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Tartu In Your Pocket

Tartu In Your Pocket

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The only guide you'll ever need for the marvelous town of Tartu, Estonia.
The only guide you'll ever need for the marvelous town of Tartu, Estonia.

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Published by: In Your Pocket City Guides on Jun 10, 2009
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

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02/12/2014

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N°18 - €1.60
www.inyourpocket.com
Hotls Rstaurats Cafés nightlif Sightsig evts Maps
TARTU
Tartu uncovered
Keeping visitors informed for over 8 years!
 what‘s on?
All the events you can possibly handle.
 witr 2013/Sprig 2014  witr 2013/Sprig 2014
 
Foreword 
4
A quick word from the IYP team
Arriving in Tartu 
5
Find your way to the ‘City of Good Thoughts’
The Basics 
6
Helpful hints to get you started
History 
7
A chronicle of the Baltics’ oldest city 
Culture & Events 
8
The best of everything that’s happening 
Where to stay 
11
A bed for every budget 
Dining & Nightlife
17Where to eat
A multitude of fabulous restaurants and cafés
Nightlife
 
23
Party until dawn
Contents
Sightseeing 
27
Put on your boots and grab your camera
Around Tartu 
32
Sights beyond the city limits
Interactive Tartu 
33
Take action
Shopping 
34
The ultimate in retail therapy 
Directory 
38
Banks, internet cafés and other necessaries
Getting around 
39
Navigating Tartu and travelling onward
Maps
Street index 40City centre map 41General city map 42
3
CONTENTS
ESSENTIAL CITY GUIDES
Winter 2013/Spring 2014
tartu.inyourpocket.com
 
4
FOREWORD
Tartu
 In Your Pockettartu.inyourpocket.com
5
Tartu Visitor Centre
 B-2, Raeko-da (Town Hall), tel. (+372) 744 21 11, info@visittartu.com, www.visit-tartu.com, www.tartu.ee.
 Located in the beautiful, old Town Hall, the Tartu Visitors’ Centre is a full-service affair. They provide travel tips on all of Estonia, but of particular interest is the wealth of information available for Southern Estonia. Here they’ll arrange for tour guides, book accommodation, hold onto your luggage and even sell you some cool Tartu trinkets. There are three internet terminals, free for tourists, a coffee machine and exhibitions on the city of Tartu in an adjoining room.
Q
Open 09:00 - 17:00, Mon 09:00 - 18:00, Sat, Sun 10:00 - 14:00.
Tourist information
 
5
ARRIVING
Winter 2013/Spring 2014
tartu.inyourpocket.com
It’s now 21 years since we published the first
In Your Pocket
 guide - to
Vilnius
 in Lithuania - in which time we have grown to become the largest publisher of locally produced city guides in Europe. We now cover more than
75
 cities across the continent (with
Batumi
, in
Georgia
, the latest city to be
pocketed 
) and the number of concise, witty, well-written and downright indispensable
In Your Pocket
guides published each year is approaching
five million
. We also publish an
iPhone app
, including more than 40 guides, which can be downloaded for free from the
AppStore 
. Search for ‘IYP Guides’ by name.To keep up to date with all that’s new at
In Your Pocket
,
like
us on
Facebook
 (facebook.com/ inyourpocket) or follow us on
Twitter
 (twitter.com/inyourpocket).
Europe In Your Pocket
CzechRepublicPolandRomaniaSerbiaBosnia
Kosovo
AlbaniaGreece
FYR Macedonia
BulgariaMontenegroItalyCroatiaSloveniaAustriaSwitzerlandUkraineGeorgiaBelarusLithuaniaLatviaEstoniaRussiaGermanyBelgiumNetherlandsNorthernIrelandIreland
These three godesses are among several that are currently gracing the elegant Tasku shopping centre (see page 37). The colourful tapestry of Greek-inspired lovelies certainly adds a nice splash of colour to Tartu during the colder months. Photographed by Priit Ladva for Tasku Center.
Cover story
Tartu is the second largest city in Estonia, but the largest in terms of student population. This is all thanks to a Swedish king named Gustavus Adolphus, who back in 1632 made a decree that there should be a university built here. Why would a Swedish king make such a proclamation? Well, you see back in those days, Tartu, which was called Dorpat, belonged to the Swedish Empire and a very fine gentleman by the name of Johann Skytte convinced the king he should do so. In the 1600’s there were very few institutions of higher learning in Northern Europe, so the founding of a University in Tartu was a pretty big deal.Even if you were never much into school or didn’t go to university, Tartu has something for everyone, loads of fun can be had here and there are plenty of other things to see and do in Tartu that don’t involve test tubes or long division. We’ve got quite a great list of events starting on page 8 and now more than ever before, ‘The City of Good Thoughts’ has something to offer the whole family. High-end shopping, a science centre and a fantastic water-park are  just a few attractions that one can enjoy here. Most of all though it’s the youthful spirit of this town that keeps people coming back for more. For over 8 years now we’ve also been coming back for more and we’re excited to continue to provide the most complete and up-to-date information on this great city.
Publisher
Linnajuht OÜ, Vana-Viru 4, 10111 Tallinn, Estonia
Company Office & Accounts
General Manager
Küllike Johannson-Singer 
Accountant
Marian Puusepp tel./fax +372 644 64 70 tartu@inyourpocket.com, www.inyourpocket.com
Editorial
Editor In Chief
Nat A. Singer 
Contributor
Steve Roman
Researcher
Irja Luks
Layout & Design
 Küllike Johannson-Singer 
Photography
Küllike Johannson-Singer, Nat A. Singer 
Cover Photo
Priit Ladva ©
 
2013
Sales & Circulation
Sales & Circulation
Marek Pärn
Advertising Sales
Marek Pärn, Irja Luks
Copyright notice
Text and photos copyright OÜ Linnajuht 1997-2014. Maps copyright cartographer. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form, except brief extracts  for the purpose of review, without written permission from the publisher and copyright owner. The brand name In Your Pocket is used under license from UAB In Your Pocket (Bernardinu g. 9-4, LT-01124, Vilnius, Lithuania, tel. (+370-5) 212 29 76).
Publication details
Printed
 by Reusner, Tallinn
Published
8,000 copies, twice per year ISSN 1406-2690 © OÜ Linnajuht 
ESSENTIAL CITY GUIDES
Even if Tartu is your final destination, it’s likely that your  first stop in the Baltics will be Tallinn or Riga. Pick up the appropriate
In Your Pocket
 guide to learn the intricacies of arriving in those cities.
By bus
For anyone without a car, the bus is by far the most con-venient way to get from Tallinn to Tartu. Each day more than 30 express buses make the 2.5-hour trip from the capital, departing from Tallinn’s bus station
bussijaam
) at Lastekodu 46. The ride costs about €8 - 10.80. See www.tpilet.ee for a complete schedule. Buses arrive at Tartu’s bus station at Turu 2, C-2.
Left luggage
 (p
akihoid 
), open 24hrs and is located in the bus station itself, costs start  from €2 day, depending on the size of the bag. The
ATM
 is in the main waiting hall, near the door to the platforms, and the WC is next to platform 4.
Getting to town
Taxis are usually standing out front, but you’re only a 5-minute walk from the heart of Tartu. Follow the buses leaving the station until you hit the first large street, then turn right. After 1.5 blocks you’ll be at the corner of Turu and Riia. Cross to the left, so you are going uphill on Riia. At the first big crossing, follow the crowds turning right to cross over Riia, then keep going straight. You’ll be at Town Hall Square in no time.
By train
Compared to the buses, trains offer a more comfortable way to reach Tartu at roughly the same price. They are, however, relatively scarce, with only 3 - 5 departures  from Tallinn’s Balti Jaam train station each day. Rides take about two or three hours, depending on the train. On express trains you can spend an extra couple euros  for first-class ticket (book early on weekends), which gives you nice seats, coffee and a WiFi connection. Edelaraudtee (www.edel.ee) has the schedules and ticket purchase options.
NB!
As of January 1st 2014 the trains to Tartu will be operated by Elron and the old trains will be replaced with modern ones. Schedules and prices have yet to be confirmed, please see www.elron.ee for details.
Getting to town
 Tartu’s train station, located at Vaksali 6, is about 1.5km from the centre, so walking isn’t out of the question. A taxi should only cost about €4-5. Buses No 7 and 20 will also get you there. 
By car 
Driving from Tallinn is fairly simple. Just head out of town on Tartu mnt. and once you get past the airport, it’s a straight shot all the way down. Once you reach Tartu, there are a couple of twists and turns you’ll have to make to get into the centre, so we recommend you glance at a map and pay attention to the signs before arriving.Please note that there are occasionally insane drivers on the Tallinn-Tartu highway whose need to never have anyone drive in front of them outweighs that of public safety. They can usually be identified by a newer model BMW, Mercedes or expensive SUV. Use caution when they try to pass you or when they come straight at you in your own lane. Due in part to these self-proclaimed, race-car-drivers - there are automated speed cameras in place at various sections of the Tartu-Tallinn highway. There is usually a warning ahead of time, however - try to stick to the posted speed limits to avoid  future driving difficulties the next time you pay Estonia a visit.Those driving from Latvia should be aware that, though there are no checks at the Schengen border, border guards sometimes stop vehicles a few kilometres into Estonia to check documents.
By plane
Unless you own or have rented a private jet, prop plane or helicopter, your only current flight options to Tartu will be via Flybe through Helsinki. Those flights serve Tartu’s small airport five times per week. For a list of scheduled flights, visit www.tartu-airport.ee.
Getting to town
 is a breeze, at least, thanks to the conve-nient Airport Shuttle, which takes you right to your hotel. A one-way ticket costs €4 and can be bought from the driver with card or cash. A cheaper alternative is the 912 bus, which leaves about 20 times per day. The 30-minute ride costs €1. You can also make the 11km journey by taxi, which will set you back around €10. 
If you’re arriving via the Tallinn Airport
and transferring to Tartu by bus, you can hop on the Sebe Täistunni Ekspress bus (www.sebe.ee) that will take you directly from the capital’s airport to downtown Tartu. Buses leave every hour.

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