),

.]]


70

^

€V

rfj

kvoi-

15

\
dvi
kv

, '
^
'

€€€-

{]\-

6€

20

,

-

^"^

25

^
}

,

b

^

30

{} ()

, .

'

,

1127.
35

CONTRACTS
[.

223

2nd hand IIovwXios OvixTLos Aioyi-

?
ov

tou

to(j/)

4•

1.

19.

(

4

Kaff
7•

€0
"

kvoLKiov

€!.
COrr.

COm;

from

.

20. s of

, 8
vn[ep(S-

ttc-

[

m

1.

(J).

12. s of
COrr.
1.

COrr.

from

COrr.

25.

ov

OX

*

.

v.

' ApoUonius son of Sosus son of Sosus, of the city of Oxyrhynchus, has let to Publius Vettius Diogenes for four years from the first day of Thoth of the coming 24th year the upper room of the house belonging to him at Mouchinor and the pigeon-house there with its wooden ladder at an annual rent and revenue of 60 drachmae of silver free of all risk.

The lease being guaranteed, the lessee shall use the room and the pigeon-house for the four years without hindrance, and shall pay the rent annually in two half-yearly instalments of 30 drachmae, and at the end of the term shall return the said room and the pigeon-house in the condition in which he receives them and the two doors and one key attached, or
shall

times the property.
7.

pay the value of anything that he does not restore, and shall forfeit one and a half amount of any sum owing, right of execution lying against him and all his This lease is valid.' Date and signature of Publius Vettius Diogenes.

The

village of

was apparently
converted into a
v.

,
1128.

originally written, the

in 491. 3 and 895, is probably meant. being afterwards crossed through and then was another Oxyrhynchite village.
is

which

mentioned

Lease of a Dining-room.

A
14
;

lease of a dining-room

()
6

8•6 7-4 cm.

a.d. 173.

years at a rent of 20 drachmae per annum.
the formula resembles that of 1127.

and a store-chamber within it for two Cf. 1129, B. G. U. 25^, P. Strassb.

{€) {) '

5

?

^ ? ^ ^

{')

?

? ? €-

^ ^^-

kvi-

2

reXet

?

€€9,

224
6)9

9
09
15

6869

^
}
.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Svo

eiKaSos

€9
kv

^-

^
-

25

TOS

1,

€{€)
COrr.

^ /
(,
. .

kvoLKLOv

as

[] .
hand over an
20.
e
1.

€ [] ^€ )^
. ()
€.
of

-

{) and

in a different
cf.

was no doubt
of

originally written;

19.

erasure.

corr.

from .

23.

'Chaeremon
called

also called

Ammonius Theon,

his

Sinthonis, of the city of Oxyrhynchus, has let to

mother being Theanous also called Ammonius, freedman of Sarapion also

city, for a term of two years from the 28th day of the present of the current 13th year of Aurelius Antoninus Caesar the lord, from the house belonging to him in the village of Sepho, a dining-room and the store-chamber within it at an annual rent of 20 drachmae, which the lessee Ammonius shall pay to the

Theogenes, of the said

month Pharmouthi

lessor

Ammonius

also called

Theon

at the

of the term he shall restore the rooms free of keys attached. This lease is valid.' Date.

end of each year without delay, and at the end filth and dirt of all kind, and the doors and

1129.

Lease of Dining-rooms.
31.7x19.5 cm.
A.D. 449.

Lease of two dining-rooms at the rent of ia,coo,ooo denarii, the contract to
last

during the pleasure of the lessor

^

;

cf.

1037.

5

^^

^^

^

8.

6€.

e^rjs

15

and hand

[

8 ^ ^ ,^ , , . -. . '] [
1129.

CONTRACTS

225

€€9

erovs


en

cj5

Scvripas

€€[]

kv

€ ' ^,
]
• •

[]

[] [ ][]
[

[]

I.

/
20

e/5[oroy.]
4-

di emit
of

No

.

.

.

osios

.

.

Pap.

4.

>;

COrr.

from

.

5• v'iov

Pap.

II.

Pap.

illustrious,

of Flavius Zeno and Flavius Postumianus the most Aurelia Mikis daughter of Theodoras, of the illustrious and most illustrious city of Oxyrhynchus, from Aurelius Phoebammon son of Artemidorus, of the said I undertake of my free will to lease from the first day of the next month Mecheir of city. the 94th year and of the present second indiction two rooms or the current 125th which dining-rooms belonging to you in a house situated in the said city in the quarter of Small Teumenouthis with all appurtenances, and I will pay in rent annually 1,200 myriads of silver, which I will deliver annually in half yearly instalments of one-half, and whenever you wish I will surrender the said rooms without delay. The lease is valid, and in answer Signature of Aurelius Phoebammon written for to the question I have given my consent.' him by another person in Greek, and of the scribe in Latin.

'The year Tubi

after the consulship

24.

To

=

I.

(€5.
1 9. f

10.

Rufius Praetextatus Postumianus has apparently not been called Flavius elsewhere. is well knowu, but this is the first mention of the The

8 ?

€(€<

was perhaps abbreviated

etS,

1130.

Loan of Money.
30-8

X

19 cm.

A.D. 484.

Contract for a loan of lo solidi
interest consisting of

for a

period of about six months, the

twenty bundles of tow.

The document

is

written

in

a well-formed upright hand, but in very illiterate Greek.

Q

226

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

.

5

\ / ^ •
[\][^'\

^

€{) {)

'

v[io\s

^eoy

•)( [^'\ ^() [\\(

{^).

^-

6^

[] €[] [] , {€) () {)
e/y

€•)(€

[]

9. €

yatpeiv.

iv

,

,
ivea-

\

15

€€ (€) (€) [] [] €€ [] i^fjs

€[][,]

,

2

[]

25

2nd hand

., , . . ' ()
)[]

,
^

{)-

()

{)

[]


1st

hand

. ^ .

+

On

the verso

{) ' (€)
+
[.
4•
.

1130.

CONTRACTS

227

^(6{€
.

{) {>)
.
.

[.

.

1.

. ^ .8 . . .«.. [] ! . / ."
.]
. .

(]§[]
[.
.
.
.

^€€9
1.
. . .

(\.
.

2.

Pap.

'•

;

SO in
1.

1.

"J.

1.

1319.

of

[]^/ corr.
. .

.

(

33•
.

5•

Pap.
8.

6

COrr.

from
II.

e.

ovtos
,*

.

nporepov.
1.

1.

g

1.

Pap.

SO in

32.

15.

1.

6.

1.

»??.
.

Third

«

of

rewritten
.
.

1.

(VToyiov
.

aitohoaiv

.

.

.

.

20.

1.

.

.

(

8e.

21.
.

1.

23.

1.

24.

1.

re

.

.

.

.

20.

of
.

.

.

/.

COrr.

27.

1.

X«p«
1•

"^^-

28.

\.

29.

1.

3°•

.

.

.

eldoTos.

32

' The year after the consulship of Flavius Troconda the most illustrious, Pachon 9, Aurelius Abraham son of Ision and Sophia, of the village of Senokomis in 7th indiction. Alexandria, the Oxyrhynchite nome, to Aurelius Isaac son of Nilus, of the capital city I have I acknowledge, my former bond remaining valid and secure, that dealer, greeting. from hand to hand out of your house for my own pressing now received from you as a loan need ten solidi of gold of the genuine Imperial coinage, of full weight and unalloyed, total following 10 solidi of gold, as a capital sum, and for interest upon it up to the term herein twenty bundles of tow, pure and satisfactory, according to the weight of the

I

will

pay

This sum I will perforce repay to you free of all risk in the the 130th year, at the beginning of the eighth the current i6ist which shall not be lawful indiction, without delay or dispute of any kind, with the condition that it deed or receipt for me to say that I have paid any of the aforesaid debt without a written If at the expiry of the term I do or before the recovery and annulment of this my bond. term, not make the payment to you and you are willing at my request to grant me another with the same interest for the overtime, and you shall have the right of
village, total

20 bundles.

month Phaophiof

=

I will

pay you

this

sum

This bond, of which a single copy is made, is execution upon me and all my property. Signature of Aurelms vaUd, and in answer to the question I have given my consent.' on the for him by Banos, deacon, signature of the scribe, and endorsement Abraham written
verso.
1.

:

2.

cf. 940. I, note. Cf. Cod.Just.\v.^g.2postconsulatum Trocondae;

he

is

commonly called Trocondus,

The nomen Flavius appears to be new. 1. 2. and the year of the mdiction 3. There is an inconsistency between this date Pachon 9 Pachon 9 of the year after the consulship of Trocondus is May 4, a.d. 483, but The number of the indiction year is supported by of the 7th indiction is May 4, a.d. 484• the same line, where, in 1. 1 6 and confirmed by the years of the Oxyrhynchite eras in

m

;?
1.

though eV€ou(J^•)must be an error current year was a.d. 484, not 483.
2, if

the

name of the

consul for

the note adloc), it is implied that the should therefore have been written in &c., a.d. 484, Theodericus, who occurs in Cod. Just. i. 3. 36,
for daiovros
(cf.

Toif

on April

28,

was not generally known.

228
4•

in 47. i6 and 740. 37, where should be read. P. Leipzig 45. 13 as corrected by Wilcken, Archiv iii. p. 565, with his supplementary note in Archiv iv. p. 189, P. Cairo Cat. 67030. i. 3, ii. 10, and P. Cairo Cat. 67023. 6—7 P. Flor. 93. 7
IS

6.

/
So

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
:

mentioned
cf.

.
12.

Wessely, S/ud. Pal.
for

Al/ersmdi'z.

cf. P. Brit. Mus. 239. 18, 979. 13, B. G. U. 1080. 18, Wessely, im Philogelos, p. 29, is no doubt a vulgar spelling of or as suggested by Wilcken, Archiv i. p. 556. For other instances of interest in kind cf. P. Grenf. II. 90, B. G. U. 740. A verb like has to be supplied both here and

,

7(€)
i.

e.g. P. Grenf. II. 90. 8
p. 7. (2) 13.

,

€[(]!

8€

;

[][]76.

cf.

P. Leipzig 61. II,

which

{),
,

in

1.

the

perhaps (5) should be inserted. 15-16. Numerous instances show that the year by the eras of Oxyrhynchus began, like the ordinary Egyptian year, on Thoth i cf. introd. to 125. Since the contract is dated in Pachon (1. 3), to speak of the coming Phaophi of the present year is a contradiction, and must be a slip for eiVtovro?. Though the remains of the figures after are very slight there is little real doubt about the reading, and I consider to be inadmissible cf. the note on 1. 2. The reference to Phaophi as the of the new indiction, which usually began in Egypt in the latter part of Pauni, is not to be taken

;
29.
14.
;

of

the sentence

/

OCCUr in B. G. U. 837. 27. of COUrSC refers tO or would be improved by some conjunction, e.g.

.

'
.
:

;

'

'

strictly.

I7~l8. Cf. B. G. U. II 27. 20 f^e'ivai \eyiv perhaps though this adjective is not used in the contract. [ 33. This line is written in blacker ink but apparently by the same hand. supposed chrism may perhaps be an abbreviation of
32.

\

[,

€.

-.

The

1131.

Promissory Note.
30-2

X

10. 1

cm.

Fifth century.

An
chase
914.

acknowledgement of a debt

of 3 solidi less 8 carats, being the pur-

money for some vi^ine which had been delivered but The writing is across the fibres of the recto.
[

not paid for;

cf.

[

]

.

[•]^|[.]"9

€yS6]^(ov)

[{).]

[]
'4

€(7})

'

€[]9
5

[a]^f^ vnep

[]

\

1131.

CONTRACTS

929

10

apeTrj

, {€ {) [] € \€ \ []0()
)({)
rfj

8

{) €() ,

15

{) {9) . {$) {) ? 6[€).

.)9
afj

kv

kv86^{ov)

2—3•
'

].

^

(^),

4•

1•

(€.

I have from wine-dealer of the honourable house, from Julianus, lawyer. for the price of wine sold to me by you, two solidi of gold less eight carats, total 2 solidi of gold less 8 carats, and this sum I am ready to pay your Written on excellency at the collection of arrears of the honourable house without delay. I, the said Julianus, lawyer, assent to the deed the 9th of the month Pauni, ist indiction.
. .

.,

your excellency and owe to you,

as above.'

{) ('[(, .

1-3. Julianus, who signs the acknowledgement, is naturally regarded as the debtor, so (cf. 1. 17) occur should be inserted, should be else in 136. 10, 154. 10. is properly a list of arrears, as e. g. B. G. U. 976. 20 12. Flor. 67 introd. 977• 4 °[^° in 136. 1 3 iviuvrov It here has a certain temporal signification like
that

]7(^){)
:

[\, .
of the

6

-

G. U. 799. 2—3 through the are written as a monogram, the

17-18. note was mistaken,

{>) {^^ .
1132.

cf. e. g.

() \
934.
tail

lvh\^vo^.

yap

.

{) , .
The
About

where the
letters

Repayment of a Loan.
9.4x7-5 cm.
A. D.

162.

Acknowledgement

of the return of a loan of 600 drachmae, which

was being

This promptness may repaid before it was due. the interest charged was at double the normal rate.

and hand

[]

^

be explained by the fact that

^]{

)

.[....

230

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Xecoy
.

5

Q>i/os

aiTeyjeLv

15

^ , •
[e/y

^ ^\
yaCpeiv.

[• \€[] []\\8\ [ [\ ^ /[ 8[6\[ \\
. .

9
\

eui

€[-

^^ '
]6\^

€ €
Pap.
. .

ii[a-

)^€6[ €4-

2

1 6.

Chaeremon son of Sarapion son of his mother being Taplutas, of the city of to Tryphon son of Heraclides son of on, his mother being Taapollonides, of the said city, greeting. I acknowledge that I have received from you, who are making payment of your own accord before the appointed term, through the bank at the Serapeum at Oxyrhynchus of Phanias, ex-chief priest, and Ptolemaeus, the overseers associated with Audasius Paulinus, the capital sum of six hundred silver drachmae with the interest thereon up to the present time at the rate of two drachmae per month, which sum was lent you by me in accordance with a note of hand through the said bank on the intercalary days of the second year of Antoninus and Verus, lords and Emperors, until
'

.,

Oxyrhynchus,

.

.

.

.'

.

.

I.

]77(
and

),

if

doubtful,
4.

]apaf or

'\ would be also possible.
as

right,

might

refer to the

Serapeum
]

individuals, 98. 7 KXtavbpov, 269. i.

' , . ^ . ,
short

A

8-12.

name such The bank at
3

'\

or

'Sipi\(uvos is
is

the HpuKXtlbov

Serapeum

'^[]
is

^,

in

several

264.

7

^-

required.

{

(1.
.

9)
.

;

.) is

but the reading not suitable.

is

very

papyri called after the

267. 4 ^opairimvos are mentioned in 91.

\,

names of

'2(

8in

hia

(?)

and an

.

,

.

37-8.

The

(^)

present passage

peculiar in describing the

bank as

that

of the

513. In

1132.
the note on 513. 37
the

CONTRACTS

231

(
19, B.
9.

it was suggested that the persons who successively gave their names to bank were more probably either the or the it than the owners This view now receives some confirmation so far as the are concerned, and the theory that they were only mentioned in 91 because at the time there was no (Wilcken, Archiv v. p. 212, note 4, Preisigke, Girowesen,•^^. 21-3) becomes less plausible. of banks at Hermopolis occur in P. Flor. 1.3,?. Strassb. 52. 3. sc. tjj which is twice the normal rate at this period, 15. were the usual charge in the second and first centuries b.c. upon overdue loans, e.g. P. Amh. 50.
'

'.

:

,

G. U. 1053. 38-9, but are found in ordinary loans, as here, in B. G. U. 1052. 43, 1056. &c. (reign of Augustus). In B. G. U. 1 145 (b. c. 5) interest at the rate of 8 obols occurs.

1133.
27-6

Receipt.
X 18 cm.
A.D. 396.

fruit sold by a grower to a dealer. An had previously been made by the latter at the time of the sale (cf. e.g. 1131), but this could not now be found and handed back to him, and therefore the present document was drawn up releasing him from further obligations in the matter.

receipt for the price of

some

acknowledgement

of indebtedness

[]6€9
5

^ ^? [ \• €[\€]€8^ ^.
'
€[']

.

6[€

^

[
.

€] .
]6(
.

kv

€€
15

€ []6€{) [

€ ^
re
[

)^

2nd hand

[ ' [\
.

€[ , €]
.][•
«jf

€^€6]

^[\

.

,

232

.
hand
the verso

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
dSoTOS.
^t

-/()

1st

[]

'
1.

.

[.]/30;

virep

€().

On

7•

1.

< 6\.
2.
1.

II.

.
The

COIT.

4•
8.

^•

1.

12.

1.

year after the consulship of Flavius Olybrius and Flavius Probinus the most 28. Aurelius John son of Sarmates, fruit-gardener of Heracleopolis, now living at the village of Nesus Limenius, ex-primipilarius, to Aurelius Artemidorus son of Calopus, of Arsinoitonpolis, living at the illustrious and most illustrious city of Oxyrhynchus, fruit-dealer, greeting. I acknowledge that I have received from you and have been paid in full the four gold solidi less 600 myriads due for the price of the produce of the said village, and I have no claim upon you in respect of this, and I make and will make no charge against you and since your bond has been lost and cannot be found I declare that it is null and [void] both for me and every one producing it, and I have issued this receipt Signatures for your security and in answer to the question have given my consent.' of Aurelius John, written for him by Aurelius Theodore, and of the scribe, and title on the
'

.

. , ^, ^, .
5•
1•

\p{iovs).

6.

1.

g.

1.

.

of

/
.
.

.

COrr.

.
from
in B.

ef.

13.

illustrious,

Phamenoth

;

verso.
I.

The
For

brothers Olybrius and Probinus do not
cf. c. g.

seem

to

have been given elsewhere the
is

name

Flavius.

3.

B. G. U. 643.

1.

The

adjective

found

G. U.

900. 24.
5.

cf. P. Flor. 71. 697, 713, P. Leipzig 41. I, 8-9. This great depreciation of the at the end of the fourth century is somewhat surprising. The passage does not necessarily prove that 600 myriads were less than a single solidus (cf. e. g. 1138. 6-8), but they must have at least been considerably less than four. Late in the Byzantine period the value of the was very much lower than this (We^sely, Alkrsindiz. im Philogelos, pp. 45-6), but for the fourth century the ratio of I \ibid. pp. 32-3) seems to be the highest that has previously occurred. 12. For cf. B. G. U. 214. 15 P. Brit.
:

{)7\:

no

€(^€(^
or
last

Mus. 918• 22—3
14•
1 7. 1 8.

((8\:
.

efi]u,
letters

[\(.
as in

€7{7}€',
or

1034.

16.

[.]pov

perhaps represents some misspelling of
few

The

8.
at the end.

of the signature are a mere scribble, with a

1134.

CONTRACTS

233

1134.

Official Receipt for Rents.
29'6x30-5cm.
a.d. 421.

and discharge given to an agent by an official who was in the department of the Imperial domains (cf. note on 11. 3-4) for rents collected during the preceding two years from local cultivators. A contract of a kind similar to 136, the phraseology of which is recalled by 1134 (cf. note on 11. 7-10), had probably been previously engaged in by the agent. The document, which might have been included in section {a), is well written in a large and
receipt
clear hand.

A

MFera]

vnareiav

[]
5

9 " ^? ^
&

'

u/os

?^. ? ^^
6€
{6).

€8

^

.

€€

€€ ,
re

'^€

15

, {) {)

234

eh(
Pap.
'

I.

.

1.

( .
Pap.
. .

'//^
2.

OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Pap. ; SO in 1. 3. Pap. 3. over a washed OUt WOrd, perhaps

'\\

Pap.
12.

of third

COrr.

from

/»?.

13.

«
;

so in

1.

5.

7.

[(\.
Pap.

10.

The

year after the consulship of our lord Theodosius, eternal Augustus, for the ninth

time,

illustrious patrician, for the third time, Phamenoth 7. Flavins Phoebammon son of Diogenes, ex-member of the body-guard, administrator for the divine house, of the illustrious and most illustrious city of Oxyrhynchus, to Aurelius

and of Flavins Constantius, most

Maximinus son of Ammon,
paid in
full

collect from and other places, discharging the function of an agent in faithful accord with the list of dues handed to you by me and in method corresponding to the account given by you of receipt and expenditure in the two past second and third indictions and that for the future I have no count against you and neither make nor will make any charge against you in respect of produce or money or dues of any other sort or kind of those which you undertook to collect in the said second indiction and in the past third indiction from the responsible cultivators of the village Nesmimis and the other accompanying lands belonging to the divine house and under my administration; and for your security I have issued to you this receipt, of which a single copy has been made, and in response to the question I have given my
;

of the said city, greeting. I acknowledge that I have been the rents of every sort, whether in kind or money, which you undertook to the responsible cultivators in the administrative district of the village Nesmimis

consent.'

Mus. 412.

Wilcken remarks that the Apion family seems to have modelled the administration of its property upon that of the Imperial domains. For cf. e.g. 1147. 17, 19, and Gelzer, Byzani. Verw. p. 87. The village of Nesmimis is mentioned in 1053. 21.

, ') (( 8( (( . ^
[]
which
refers in
11.

121 sqq. otVi'as the precise status of this official is not clear, but he was evidently concerned with the royal estates, the meaning doubtless the Imperial house. Cf. P. Brit. Mus. 234, a letter written in a.d. 346 by an eVtVp(o7ros)
I v.
.

: 8 ,
3-4.
cf.
. . :

43. rectO

iv,

18

Mommsen, Ephem.

,,
Epigr.

Amh.

1

37.

2,

P. Brit.

19—20

to

.

Cairo Cat. 67024.

7j

&c.

Whether

as in P. Klein.

may be doubted. 7-10. Cf. the very similar language of 136. 14 sqq. (a.d. 583) eVi
Form. loio and probably
in 901. 3,
. . .

^8,

(68

ip

.

.

.

'

€ (^ , (
pe
.

3 here implies deputed functions,
i.

.

€7«(')

Leipzig 96.

.

,

\

ety

' (-

1135.

TAXATION

235

(e)

TAXATION.

or, as it is termed This and the following papyrus are receipts for in the issued in the one case by collectors in 1135, iepbv seems to have been The first receipt, which other by an assistant
*
'

,
Archiv
tablets,

1135.

Receipt for Anabolicum.
9•89•2 cm.
Third century.

().
is

()
;

written about the middle of the third century,

is

for a

money payment,

the

second, dated A.D. 420,
to Wilcken;

is

for four tunics.

Apparently the only other papyrus

mentioning the anabolicum
cf.

iv.

P. Thdad. Inv. 15 (the reference to which I owe p. 185), a receipt issued in A.D. 324 by the a-nohUrai

Upov

for

some leaden

and

in the

50 pounds of flax. The name has also occurred on Edict of Julius Alexander, C. I. G. 4957 =

cf Vopiscus, ck Dittenberger, Or. Gr. Inscr. 669. 21 Aurel. 45 vectigal ex Aegypto urbi Romae Aurelianus vitri, chartae^ lint, stuppae atque anabolicas species aeternas constituit. On the nature of this impost see

Rostowzew's discussion in Mitt. d. Arch. Inst., Rom. Abth. 1896, pp. 317 sqq., Wuch. Klass. Phil. 1900, 115; he points out that the commodities mentioned by Vopiscus were, with corn, for which there was the special word annona, the = to lade a ship), and describes the ratio principal exports of Egypt anabolica as the taxes upon a certain group of monopolized Egyptian industries.

{ €[)
^{)
€|,

Upov

\[) 6{) \{6 () ()

?)

5

']{) [{€). ^.
4•
1•
'

. ((.) €[] . []{) '[{)
y
total

Paid to the collectors of the sacred anabolicum on account of the heirs of Sarapas

through his wife, fifty-six drachmae, me, Aurelius Antonius Alexander.'
2.

56

dr.

Fifth year,

Phamenoth

19.

Signed by

Itpov

1019.

3.

means Imperial; the annona is similarly called Upa, e.g. Wilcken, At the end of the line »;('/;') (Wilcken) is preferable to

().

Ost. 682, 3,

236.

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
1136.

Receipt for Anaholicum.
15-1

Another
ing papyrus.
part of a

later receipt for

The

writing
list

is

across the fibres of the verso, the recto containing

much

effaced

5

(, € .
of payments in
Si e/xoO

,,
X
IO-2 cm.

A. D.

420.

on which see introduction to the preced-

headed

((€

)

.

.

.

y^verai)
(iTovs)

\{)
^^^ Pap.

\ 8[]^9)
[]
8,

[).

€{)

^|

€.

€().
1•

3•

4•

<.

Receipt issued by me, Apphous, through me, Sarmates, assistant. I have received from Theon, goat-butcher, for the anabolicum of the fourth indiction four tunics, total the 66th year, Tubi 5. Signed by me, Sarmates,' 4 tunics, and no more. The 97th which
'

=

,

3,

is

probably, aS Wilcken remarks, for
10.

e.g. p. Brit.
4.

Mus. 1028.

&;or
cf.

cf P. Leipzig 59. 13, 60. 14. 186) that according to Cod. Theod. vii. 6. 3 of A. D. 377 this impost Avas in Egypt payable in money (cf e.g. B. G. U. 21. iii. 17-18, 727. 14), and thinks that the delivery in kind attested by P. Leipzig 45-6, 58-60 is due to the fact that they are all earlier than the year 377. But this view will not account for 1136, and hence it is necessary to fall back on the alternative explanation that the adaeratio was permissive only and not compulsory.
for the clothes-tax

For the collection of

Mitteis notes in connexion with those two

documents

(p.

1137.

Receipt for Dues on Land.
1

2-4

X 3•9 cm.
due upon some land.

a. d.

562-3.

A
+

receipt for a

"/
(7€)

\

{)

payment of iq\

carats

iX^rep)

^( 48( {)

, ? {)
.
.

1137.

TAXATION
8'

{€) {) €[) () ? 6€.
+

;^
.
1.

5

+
?

5t

€9
-{
^•

+

.

.

2

1.

3•

^"

) .. .
^epcmlavos

()
SeCOnd

, {5)
[9).
.
1.

237

{irovs)

of aepamovos COrr.
.

4•

1•

^
is
.

.
.
.

, Macarius,
been paid
in full

assistant at the village of Serapion son of

indiction, twenty
in

on and

security (have issued)
the

239th which
official

Chaeremon, have received and of the public dues upon the land of Akous for the eleventh account car. gold for dues in full, and for a quarter carats of gold, total the receipt as above. Written in the month Tubi of the nth indiction = the 208th year. (Signed) Through me, Jeremiah, scribe, and

2|

Phoebammon,
1.

;

agreed to by me.'

more probably for For these local otherwise known.
is

Gelzer, Archiv
2.
cf. e. g.

v. p.
is

to

357. be taken substantivally, not as an adjective agreeing with
,

P. Klein.

Form. 76.

2

,
24
1

(, {)
than
95. 7

though
e. g.

this

village-name
4, 6, &c.,

cf.

1147.

and 125,
/

{).

;

not

1138.

Receipt for Money-taxes.
0-2 cm.
Fifth or sixth century.
*

Receipt for a payment inade on behalf of a church on account of moneyAbbreviations are in several cases marked by a dot above the final letter taxes. as well as by the usual diagonal stroke, as e.g. in 1053.

+
ini

{)
{€)
5

{?) {) ) {)
7{)
fv,

) {)
€{) {€)

€{) 6{) €{?)

7{€€)

{) , {) ) {) {)
6{).

233
I

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

(9) , € (€),

.
. .

+

On

the verso

2nd hand

.

.

.
'

^
and
St

e

.

.

First

of

in

1.

1 1

blotted,

Pap.

Paid to the credit of the church by Apphouas, presbyter, for the money-dues of the loth indiction, twelve sohdi of gold less fifty-one carats on the private standard, total Phaophi 8, nth 12 solidi of gold less 51 carats private standard, and no more. Once for all.' indiction, through me, Phib, scribe.
5. On the relative value of a solidus on the private, public, and Alexandrian (e. 1147) standards see 154. 13, note. 10. ta: or possibly «, with tS in 1. 4. 13. Cf. B. G. U. 1020. 15. 14. These letters on the verso seem unintelligible and suggest a magical formula. g.

{/)
1139.

ORDERS.
Logistes.
Fourth century.

Order from a
5*5

X

17*5 cm.

An

order from a logistes directing the presidents of the guild of vegetable-

dealers to supply an exceptor with a certain quantity of vegetables.

These trade-

guilds are frequently mentioned in the papyri of this period, e.g. 53 (carpenters),

84 (ironworkers), 85 (coppersmiths,
cf.

beersellers, bakers, oil-sellers, bee-keepers)

;

Ziebarth, Griech. Vereinswesen^ pp. 96 sqq. The order is written on the verso, the recto containing the beginnings of lines from a list of payments dated in

€ [
Hathur of the 17th
iii.

=

the 15th

=

the 7th year,
is

i.

e.

A. D.

322

(cf.

Wilcken, Archiv

pp.

of 383-4). A ( (/,') ).
. .

wine

valued at 3,000 drachmae

{

.]

1139.
Tliaph)

ORDERS

239

^. €{€). €€ .
S6t€
2.

(

Pap.
vegetable-sellers.

'

From

exceptor,

the logistes to the monthly presidents of the one ration of vegetables. Signed by me.'

Give Arcadius,

€€ ^.
2.
cf.
:

of Other Oxyrhynchite
13.

guilds are

mentioned

in

53.

3,

84.

6.

For

1108.

the word is commonly used in late Greek in the sense of food, especially 3. itapa . . p. 254a fodder for horses, e.g. Chron. Pasch. p. 138 b ^ In the present passage, as in B. G. U. II18. 16 ttpaaov yXvKeas rayas «V has a similar sense in Const. Porph. (. c. 23-2), it implies a definite amount, and should be read in P. Flor. Possibly (Bonn). Cf. 1158. 12, note. Cer. p. 311. 17
.

^

/?,

,]

119. 4-5.

1140.

Order for Vegetable-seed,
'

6-1

An

order for the payment of an artaba of

{)
$09
5 (eroi;y)

, '. / ()
.
kvarov
3•
i
:

. € ]^
X22.8 cm.

A.D. 293.

{€).

.

of eXaiovpyiKm COrr. from .

Seuthes to Sarapion, cultivator, greeting. artaba of vegetable seed by oil-makers' measure, total Mesore 30.' the ist year. the 8ih which
'

From

=

3.

measuring

€ \(.

(
=

Give Heraclius, donkey-driver, one Good-bye, The 9th which art.

cf.

P.

Flor.

82.

8,

85.

12,

in

both instances, as

here,

for

240

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
1141.

Order for Wine.
9-4x10 cm.
Third century.

An

order to hand over ten jars of wine and the like quantity of ofos which
in

were due
the fibres

connexion with certain agricultural operations. The writing of the verso on the recto is a fragment of an account.
;

is

across

{) {)
80s
€LS

7{}) [\ [) 6()
€?
(eTovs)

5

{) €6{9)
[]

^ €€
Aioyivovs

\a{ip€iy).

^\{6)

(erovs)

\[) €[)

€.

€ .
5•

€{)

(2nd hand)

€.
6.

,

6^(ovs)

{9)
-

o|(ot;y)

1st

hand

(erovy)

.
Kar'eneiyoPTa

Pap.

'

Pap.

,
4.

Diogenes to Thonius, wine-keeper, greeting. Give to Copreus, agent on account of the cutting of the gro\vth of reeds in the past first year and the other pressing work at the farm-stead of Gaianus, 10 jars of wine of the produce of the past Signature of Julius Diogenes. first year and similarly 10 jars of vinegar.'
'

From

Julius

at Seruphis,

(for

6.

may
&C.

be the genitive of the

.

?)

seems

to be novel.

name

Taiavos or

an adjective from

Taios like

1142.

Order for Purchases.
10x8-6 cm.
Late third century.

list of various commodities which an unnamed person and his friends wished to be purchased for them.

A

*EvTo\iKov
ov

5

, ()--, {), []
,
ovvyos
[.

^. ^(^)
/,
Xlet

114.2.

[.

ORDERS

24

{\) ,

-

.]

[^]^

\ay6paaov\

[....,
15

. €^^" ^
ayopapov
'

{^) , ^(^) , {) , {\\ . '2?['-]

[

.

6]
]9

[
[

,

[

yX\vKiov

(]€.

.
).

() {)-

On

.
17.

2.
1.

1.

. , )
1.

the verso

.
5•
1.

3•

^•

Pap.
12.
1.

(\.

II.

Pap.; SO

I

7 f^'x]"/**)•

,

7• ^

( KTevia COrr.
1

4.

1.

iXaiov.

'Order to Achillis. Buy half a cotyle of dry precipitate (?) of good perfume at 16 drachmae, some trodden grapes (.'') at 8 drachmae, sweet gum (?) to the weight of 4 drachmae, onyx-shell to the weight of 4 denarii, incense to the weight of i denarius, some large cones at I denarius, dry powder at 12 drachmae, thread at 20 drachmae, 2 hair-combs at i denarius, Diogenes says, sauce at i denarius. Horion the baker says, buy me 4 obols of marjoram. buy us i (?) sextarius of oil, buy us . buy a sheet of papyrus. Buy us a bedstead some pomegranate wine. I pray for your health.'
I. Cf. 741. I Xoy(oi) a list of articles ordered, and B. G. U. 953. 'sediment.' The division apparently an adjective formed from by weight is unsatisfactory, since the article immediately mentioned was to be measured. Perhaps trodden cf. 1156. 9, where it is evidently a kind of fodder. 3. For or straw of some sort may be meant grapes were so used (cf. B. G. U. 1039. 4 ot (e. g. B. G. U. 591. as an epithet of (cf. P. Flor. 150. 5 apparently an unknown form, is perhaps for 22) has a different sense. in Galen, De Antidol. ii. which occurs in conjunction with

is
'

'

, ,
. . .

.

.

6

(,/
. .

.

).

),

,

R

.

242

4. *lvbia ('

Tebt. 413• ^2. ; cf. 1110. 2 1 and e. g. 53. 5 perhaps []. 11. There is room for a couple of letters before and v[to]y is a possibility, Xeyet (which is apparently 12. The letter after [v\]s may be not to be read in this line) being understood. is for for which cf. 646, P, Tebt. 414. 13. 13. a ; but the remains suggest \s rather than ]ur. a, 14-15. Possibly
7•
cf.

, ^ ' ., ^ :, . . . ,: ; ^ ,
THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
ii.
'.

cf.

DioSC.
cf.

10

«

rrjs

6.

9.

[!] 8. ^— . «
:

1088. 55> 1144.

1 1,

.

8.

tv

G. U. 362. Fr.

2,

i.

7

18

8(

![] \

[fijs

is for Xeyei

^([

^^
34

16.

For

cf.

DioSC.

v.

oivos.

^)
1143.

ACCOUNTS.
Temple-account.
8-7

X

IO-4 cm.

About

. d.

i.

and the following papyrus are fragments of accounts of payments Not improbably in connexion with one or other of the Oxyrhynchite temples. of receipt and expenditure which it was they come from the annual reports incumbent upon the priests to submit to the civil officials of the nome cf. The deified lord emperor on whose behalf were made the P. Tebt. 298, introd. sacrifices and libations recorded in 1. 4, was no doubt Augustus, to whose reign this document, from the handwriting, is to be attributed.

Both

this

;

'

'

5

{^) . 6] {^) .
]

]
(?)]
]

(5:)

^

[) 9(
€is

.

lepoD

6(^9)
ci'y

anovSas

n€p]ia-T€piS(t

]"

{[) [)() )
)

{)
€ts

(9) ^^) (\)
lepbu

S

{9)

? ()
, aXbs

),
]

e\aio(v)

,

€(€)

(-

,

.

^[\]

]

^.

1

1143.
2.

ACCOUNTS

4-

([) ^^) . .
Cf.
;

.

cf. 1144. 3, 5> 9• G. 1 ^eoC 37• 3 (. C 6) The two diagonal strokes at the beginning of the
:

line

.
first

243

probably marked fractions of

the artaba

the horizontal line following apparently indicates a total.

1144.

Temple-account.
14-8

X

7-4

cm.

Late

or early second century.
cf.

A

fragment of an account of expenditure at a temple
(cf.

;

introd. to 1143.

The goddess Thoeris

1117.

i,

&c.)

is

named

in

1.

lo.

The column

printed was

preceded by another, of which only two or three are the ends of three lines in a different hand.
Col.
ii.

letters survive.

On

the verso

5 TOiy

^ao6po[]s

^^ €^€[ 765
Tois aOTois

[[ 69 () () ()[ [69 €\.^ ()
CToXyi^JTrj

..[.].

^
779

(Is

toTs

7[€/9
€[
[

,

,

Upas

€[vs

eW

,

,

tepeOaei

15

(^^) » ^> avr|S K€s
[

ivs €5
]

[
opos
[6o6s
ds
.

[

?),

.

[

To[ts]
[

. Second

of

^
[

^s [
[

[

()
R
3

[

]

.

10S

[

COTT.

3•

1.

;

SO in

1.

13•

7•

*

of tf corr.

244
I.

and might be meant for f, but that is no but the word does not occur. ' Cf. e.g. Pausan. viii. 37. 2 kc/ts/ernn. re Upa 6. Upas Marquardt, liom. Siaatsverw. iii. p. 46, 110. 2 since neither Claudius nor Nero 7-8. Not yeveOXiois was born in the month Germaniceus (Pachon) or Germanicus (Thoth). But if, as is possible, the name Germaniceus was given by Claudius, a festival in his honour in that month would be natural enough. 1 7. Payments in kind begin at this point ; Wilcken aptly compares the similar arrangement in B. G. U. I. 17.
easier.

[(^
:

^^^ OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
would be

()[5=

the third letter has been altered
intelligible,

(

8 €,
\(
27-8

".

!,

1146.

Account of a Sitologus.
X
25-6 cm.
First century.

fragment from an account recording amounts of wheat delivered on days by various persons who are arranged under their villages, apparently part of the day-book of a sitologus cf. e. g. P. Fay. 340. The begin-

A

)
different

;

nings of lines of a second column, mentioning the village

and the names

Taairis,

?, ,/[, and
Col.
i.

Nii'yai'6/)os(

= NtKaj;6poi ?),

[9

(1.

are not printed.

,
{
)

[
5

-9
/^
rrjs

)

[],

{ (

) )

€€

^/2/o[oy]

(
10 ^(

)
)

{
(
{

)

'^ ^9

'
[9
?)

?^
^

? ? •
\

^
S)v

() {) .

[) {) .
,

v8,

() €() () {$) {€ () (€?)
() ' ()

,
aL•
e,

)
)

/

() () ()

€,

x(oiviKcs)

,
,

aL•,

,

{€9)

1145.
IS

ACCOUNTS

245

246

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
;

the recto contains a fragment of a document, This account is on the verso apparently a petition concerning the division of an inheritance, mentioning a bmaLoboaiav bioiKovvTi, i. e. a deputy iuridicus. and
Col.
ii.

[

[

[] ^}
]

5

8[]

TepevTL

15

'€ ()(}) ,
,
20

) €[ [) ^ ) ^) []
[

^ ^][ }
,
'^/2[0]€$'
e/y

] []{^) .
1

r«K

1

[

e

.

[.]//

,

([

^[\•
[

[

,

,

^i[j

,

TepcvTi

, ,
.

€[
[
.

^\'[']^6

.

[

[

[""]]

,

.

.

.

[

{£])

,

\[]

[

[

{7€})

[

'\€['\
4•
1.

07![;.
13•

II.

Pap.
2.

[] .
.

...[.].
[.

//[
.

.]

5•

^•

Pap.

1

6.

\.

.
[.][
*].

Pap.

9• tci8&)/>[a]

Pap,

To

what the

figure

refers,

and why

it

is

not

clear.

3.
4.

[.]/)7 might

\\\

perhaps be for
1,

is

restored from
cf.

\\
8
;

so constant throughout this column,
it

;

or

may be

cf.

the repetition

a proper name. of Tepevn,

below.
5. 8.

,

is

and

For the village of This feminine form of

132.

i,
is

&c. apparently new.

it

doubt i. 5, where no this word occurs in P. Leyden S iii. 30, vii. 8, It means, a dative masculine, not, as given by Leemans, a nominative feminine. apparently, a stoker; cf. e. g. B. G. U. 760. 10. 13. Idiov may be a word in itself, hufsipov is unsuitable for the preceding name. occurs in Photius, p. 4 1 8. 6, but the term must have some other 15.
10.
:

is

]
here.
TToXtrtKos

1146.

ACCOUNTS

247

('

meaning
16.
i.

p. 2, P.
1

:

Leipzig 26.

7.

Mus. 387. 4, 390. I, B. G. U. 34. V. i5,Wessely, Studten, &c. as a title apparently occurs in C. I. G. add. 4957 b AtoSoros
cf.

P. Brit.

9,

(?).

20.

is

perhaps for

;

cf.

2 !.
and
' '

[]

1147.

Account of Arrears.
32 X
1

6-4

cm.

Late sixth century.

account of sums which had not been included in the great list but had been paid since or were still owing. Some of the items have been subseeither quently cancelled. The account is described in the heading as relating to the of a cojnes, and mentions several familiar village names (cf. e. g. district

An

()

998 and 1053).
4]

'77{?
^()

?)

m

{€)
{) {)

{9) ,
6{€09)

-/()

^

'A\i^{av8piias)

5

Toh

[
Tots airh

{?)

'AX^HavSpeia^

\

{€€) €{8€?)

'AXei^avSpeias)

{^ {
\

{)

^

'AXei{av8pdas)

A\4{av8pda^)

{) {) {) () ^) €() {) €() {) ({) {) €[)
.,
kylS
,

Sl,

5',

,
•,

I

[]

[[[uTTJep

1

5

20

{) ? {9) \ \(9) {€) {) [] ^?) {) () {) {) {€) [) €[ ^^^ () {) ({) () [,) €() () ^) {}) €{) (€$) [) € () ^ \ () {) \^{9) {) €() () ? ^ €•(€) %() €() ^) (() ' () {) () '€(^'€9)().[ (€) (5) {) €()
248

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

[]€8

{)
8

'AXe^^aySpeias)

$€[]({)

ayi(ay)

rfjs

€() , ^ €{) ,
iOl.

.

\€{8€9)
.

0.]]

!AX€^{av8pHas)

[]

ji\€^(av8peias:)

^-,

[]

{9)

KCf^uTia) €,

[]

?
9•
;

aL•'.

.

AX€^(av8p(ias)

,^

[[[]

e/y

vwep

[[yi^fcrai) 'AX€^(av8peLas!)

€(,)

.^

\

4•

M"tC/ Pa-P22.

5•
1.

4•

^^/ Pap.
.
4.
5.

\() \{.)
'.\{85)•.
:

^'' 8.

Pap.

Pap.

12.

Pap.; so in . 2 2.

9.

15.

{) ,
8, note.

:

cf.

cf.

164. 1 3, note. 140. 7, &C.
1.

the office of a
here, like

This word, which goes with

19.
cf.

1134.

^
,
is

have found no Other instance of either word.

seems to occur only here. 14, ought also to have been crossed out. in 1. 1 7, is a village; cf. 998. For the

23. This deleted total

the correct

sum

of the items in

II.

13, 14, 20-2.

1148.

ORACULAR QUESTIONS, AMULETS,

ETC.

249

{h)

ORACULAR QUESTIONS, AMULETS,
1148.

etc.

Question to the Oracle.
7.1

X

5-8

cm.

First century.

The two following papyri contain questions addressed to the oracle of Cf. 923, Serapis, who in 1148 is identified with Helios, in 1149 with Zeus-Helios. analogous documents to which in the light of 1149 is now intelligible, and the which references are there given. The text is written in a crabbed cursive hand
across the fibres of the recto.

Kvpii

(^,

papain

"€
^)

5

()
;

€V€V-

-

10

€.

'4[).
4• yvvaik

Pap.
is

*

lord Serapis Helios, beneficent one,

it

better for

my

son Phanias and his wife
contract
?

not to agree now with his father, but to oppose him and Goodbye.' this truly.
"UXie
cf.

make no

Tell

me

1.

:

1149.

I.

The

identification of Sarapis with

Zeus and Helios

is

found in
2.

many

inscriptions.

^ is probably meant, so e.g. Wessely, Scrip/, Gr, Spec. 26 « ol[v hOporai. el might also be regarded here could readily be supplied, like oracle in that sense,' and this as the conditional particle, 'if it is better ., grant me an somewhat easier; cf. 1150. 2. But the parallel examples are in would make favour of taking the first sentence as a question; cf. 1149. 3-4, P. Fay. 138. 2 will then mean 'in accordance with truth' or iv &c.
e?:

though a word

«

,
'

expediency

'.

,

.

.

;

250

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
9.

. G. .
I

think,

'give an answer', like

,
evevKe:

SO P. Fay. 138. 1—3

2 29• 3""4

^"
this

(1.

mean

'bring

to

pass' as translated in P. Fay. 138, but 'deliver an oracle', in P. Fay. 137. 4; cf. P. Giessen 20. 18

^ )
9-7

.

.

.,

[]

U

»

;

((,
It

i^iviKov.

doeS not,

and 1150.

6, note.

([]

1149.

Question to the Oracle.
X
6-1

cm.

Second century.

question similar to 1148 addressed to the oracle of Zeus-Helios-Serapis,
it would be expedient to purchase a slave. angles to the fibres of the recto.

whether

The

writing

is

at right

All

^. []€
5

^€[]8
€1

?
^

[] []9
\] \1
/]
8.

e^ei SovXov

[
1.

\.
y]atWa Pap.^

86s.

Pap.

To Zeus Helios, great Serapis, and the associate gods. Nice asks whether it is expedient for her to buy from Tasarapion her slave Sarapion also called Gaion. Grant
'

me

this.'

1

sqq.
in

On
6
is

this

analogy 923. 1-4
.

eptOTJacri

[]
;

,

[.]t

.

.

[.

no doubt a person. 9. Cf. 923. 14-15 TovTo fjpe'iv f^eveyKov cf. note on 1148. 9.
.
.

.]

'|/[ '. ' means

may now be

^

restored

(cf.

[ . (•\[ 2|. ]/ ^''•
Fay.
1

37•

^)

'give a reply', like

and

cf.

^ There is no need to suppose with Wilamowitz, Gott. Gel. Anz. 1901, p. 40, that Kpeiverai Wessely, Script. Gr. Spec. 26 i? ov[v where a single deity is addressed.

£] ,

is for

Kpivfre

1150.

ORACULAR QUESTIONS, AMULETS,
1150.

ETC.

251

Christian Prayer.
7-5

X

10-8 cm.
is,

Sixth century.

This prayer asking for guidance
1151-2), the old practice

like 925,

a Christian analogue of the

questions to pagan deities exemplified in 1148-9.

As

with the amulets

(cf.

was carried on under a

different nomenclature.

+ +
^eoy

^ ^,
kav

e/s

5 8ei^ov

\
;

;

^iiXOr}
'

7[][.
Anoup
to thy hospital ?

Show

God of our patron Saint Philoxenus, dost thou bid us take thy power and let this prayer be accomplished.'
cf.

2.

occurrence of eav here might be held to confirm the view that el and ^ in the but 1149. 3 supplies strong parallel passages are really conditional (cf. note on 1148. 2) evidence on the other side, and eai/may be explained as an indirect interrogative, as e.g. in iav cf the use of av in modern Greek. Xen. Mem. iv, 4. 1 2 Cf. is irregularly written, but I can see no alternative. of 6. The first Wessely, Script. Gr. Spec. 26. 5-6 v-t:6bfi^6v (so we should read, as the facsimile shows, not May my prayer have an as W.) for \1]

The

:
is

1151. 48, note.

;

[][
.

.

.

08(
answer

(,

[]
23-4

'

probably the real meaning.

.

'

1151.

Christian Amulet.
X
4-4 cm.
Fifth century
(?).

Its phraseelaborate charm, designed to ward off fever and other ills. The opening ology is purely Christian, with no admixture of heathen magic. verses of St. John's Gospel are quoted, just as the Lord's prayer is inserted in

An

and the Virgin and several saints are appealed to. The papyrus when found was tightly folded, and tied with a string it is written in a clear Cf 924, 1077, Wilcken, Archiv i. upright hand, approximating to a literary type.
B. G. U. 954
; ;

pp. 429 sqq.

252

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

5

15

2

25

2.

1.

23. vie Pap.

,?-- €^ ? €€ , ? ?. ^ ? ? ? ' ^ ? . - , , ' .?. ^.
30
fjv

+ €€ ^^,[^) () 3€•
ae
6

'4t€K€v

vibs

6(eo)v

{()

9

{€)9

?

ayiov.

'

35

{)

9, 6^€
€TeK€v

? ?

(.-

TTavTos

+

eV

{)

iv-

^(eo)?

?.
/

6[€)

45

{) {)
{\)

-

^)
\

^copei?

{) {)

lyeveTO

> ft\

€V

(€.

{})

{)

(]€ + ()6,
(€)

[]

?,
?

{)

[)?,

[]

55

?

+

37• •

(.
25.

1.

50.
'

Pap.
Fly, hateful spirit

^2. 54• yntpevbo^ov Pap.

. €5
5•

^'^^

Pap.

II.

Pap.

Pap

Pap.; SO in 1. 30• 13• J• 7• Pap. 36. 1. Pap. 46. 49• ^• Bi'""opw.
28.

.

outstripped thee.

whom

the Son of God and the Holy Spirit have of the sheep-pool, deliver from every evil thy handmaid Joannia Anastasia also called Euphemia bare. In the beginning was the Word, and. the
!

Christ pursues thee

;

God

1151.

ORACULAR QUESTIONS, AMULETS,

ETC.

253

with God, and the Word was God. All things were made by him and without him was not anything made that hath been made. Lord Christ, Son and Word of the living God, who healedst every sickness and every infirmity, heal and regard thy handmaid Joannia whom Anastasia also called Euphemia bare, chase from her and put to flight all fevers and every kind of chill, quotidian, tertian, and quartan, and every evil. Pray through the intercession of our lady the mother of God and the glorious archangels and Saint Joh^n,
the glorious apostle and evangelist and divine, and Saint Serenus and Saint Philoxenus and Saint Victor and Saint Justus and all the Saints. Upon thy name, Lord God, have I called, the wonderful and exceeding glorious name, the terror of thy foes. Amen.'

Word was

7-8.

The

allusion
i,

15-2 2

= John
:

is to John 1-3.

v. 2

^

be

.

.

.

eVl

.
'

' •^,
.

«/ 22. so t^cABC, &c. ; ouSeV t>i*D. In ending the sentence at yeyovtv, instead of connecting those words with the following sentence, the writer is in accord with &c. ; cf. Ambrose, Enar. in Ps. 36. 35 Alexandrini quidem et Aegyptii legunl '. .facium est nihil quodfactum est', et interposita distinctione subiciunt in ipso vita est'. 26-7. Cf. B. G. U. 954. II-12, and Matt. iv. 23 (1077. 3° sqq.) ; similarly ix. 35> x• • 35-7• Cf. P. Tebt. 275. 20 sqq. ttuvtos piyovs G. U. 95^•

',
38.

.

is awkward, but cannot be evaded. Serenus appears also in B. G. U. 954. 3, 29, St. Justus in 941. 14. The latter, like Victor, was martyred in the reign of Diocletian. Philoxenus (cf. 1150. 2) I cannot identify ; the Monophysite bishop of Hierapolis is not likely to be meant. 55. There is ink between e and of and there was perhaps some mis-

The

infinitive

47-50.

St.

^

^

.

.

.

spelling.

,
kXoid,

1152.

Christian Amulet.
4-2

X 6-1 cm.

Fifth or sixth century.
;

A short
loeo.

The

writing

incantation containing magical, Jewish, and Christian elements is across the fibres of the recto.

cf.

5 f^i

,^, , , ,
COrr.

'. (|).
3• •

2.

of

from

ftr

'^.

Oror phor, Amen.'
'

eloi,

adonai, lao sabaoth, Michael, Jesus Christ, help us and this house.

1-3• Cf. 1060. 3

,

ahovf,

.

G. U. 055.

I

.

254

T^HE

OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

(/)

PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE.
1153.

Letter of Apollonius.
2 2-2

X

1

1-8

cm.
it

First century.

A
verso,

letter

from a father to his son, who,
at Alexandria.
is

appears from the address on the
letter relates to clothes of various

was staying
Nicanor,

Most of the

kinds.

who

frequently mentioned, and was in the son's company,

was perhaps

his brother.

[]< ^^. [] 9 9,
5

^\\\^

\

^^, .
Tas

?

rfljiiyovv

\\<(..
[...]. K€v

[][]^
o[.]ias

.[]

€€•

? ^?.
€9
kXaiov
$k
Trepl

{)
€(


eSo^a

[6]
15

, \
e/c

'ilpiyaTos

20

^?},
r^^e
TTJ

, € []€ €9 .,, ^, ^?
kav
kv

, ? [). ( {)
€€().
ev

kav

?

(coy)

^
€?,
{,)

\

,

kv

?. ? €(?)
€?

-

1153.
25

PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE
,

255

[^^, [] (86.
yap

kav

],
kvTonia 8\

{€)•

•^6()

^.
kv

In the

left

margin, at right angles

€[].
On
the verso

30
5•

.

.

.

[

)

/3(

)

^[8{)

....
19, 8f

1•.

6.

[7]/6'5/

Pap.

14.

added above the

line.

added above the
'

line.

Apollonius to his son Apollonius, greeting. I have received through Heraclas the boxes with the books, as you write, and the half-chous jar of oil Avhich Nicanor writes that he has sent. Tell Nicanor that Heraclas the boatman ... to pay us the 600 drachmae for his freights ; he was here to-day ; I found the boat sailing down and I thought that I ought to let you know about what I have said. You will receive through Origas two variegated (?) wrist-bands, one scarlet and one purple, which your brother Pausanias went to the expense of having made some time ago and presented to you ; write and acknowledge their receipt. If I can buy a cloak for you privately, I will send it at once, if not, I have it made for you at home. The blankets have been cut out ; the account of them, as jou write, shall be sent by Diogas to Nicanor through Heraclas. A pattern of the colour of the dress that is being made is enclosed in this letter give it to Nicanor to look at, in order that, if he likes it, he may write to us, for it has not yet been given out. We are going to use local purple. Good-bye. Mecheir 6.' Address on verso.
;

\(€5.

cf. B. G. U. 14. iv. 18 4. /, a passage misunderstood equally by the compiler of the B. G. U. index, where Xfnr'ios is given, and by Herwerden, Zex. Supple/., who translates it monetula '. in 920. 4 and P. Strassb. 40. 48 should no doubt be interpreted like XenrLov here; cf. P. Flor. 50. 104 71. 343

\'.

.

[]

'

.

.

.

(\ (^) (€,

similar verb, ras [8'][] evidently being the object of beginning of 1. 9 begins with a round letter, probably o, , it does not seem possible to read is very unlikely, or ; Avhich word was of 14. There may be one or two letters before the supposed added above the line. \evKOiv(ovy npos iKeivT] ttj 23 sqq. Cf. 113. 4—7 croi eu f and P. Giessen 20. 14— 16 onoijov ep[yo]i' (? e/,[to]i>) SCemS tO be novel. For cf. 496. 4, P. Hamburg 10. 13, and P. Giessen 21. 8 avvOfaf

7—9. Perhaps

[€]€

or

some

The word

at the

^]. ({)[]

[)]' ' €7[]
26. [owjou,
if

€ ^ €

,

.,

^^^,

rightly restored,

is

for

[],

as

e. g.

in P. Tebt. 423. 12

Or something

like [^^•] ov yap

may be

read.

..
;

^^
cf.

(
13.

256

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
1154.

Letter of Theon.
12-5

X

10-2 cm.

Late

first

century.
?)

Commencement

of a letter from a

man

urging his sister (and wife

not to

be anxious during his absence.
0e[fu]i/

Line
rfj

1 1

5
VTjS,

aeavTrjs

irepi

,
\Sk

|ei/[o]9

][
^
. .

?

€)9 €
8e

^. ?
ewi

}
e/-

suggests that he was on military service.

eycrei-

€ €
(?)

kvOaSe.

kav

In the

left

margin, at right angles

?
[

[

].[...]..

[
[

On

the verso

[()]
'

when
about

Theon to his sister Sarapous, greeting. with you, take care of yourself so that I

Above

me because I am away from home, and am not a stranger here
.'

12.
1

(or

3.

Possibly

a local name, though

/] , £^\

)

may

for I

am

as I enjoined upon you and do not be anxious personally acquainted with these places
all

else,

have you

well,

preceded

not is excluded.

. \.

But

]

.

.

may be

a personal and not

1155.

PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE
1155.

257

Letter of Theonas.
19-4

X

15-5 cm.

A.D. 104.
Isis.

A

letter sent

from Alexandria to a pastophorus of the temple of

written in a rude

hand and

^ 7[]

is

in

very vulgar Greek.

Attiovl

^ioLLpeiv).

5

.9 . ()
6(^

\^8,

7{\

€€€

[ ./ €€
ei).

It is

€ [-

evpou tou

-

€ -

iravT^s TOVS

€69
15 (eVofy)

^^
in^v>^d

?.

€9

'.

'4{\.
.
On
the verso

{)
First

€()

^
20
3•

h

In the reverse direction

I.
1 6.
1.

. ,
1.

20.

1.

. .
1•

.

8.

COrr.

from

;

1.

.

I wish you to know that as soon as to his dearest Apion, many greetings. Alexandria I immediately attended to the matter about which you asked me. Greet all my friends. I send you the actual I found the man prospering in the main.
'

Theonas

I arrived at

S

258

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

proclamation of the praefect in order that you may hasten to do what concerns you. Good-bye. The 7th year of the emperor Nerva Trajanus Augustus Germanicus Dacicus, Pachon i. (Addressed) Deliver to Apion, pastophorus, at the Iseum, from Theonas,'
I.

3. iV(6)t
5.

Qmvas: on the verso Qeovas, cannot be read.
for

i.e.

an odd form. have been intended rather than 12. The praefect in office at this date was C. Vibius Maximus ; is for 0, Ti; of. note on 1119. 22-3. 13. 19. On the pastophori, who were of lower rank than the Upas, Tempel, i. pp. 94-8, ii. p. 152, P. Tebt. 299. 68, note.
IS

(\(

€€

,

which

is

the usual form.

6.

Seems

to

(1.

1 1).

cf.

P.

Amh.

64.

cf.

Otto, Priester

und

1156.

Letter of Anubion.
I

r«3

8•6

cm.

Third century.

Part of a letter apparently from an agent or steward to his employer, concerning the purchase of

some

fodder.

, () ?. [/)]€,
Kvpik

(
$•

6

5

eVe/f€v
e/?

rfjs

\^\

*[] [] , € []
[/xe]»/

[]
[€

ovu eiXjjs

[€€]

^\
ovu
.

^.
.]
.

[
On
the verso
15
5.

1] '][)]

[.
. .

[.

[]
»/.

of

ej/fACf /

corr.

from

8.

[^

[
added above the
line.

13.

\.

8

(^).

1156.
'

PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE

259

to
to

me

him

Greeting, my lord Antas, from Anubion. Sarapion of the village of Philonicus came about a small quantity of provisions for sale. Perhaps you may be willing to give something and take from him the trodden grapes (?) as the price of it, since we are likely
I therefore

be wanting green-stuif ?

send him to you in order that you

may do

as

you

please with
4.
9.

him

.

.

.'

:

cf.

965 and
3,

P. Hibeh, p. 8.

:

cf.

1142.

note.

1157.

Letter of Pathermouthis.
26-1

X

8-7

cm.

Late third century.

The
for him.

subjects of this letter are a registration, evidently for the census,

and

a payment of the poll-tax, both of which the writer wished his sister to undertake

He was

uncertain whether she would be allowed to register
let

absence, and he asks her, in case this should not be possible, to

order that he might

€€.9

€ .
Trjs

him in his him know, in

come and do

?
yjrc,

4V { iv

5 0^$• nepi

] €] ' [] ,€€ ] ]
15

On
30

the verso

,
13.

' , ,,. . 2
25

, ^- €€, - ^. it

for himself.

res

€€-

'

kav

\

[\9,
[]€

epi

€-

7[][]

)(^.

(.

.

6{)
51.

10.

1.

€/xe Tf.

;. .
[()
SO in
11.

&.
7.
el

.-)

8 and 12.

Pap.

1.

(

for

]

so in

1.

24.

1.

24.

1,

S 2

26
'

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

To my sister, mistress Dionysia, from Patliermouthis, greeting. As you sent me word on account of the registration about registering yourselves, since I cannot come, see whether you can register us. Do not then neglect to register us, me and Patas but if you learn that you cannot register us, reply to me and I will come. Find out also about the collection of the poll-tax, and if they are [hurrying on with] the collection of the poll-tax, pay it and I will send you the money and if you pay the poll-tax, get the receipt. Do not neglect this, my sister, and write to me about the registration, whether you have done it or not, and reply to me and I will come and register myself. I pray for your lasting
; ;

health.

(Addressed) Deliver to Dionysia from Pathermouthis.'

lo. The name Uaras occurs in P. Brit. Mus. 1170. 264. There is a small hole in the papyrus immediately after the v, but if another letter, except t or o, had been added, it would be partly visible. 14-15. The context indicates that the writer wishes his correspondent to get

information and is not himself giving it, so that practically means . . ' find out when they are collecting '. 15-16. Tfs seems to be the termination of a participle of which the commencement has been accidentally omitted ; the sense requires some such word as {fneiyov)Tfs. For the construction cf, e.g. P. Tebt. 333. 13 eav jjs 423. 1 8 eav ovv
.

6(5,

.

1158.

Letter of Lucius.
i7-6xi3-9cm.

A
verso.

letter
1.

to
i,

a

shopkeeper

()

Third century.

from

a

man who
in

salutes

him

as

'brother' in

but describes himself merely as a friend

the address on the

The

writer requests his correspondent to collect a debt for

him and make
His Greek
is

certain purchases,
erratic.

and announces the dispatch of some presents.

5

({] ^. € \ €[(] ? . ? ^) []9 ? \/1]
AovKL?

^
\'\.
5e|e

6fjs

€iav

)?

^'

{^

[]

S)v

(')

? ]?.
kv

€()€-

Tiaaepa

??

,

kp)(^o-

•«-

1158.

a

€19

15

€ ^ .^ , €€€
Si^€
ii8ov

PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE

261

.

? (€€ 6€.
6e\[is,'\

Sfj

cvv

[]
20

kav

^ ^,
ae.
4•
^•

25

€€ ^^
{69)
''"^•
'^

.
1.

^-. . €()
'

-

ttoXXois \p6v019.

( . ^ \. '^ 8. / /
On
the verso
8.

.
7.
1 2.
1.

/
\.
*

3•

1.

of

added above the
1 3.
].

line.

for

.
87

COrr.

Se'lai

;

SO in

1 4-

=.

oi
1

corr.
\.

6.

{=
25.
\.

17.

20.

Fap.

2 1.

of

COrr.

from

.

of xpovois corr, from

.

2 6.

Pap.

.
I.

12.

from

;

Kvibiov).

brother Diodorus, many greetings from Lucius and Sarapion. Before all else your prosperity and that of your whole house. Many times in the day we It would be kind of you to go to Aretion the baker and obtain expect you to come to us. from him four talents which he had from us when he was at Alexandria, See that you do not neglect this. If you get the four talents from him, when you come to us, buy us some You must know that I have provisions for our use and obtain stores and send them to us. ., I will send written to Aretion to give you the four talents. As you said that you vish for I got the Cnidian jar of vinegar from Ammonas, and I have sent it you when it is brought. We greet our sister and her daughter Helenous you by him a basket of dainties and a and her daughter. Greet Aphunchis and Techosis and Ptolemaeus from us. If yoa learn that Aretion is going to accuse you about the copper, write to me and I will send him an addition. I pray for your lasting health.' Address.

To my
for

we pray

.

.

.

.

.

2.

The

position of

was intended.
12.

and
22,

note,

and

e.g.

1069.

8{
is

probably for

seems

,
and

the use of

ij/xel?

and

make

it

clear that

a double diminutive of

,

for

less likely.

For the interchange of

which cf. 1139. 3 and cf. 11. 1 6 and

202

may

if that is the right reading, cannot here have its ordinary meaning. It 15. possibly be connected with the form of sauce called or 1 8. is for which occurs also in 741. 8 Wilamowitz Cevy{q) proposed to interpret the term in that passage as the Latin soleae, but the occurrence of the singular here is not in favour of this explanation. See moreover P. Cairo Cat. 67006. 47

, (

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

,

.

.

/(?)
iii.

(1.

p. 205.

96 and

).

The

active

form

(cf.

1.

2o) occurs in Boiss. Anecd.

in Hesychius.

1159.

Letter to a Wife.
23-1

X

5'8 cm.

Late third century,

is unaddressed on the back was sent to a woman who, since the writer sends salutations to his children and our mother ', was probably his wife. He gives her various commissions.
;

This letter has lost the commencement and

but

it
*

.

.

iatrrov iva

,
5

€€€

76/3 8k

.^ ^
€1

«

-.

a

-

.

20

,? '
\<^
t/rco

€\\

9 //eVey-

8e

.
Sk

,
on
25

,
8k

\

^ kvo-

15

. (, ^}^
. .

aeiTov

8
30

.[8\

k-

.
Pap.
23. tvey'Kov Pap.

[

'
.

that I

may
;

coming by

the 30th

not trouble him about provisions, since I wrote to him that I was otherwise, arrange with him that he shall come by the 1 3th Phamenoth.

1159.

PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE

263

do not neglect to worry Thonius. With regard to my sending the expenses for them, and leave the tools with them until I send the expenses. When you come, bring the old cushion that is up in the dining-room. Salute my children, whom the evil eye shall not harm, and our mother and your sister and all our friends.'

With regard

to the deposit of corn,

tools, tell the

men

that I

am

I.

The

letter after kol is

not

v.

10. Cf. 1125. 19. 12.

There are ink-marks above
cf.

accidental.

15. avvipytuv:

.

the

latter

part of this line, but they are probably

8, 12,

where avvtpya apparently mean weaving-implements.

1160.

Letter of Trophimus.
27.1

X

lo• 7

cm.

Late third or early fourth century.

This

by a son
terms, in

at

which h'ke 1155 is in more than usually vulgar Greek, was written Alexandria to his father. The pair seem to have been on very good spite of the father's aspersion on his son's morals in 11. 24 sqq.
letter,

5

'
eyo)

\

^.


\

S}v

.
€€
{)€

ex(<u)

'
()

^ , [

[

€€-

ei

€€,

15

^.

, .{)

,

^.

-

204

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
oTL

[;]€
eA%

20 eav

,&. ^.
,

25

' €. [] . €{\
•^
[[ei

^' \

-

kXaLov.

eypar//-es

-

^
6

^^

\

69

' (.

/']]

On

the verso

.
lO.

cw(vos

,
from
'

of 1. of ypayjrov COrr. 19. so in 1. 20.

! . (
(7059)
1.

*n,piyit\i\

'Cpiye'vft.

.

Pap.

;

1.

written above

,

which is crossed through, and 1 1. added above the line.
Pap.; SO in
21.
1. 1.

. »^
^^)
«at

nai

'.
12.
17.

8.

of

peiOs also
1. I.

added above the Hne.
Pap. 1. a. Pap. ;
of
1.

nenpOKare.
&Sf.

1

3.

15.

14.

;

1.

.
all

1.

TloXvdfVKov.

COTI.

from

e;

et.

25.

1.

^'/.

Pap.

22.

SeCOnd
26-7.

[]

COn*.
. .

.

To my
many
the

revered father Origenes,
salutations to

I send

many greetings from Trophimus. Before all else you and your consort Copria and Isidorus and Phullon and

You wrote to me in your letter that my boastfulness our friends severally. of " Gift of Zeus " because I sent you money ; but I do not boast about what I sent you by Philoxenus. If you have sold the various things which I sent you, write I have been idle here for two months, otherto me in order that I may send you more. I am keeping for the trial the money that wise I would have sent you all some more. I have collected; for I am waiting for the memoranda. You wrote to me, " Petition against
Helene and
earns

me

name

Polydeuces." If the memoranda come to me, I will petition against him and against You wrote to me " You are If it seems good to you, send me a pot of oil. Sarapodorus. staying at Alexandria with your paramour ". Write and tell me, who is my paramour. (Addressed) Deliver to Origenes from Trophimus.' I pray for your health.
8-9. The name Diodorus seems to have been jestingly applied to the son on account of his liberalities. cf. 1. 12. or perhaps (S}v), the loss of which would be easier after 10, (a) papyri. for is 16. is for a, a use not uncommon in the a noticeable form. cucuma ; another form found in P. Amh. 126. 30 and P. Hamburg 23. The diminutive or ^J.ov) p. Grenf. II. III. 23) 10. 36 is

or
29.

).
:

=

is

more common.
:

{

, (\

*Qpiyei'[t]

0 €\{)], as in

1.

I.

1161.

PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE
iiei.

265

Christian Letter.
7x8-8 cm.
Fourth century.

This and the next papyrus are both somewhat early specimens of Christian 1161, written by a sick woman, is only a fragment. The upright semiuncial hand is hardly likely to be earlier than the fourth century.
letters.

5

^ [\6 / , ^. ,
aya6[(a

[]

]
Trj

]..«$"

[[^(€//)<]]

TrdvT^s

, ?,
8i

\'\^

-^,
Se

-

€.

-

€.
ye


e[

.
]9

15 y^v

In the

left

margin, at right angles

€9
.

\
•^( Pap.

On

the verso
]

^
3.
1. w[t]<p.

[.

14.

'. . (to our God) and gracious saviour and to his beloved Son, that they all may succour our body, soul, and spirit. I write this to you in sickness, being very ill and quite unable to rise from my bed, because I am very ill. With regard to what you wrote
.

to

me

.'
. .

266
2.

is right, accompanied by other epithets preceded in ]. i. Or might be read in place of Cf. e. g. Luke i. 47 is unconvincing, and it is not clear 12-15. These last lines are obscure, whether fntiye is imperative or for ^n-eiye, or how the letters veav should be interpreted

{()

\

If

^

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI

(

.

.

fc'i;

for

vf'a is

hardly satisfactory,

should

strictly

be

(.

;

1162.

Letter of Leon.
125 X 92 cm.
Fourth century.

A letter from
conspicuous.

a priest

commending a
5, 9,

brother- Christian to the good offices
is

of the priests and deacons of a local church.
the size of the writing,
11.

There 12 and the word

(

considerable variation in
in
1.

13 being especially

€€9 ?^\.[9]
er
5

{) {€)

[][^]

[]^>.

?],
kv

(
2.
f

^ €
T0V9
kv

()\ {^
1.

?

?? [).
kyoa
?),

()
(\.

[€]€

[]{€).

15

of

added above the
COrr.
8.

line.
;

3.

8.

6.

10.

1.

T(.

12.

A

blot,

1. Pap. SO in 11. 10, II, 13. perhaps due to a correction, between

8.
1.

8(\.
and

" €.
y.

First a of
Vz.^.

p.

' Leon, presbyter, to the presbyters and deacons who share the local service, beloved brothers in the Lord God, fullness of joy. Our brother Ammonius, who is coming to you, receive in peace ; through whom we and those with us greet you and those who are with you kindly in the Lord. I pray for your health in the Lord God. Emmanuel is my

witness.

Amen.'

2. avWtiTovpyos reading here.

{)

5. Cf. e.g. John iii. 29 9—12. Cf. P. GieSSen 55• I3~I4 '''^ verb such as

.
€8
i^fJ9

1162.
is

PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE
ecclesiastical

267
satisfactory

a good

.

word, and

is

sufficientl)'

as

a

A

\( may

aheK^ovs iv

{)(

o'l

epoi eV

be understood with the

infinitive.

1163.

Letter to Heraclammon.
18 x30.6 cm.
Fifth century.

This incomplete letter, which is addressed to a comes, was written from the Cyrenaica giving news of the writer's movements. The writing in this and the two following papyri, as usual in Byzantine letters, is across the fibres. On the
recto
is

a fragmentary account, headed, like the recto, with

?/
SeanoTTj

Trj
ttJ

5

^XPV'^

€€7€ [\ €8 [] € ? ^? ^^? )[
eh ianipav
_

(

_

?
.
.

/.

avSpi-

[

[€\
[
5-

On

the verso

€(9)

)
Pap.
6.
. . .
.

' arrived on the 4th at the western border of Darne, and on the next day met my On the inquiry of his magnifimaster the most magnificent and most courageous comes. cence I told him what was fitting about your magnificence, and immediately had the (Addressed) Deliver to my master the most magnificent submitted and written and .' and most illustrious comes Heraclammon from
. . . .

^
[. .]

.

.

Pap.

1.
2.

:

cf.

1165.
(the

Darne
is

I and note on 941. i. modern Derne) was in the extreme

east of the Cyrenaica.

that

also to be given a capital

initial,

but perhaps

we should

write

.

suggests

268

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
Letter of Theodosius.
25-1

1164.

X 29-4 cm.

Sixih or seventh century.

Letter to a comes from a minor local magnate concerning a dispute for the
possession of a camel, which was claimed
writer proposes arbitration and promises that the sentence should be respected.

+

5

? , ,\ ^ ^• ! , ^ . ^ €
by
their respective subordinates.

The

Ot

€\€€9
8^8

'iveK^v

\

9 €€9
}

Sk

[]9

kariv

kav

/ceXei/ere,

. '
On

+

{)
ii/i€Tepas

the verso

() {)
^{)
Pap.
3•

. . ()
Toii(y)

),
e/y

6

+
. .

.

.

(

)

.
'

Pap.

g.

1.

. . (
() +
.

(

)....(

)

+

13.

.

The letter-carriers came to me bringing me a letter from your paternal magnificence about a camel, and I was very grateful for the opportunity granting me to be deemed worthy after so long of your honoured words. I immediately brought in their opponents and they produced not a few persons testifying that the camel is theirs, while on the other hand the letter-carriers brought other persons testifying that the said camel belongs to them and since both sides brought witnesses, I could not settle the point between them. But if it be your bidding, order them to come to an arbitration with my people before any one whom they shall both select, and to accept the results of the arbitration ; for I will use every means to secure that my people abide by the judgement given them. God is my witness that I am anxious in everything to perform your orders. I write this with many
;

1164.

PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE
To my
eU
.
.

269
master the

reverences and greetings to your paternal magnificence. (Addressed) most magnificent reverend comes Peter, from Theodosius.'
.
.

.

.

85
14.

8-9. Wilcken notes the parallelism to P. Grenf,
(cf.

Some

-

II.

Archiv

iii.

p. 1 2 6).

abbreviation of

???

probably preceded

^ ^^)
99. {a)

5-8

\

as in 1165. 13, but

the traces of the letters are too faint for identification. immediately after ^'), though looks right.

^'

Perhaps the proper name begins

1165.

Letter of Victor.
16-9

A

letter

from one advocate

(?:

X

29-8 cm.
cf.

Sixth century.

902.

i,

note,

and Gelzer, Byz.

Verwalt. p. 34) to another expostulating about the treatment of some cultivators The cause of the trouble was in the writer's employ, and threatening reprisals.

apparently a dispute about some camels, perhaps a question of ownership like
that involved in 1164.

+

£5e£

]

€VTe\€Las

€€ 9
5

?€
6€€

7[]

. ^, ^^
ei

^ ,€

eyo)

^{^ []

ev

\

ey

^
€€

^} ^. ,
Xeyei

?

€€€

^^ €€,

^^ .
^^^

.']

€6{)
.
.

.

[.

5]e

.

270

€ ,
e/y

', [^] ^. €[]9 '[]9.
ovu,

THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI
€€

'
eK([i]yq

'

?^
($•).
(€)

e/y

On

the verso

+ €6(])

/ () () {) {() 8€[)
e

[)
to

() () ) (()
{()•\3• /"? ^^'^^

line.

added by the second hand above the hand over an erasure, probably of yevo/xf roir The top of the original e is visible. and of corr. by the second hand. 9. II. ovu added by the second hand above 8f, of which the is lightly crossed through.
2.

5.

(

Pap.; SO in

1.

6.

yevfaSaL

by

^

the second

ought to have helped my insignificance and not undone, and not only not to injure me and my insignificant property, but to prevent others who wish to do so. I have said this because my cultivators at Amoules have been put to such straits, and because of some camels worth a score of denarii. If we go to litigation and your fraternal wisdom says that the guard did this, you control the guard and you ought to help me rather than to proceed against me and then leave the whole matter to my insignificance. God knows, I too could have injured an estate near Murmux belonging to the mistress of that guard, as I did on another occasion in the time of the honourable comes Paul, when I was injured once before by the inhabitants of Teruthis. Let me tell you then what you should do ; be persuaded, whether they made an error or whether they did not, to have them released, so that I may not come to that or to other steps which might cause us vexation. I write this with due reverence. (Addressed) To my master the most illustrious, most wise, worthy of all reverence, my dearest brother the most illustrious advocate, from Victor, by the grace of God, advocate.'
'

Your

fraternal, illustrious learnedness

have allowed

me

be so

far

I.

:

but the writer immediately after relapses into in 1. 9 appear to be local names. {= 6. denarius, the smallest monetary unit (cf. Hultsch, Metrol. will here be a contemptuous phrase meaning that the p. 343), and a^M quarrel was all over a mere trifle ; cf. P. Cairo Cat. 67009. 24 Toh Probably the camels did not belong to Victor.
3.
airfj
:

5.

]
cf.

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TEXTS.

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;

;

[}

Pa.p•)

1088. 15• 1099.

2 1.

2 5, 32•

((
70, 82.

qui 1073. 4, 35• quingenti 1073. 39•

! / /
-?

1086.

2 6.

((

^^^/

1076. 20. 1085. . 35• 1087. 9• nXfvpa 1085. . 1 6. 1088. 2. 1087. 34• 1086. 98 (?). 1087. 1 8. 1086. 46. nXvveiv 1088. 5• 1084. 6; 1086. 1 2, 32, 66; 1088. 41, 42 1089. 48. 1086. 58, 99• 1087. 88 (?). 1086. 109, 1087. 9• 1086. 29, 77• 1086. 66, 69, 72, 76,

1086. 84 (?). 1088. 45• 1086. 96• 1087. 2 . 1086. 55• 1085. . 6. 1089. 46. 1088. 45•

1085.

ii.

26.

1086. 74.

\//•


pevpa

1081. 38, 41) 46• 1085. . 34• '1081. (?); 1083.1.9, 1086. 2. 5; 1085. . 38
;

1099. 3• 1088. I, 8. 1085. . 28. 1089. 3• 1087. 45, 46• 1085. . 4•

•1087.

3•

II, 12, 28, 43> 47, 66,72,

€[

^
; ;?
.

;

^
98
8,
;

.

.

8
79,


Tfpov

1088. , 46, 48; 1089. 35; 1099. 7, 24• 1086. 76. 1083. 6. . 1089. '^. 1083. . 8. 1088. 25.
1087. 64
32,
;

(

28,

38,

((
107,

8,

82,

9•

1086. 92. 1085. . 13• 1087. ^6, 1088. 32•

1083. 7• • 1086. II, 1 8. 1086. 66. 1088. 1089.

-

1083. . 6. 1083. 2. 2. 1089. 41 (-• Sem 1073. 41• 1089. 25. 1089. 34, 48 (?)• 1088. 57 Seth 1073. 9. 1085. . 26. 1086. gi, 93• 1086. 28, 47> 83, 98»
(•'')•

"4•

4

>

58.

1083.

2. 7•

1086. 17• 1086. 1087. 41. 1088. 38.

.

282

INDICES
1087. 2(). 1087. 6. 1087. 66. 1081. 2 71085. . 1085. . 25

,' €(

1087. 3 , 39• 1088. 6. 1083. 20. 2 {?). 1086. 1 0,5• 1088. 47• 1087. 9• 1088. 43• 1089. 5. 1087. 35• 1083. 5• ^• 1083. 3- 2. 1086. 23.

.

;

€ "
//
Te

1086.

^'
42.

45, 48.

1076.

2,

12.

1089. 57• 1087. 30. 1086. ig. 1081• 4; 1083. I. 14, 3• 3; 1085. ii. 24; 1087.
20, 46.

1088. 1 7. 1088. 63. 1086. 3; 1088.
1076. 3; 1087. 49•
1081. 32
;

7,

3•

1086.

^

;

speciosus 1073. 48.

1084. 2. 1088. 15, 65. 1086. 2 2, 2 4• areViiz/ 1083. 25. 3(?); 1086.

'

'

52, 54•

1087. 4^• 1088. 1085. . 8. 1085. . 28. 1087. 9• 1083. 3• 2. 1088. 55• 1088. 2 0.

.

1087. 6 I. 1089. 38. 1083. 35. 1086. 6. 1085. . 28 (.?). 1088. 3^• 1083. 3• 3. Tei/cpos 1087. 56. //;; 1083. . 8. 1087. 2 91084. 7• 1087. 42, 44•
Teiveiv

1087. 2.
39, 66.


36.

[

1088.
;

€ €

1076. 34• 1086. 69 1089. 56. 1087. 3• 1087• 8. 1083. . 7• 1088. 66. 1085. . 17; 1086. 49•

5,
^

53,

64,

8,

92.

1086.
Pap.).

65

{.
:

risl083.

.
1

1,4,

3•

3; 1089.

1085. . 4• 1099. 37• 1086. 3• 1076. 1083. . 17, 1 8. 6; 1086. 86(?); 1089.

;

36, 47=
(\,

5,

59•
6.

1086. (?). 1085. . ly• 1086. 1086. 5• /6;(» 1087. 7• 1086. 8. 1099. 8. 1086. 6 (.?). 1085. . 1 6. ;(^/ 1087. 8. 1086. 47• 1088• 5•

^ ^ /
1089.

1084.

. 1088. 36. 1086. 1087. 23•
27, 35,

4•

/^

.

1081. 1083. 2. 4; 9 1086.37,64,68; 1089.44• 1086. 2, 5• 1085. . 3• 1083. , 2. 1089. 6. 1086. 66. 1087. 58• ^?7 1086. 20. 1086. 4 1 1088. 8. 1089. 3• 1087. 37• tres 1073. 40. lOSb. . II. 1088. 25, 28 1088.

)7

;

1086. 29. 1086. 45• 1088. 29• 1083. 5• 4• 1099. 8.
vivere

1073. 4

^ saep.
29, 335

\08\. 8.
1081. 29

1086.

;

1085..2;
1085.
33•

1088. 46. 1086. 15, 33, 50, 69; 1087• 39, 46, 48, 85.
1091.
label.
;

.

1083. 2. 3. 2 1086.
;

;

34, 36, 44•

1088.

6,

II,

33,

67•

1087.

24.

1086. 115. 1087. 55> 56. 1086. 25 (?)• 1081. 5 (•'')• 1083. 12. 4•

8,

1084. 4 ('. Pap.). 1081. 3, 13, 2 3• 1084. 5• 1087. 34• 1087. 35• 1089. 25, 35, 40,
42, 55•

1085. . 7• 1088. 36•
.

/.

NEW LITERARY
;^}^ 1086.
4^•

TEXTS
1083. . 3• 1068. 65. 1088. 4) 12. 1088. 39•

283

1085. . 4• 1085. . 6. 1088. 9• 1087. 2 7, 28. 1099. 52. 1087. 2 0. xei> 1087. 35, 36, 46. ^/1083. 2. 2; 1085.

^ /3
;^(;

; [

6 ,

1086. 28, 30. 1083. 4. 6,

4•

3,

19- 8.

1086. 40. 1087. 54• 1083. 2. . 1087. 8 1, 1083. 2. 8. 1086. 29. 1088. 2 2. 1083. 5- 2.

? €

1083. . 6. 1083. . . 1083. . 1 8. ;^^/ 1089. 2 6. 1086. 33• 1088. 17,

(^).

19,

31

1086. 43• 1X2; 1088. 68. 1083. 7• 2; 1086.
58;

;^07

^
.
30•

1087. 25. 1086. 1089. 57• 1088. 2 2, 2 3, 6. 1086. 45• 1086. 8. 1086. 72. 1086. 75, 1088.

3•

^

;

1083. 4. 1086. 71• 1083. . 12. 1083. 4• 3 (•'')• 1085. . 30. 1086. 55• 1088. 58. 1088. 46. 1081. 13. 8; 1085. . 12,13; 1086. 14, 9, 45> 67; 1087. 4, 6, 24, 58, 63,85. 1088. 2 7, 3^• 1086. 4• 1086. 7, 22, 42, 78•
;

41, 59•

.
Augustus.

EMPERORS.
4•

\
Tiberius.

1143.

1124. 21, 23.

Claudius.
deof

1144.

8.

DOMITIAN.

,^
2f/3.

1105. 22.

Vespasian.
deos

1112. 12.

Trajan.

.

-. Nepovas Tptuavos

.

1165. 15•

284
Hadrian.
Seos 'Abpiavos

INDICES

111.
ii.

I 5•

1086.

6.

Antoninus

'. .
1128. 28.

Pius.

Kvpios

1123. I/•

Marcus Aurelius and Verus.
*AvT(ovivos Koi
ol

.
.

1132. l8.

Marcus Aurelius.

COMMODUS.

Septimius Severus, Caracalla, and Geta.

.. . €. . .
MeyuTT.

AvprjXios

Sc/S.

.

!
/3.

.

1128. II.

1127. S'•

.
8.

..,

,

1110. 5j

7> 2®•

2(
1113.

2(. 1113.

^' , (, 2€ .
i.

20,

ii.

12.

HepTiva^

.\2€\
€,
(.
I'J.

^2(
(.

,
^.

. .

Maximinus and Maximus.

. .. '^ '.
f.

1114.

, .. . . /. , .
-

Imperator Caesar Gains lulius Verus Maximinus Pius Augustus Germanicus Maximus Dacicus Max. Sarmaticus Max. et Gains lulins Verus Maximus Germ. Max. Dae. Max. Sarin. Max. Caesar sanciissimus Augustus filius Alignsti \\1^. i.
Philippi.

^

111.

2 2, 24, 38.

Galli.

.

.

Tptvavo
SfjS.

111.

5, 13'

//.

EMPERORS

285

Probus.
Kvpios

€, «.
(?).

1116.

1

7•

NUMERIANUS
iros

1115. 20.

Diocletian and

.
1121.
2 8.

2\
5•

CONSTANTIUS AND GaLERIUS.

( .:
\ \
1140.

2(\ \

\
Index
III.

Kaapf

1104.

1

8.

Cf.

^

\

MaXIMINUS, CoNSTANTINE, AND LiCINIUS.
eros
eros

1139. introd.

Arcadius.

Theodosius.

dttoTttTi;

( (
et
Tiji*

1134.

1122.

.

.
.
.

1.

1116.

Augustus 1114. 35•

1114. 35• 1113. 4•

III.

CONSULS, ERAS, INDICTIONS.
i,

Consuls.

1116.

' .€ ' . € . 8€
Perpetuo
ori «rt

Corneliano co(n)s(ulibus) (237) 1114. (295) 1121. I.

36, 38.

/€

*

)

(306) 1104. (360) 1103. .
lepoi

.

(363)

.

(396) 1133.
$•

.

(407) 1122.

.

286

(
eVoi/i
eVos

. 8€ . . / 8
INDICES
1134.
ff

(42

)

.

(449) 1129.

.

(484) 1130.

2.

Eras of Oxyrhynchus.
^(363)1116.
15•

(Tos

€Tos 6T0S

(420) 1136. 6. pKe (\8 (449) 1129. 7. (484) 1130. 1 6. (562-3) 1137. 4•
(\

^

Indictions.
1st (5th cent.) 1131. 16.

2nd (418-19) 1134. 3rd (419-20) 1134.

II, 13; II, 14•

(449) 1129.

8.

4th (420) 1136. 4. 7th (484) 1130. 3. 8th Phaophi, (484) 1130. i6. loth (5th or 6th cent.) 1138. 4. nth (5th or 6th cent.) 1138. 10 ; (562-3) 1137.

2,

4

;

(late

6th cent.) 1147.

i

14th (5th cent.) 1126. 10, 15.

IV.

MONTHS AND DAYS.
(a)

Months.
.

([
fiKOf

.

.

1144.8.

() Days.

ۥ
nonae

1128.

8.
1

1116. 13; 1132. idus luliae 1114. 37. 1116. 12 1127. 4
;

7.

;

1129.

6.

luliae 1114. 13, 36.

TCTpas 1163. 2.

.

V.

PERSONAL NAMES
PERSONAL NAMES.
4, 26,

287

"8 "8
'Akovs
(?

, "
32, 33•
1121. 31. s. of
f.

',

^ (^
and Admetus
gen. ab
4, 9> 15, 22,
)

V.
A.
S.

of Ision 1130.

1145. introd.

..
1111.
ii.

',
relia
'

S.

of Serenus

Aiurelius Saras 1114. 28. AuApollonia, &c. 1114. 10. d. of Marcus Aurelius Apollonius 1114. 25. Aurelia Apollonia, &c. 1114. II.

of

Marcus

.

Admetus

14,

) ,/ '€8 " \8, /? " ^ // ", "^
1111.
ac/i's

of Heracleus (?) 1111. ii. 7, s. of Heracleus and f. of Heracles
ii.

9.
i.

also called Thoeris, goddess 1117.

^/?,
f.

. pracfect 1100. . epistrategus 26. . 1135.
1108. 11.

1137.

2.

I.

1119.

7•

•(

f. of Doiion 1145. 22. 1108. 13•

of Aurelius Maximinus 1134. 1158. I 6. 1116. 24; 1133. i8 1162. 6.
;

5.

' / , ' ? "
1112.
2.

1102. 24; 1104. 21. f. of Apollonius 1153. I. f. of Apollonius also called Horion
s.

of Apollonius 1153.
s.

I,

30.

also called Horion,
2,

of ApolloS.

nius ex-exegetes 1112.

.

18.

senator,

of

Demetrius also called Psammis 1114. 25.

Marcus Aurelius Apollonius, &c.
f.

S.

1114. 11. of Petechon elder 1145. 9. of SoSUS 1127. I.
2

1145.

.
7.

assistant 1147.

beneficiarius 1121. chief priest 1146. 6.

.

2.

presbyter 1138. 1136. I. 1158. 6, 13. Api[ 1100. 23.

3.

frecdman 1128.
also Called

4, 18.

Chaeremon 1128.

I.

Cf.

/uois
f.

1128. 19. of PetechoH 1145. 8. s. of PtolemaCUS 1124. 12. 1123. 2.
s.

of Saras 1112.
also

7.

called

Euphemia

1151.

12,

31•

? .// ^/

, // "
'/

1110. 2. 1156. 2. 1150. 4. 1156. 2.

epistrategus 1119. 4» 9,

15, 22, 26.

.

1135.

7•

',

1146. 4• 1146. 2. f, of Dionysius 1113. i. 18. s. of Nicaeus 1145. 3. pastophorus 1155. i, 18. s. of Sarapion 1123. i

," , €, ' ,
^

',

9•

,
A
.
.

. dioecetes 1115.
also
called

5,


S.

also

Called

Chaeremonis 1113.

.,

of

Sarapion 1113. i. 7. f. of Heracles 1145. 13. f. of Horus 1145. II.
also Called H,,
S.

of

Horion 1109.
f.

i.

of Harpocration 1109. 15. of Harpocration and of on 1109. 15. S. of Theon 1119. 3, 6,
s.

.

18, 26, 27, 29.
f.

of Aurelius
A.

Phoebammon

1129.
5.

5>

16•

S.

of CalopUS 1133.
i.

1103.

3•

s.

of Cephalon 1111.

1115.

2,

.

.

8.

.

senator,

S.

of Achilleus 1103.
18.

2.

also called Dieus, d.

centuHon 1146.

.

288

INDICES
1145. 15. s. of Petenouphis 1145. 17. Uavk'ivos banker 1132. 1 1.

'

dorus 1114.

21,

Saras, &c. 1114. 7.
4, 21.

114.

Marcus Aurelius Saras 1114.

Apollonia, &c. 1114. 10. d. of Marcus Aurelius Aurelia Apollonia, Apollonius 1114. 25.

'
7•
S.
'

,
33.
S.

Marcus Aurelius
S.

of

Theon

1116.

also Called Dieus, d.
28.

of Aurelia
of
18.

praefect 1110. 6.

1115.

2.

Phoebammon 1126.

amphodogrammateus 1119.
7, 19, 25.

'^ :
MtKts d. of

&c. 1114. II.

Thcodorus 1129.
27.

3.

also Called

also Called Sosipatra, d. of

gus 1115.
16.

I,

18.
s.

,
2.

strate-

Marcus Aurelius Saras 1114.
Stratonice, &c. 1114. 9.
d. of

Aurelia

of Artemidorus 1129. 5,
called Lucas,
s.

^(5
S.

Diodorus 1121. 3, 31. of Ision 1130. 4,26, 32, 33. S. of SerenUS 1121. 3 1 beneficiarius 1121. 2. 1135. 7• dioecetes 1115. ^, \. S. of Theon 1119. 3) 6, 18,
of CalopUS 1133.
5•

Melas 1122.
1104.
2.

(

also
6.

of

also Called Horion,

logistes

1158. 2 . 1142. I, 1 8. f. of Asclepiades 1103.

26, 27, 29.

' '/ € !8 ' / ' ,'
1119.
9, 25.
s.

2,

.

1115.
also called Pertinax, strategus

?
(
1113.
/ios

s. of Pe 1123. 2. deacon, s. of Peter 1130. 29. f. of Didymus 1145. 14.
.

.

.

saint 1151. 49. scholasticus 1165. 14.

s. of Theon 1122. 4. of Melanas 1116. 19. 'Hpas phylarch 1119. 2, 13. 1133. 1 7. S. of Th s. of Theon 1119. 3, 6, 12, 18,

senator,

.

.

.

, €(
,,
d.

1141. 6.
8.

26, 29.

also called

Noninos, senator
5.

1104.

4.

Sarapion also called G. 1149. f. of Heracleus 1146. 1 1 Geminius Valens 1114. 5. chartularius 1108. 8. scribe 1108. 4. chief physician 1108. 6.
.

S.

of Nilus 1130.

1115.
s.

2,

.
S.

also Called

Psammis,

f.

ex-primipilarius,

of Sar5.

mates 1133.

3, 16.

Aurelius Apollonius 1114. 25. &c. 1114. II.
1111.
i.

of Marcus Demetrius,

, ,

.

S.

of

Ammon

1134.

2.
i.

senator,

of
11.

of Cephalon 1111.
3.

i.

Demetrius also called Psammis 1114. 25.

Marcus Aurelius Apollonius, &c. 1114.

.

AioyeVijs

also

called

Heliodorus, f. of Marcus Aurelius Saras, Marcus Aurelius 1114. 21. Diogenes, &c. 1114. 8.
senator

,
113.

also Called D., ex-chief priest
i.

1110. 15.

.
4.
s.

Senator,

S.

of

Theon

.

cus Aurelius Diogenes also called Helio-

2

1122.

senator,

S.

of

Mar-

also Called
i.

of Batrachus 1145. 14. Didymion, ex-chief priest
3•

V.

PERSONAL NAMES

289

Aurelia Apollonia, &c. 1114. 10. 1153. 21. Aioyei/Tji 1142. II. f. of Flavius Phoebammon Imperial administrator 1134. 3. 1141. I. Aioyevtjs, also Called Heliodorus, f. of Marcus Aurelius Saras 1114. 21. Marcus AureliusDiogenes, &C.1114. 8. OvfTTios 1127. 3) 3^• s. of Sarapion 1113. i. 6. f. of Thoilis 1123. 7. procurator 1113. i. 12,
]\Iarcus Aurelius Saras 1114. 28.

'/ 8\
f.

of Dionysius 1109.
i.

4.

?,

f.

of Isidorus 1110.

also Called D., d. of

' -,
ii.

.-

, "
f.

ex-gymnasiarch, s. of Zoilus 1110. ii. of Zoilus 1110. II.

s.

of Dionysius 1111.

i.

2.

alsO Called

,

.

€,
3.

'
,
d.

, ,
s.

.

.

'
1132. 4.
f.

of Marcus Aurelius Saras 1114. 22. Marcus Aurelius Diogenes, &c. 1114. 8. god 1148. I 1149. i. comes 1163. lO. 1153. 3, 7, 2 2.
f.
;

.,

1109.
s.

1

6.

114,6. 12.

of

.

.

.

and

f.

of

Tryphon

21. 1146. of Admeius and Mieus 1111. s. of Gemellinus 1146. 11.

,

ii.

9.

1158.
f.

I,

26; 1160.

s.

9.
s.

f.

of Aurelia Techosis 1121. 3. of Pekusis 1145. 21.

of Admetus 1111. ii. 12. of Harpaesis 1145. 13.

1140.

1157. I, 30. 1125. 3, 6.
s.

. phylarch

2.

1119.

2,

13.

of

Apion 1113.

i.

17.

. praefect 1110. 6.
s.
f.

of Pekusis 1109. 3. also Called Sinthonis 1128.
also called

2,

s.

of Didymus 1109. 4. of Heliodorus 1111. i. of Theon 1124. 4, 6,
;

Geoyevijs,
2. 9,

Th. 1128.

5•

18, 22.

1116. 23. 1110. 4, 12

1146. 1 6. of Alexander 1145. 22.

" " . ,^

'

,
1103.

1160. 51158. 19. s. of Anubias 1110. 2. 1126. 19, 21. f. of Aurelius also called Harpocration, s. of Horion and f. of Ptolemaeus 1109. i. f. of Horion 1109. 2. 1102. 3, 8, i8 ; 1107. 6 ; 1120. 6 1146. 15.
.
.

.

,, ,'
(^
1128.
f.

1164. 1 4. 1120. 1 7. f. of Aurelia INIikis 1129. ) 1108. 12.

3.

S. of Th princeps 1108. 2. riparius 1147. 10. 1155. , 20. or 1154. 1117. II ; 1136. 2
.

.

.

.

1133.

7•

;

,

14.

.

also

Called

Chacremon

;

,

I. Cf. 1128. 19. of Aurelius Arsinoiis and Aurelius Theon 1119. 3, 6. f. of Aurelius Didymus senator 1122. 4. S. of Theon 1119. 3, 6, 12,

.

18, 26, 29.
f.

praefeCt 1101.

2.

of Aurelius

Moses 1116.
17, 18.

4.

3.

also Called

.

banker 1146.
1151. 13,
f.

, (
22.

of Dionysius 1124. 22. goddess 1117. 5.

also called

.
I.

S.

of Mclanas 1116. 19.

god 1149.

Th. 1117. I. f. of Hierax 1105. 1 5. f. of Thoonis 1105. 4.

U

.

290
s.
s.

INDICES
of Thoonis 1105
of Thooiiis and
s.
f.

3.

of

Thoonis 1105.
12,
1

4.

!
(/
.

of

Komon
;

1141. 2

(?) 1145. 1159. 13.

6.

1120. 13. s. of Diogenes 1123. 7. or Qeopus 1155. 1,20.

,' ' ,
agent 1141. 1160. 4.

3.

.

praefect

1104
i.

.
3>

larouapiaroy,

^?
1

,
NoninOS,

praefect 1111.
.

2.

presbyter 1162.

also Called L.,

S.

.

pracfect 1115. 4•

€,
[

1152. 2. 1110.

8.

.
Thoonis and

also

Called

of Melas 1122. 6. 1158. 2, 26. f. of Lucius 1145. 20. S. of LuciuS 1145. 20. s. of Petronius 1145. 21.
praefect 1117. 4. praefect 1111.
assistant 1137. i.

senator 1104. 4.

€?
s.

of

f.

of Tbekis 1105. 14.

assistant 1147. 6.

scribe 1137. 5.

lawyer 1131.
1141.
1

2,
1

16.

,' ?
S.

,

, '
.
S.

i.

3,

ii.

2.

of

Ammon

1134.
S.

5.

Demetrius also called Psammis 1114. 25.

saint 1151. 50.

.

Marcus Aurelius Apollonius, &c. 1114.
rus,
5.

S.

of NiluS 1130. 5.

1146. p. 1146. 13; 1160.

I. 1115. 2, of Didytnus 1110. . 1146. 7• f. of Aurelius Abraham 1130. 4, 26,

.

f. of Marcus Aurelius Saras 1114. 21. Marcus Aurelius Diogenes, &c. 1114. 8. senator, S. of MarcUS

^
1115.

Senator,

of
11.

also called Heliodo-

1114. 1114.

Aurelius Diogenes also called Heliodorus Marcus Aurelius Saras, &c. 21.
7.

32, 33.

of Sarapion 1123. i. Ivivilinus (?) tabularius 1114. 35. 1151. II, 30. assistant 1107. 6.
f.

,
1111.

.

ex-primipilarius,

S.

of

Sarmates 1133.

3, 16.

,

evangelist 1151. 46.
f.

of Aurelius Artemidorus 1135. 5.

,
^

1145. introd. f. of Aurelius Zakaon 1116. 19. f. of Aurelius Phoebammon also called Lucas 1122. 7. MteCr s. of Heracleus 1111. ii. 16. d. of Theodorus 1129. 3.

.

archangel 1152.

.

KepeaXii

hypomnematographus 1102. 4. of Asclas, Cephalon and Didyme
f,

1116.

4, 21.

,
p. 3,

S.

of

Theon

i.

I.

s.

of Cephalon 1111. i. 9. procurator 1113.
i.

;?
i.

1110. 1106.

3• , II.

12, U. 3.

f.

ex-iuridicus 1102. 16, 24. of Apion 1145. 3 (Nty. Pap.).

1113.

1 6.

praefect 1104. 10.

s.

(?)

1145. 23. 1108. 5. of Taur 1106. I, I I. f. of Thracidas 1145. 12, 16.
.

1145. introd. (Ntyy. Pap.). 1153. 6, 22, 24. 1149. 4. f. of Aurelius Isaac 1130. 5.
(?),

.

.

also called

.

1104.

4.

1112. g.

1148.

2

.

praefect 1102.

7•

.

.

Ovfjavios

,

1108.

.

.

(
6.

V.

PERSONAL NAMES
3•

1127.

3^•

^

291

1157. 2, 30. ex-elder 1147.

.

1146.

.

, ' €8 ,^ : , ((
official 1147. 9• 1110. 4(?)• comes 1147. 3•

/^

1135. 3. 1110. l6, I 7. god 1148. I ; 1149. 1102. 24; 1114. 1156. 3; 1158. 2.
1113.
i.

2.

31; 1140.
s.

i;

.

,,
1110.
6.

also calkd Arislocles,
7.

of Sarapion

.
7, 19, 25.
f.

amphodogrammatCUS

1121. 1157.

.

6.

1146. 1157. 2, 30. also called Paulinus 1110. 14. also called p. 1110. 14.

.
.
.

5.

banker 1132.
. .

II.

comes 1165.
S.

10.

of Sillagr 1153. 5•

1106.

,

11.

' ' '
1119.
1113.
1113.

s.

of Chaeremon 1132. 2. of Chaeremon 1137. i also Called Gaion 1149. 7.

s.of IschyrioH

and

f.of Apion 1123. i.

also called Phanias, ex-gymnasiarch
ii.
f,

I,

17.

f.
i.

of Phanias 1105. I. 1146. I 7. of Sarapion akso called Aristocles
8.

also called jeivnpovs 1110. 18.

HeKvats

of Diodorus 1145. 21. f. of Thais 1109. 3. f. of Petechon 1145. 2,
s.

also called
7.

Theogenes 1128.

5.

also called P., strate-

gus 1119.
f.

s.

9, 25. of Halres 1145. 1 7. of Pelousis 1145. 2, 7.

,
(
d.

1160. 2 2. 1154. I. s. of Amois 1112. 7. centurion 1146. 19.

.

senator,

S.

ofMarCUS

1130. 3 I f. of Ammonius 1145. 8. f. of Banus 1130. 30. comes 1164. 14. ueVpof elder, s. of Apollonius 1145. f. of Horus 1145. 8. f. of LuciuS 1145. 21.

Aurelius Diogenes also called Heliodorus 1114. 2ij 33. ]\Iarcus Aurelius Saras, &c. 1114. 7.
assistant 1136. 2, 6.

'' 8€
?,
21.

4 ,

9.

1110.

^ €
.
1

1115.

2,

of Aurelius John 1133. 3, 16. 1146. 14. {. of Aurelius Agathodaemon 1121. 31. f. of Phoebammon 1126. 20, 21.
f.

saint

115L
;

47.
i.

5.

1120. 3; 1121. 33;
1127.

11•
3)

9•

praefect 1115. 4•
3^•

(?) S.

of

Phoebammon
pracfect 1102.

1126. 19;
7•
f.

{ ,
d.

1120. 13
2.
) f.

1140.

.

also called Horion, logistes
II.

1104.

.

([

Psammis, Demetrius also called P., Marcus Aurelius Apollonius 1114. 1

of

1.

(

1146. II. 1158. 21. f. of Ammonius 1124. 12. banker 1132. 10. s. of Hermippus 1109. 8. {. of Horus 1145. 10.

, ,
of

of PauluS 1106.

I,

also called S. 1128. 3. praefeCt 1100. I.
;

1108. 9

1130.

4.

.

also Called Sosipatra,

of Marcus Aurelius Saras 1114. Aurelia Stratonice, &c. 1114. 9.

27.

also called S., 28.

Marcus Aurelius Saras 1114.

Aurelia Stratonice, &c. 1114. 10. f. of Sosus 1127. 2. s. of Sosus 1127. I.
2

292

INDICES
1121.
1

2!

6.
I.

1107.

'/ !
;(
Tews
Tartaj/os,
) f.

1145. intiod. 1132. 1123. 7• 1132. 3•
1111.

5•

.

1149.
of

Komon


6.
(?)
;

.

. praefect 1101. 2.
1106.

,

11.

TfpeCi 1146. 8, 9.

,'
1121.

d.

of Hieiax 1105. 14.

3,

. d. of Diodorus
f,

g

1158. 21.
1121.
.

3, 31.

,! , , / £ , ^(
Melas 1122.
5> 16.
6.

. also
s.

Called LucaS,

S.

of

.

of Artemidorus 1129.
5.
f.

ofijcial
s.

1137-

of Serenus and Pranischolus 1126. 19, 21.

of Aurelius

s.

Imperial administrator, of Diogenes 1134. 3. exegetes 1146. 4, 8.
(?)

.

1160. 5. f. of Pstheious 1107.

i.

also Called Ch. 1113.

i.

10.

:
s.

of Totoeus and
f.

of

Ta

.

.

1123.

4,
I,

also Called
Cf. 1128. 19.
f.

Ammonius Theon
i.

1128.

II.

Toroei's

of
s.

s.

Teos 1123. 4. of Origenes 1160. 1,29. of Heraclides 1132. 4. 1123. 5•

s.

Xei/eroCjSts

Valens, Geminius V. 1114.

,
9.

of Sarapion 1137. of Sarapion 1132. 1118. 3.

2.

5.

! ! ,

Aurelius Apollonius 1114. 25. <ireeiois s. of Phutos 1107. I. "iroels, logistes 1116. 3.

1105.
s.

I

;

1148.

3.

!
f.

also called Ps.,

f.

of MarcuS

.
3.

ex-chief priest

and banker 1132.
i.

of Sarapion 1105.
i,

'Qpiyas 1153.

I

also called Ph., cx-gymnasi18.

arch 1113. ii. //3 1138. II.

^,
^6/
s.

AvpTj'hios
i,

.
18.

also

Called

Horion,

strategus 1115.

1113.

ii.

5.

? ^ !

1160. II. saint 1150. 2 ; 1151. 48. 'Apre/xtof duX 1103. 3.
praefect 1101.
2.

, , ,
^ ^ ^ *

of Trophlmus 1160. 1142. g.
2.

I,

29.
s.

also called Horion,
also Called

of
2.

Apollonius 1112.

. 1104.
Called

also

.,

strategus 1115.
S.

,

18.
f.

of Hermippus and

of

Hermippus

also called Harpocration 1109. 2.

Imperial of Diogenes 1134. 3.
lOets logistes 1116. 3.

administrator,

1110. 13s. of Harpaesis 1145. 11. s. of Petechon 1145. 8.
s.

of PtoUis 1145. 10.

;

VI.

GEOGRAPHICAL
GEOGRAPHICAL.
Mt/cpa

293

VI.
{a)
K'lyviTTot

Countries, Nomes, Cities, Toparchies.
1118.

1119. 16 ; 1121. 2. 1101. 2 'AXe^afSpaa 1147. 3 e( saep. ; 1153. 1155. 4 ; 1158. 8 ; 1160. 25. 17
;

^\€8
1114. 23.

.

30
6.
J

1116.

1 1

.

(. 1130.
1100.

"
.
;

"
4•

2 (?)

Alexandrinonim
'AvTivoeiTiKos

civitas 1114. g.
feoi

1119. 28. 'AiTiiOeif 'AvTivofvs 1119. 3, 4, 6, 26. "EXXj/Key 1119. 1 4, 2 2. 1119. 14) 2 2.

^
"
1134.
II

1102. 12;
1118.

1121. 1119.
;

3•

2;
)

1100.

8 ; 1104. 3 1115. , 1116. 3; 1119• 6, 2 2, 25; 1130. 5• 1117. 21, 26, 33 J 1119. . 1104. 19, 25• 1129. 3 1133. 7 1121. 4 1122. 4 5

()
;

;

1121. 3•

,

\

.
;

;

;

''€

^
!
pjjrpOTToXts

1105.
i.

4,

6

;

1109. 3

;

1110.
1114. 1132.

1100. 23. 1154. 13. 1100.
;

2

;

1111.

3

;

;

1123.

3,

8

;

1113• i• 1127. 2

5> "•
;

.

2

;

1128. 3

;

1133•

.

1163. 2. vioi 1119. 1 4. 2 2. ivupia 1101. 5• inapxia 1101. 14• 1133. 3
'>

/
H^V.
21.
2
;

3, 9•

Oxyrinchitaium
;

civitas 1114. 7, 12, 13•

1115. II. 1119. 1101. 5

1

6.

=

Oxyrhynchus

'AXe^afSpeta 1130. 6.

=

Oxyrhynchus 1112.
6.

1119.

7>

27.

1109.

1119.


(?)

1110. 2, 15, 18, 21; 1105. 15; 1113. i. 11; 1114. 32; 1116. 5. 20; 1117. 3. 4, 16, 21 ; 1122. 7 ; 1128. 6 ; 1129. 5, 9 > 1132. 6 ; 1134. 5• peV?; 1113. . 2, . 5 ; 1145. 3• 1102. 2 5•

Villages,

() Oxyrhynchite.

<5)

1165. 5• 1147. 9• 1145. 4• 1112. 23. 1124.
(?)

;
7•

, , {
€«-

-.
.
4. 32, 33•
;

1137.

.

SerepeXeu 1112.

1145. introd.

1111. (.
(?)

1.

7> "• 2.
?)

1127.

€1128.

1165.
7.

9•

Nepi'pa 1112. 6, 2 1.
Netrpipts

)7

1134,

4•
1133.
4•

nayyouXeetou 1147. 16.

13; 1147. 1147. 7• 1147. 4'^• 1147. 9• Tepi^tf 1165. 1124.

^

)

1112. 131113.
;

1130.

1112. II 1112. 8

i.

, 5•

1141.

3•

8.

.

;

1145. introd.

''

(?)

1123. 12.
7"

1112.

'$ 1146.
5» ^^•

1113.

.

5•

5•

UeTciOvptoi

1123.

294

INDICES
(2) Heracleopolite.

2 "Krjrs

1126. 8. 1145. I. 1145. 19-

1126. 7• 1156.

4•

!

,

()
1109.
1 3•

uoba.
tiorov
[.]

(Antinoopolis) 1110. 1116. 6. Tfu/i€vov^fu)s 1129.

3) 9•

.

Tf/^yfi/ou^ews

1105. 7• (AniinoopoHs) 1110. 1109. 7•

.

(/)

Tribes and Demes.
() Alexandrian.
1145.
2 2.

1110. , 1110.

^[
2.

(a) Antino'ite.
(?)

1110.

4•

!
&C.

6

2((05 6

.
(e)

,

1141.

6.

KXf avbpov 1113.

i.

1

6.

/
1113.
.


5•
7.

1110. 9• 1119.

3) ^•

1126.

5•

.

(/)
1104.
I

Miscellaneous.
[

6.

(

1119. 2

VII.

RELIGION.
() Pagan,

",

'
(
1144.

\
1149.
4•

Bea

. 1148. .
.
Cr.

Index

€ " ^
1117.

() Gods.
1117. 5
1117.
piyas

.

1149.

.

Zeis

"
.

>

1144.
.

.
Zei/y

.
"HXtos
/xe'yas

.

1148. 1149. I.

1117.

.

VIL

RELIGION
Temples^ &c.

295

(2)
'AhpLavflov 1113•
lepav
if pa
i.

6.

1116. lO.
6.

1144.

/ ^
&c.
19.

Upov 1143. 2, 5. i. kv^ovarov 1116. lO. 1124. II ; 1155. i8. 1105. 7 ; 1132. I (?), 9.

(3) Priests^

1113.
apxifpfiis

i.

1114. 32
4.

;

1132. 10. 1146. 6,
4
;

Upevs 1144. 10.

Uptvs Koi

! ;?
6 4,

1143.

2

;

1144.

3, 7, 9,

13

;

1155.

1144.

.

1102.

() Christian.
ayioi 1151. 51•
a^'ji'

^,
TTvevpa

, (
Ofos
3.

1151. 56 ; 1152. 5 ; (\ 1162. 15. 1151. 44. 1151. 42• aycos 1151. 49• 1130. 29 ; 1162. 3•

1162. 12.

(
3•

evayye-

.

1151. 43• 1151. 52

(

;

1162.

4•
1152.
1151. 6.

.

(:

1138. 2. 1162.

ayia eV. 1147. II.

4•
5,

(€ ^,
6

1138. 3
S.

1162. 1,2. 1151. 47*
,*

1151. 45•

• (, 8(' '»;

1150. 1151. Ki'piof 1165. 8, 14-

;

(
.

7.

24; 1164. 1151. 52; 1162

1161. 2. 1151. 5• 6 1151. 23•

^'
^'°^

"^*'

,
^

1151• 40•

1152. 3• 1151.

.

^, '
1130.

1151. 1151. 23-

3•

^•

"'''

1161. 3• Xoyos

IijToCs

.

1152. 3• 1150. 2 ; 1151. 4^•

.

( (

^.

.

() Magic.
1152.
2.

€1152.

.
1152.
2.

1152. . 1152. .

VIII.
1108. 1 1. 1105. 2.

OFFICIAL

AND MILITARY
1135.

,

8€ .

1119. 4) 6, 8, 1115. 2. 1115.

, 9,
g.

20, 23•

, (
1110.

TITLES.

]
1108. 12. 1108. 7

oiKiiif

,

3•

)

{)

296
1108•
6.
i.

INDICES
1113.
4
5

(€

1132.

.
2 2.

1119.

1 5.

1114. 32. 1117. 3- 57

J

1119. 14;

.
2.
;

.
(.
D.

1119.

5•

1101.

4•
1121.

203) 1113. . 13,
1114. 2 2.
8.

,
1132.

.
1104.
4•

«.

3•

:
/3

factus eutheniarcha

1114.

1107. 6

;

1136.
25
;

2

;

1137.
2
;

1147.

4,

6, 7, 12.

1121. 27.

1101.

1103.

1104.
4•

4
1

"
1114.

2 1, 22, 20, 32,

33

;

1122.
22.

1119. 2 1. 1117. 2; 1119.
2.

1103. 2; 1119.
1119. 4, 8, 26.

2,

14,

'
4•

.

8;

1102. 2. 1143. 2; 1155.

, 1102.
(.
D.
1

\

6

7•

1117.

1137. 5^ 1138. II. 1164. , 6. 1143. 3•
7,
;

.

88) 1110.

1117.

.
.

3,

2.

gymnasiarchus 1114. 1103. 2

12.

1100.
>

,

8

;

1114.

2,

26,

33
7,

1104. 4 1146.
'}

1113.
2.

. (.

.

D.

284) 1115.

factus

gymnasiarchus 1114. 1102. 9•

12.

.

, 88 '8 88,
6;(6
decurio 1114.
eVt
7,

1101. 1119. 17•
1112. 20.

'. (. .
6.

-

D.

203) 1111. .

(.
6

. 26)

4•

/-

(.

D.

3®^) 1104.

2.

12.

'
Ko/xey
1

1112.

.

1115. Q•

,
(.
D.

1134:.

6;

1146. introd. yevopfvog . 1102. 1147. 3•

1147. 3

;

1163. 4, 10; 1164. 14; 1165.
1112. 21.
1113. .

6.

10.

tioiKwv

^,
e

8
36)

284) 1115. 5

J

(
6
2.
2.

.
.
1115. II.
3•

.

1134. 1146. introd.

1141

.

II.

. (.
3-

D.

( ,. '
8
1146. 1108. 3•
1112.
4) 8.
2.

1103.

1139. . (a.D. 3*^6) 1104. 2. (. D. 360) 1103. 3•

',
(.
D.
.'

363) 1116.
1147.

3.

9•
;

1146.

4) 8.
;

1121. 2 2, 26

1137. 5

1147.

4, 9•

1108. 13
4•

1139.

1101.

1121.

Cf.

(^^
6

1116.

1115.

'

1117.

,

. . .
2.

1139.

2.

1115. 3• 1103. 5•
1131.
1 7.

. 1119. . (.
'J,

,

21. 27.

'13•

D.

244) 1119.

1134. 1146.

2.

7•

1104e.

4• 9, 15, 22, 26.

1

,
ptTToptoy

1133. procuratio 1114. 6. 1134. 8 ; 1147. I'J, 19• 1134. 7• 1104. 1 7, 2 2. 1103. 2 1104. 4•
;

,
20, 2 2.

,! €
11083•

IX.
I

WEIGHTS, MEASURES, COINS
1

297

1101. 9,

3,
if

8, 27.

.

(.
:.

D.

284) 1115.
2.

,

1

8.

1116.
^3^
J

.

1118.

1119.

(^) 111^. 2; 1145. 9

7) 1 9)

^•
11< 1147. 6.

1101. 13, 8; 1115. 13. 1106. 7• 1116. 5-21.

5•

1165.

1 4.

1104. 21.

.

'
.
\
;

1104. 1134. 3•

5•

1101. 26; 1147.

,
1120.
5.

tabularius 1114. 35•
114:6.
I'J,
1

8.

y

.
1119.

3•

^.

See Index

'
III.

1102.

2.

. 1102.

4, 17, 20, 23.

pnys 1100.
244) 1119.

1108.

4•
;

1102. 12
Aflos 6

1119.

4, 6,

,
D.

1141. 1119.

3•

2,

II,

3.

(.

9)

25.

1108.

8.

IX.

WEIGHTS, MEASURES, COINS
(a)

Weights and Measures.
7; 1126.
3, 6,

1102. 17; 1113.
12.

i.

19,

ii.

1143.

7•

5,

1124. 13 ; 1125. i 1140. 1144. 18 1145. 5. 7
; ; ;

4

;

1143.
AtdSioy

1140. 3 •• 1124. 12.
,'

1115. 3(!').

1130. 14, 29, 32. 1142. 4, 5.
1142. 2. 1153. 5•

1142.

1 4•

1130.
(?)

1 3.

1158. 12.
1

1139.
Kn'Stoi/

3•

11ZQ. intiod. 1158. 16.
1143.
I.

;

1141. 7-9»

n-

1142.

.

1145.

8, II, 14,

7•

() Coins.

/)/ 1104.
14,

II, 22, 23; 1105. 6; 1124. 17; 1125. 3; 1127. 1 1; 1129. 2; 1132. 12. 1160. g.

1117. 22;

1104, 12, 23, 24; 1142.

5, 6, 8, 9•

6; 1112. 14-16, 24, 25; 1124. 14, 17; 1125. 3 1127. II, 1128. 6; 1132. 2, 15; 1135. introd. ; 1142. 3, 7 1143. 4, 5 , 3, 5; 1144. 4 f/ saep. ; 1153. 8.
1105.
;

2
;

;

39•

;

298
Cvyov,

INDICES
'A\(^avhpfias
{(.)

112.
1112.
KfpOTiou
2,
1

12, 13,

1147. 3 e/ saep. 22 1138. 5, 8.
;

.

1165. 6.

6\05
6.

1112.

1

6

;

1143.
II,

7

;

1144. 11.

1104.
1131. 8, 9; 1137. 1126. 12, 13, 21 1138. 7 1147. 3 el saep. 3 1157. i8; 1160. 16.
; ;
;

12,

22,

1117. 4, 1 6; 1158. 8, 1112. 2 5•

,

24; 1105. 21
14.

;

.

^

;^? 1158.

23.

1125. 5• 1129. 12; 1133.

g.

1105. 21. 1133. 9•
1117. 8. 1121. 19; 1126. 12, 21 II, 27, 31 ; 1131. 7, 9 1137.
',

1130. II, 2'j, 32; 1131. 7, 9; 1136. introd.; 1138. 6, 9; 1147. 3 f/ 1130. lo. saep, V.

;

2,

1130. 3 ; 1138.

,

5,8.

.
1135. 2 1105. 21.
1115.
9•
;

TAXES.

1138.

3•

(

(.(
19
12
.

1157. I4j

1 6,

2

.

1112. 14, 2 4*

1134. 27; 1138. 4•

6,

12.

"],

20,

1109. 12.
1112.

/;
14.

6,

25.

1137.

2, 3-

^'^^ 1125.

;

1126.

1123.

5.

^

XI.

GENERAL LNDEX OF GREEK AND LATIN WORDS.
7-

a 1114. 15.

1103. II. 1159- 2 1153. 1 8.

1113. i. 15, 18, ii. 7 ; 1125. 10. 1126. 1161. 2. ; ayavaKTf'iv 1119. 8. ayanav 1161. 3. 1162. 3. 1151. 6 e/ saep. 1147. 1 1 ; 1150. 2 ayvevdv 1144. I 7;

.
€ 8€\

2 / saep.] 1149. 5; 1153. 18; 1158. II. See Index VIII, 1110. 1 3. 1106. 2. 1154. 6. 1119. 17. 1154. 1157. , 22; 1158. 19; 1159. 31 7•
;

1119. 1 1. 1119. II. 1142.

; .

1

..

.

' 6
XL
;

GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK AND LATIN IVORDS
ai'a/3atVeti'
;

299

1165. 2, 6. 1111. i. 8, 1102. 8; 1106. , ii 1162. 1154. 12 1158. i 16 1153. 15 4, 6; 1165. 14. ahiaiptTos 1105. I 3. ahaeeros 1114. 28 ; 1121. 13. a^iKflv 1100. 17. 1124. 1 1 1152. 2.
; ;

dm/SoXtKoV 1135. 2

;

•(

1157.

7,

13, 26.
;

1136. 3. 1102. 6, 1 3, 25. aVayKoios 1130. 9 1153. I I.
;

^'

affirmatio 1114. 36.
aeereiv

/ ]
23.

/;

1121.

1105.

2

;

1109. 12
;

1123.

.
I

avadidooKfiv 1103. 4

1163

5.

agere 1114. 38. 1120. 8.
111?. 23.
(?)

\

1104. 9, 24; 1119. 2, 23; 1125. 1130. 1 9• 1104. 8; 1159. 1 8, 22. 1126. 6. (.?) 1144. . 1105. 2
.

9•

1136. 3. a'lpflv 1110. 3 1127. 20. 1124. 19; 1164. 9.
;

1121. 12.

1118.

I I

;

avanepneiv 1157.

/^/

8.

1121. II. 1115.
2.

ti'iptaK
alre'iv

1117. 1 1 1115. 3; 1121. 2

2.

1104.

6.

/
/ios

1119. 1122. I

1
;

9, 23.

1134.
2 5•

i

88
1112.

1106.

8.
; ;

1128.

1112. 5, 21.
;

^, fa
2;

«-

1124. 2 1125. g ; 1127. 2; 1130. 14. 1102. 6 1104. 8 ; 1115. 1 2 ; 1117. 9. 17; 1134. g. 1102. 12. 1124. II. 1133. 3• 1127. 1 6. (' 1110. 21. 1165. 12. 1122. II. 1105. 1103. 8; 1104. 1116. 6; 1119. 1 6 1106. 3 ; 1113. i. 1121. 1124. 4; 1134. 8, 13, 1141. 5 ; 1145. 3 ; 1160. 13, 15 1164. 6 1165. 4, 12. 1165.

,

;

1103. 5 1115• 6 1119. 26. 1102. 5• 1163. 3• 1123. 1 4. 1106. 5• clvev 1101. 7 1126. 15 ; 1130. 17. UVTJKflV 1104. 5• 1143. 6. 1120. 2 1123. 6 ; 1164. 5•
;

;

« /^.
1

.
1107.
2
;

^-^

1155. 7

)

1159.

6.

,

6

;

2
5

;


/»/

1161. g, 1115. 9• 1121. 2

.

;

;

;

;

;

.
.

/^^^

1121.

6.

( -. /
;

1143. 5, 7• 1107. 3• 1124. 1 1119. II. 1158. 9 1159. 1 1157. 9, 22 1151. 56 1152. 5• <^ 1162. 15.
;

^
1131. 14-

1153. l^J 1157. 12, 25. 1115. 7, 19 5 1102. 1101. ; 22, 25. 1118. 4; 1119• 3. 3, 1164. 4• 1123. 9• 1148. 7• 1126. 5; 1130. 7• 1123. 19 5 1165. 2, 7• 1121. 2 7• 1121. 7• /76(9€' 1126. 15; 1129. 14; 1130. 6;
IV
',

,

;

;

2.

1151.

'^6.

1119. 6, 13-

See Index VIII. Cf. Index VI {c). 1109. 6; 1119. 19; 1164. 7,

9.

1159. 26. 1127. 26. «^tosll64. 14; 1165. 5, 13• 1102. 17, 19» 2 2 ; 1115. 7; 1117• 9; 1118. 1121. 24; 1130. 22 ; 1164. 3• ;

300

INDICES
1\0
.

51 1119• 8; 1157. 1 5, 1 6. 1134. 9• 1126. 4• 1135. . 1119. 1 6 1164. 8. 1102. 8. 1138. 1 3. 1123. 3• 1101. 1121. 2; 1122. 2; 1123. ; 8; 1164. 1 1. e\eepos 1128. 4•
;

1153. 25.
apern 1103. 4
;

1131. 4,

I

2.

111. 15; 1130.
apovpa.

ii.

1156. 1 5. See Index
1121. 6, 7.

IX

{a).

6

^»;.

See Index

IX
g.

(a).

epa^a 1112.

12.

, / ^
dn-exeii/
ii.

7€7/ 1114.
1132. 7
.

1158.

6.

24.

1111. . 7

1130.

, 25;
;


ii.

1146. 8, 1158. 7• 1115. 3, 6, 13. 1142. 9.
app^ayyeXoi 1151. 42.
apXet!/

1101. 13

;

1119.

1 6.

1101. 14•

1100.

9

i

1106.

6.

apxcvres 1117. 3> 5. 7•

1126. 8. 1134. 17.
1110. 6 J 1111. i. 4) 4 ; 1157. 5 d'/ .v^i"/). 1157. 4, 24.

1119.

6;

1130.
6.

1 6.

1108.

4

;

1113.

i.

13,

. 6^€

^,€
oTToXveiv

1114. 34 ; 1110. 3^ 8 ; nil. i. 5, ii. 4. 1114. 32. 1147. 1 41118. 5; 1124. 8, 14 1125. 6; 1126. 14 ; 1127. 1 7, 39 J 1128. 16 ; 1129. 12, 17; 1130. 15; 1132. 7; 1155. 18; 1157. 30; 1158. 26; 1160. 29. 1151. 32. 1117. 1130. 2 1. ;
;

'

€€
^!/

1113. . 4
;

!

1132.

.
»

1114. 32 1146. 6. 1111. 15.

.

1120. 12. 1158. 8, 20. 1155. 9 1159. 27; 1160. 3; 1164. 13. 1133. 15 ; 1134. 6; 1137. 3•

-^^

1115. 8.
1111.

.

15.
8.

1122
1115.

2

1105.

.

,

7> 9» ^8.

7/;3// 1102. 8

1117. 7•

autem 1114.
;

13.
8.

1133.

8,

7;/ -/

1151. 44• 1121. 20. 1124. 2, 5> 7» 9 J 1126. II. aTTonVfti/ 1124. 13; 1127. 27. 1102. 2^; 1117. 6. 1102. , 5 j 1117. 9• 1104. 24 1115. 6, 7, 9> 1130. 19 ; 1133. 15, 6, 19; 1134. 1137. 4; 1157. 2 1.

' ^-

1147. . 1102. 19, 21 1165. 11. 1134. 8; 1164. 1 2. 1120. 1 6.
;

1103. 4• 1154.

1114. 2 8.

1119. 17.

1164. 3• 1130. 12.
^aXai/etoi/

1107.
1

3•

1104. 1159. 2.

6.

8

;

6;

1107. 2. 1160. 14• apyvpiKOv. See Index dpyvptoi'. See Index IX
apyeii'

-

€ (

1119. 17•

1146. 14. /3e/3aios 1126. 18; 1130. 7• 1119. 17; 1124. 1127. 3• 1148. 2.

.
[b).

114lQ. T2.

^ '

8;

1125.

151

1121.

2.

/3m 1120. II, 20.

1108.

'J,

1119. 19 1120. 4, 8. 1101. 1121. 23; 1153. 1121. 12.

;

;

4•

1

;

XL

GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK AND LATIN WORDS
1101. 21. 1101. 19 ; 1152. 4 See Index VIII.
10.
;

( .
.

1161.

5.

bona 1114.

1110. 1 1. €K 1126. 8. 1112. 2 2.
;

,.
1119.
7•

301
7,

23; 1159. 4; 1160. 7 e/ saep.; 1161. 12; 1163. 7; 1164. 12; 1165. 12.

See Index VIII.

.

1112. 13-

1102. 9• gymnasiarchus 1114.
3

*j,

12.

7^^1102.24; 1114.27; 1120. 12; 1135.
;

1100. 5 1101. 8 ; 1126. g 14; 1130. 21; 1165. 4. See Index VIII. /SorXevTjjs. See Index VIII.
(?
1.

1129.

;

1148.

4•

)
,*

daveiCeiv

1142.

3.

1132. 1 5. 1143. 5. 1125. 1 8 ; 1144. 6, 16.

civitas 1114. 7, 9, 12, 13. See Index III. consul.

ye 1159. 6.

de 1114. 14. decedere 1114. 35. decurio 1114. 7, 12. defungi 1114. 13. deiKvvvai 1150. 5• delv 1104. 12 ; 1165.

2,

10.

7€121.

i8; 1126. 7. yeveSXia 1144. 4. yerjj/ia 1134. 6, 12 ; 1141. 6. yivos 1134. 13. 1107. 2. yewpyia 1124. 1 6. 1134. 7, 14 1140. I ; 1165. 1107. 2 ; 1124. 5; 1125. i2.

(
ysStoj/

8
5.

bfivSis

1161. 8, II.

1130. 14, 29, 32.
; ;

btanoiva 1151.

40 1165. 9. 1122. I 1134. i ; 1163. 3, 9 1164. 14; 1165. 13. 1130. 1101. 15 ; 1136. 2 1157. 2 ; 1158.

.

;

7. 12.

1123. 13, 151126. 4; 1134. 15. 1104. 15; 1101. 5; 1102. i6, 21 1106. 4; 1107. 4; lllV. i, 18, 24; 1119. 4, 6, 13, 15, 20; 1121. 11; 1125. 11; 1127. 28 1130. 11, 14, 23 1126. 6, 13 1136. 5; 1137. 3; 1138. 8; 1147. 13 1165. 5. et saep.; 1153. 22 yiyvavKfiv 1118. 7 j 1155. 2. ykvKiov 1142. 1 6. 1122. 8.
;

)1101.
1112.
3.

12.

1102.

;
1

;

1109.

1 1

;

1111.

.

1 1,

1125.

8;

1130.

2;

13 ; 1133.

13; 1153. 12.
1101. 2 .

;

;

;

( . $
;

;

1119. 20. yovevs 1109. 6 ; 1121. II.

.

1100. 3

;

1104. 9

;

1110.

3,

g

;

1117.

•^
|36/

1123. 12, 15- . . 1 6. 1117. 1381125. 1 71124. 4, 7• 1125. 12; 1126. 14; 1137. 2, 31101. 24. See Index () (^). di{a) 1129. 20. 1158. 2 2.

1104.

,

1117. 3•
7,

12; 1119. 23; 1121. 32; 1130. 30; 1164. i. 1148. 8; 1160. 7 1133. 17 1130. 8 et saep. 1133. 12. See Index VIII. 1164. I, 6. 1107. 4 1118. i ; 1119. 3 1121. 1131. 32; 1129. 18; 1130. «25, 30, 31 15; 1133. 17, 18; 1134. 17; 1137. 4; 1153. 4, 5, 21, 25; 1157. 23; 1158. 13,
;
; ;

1157. 1 1135. ; 1112. 20 1119. 1115. 6.
;

9• 7•

1101

8.

;

;

( €

1115. 9•

1164. 8, g. 1130. 29
1101. 2 1

;

1162.
(.'').

3•

1161. 12.

302

INDICES

1103. 8. SiaadtivllOO. 6, 13, 14, 16. 1104. lO; 1115. 4, 5. 1165. 5• 1100. , 21 ; 1101. . 1104. 7• 3; 1129. 8; 1147. 1 1; 1165. 31118. 1130. 1 1, 28. 1110. 2 2. 1101. 3• 1106. 2. 11171103. 7; 1104. 22; 1116. 7 1139. 2; 1119. 9 1130. 1 8 1134. 2; 1140. 2; 1141. 3; 1147. 22; 1148. 7; 1149. 9; 1153. 24; 1158. 8; 1158. 14 1164. 3^ 1119. 20. H^l. 4. 7• 1109. 9, 13 HH• '• 5

( 1159. 19;

1153.

5•
1119. 23;
2.

^ €
<5/

// /

;

( -!/
6,

1165. 3• 1107. 3; 1114. 27; 22; 1125. 8; 1159.
;

1121.

1116. 6. 1121. 25 1130. 1 9. eymXeli/ 1133. II 1134. 12.
iyyparf>fiv
;

1124.
20.

5.

-,

emu 1129.
1119. 17•

e(?iOf

(
;

;

;

;
;

1116. 9• dbivai 1119.
;

(. (
,

;

;?

dies 1114. 14•

«VayyeAXfif 1116. 7

?

1146. introd. 1102. 1 6. 1165. 6.

1117.

9(?); 1126.

7•

^^''"^ou

1119.

( <• (
€6

13, 15; 1121. 16, 32; 1129. 116. 8. 19 1130. 30; 1133. 17 1134. 13 1160. 1 2. 1128. 8. 3; 1165. 1162. 9• ^'' ffoi 1119. 1 f ? 1153. 1 4. 3.
;
;

.

.

.

.

\

28; 1123. 17.
1119. 15. 1101. 23, 27; 1106. 8.

»7119. 8;

1124.

2;

1160. 17.

/ ^ ;;. €
;

1160.

4•

1101. 25 ; 1117. 9• 1134. 3 ; 1146. introd,

1134. 6; 1147. 3• See Index VIII. 1124. 1 5.
;

1117. 4- 1 6, 1150. 3 ; ; 1158. 15. eiVellOl. 7; 1165. II. 1101. 51 1117. 20 1124, 13; 1125. 4; 1126. II ; 1128. 2. 1125. 3• 20. 1146. 8, 1 9. 1133. 14, 1153. 26. 1101. 8; 1121. 2 1.

(
fa.

1119. 2

;

1119. 7• 1125. 1127. ;
;

5•

1105. 12. 1120. 1 4.

1100

1 8.

1102. 9

2

;

< 6
€<(
24.

;

6

;

1108. 13.
1119. 12
;

1151. 3•
;

1127.
;

8.

' ^

. ( 6^;^

1102. 7,14; 1117. 6 1119. 85 II 1156. 13; 1160. 22. 1130. 1127. 9• 1110. 6, 17 1120. 6; 1151. 1149. 7" 1103. 3• See Index IX (3). 1125. 4) 8.

1153.

.

«elvos 1106. 5 9, II.
(Keiae 1119. 7•

1119.10; 1121.6; 1165.

;

,

See Index VII
1117. 3
(?)•

29.

ducenarius 1114. 1150. 5•
1117. 2 2

1

5•

;

1157.
8, 12.
2

6, 7,

II

;

1161. 9

;

1164. 7; 1165.
1119.

.
1
,

1109.

II, 12,

6.

:124. /

1122. 8. 6; 1132. 7• 1101. II 1121, 1 5. 1153. 2 . 1134. 1 6, 1119. 28,

(
(?).

(3).

1126.

2

;

1129.

5; 1125. 8, 2; 1134. 6, 1142. 14; 1143. 1 ; 1153, 5; 1160.

;

XI.

GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK AND LATIN WORDS
1146. 4• 1140. 3.

(\\
i^atovpyiKos

(€(,

( 8€(
4( '
e

1100. 4• fXeyXfiv 1100. 15.
1121. 9; 1160. 1118. J.
1121.
2'J.

eXft)ill52. I.

.

1164. 1159. 14; 1164. e/ixTTOStof 1104. 15.

( (
5
iviavTOi

.

g,

,

14; 1165.

13.

(
€!^
17•
f'wav

( (8
/^/

1116.

6

.
;
;

303

1129.

See Illdex VIII. 1130. 1 2 ; 1163. 7
;

3-

1123. 23. 1120. 7•

1108. 13• 1104. 6, 21 1117. 7. 1 1. 1104. 4 1134. . 1105. 12. 1103. 3 1120. 8; 1123. 22. 1144. 3• enaydv 1121. 21. tnaynpfvai 1116, 3; 1132.
:

,

;

1121.

2 2,

2^.

1117. 2.

1102. 20.
1130. 1 5. 1100. 'J.
1 4.

1104.

5•

enavayKUCeiv 1119. 9; 1121. 24.

eVSfir 1117. 8.
iVSo/iei^e/a

€vayf
I

1102.
2,

5

;

1121.

1 9.

1131.

13; 1151. 42, 43; 1165.

.
2.

eveXiaaeiv 1153. 23. ^ufKev 1119. 26; 1156.

5; 1157. 4; 1164.

ivfxvpov 1126. 17. tvBa 1121. 17.
eV^aSe 1154. 10.

. /
,

1101.

See Index VIII.
;

fVtauaiW 1129. II.

( (
«/

1106.

6.

1102. 18; 1116. II

;

1128. 20.
; ;

\
'
;

1110. 7, II ; 1113. i. 14 1114. 24 1116. 15; 1119. 12; 1123. 16; 1125. 5, 7; 1128. 9; 1129. 7; 1130. 15, 21.

1105.

1 8.

€/(£127.

9, i8,

40; 1129.

11, 17.

fvopia 1101. 5.
eVoj^Xeii» 1100. 13; 1159. 12. ivTUyiovllSO. 19; 1136. I. 1119. 3, 25. 1119. 6 1181. 1 6. 1154. 3• ivrfidev 1134. II. etrev^tf 1101. 6. 1142. I, 1 8. f 1153. 2 0. 1128. 14.

4>

(
4
iVruy;^ai/eti/

;

i6va

1119. 1121. 5. 1102. 8 1119. 6, i8 1156. 10; 1159. 4. 1155. 13; 1161. 12. 1107. I ; 1157. 6. 1119. 1 6. 1120. 1165. 7• 1106. 2. 1126. 8; 1129. 15; 1130. 26; 1133. 15; 1134. 17. 1112. 4, 24; 1119. 1 7• 1165. 3) 4> 8, 1122. g. 1105. 2 . 1155. 3• 1126. 2 ; 1129. 6. 1103. 4 1117. 2. 1119. 21. 1101. 1107. 6 1114. 34 1115. 6; 1116. 1119. 2, 29; 1120. 1121. 7, 23, 31 1134. g 1163. 9. 4
;

;

.

'.

;

2

;

;

;

;

;

1121.

7•

1158. 24•

(^
(^

( (

1160.

I

9, 21.

67(«^

1151. 9• 1119. 5•
1118.

1112. 2, ig \ 1151. 52. 1127. 24; 1128. 26. 1157. 14» 6, 20.
5•

1127.

.

1101. 13

19; 1129. 13• 1130. 17• 1102. 24; 1150. 6. 1102. 12.
;

.

1109.

^•

1123. 20. 1119. 2 . 1154. 4•

See Iiidex VIII. 1106. 7•

( ( ( .
304

INDICES
II,

\\.

4•

1151. 2 8.

€\( ,

1119. 2 5• 1121. 21.

( (
(€\

1119.

7•

1104.
3,

6,

13; 1115. 3; 1119• 8;

22, 25•

1119.

22 1153. 24• See Inclex VIII.

1130. evriXna 1165. 2, 8. 1165. 4• eutheniarcha 1114. 8. See Index II. 1119. 2 1. 1108. 1164. 2.

.

(.
ei);(e/ja;i
;

1121. 5•

(
(
€Tf/Dos

1118. eVtrijofioy 1116.
fTTiTeXelv

.

6.

(
/
;

;


; 5

1103. 4

5

1121. 6.

1132. II. 1124. 17. eniTpeneii• 1164. 8. 1119. 5• See Index VIII. 1104, . em(j)epfivU15. 1 2; 1119. 3° 1133. 14. 1121. inixeipfiv 1106. 5 ] 1118- 18, 24

€.


;

(
8, II.
filia

1151. 38

( 6 ^

^

;

;

8.

1121. 24• 1133. 4) 1165. 12. 1116. 8. epyov 1100. 7 ; 1112• 9 ; 5• epe?i/ 1106. 3. 4; 1153. 15; 1165. 4• 1159. 6, 1158. 5, 1106. 2 1164. , 8 1165. 1 1. 23 1160. 1149. 3 ; 1155. 6 ; 1163. 4•

.

4•
;

^ 5
8,
filius

1104. 17; 1119. 24; 1142. 17; 1157. 28 1158. 3, 25; 1160. 28 1162. 131121. 1 8. 1106. 1100. 8, 8; 1104. 2 2 1107. 4 1113. i. 14; 1115. 5> 8, 8; 1116. 23; 1117. 1123. 28; 1120. 8, 13; 1119. 1130• 8, 26; 22; 1125. 2; 1127. 7 1131. 3. II 1133. 1134. 1 1 1137. 1149. 7; 1156. 1160. 8; 1161.
;

;

;

;

,
;

2

;

; ;

;

1136

introd.

;

1147.1.
7,

exemplum

1114. 14, 16.

& 1124.

1125. 15; 1144.
7-

4;

1159.

2.

6?

2

;

;

;

facere 1114. 7, 8, 12, 14. 1114. 9, II•

1114.

8.

1121 1 91163. 2.

t^i^lll7. 19; 1151. 25.

esse 1114. 13, 15•

-.
?l

See Index

IX

(3).

1105. 11; 1118. 9; 1119• 1 5) 2, 27; 1130. 2 2. 1119. 20. f• fii/ 1111. . II, 13; 1119. 24, 27•
1118. 5. 1131.

eros,

( ( (
'
e.

. ,
;

1105. 20 17, 21 ; 1127. 1129. 131130. 1100. 3•

1117. 21

;

8, 40;

1125. , 12, 1128. 15;

1148. 2 (?). 1106. 6 1118. 7 1119. 9, lo 1121. 16 1124. 13; 1125. 8; 1127. 25; 1130. 19; ovu 1130. 19. 1157. 25; 1165. 7, 12. 7/1102. 12. 1104. 13 1119. 1 7.
;
; ;

;

)5^
54

1151. 45•

3•

.
8
5,

;

1121. 27.

jjyf^oi/tKOy

1102. 25; 1119. 21. See Index VIII. 1162. II.
;

evepyer f7v 1117•

((

( ^ (

8•
2.

1148. 1155. 3• 1164. 4-

^
2 2.

1121. 2 5.

1119. 7

;

1155. 4

;

1114. 1119.

.

1\3.

12; 1153.

, 8;

1155.

7•

1114. 24; 1121. i2; 1145. 1100. 4 18; 1158. 4; 1161. 13. ;7/xeVepoy 1119. 9, 12, 1 5, 19, 21. 1142. 2. 1127. 27. 1153. 5.

^

.

(
{

XI.

GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK AND LATIN WORDS
1112.
I

305

6.

1119. 8 (?). 1129. lo; 1134.

6.

inserere 1114. 36. intestatus 1114. 13, 35. is 1114. 12, 15.
iVos

^

)

1145. 2 efsaep. 1144. 2. 1158. 4.
1121.
1 5•
1

1124. 18. 1102. 1 7,

1121. 26.
2 2.

1101.
2.

8.

1124. 2 . 1124. II ; 1125. 19; 1126. 13, 22; 1128. 24; 1130. 131121. 14.

1151. 53•
^fa 1117.

1160. 24.
1119.
2 7-

^«?

^ftoroTos 1134. 4, 5• 1119. 1 8, 21. ^fXeii» 1155. 2 ; 1156. 7 ; 1158. 15. 19; 1159. 1151. 45• ^eo'f. See Indices II and VII {a) i, (3). 1151. 41. 1123. 2. 1125. 7• 1102. II ; 1114. 25, 27; 1120. 2; 2. 1121. 13; 1129. 3; 1158. ^/*€)7 1143. 3• 1127. 24 ; 1128. 26. 1143. 3, 4. 6 ; 1144. 15.

€1125.

.

,

1124. 2 2. 1157. 3• 1157. 1 3, 26. 1119. 17; 1126. 141101. 7• 1101. 7 (?)•
1151. 14, 38. (?) 1141. 4• 1100. 1126. ;

1100.

15•

^

,

5•

hereditas 1114. 10, 15. hie 1114. 14.

hora 1114. 14•
1151. 2

, 2,
1125.
^/ saep.

Iduv 1157. 7• ratos 1116. 7;

8;

1117. 22. 1101. 6

1130. g. 1112. .

112.

12, 13,

22; 1138.5,8; 1153.

8.
1158. 13.
idus 1114. 37•
ifpfuf.

See Index VII ()

3.

Upov 1116. 10; 1143. 2, 5. 1114. 2o; 1116. 2 ; 1135. 2 ; 1144. 6. (Kafof 1121. 25. 1122. 1 4. immunis 1114. 1 5. 1101. 26; 1117. i8, 20; 1119. 13, 21; 1120. 9; 1121. 21 ; 1153. 25; 1154. 5;

€ ( ^
4(

1100. 8; 1142. 3• «^^ 1156. 8; 1158. 5. 1164. 2, 5, 7 J 1165. 5• 1158. 26. 1153. 13. 1124:. 6; 1125. 14; 1133. 1121, 9 ; 1138. . 1147. 5• 1105, 9• 1121. 4 1133. 4, 6. 1163. 2. 1101. 26; 1119. 12 KaraXeiVeti/ 1118. 12 1121. 18; 1165. 8. 1153. 25 (?)•


((

.

;

;

;

.

1155. 13; 1156. 13; 1158. 14; 1159.2; 1160. 13; 1165. II.

See Index

^ ^
6
;

1121, 1*]. 1110. 12. 1115. 1 9• 1112. 23. 1153. II. 1101. g. 1153. 1 6, 1 9• 1101. 23, 27. 1111. 14; 1119. KQTeneiyeiv 1141. 5•^ 1102. 19; 1118.8.

7•

1102. 1160.
1101. 24
i.

2

8,
;

.
1102.
2
;

2

;

1109. 5
1 1, ii.

;

lUO.
1115.

III.

nil.

3,

ii.

1113.

i.

2

;

.

.

3o6
19; 1117. 4, 17; 1119. 3; 1164.8, II.
9, 20,

INDICES
23; 1150.
1108. 1148. 1158. Index
2,
;

8,

.
8(

KeKtvvis 1115. II.

1128.

;

10, 12; 1117. 2, 1151. 23, 52 ; 1156. 1160. 1162. 4, 1 ;

6,
;

9, 17 1157.

5

;

2,

4•

Cf.

15; 1144. i6. See Index IX {a). Kfpariov. See Index IX (3). Kepjua 1157. 18; lieO. 16. 1105. i6 ; 1130.
13, 15•

III.

1108.
;

g.

Kvpios ('valid')

30
II,

;

1124. 20; 1126. 18; 1129. 15 ; 1130. 1128. 27
7.

1127.
7,

25

;

28; 1132.

1142. 8. 1121. 14KiVSui/os llie. 8 ; 1119. 10 1121. 5 2 ; 1125. 9; 1127. 12; 1130. 14. Kivflv 1121. 16, 18. 1153. 3. 1127. 25; 1128. 27.
;

1165.

1112. 3, 19. 1101. 12 ; 1165. 41106. 3, 4 ; 1111• i• 7

;

1113.
4,

i.

2,
;

ii.

5

;

;

1124.

1126. 5; 1128. 13; 1130. 8, 14; 1137. i; 1145. 4, 6.
1112. 2
1113.
i.

13

1134.

I

I.

!
(.

1102.

g.
(?).

1121. 1 3 ; 1135. 2 1126. 5. 1142. 1127. 9• jcXtV»; 1144. 6. Ki/t'Stoj/ 1158. 16. Koti/os 1105. 13; 1114. 27.

.

(
1125.

1161.

.

{?)

1119. 3°•

1101. 3; 1107. 4; 1117. 7, i2; 1156. 10; 1158. 8, 10, 16. 1103. 3 ; 1163. 9 1165. 2, 13, 14. Cf. Indices III and VI. 1109. 12. 1139. 2. 1139. 2. 1140. 2. eyuv 1101. 2 1102. 19; 1130. 8; 1142. 1165. 6. 9 legere 1106. g, 10.
;

{)

;

;

1100.

1

9.

Xeiroupyeii'

1151. 8. See Index VIII.

1119. 1119.

6, 1 3, 1 6.
7,

II, 12, l6, 24, 28.

1102.

2

;

1124. 7;

5;


^/
(?

!
3
;

1153. 3, 13. 7• 1141. 4• 1128. 24. 1143. I

1102. 6. 1153. 4. 1134.
1126.
8.

. .

libertus 1114. 35•

1160. 23. 1120. 1 3 1146. introd. 1102. 6; 1110. 7; 1113.
;

i.

13» "•

^ /

1115. 12

;

1117. 4

;

1119•

4, 8, 9, 15,

'

17, 26, 27.

. ?
1112.

),)

1126. 8, 9• 1105. 1147. II. See Index VIII.

1102. 7, 1 6. 1102. 14; 1119.
1117.
1

1

8,

2
;

;

1164.

1 1.

1108. 6. 1121. 1119. 2 1 1118. 1 2 1104. 21 1138. 2 ; 1134. 6; 1133. 9, tStos . 1141. 4; 1151. 24; 1153. 2.
;

;

;

,

;

;

9.

.
8, 19.

KTfVLov

1142. 7. 1137. 2 1147. 12, 22 1165. 9• Kw«( )(?)1112. 24. Kvpttveiv 1118. 9 1123. 19 ; 1124. 6; 1125.
;

1147.

1131. 12.
1111• 1101. 17 1165. 3• 1165. 12. /f 1130. 2 . 1153. 2.
;

i.

II.

;

14.
('

(title)

guardian ') 1111. i. 2 1123. 6. 1103. 3 1104. 9 1107.
; ; ;

1

;

XL

GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK AND LATIN WORDS
1151.
2'].

1165.
11,

7; ;

1100. 7 1107. 4 14 ; 1158. 22.

1119. 28

;

1157.

.

307

1113.

.

6.

See Index 1109. 6.
1119.

VI (a).

9•

1164. 5, 6, II. 1114. 23 ; 1120. II 1114. 2 3• 1162. 14 (?) 114. 7. mater 1114. 12. peyaXflov 1103. 8. 1130. 6. 1163. 4, 5> 1164.
;

;

1121. 8, 23-

/^/
2, 13.

(7(

^

1108.
1117. 2
;

2,

3>

7

J

1163.

3>

9

J

.

1147. 4• 1153. 14 (?)• 1151. 2. 1124. 3, 8, 8, 22; 1125. 2 et saep.; 1126. 2; 1127. I, 14, 17. 37; 1128. , 1129. 6, 6. 17, 1124. 7> 2; 1125. 6; 1126. 1128. 27; 1129. 5• 1127. 13,

8;

8;

3;

See Index
1160. 26,
1117. 9• 1121. 25. 1119.

IX
2 7-

(b).

1164. 14.
1142. 6
;

1115. 3(?).

1147.

;

1149.

\(

( .
(8

;

1155. 91134. 9• 1147. 4•

See Index VIII. 1155. 5•

6; 1125. 3 1136. 5; 1138. 1103. 7 ; 1119. 17 1165. 3• 1115. 14, 15^ 1129. 12.
;

g.

;

( (\ ^
€ .
meus
/ie;^pi

(\(

1114. 24; 1119. 6, 13; 1121. 22; 1153. 2 7 ; 1156. 1158. 2 2 ; 1160. 15. ; 1160. 1 8. 1102. 21 ; 1105. 8, 19; 1111. i. 7; 1112. 22 ; 1125. 14, 21. 1113. . 2, . 1111. i. 6. 5 ; 1145. 3• 1153. 8. 1118. 2 ; 1153. 6. 1123. 1117. 3 ; 1126. 1 1 1125. 1 6. 1125. 21. 1143. 7•

.

.

»'eOslll9. 14;

(().

1117. 9> 1121.

.

9• IX ().
5, 8.

( . (
(('
21
;

1147.

1115.

9• 3•

1153. 7• 1103. 5•

{(.)

1127. 4 1129. 1116. 1 2 1124. 11; 1161. 4(?)•
;

;

6.

1101. 24. 1110. 5•

1100.

8, 1 8.
I'J.

1131.

See Index
1
1

IX

(b).

1119. 1119.

8.
6, 24.

See Index

1114. 9• 1132. 14; 1159.

, !

1100. (?); 1102. 8; 1104. 15; 1107. 2; 1110. 2 2. 1119. 25; 1124. 1125. 5, 7; 1129. 1137. 7; 1130. 15; 1131. 15; 1132. 14 4; 1144.8. 1164. 5•

.
WI/

1100.9; 1101. 12; 1102. 13; 1119.
1121. 13-

See Index VI (),
13, 3^• 1161. 8, 14• 1121.

nonae 1114.

;

.
4•

;

1150.

1139.

2.

1109. 2, 8, 14, 6; 1111. . , g, . 12, 14; 1114. 27; 1121. 3» 9^ 17; 1123. 1145. 2; 1, 4, 7; 1128. 3; 1132, 3, 5 1154. 12; 1159. 30.
;

,

1121. 9; 1151. 2 6. notare 1114. 37• 1124. 2 ; 1126. 7•

1165. 6. 1102. 13; 1104. 6; 1118. 5 1119. 1123. g; 1130. 8; 1132. 14; 1133. 4; 1148. 6. «/uci 1110. 15; 1119. 11.
; ;

3o8

INDICES
1154. 1142. 4• 1142. 7• 1142. 2.
1117.

.
.

1154.

7•

1133.

7•

1104.

14
;

;

1118.
g.

51

IH^•

20,

27;

^/

1161. 4 1101.

22

1158.

l\4i2. II.

|/ '

oSelll4. 23; 1130. 20; U33. 14 ; 1153. 24• 1119. II, 1146. "J. 1146. 5• 1121. 1 8. 24; 1110. 1101. 23, 27. 1105. 8, 19 1110. 3. 8, 9 ; UH• • 5> 4; 1120. 15; 1121. 17; 1127. 7; 1128. 13; 1129. g. 1134. 4,

.
'!
.

1124. 151127. 9• 1144. 15•

!
IX
((5).

1103. 1163. 5•
1119.

7•

See Index

-

.
oXt'yoi

,

;

;

.

otKoyev^r 1110.

1

6.

1107. 5• 1123. 2 2. oTkos 1152. 5 1153. 19; 1158. 4• 1130. 9• fi-So^or o?<c. 1131. 2, 13.
;

^^

««^'

1141.
oivos 1131. 5
;

2.
;

1139. introd. 1131. I.

1141.

6, 8.

28; 1125. 6; 1126. 13; 1129. 1134. 71119. 8. 1107. 3; 1158. 15. 1101. 12; 1103. 6; 1107. 4) 1142. 1151. 51 1153. 6; 1154. 1155. 3 12 1157. 24 1158. 22 1159. 5> 7. ^7 1160. 1164. 8, 9, 19' 24 ; 1161. ovbf yap 1101. 19• 1102. II 1118. 13; 1133. 1134. II. 1101. 14. ^.'1119. 8; 1130. 19; 1156. 7, 2; 1157. 1158. 6 et saep.; 1165. 11. 6, 8, 21 ov-nov 1153. 26 (?). 1102. g. ovTf 1133. II ; 1134. 12. 1102. 6; 1117. 6, 17, 22; 1147. 2. 1118. 5 1125. 1 5 1165. 8. 1154. 4• 1159. 3•

12;

,
;

;

;

,

;

;

;

,2 ,

;

.
5

;

;

/

;

;

1126. 9• 1101. 3; 1121. 5' 12, 19; 1156. 5; 1164. 4. oXkj; 1142. 4, 5• 1158. 3• 1117. II 1158. 4 1165. 8. 1106. 6. o/iweii/ 1110. 20 ; 1113. . 8.

/ 1163.

8(

introd.,

;

1165.

.

1165. 2. naibiov 1159. 29•
1111.

?

.
;

13.

;

1

1159• 25. 1121. 14 1106. 2

;

1184. 6

;

1165.

.
7•

1111.

i.

8.

6\(

1110. 13, 17 12; 1112. 17; 1141. 7• 1122. 8 ; 1123. 8 ; 1125.
12,

1109.

6;

;

1111•

! /
6, 8.

8; 1129. 15; 1130. 7, 26; 1133. 8, 15; 1134. 6, 17. 1126. 3• 1140. 2. 1102. 23; 1135. 2 ; 1151.
4•
7,

1126. 1132. 6;
2
;

5;

€ / .8
'•

; €1109. .
;

1110. 6 1134. 6 1161. 8,

(?).

1151. 35•

1164.
;

2.

1153.

8{(

;
;

1162.

1100.

1125. II.
;

1100. 20 (?) 1115. II 25; 1128. 23; 1129. 14.
1117. 12.

1127. 21,

115.

II.
;

-1 1142.
1141.

1102. 8; 1117. 13
1101. 2 0, 1101. 2 2. 11G3. 5•

1127. 23.

1129.

; 3•

1158.

7•

apaoy

;

XI.

GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK AND LATIN WORDS
1117. 2 2
;

1122.

I

.

1106.

p.

1119. 1119. 8,

.

. ,

1

8.

5•

1133. 12, 1101. 1163. 6 1164. 10. 1163. 6. 1164. 4• 1165. 7) 9• tv 1106. 4• Trapeyyvai/ 1101. 1 5, 25; 1106.6. 1102. 5 1119• 23 ] 1129. 8. 1133. 9• 1134. 15• 1134. 4• 1116. 9; 1121. 14, 25; 1123. 14;
IV

€(

;

;

( (
,/
7(9€121.

;? ! (( (€

309

1146.

5•
1 6.
;

1119. 6. 1127. 8, 15, 22, 37• pibiov 11.3. 6, 7 J 1144. 12.
1111.

1100. 1100. 4

.

8.

1131. 6; 1160. II.
8.

1134.

1 8 ; 1150. 6. 1121. 19; 1155. 2; 1164.

1131.

1 2.

^ ( /
5
1119.
;

1106.

7•

;

1119. 1 8. 1119. 15 ; 1137.
;

2, 3;

,

'^' 1110. .
1153. 1151.

1103. 6, 7 6; 1137. . 1165. 9•

1107. 3

1133. 8

;

1134.

1131. II.

.
;

1102. l8j 1106. 1113. . 7•

8.

1161.

7•

"'''•

1151. 6.

1 6.

1121. 36.

1100. 5•

. /
7?

! ^
^
;

6; 1120. 19; 1123. 13, 6, 1125. 9. 9; 1126. 6; 1124. 20 1130. 1127. 12, 3; 1128. 25; 1129. 14, 7> 24 ; 1133. 14; 1151. 14 et saep.; 1154. 3; 1155. 10; 1158. 3; 1159. 33; 1160. 3. 6, 15; 1161. 5, 16; 1163. 3, 9 1164. 10, 14; 1165. 13, 14• 1158. 5(?)• See Index VII {a) 3• 1120. I 1121. 7• 1156. 9• 1142. 3 "• 6; 1119. 28; 1109. 14; HH• • 1148. 6; 1154. 2; 1122. 7; 1123. 1160. . 1134. 2. 1164. 2, 13. 1123. 21
21
;

,

;

. €

1101. 2 2 ; 1104. 14 ; 1106. 8 ; 1117. 5 1119. 27 ; 1121. 23, 26 ; 1130. 2 1 ; 1156. 14; 1158. 6; 1164. g ; 1165. 7. 9. H• 1117. 2 3•

See Index VII ().

;

;

1119. 21, 23. 1146. 1 7• 1119. 7• 1157. 28 ; 1158. 1153. 1 6. 1121. 20. 1143. 2.

.

1104.
2,

7, ^3•

25

;

1160.

2,

3•

',

;

>

1123. 21. 1153. 2 6. 1153. 4• 1102. II. possessio 1114. 10.

J

1119. 21. 1117. 8; 1119. 1102. 1156. 5• 1121.

;

9, 1 2, 15.

.

1126. 4• 1101. 19 1153. 6, 1 9, 21 ; 1155. 2; 1156. 1157. 3; 1158. 13, 6, 17, 24; 1159. 21 1160. 9 ^^ "f^^/•

{).
5•

. .
(

1107. 4, 5• 1165. 1134. 3 1155. 6 1130. 6. See Index VIII.
J

;

4.

1116.

2.

See Index VIII. 1124. 8; 1127. 28; 1130. 24.
1156.
6.
J

2;
7,

1106. 5 1146. 7•
1117. 24. 1121.

1124. 3

;

1155.

8.

(\(

1108.
1119.
7•

.

3IO
1151. 39.

INDICES
1102.
1

6, 2 2.

(

.

(adj.)
(title).

1109.

2

;

See Indices VII
3.

1117. introd. [b), VIII.

1147. 21. 1110. 19 ; 1111• • 9) 6; 1113. . 8, . 6; 1130.

>
7,

"•

6

>

1112.

28.

1108.

pridie 1114. 13, 36, 37.

1133- 5.

1061. 14.

€(
€(,
1 2,

1100. 2, 4, 23• 1100. 12; 1119. II. 1164. 4•

'// 6; 76130. 8;
7•

1101. 1151. 1101.

8.

1155. 12. 1153. 1 2.

1119. 9? 12. 1125. 3• 1104. 8. proximus 1114. 13 (•'')• irpvTama 1104. 1 7, 2 2.

procuratio 1114.

1102.

.
;

6,

profiteer 1114. 9• 1117.
8, 20.

. ,
1104. 9• 1106.
6.

See Index VIII.

2

1130.
2

2,

22

;

1132.

• ^ 8 ^
1102.

(.?)

.

114.
;

.
;
;

(05 1151. 35•

/^/^ 1102.
05
q.

1134. 3. 1101. 3 J 1125. 21. 1165. 1 1.
II.


1144.

1119. 15.

1114. 32 1121. 8 1124. 1115. 7 22; 1127. 4°; 1129. 6, 17; 1130. 1131. 8; 1133. 17; 1137. 4• 26, 29

1124. II
1133.

;

1125.

;

8;

1145.

6,

2 e/ saep.
3•

;

1151. 4•

TrpoTOijnjs

,

1134. 8; 1147. 17, 19• 1144. 3» 5> 9• 1104. 1 5 1115. 8. 1162. 12.
',

.

f.

1114.

1 3•

que 1114.

15.

qui 1114. 13, 14•
res 1114. 14.

qui et 1114. 8, 10, 11.

1109.

6, g.
1 6,

1112.

25•

^/
;

1158. 4• 1121. 8. 1105. 1102. 9 1119. 8, 19 1156. TrpoafVKaipHvYWQ. 12. 1100. 15; 1101. 20, 23; 1102. 21 1119. 23, 24, 27.

;
1 5,

5

;

3•

. ,
;

1151. 36.

• 5 €

8,

See Index VIII. 1142. 1 6. 1105. 2 2 1140. 4 1148. 1153. 28; 1155. 4• 1100. 5• 1104. 17 > 1119.24; 1142. 6; 1157.28; 1158.25;

((
;

;

-

1101.

9•

U60. 28; U62.
1152. 2. 1153. 4• 1102. II. scribas 1106. 10.
scribere 1114. 37•

13.

1164.
1\Q4,.

2.

[\(

14; 1165. 12, 1 3. 1103. 8. 1102. 17-19 j 1147. 2 2. 1118. 6; 1127. 2 6. 1126. 4> 8 ; 1134. 7• 1150. . 1101. 9•

1119.

6.

1154.

5.

1100.

9•

1113. . 5• secundum 1114. 14, 35•

1119. 28. 1119. 4> 24. 1153• 23. 1112. 8; 1115. 19.

/

1146. 6. seu 1114. 10. 1112. 3> 1153. 9•

1

1

;

1

.

XL

GENERAL LNDEX OF GREEK AND LATIN WORDS
;

311

8 5 ^!/ :

^ (( .
ovXXeyetj/

1136. 7 1139. 3) 1141. 8, 1120. 1 9atWtoi/ 1130. 12, 29, 31. 1156. 5• 1158. 1 1. 1147. 8, 8; 1159. 1 1. 1102. 5• 1108. 4• 1158. 1121. 26 1131. 3, 1 ; 1134. 1 6 1163. 1165. 6. 1165. 13. 1143. 4• 1126. * 1126. 1164. II. 1147. 5• 1130. 3• 1117. 5• 1142. 'J. 1136. 4> 5• 1137. 5• 1119. 12. 1144. . 1103. 5 J 1154. II. See Index VIII. 1101. 1 3, 18 ; 1115. 1 3. 1106. 7• 1142. 6. 1144. 1 1142. 5• subicere 1114. 14. 1105. 3• 1102. 4• 1105. 3• 1107. 2.

€5

.

//»

(
8.

1162. 8. 1130. 22. 1159. 1 5, 2 . 1104. 24. 1153. 23. 1105. . 1149. 3•
1117. 7• 1118.
; 1159. 1122. 9• 1163. 2.

'

.

7•

;

.

(
»
/

supra 1114. 37•
1116. 5> 21.
.

1100. II.
1114. 24•

SUUS 1114. 13.

1158. 7• 1126. 7• 1165. 14• 1110. 12; 1161.
1161.
2.

6.

.;
8{?)
1139.
3•

tabular! US 1114. 35• 1158. 12.

|1100.

.

See Index IX (<5). 1103. 7• 1104. 24; 1120. 5• 1146. 6. 1109. 7• 1105. 21 ; 1125. 8; 1159. 1 6. 1153. 9• 1101. 5; 1119. 1124. 8; 1127. 28; 1130. 24; 1133.13; 1157. 1162.

[.^

;

;

.

Tewoi/ 1121. II.

1121.

6.

1129. II ; 1130. 22, 1123. 5•

//
1148.

1164. 3• 1160. 1 6. 1162. 1160. 4•
1119.

reXewTac 1111.
2.

.

II, 13.

1128. 20.
tertius 1114. 14.

(

.
J

1128. 14 1149. 4•

1129. 10; 1159. 26.

1121.
5-

5•
g
;

1115.

1126.
9•

1 1

;

1131.

1

7

;

(
(
1160.

testatio 1114. 14, 16.

1151. 37•

1102. 9• 1163. 2. 1124. 1142. 1
1117. 12.
1

1
.

2

1103. 6 ; 1148. 1122.

.

6.

1151. 12,

3•

;

;

312
1112. 15, 25
;
;

INDICES
vnayopeieiv 1102. 5• 1122. II.

( ((
1120. 1154.
8,

1106. 4, 9; 1120. 15. 1106. 7• To'juoy 1112. 1,17• See Index VI (a). ToVoi 1100. 4; nil. ii. 18; 1127. 5, 15. 22 11 OQ -,^ 39; 1128. 23; 1129. 10, 17; 1134 1145. 3; 1154. 9. eTTt TOTTcoi' 1101. »-20 /cara 1117. 13; 1120. 2. 1101. 9 1162. 2. 1165. 3.
.

.

. ^ / 3
1101.
1

1124. 13; 1131. 5 1133. ; 1139. introd. ; 1144. 19 ; 1147. 8, 18 1156. 8. 1164. 3• 1106. 8. 1121. 1 6, 1119. 2 2 1160, 26. ; 1117. . relat. 1155. 13.
;

:

2

,.
€€

1105. 5 J 1110. 9 HU• • 6, ii. 5 1119. 17; 1124. 19; 1126. 3, 16; 1127. 6, 29; 1128. 12; 1130. 24; 1134. 15.
5

See Index

III.

6.

1100.
5•

9, 12,

8

1151. 55• 1151. 54•

;

1106. 7

;

1121.

9;

1165.

8

;

33; 1132. 4•
1119. 8.

.

1118. 6; 1125.6; 1130. 23, "• 1125. 4j 9• 1132. 4•

1128. 21. 1125. 8. 1127. 5> 3^•

.

1134

7,

4•

1119. 21.

77;€/

1100. 14 (^ 1121. See Index VIII.
6.

.

TOTe 1119. 4, 6, 9. 1158. 1 8.

.
1117.

1101. 25 ; 1163. 1134. 7» 3• 1105. 3• 1146. 21.

,

1100. 6. 1124. 5• 1107. 3•

4;
8.

1118. 4 1160. 17, 20. See Index VIII.
>'

1100.

1115.

8.

1132. 12, 1 7. . 1146. 1 7, 1 8. 1109. 6, 9• 1105. g. 1151. 37•

1117.

1 3.

1142. (?). 1102. 14.
1117. 6.

1114. 24. 1112. 25. 1101. 3 1164.
',

.
2;

,

1119. 23, 26. 1105. 6, 14 ; 1118.

8.

111Q
1102. 1119.

.

II.

.
8.

1118. 12.

1 5 ; 1101. 1121. 5• 115^. 1159. 24. 1101. 7, II, 21, 24; 1110. 21.

1107. . 1146. 6. 1100.

1119. II, 28. uxor 1114. 12.

vicesima 1114. 15.
1118. 3 ; 1120. 9 ; 1123. 2. 1143. 7• 1101. II. 1121. 32.

6.
5•

-, '

vyiaiveiv

1110. 21.

14; 1111. . 2, 14; 1114. 20, 21 ; 1126. 19, 1129. 5; 1130. 4, 5, ; 1146. 1 1 1148. 3 ; 26, 3; 1134. 3, 5 1151. 5. 23 1153. 2 1161. 3• 1163. 5; 1164. , 13; 1165. 2, 6. 1119. 24; 1161. 14•

1109.

2

1100. 3
;

;

1119.

3•
;

;

;

;

;

1157. 3• 1148. 9 1159. 23 IV 1151. . 1103. 6. 1102. 7•

1164.

,

6, 7-

1

XL

GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK AND LATIN WORDS
17;
1 6.

313

( •

1104. 5, 1158. 20. 1153.

1109. 4 1155. I

1155. 10; 1165. 14.

-

.
»;

1151. 55• 1115. 12.

See Index IX (a), 1107. 3 1156. 1 Xpeia 1116. 17; 1130. 9; 1156.
;

1107. I, 3; 1117. 15; 1126. 1127. 1153. 9• 1105. 1100. 3 ; 1119. 23•

.

, 13;

.

.
27.

1130 XJ.UV7.

1.

11; 1160,

1130.

1

8

;

I,

1133. 19. 5; 1131.

4.

1163.

5.

1113.

^1130.

.
;

2; 1114. 23,
;

2 6.

8((

1141.

3•

1151. 33* 1121. 20.

1119. 2. 1116. 20. (magic) 1152.

27; 1158. 2. 1100. 22 1127. 14 1153. 27. W05. II 1129. 1 1. XpoiOsll05. 17; 1119. 15; 1121. 36; 1123. 18; 1127.21; 1128.7,22; 1130 23; 1157. 29; 1158. 25; 1164. 3•
8,
;
.

.
1122. 8 1133. 7 1153. 2

1117.

.
g.

1100. 20.
1105. 2 ; 1119. 15. 22] 1123. 8; 1130. 6; 1132. 6 1141. 2 1134. 5 ; 1140. ; 1154. 2 ; 1155. 2 ; 1156. 1160. 2 ; 1162. 51142. 1 3• 1158. 23. 1105. 21. 1162. 5• 1142. 12.

.

1133.

1117. 8.

See Index VII {b). 1117. 12 1146. 13.
;

1112. 6, 9, llj 22.

U57.

2

1100. 17; 1134. 8. 1102. 15; 1115. 13; 1165.
1141.
6.

6.

1124.

6;
6.

1128.

2

;

1130. 19, 27.

•^ 1161.
6.

€,

(

1108.

8.
;

1130. g 1132. 1 6.

1146. 14,

S)Scll60. 14. 1114. 24• (magic) 1152.
1121. 12.

.

1120. 12.

XII.

INDEX OF PASSAGES DISCUSSED.
{a}

Authors.

314

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