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Buod ng Nobela

Mga tauhan

Buod ng Bawat Kabanata:

1: Isang Pagtitipon

2: Si Crisostomo Ibarra

3: Ang Hapunan

4: Erehe at Pilibustero

5: Pangarap sa Gabing Madilim

6: Si Kapitan Tiyago

7: Suyuan sa Isang Asotea

8: Mga Alaala

9: Mga Bagay-bagay sa Paligid

10: Ang Bayan ng San Diego

11: Mga Hari-harian

12: Todos Los Santos (Araw ng mga Patay)

13: Mga Babala ng Bagyo

14: Si Tasyo: Pilosopo o Baliw?

15: Ang mga Sakristan

16: Si Sisa

17: Si Basilio

18: Mga Kaluluwang Naghihirap

19: Mga Kapalaran ng Isang Guro

20: Ang Pulong sa Tribunal

21: Kwento ng Isang Ina

22: Mga Liwanag at mga Anino

23: Ang Pangingisda

24: Sa Gubat

KnK: Elias at Salome

25: Sa Bahay ng Pilosopo

26: Bisperas ng Pista

27: Sa Takipsilim

28: Mga Liham

29: Kinaumagahan

30: Sa Loob ng Simbahan

31: Ang Sermon

32: Ang Kabriya

33: Malayang Pag-iisip

34: Ang Tanghalian

35: Usap-usapan

36: Unang Ulap

37: Ang Kaniyang Kataas-taasan

38: Ang Prusisyon

39: Si Donya Consolacion

40: Karapatan at Kapangyarihan

41: Dalawang Panauhin

42: Ang Mag-asawang de Espadaa

43: Mga Balak

44: Pagsusuri ng Budhi

45: Mga Inuusig

46: Ang Sabungan sa San Diego

47: Ang Dalawang Senyora

48: Hiwaga

49: Tinig ng mga Inuusig

50: Ugat ni Elias

51: Mga Palitan at Pagbabago

52: Baraha ng mga Patay at ang mga Anino

53: Ang Mabuting Araw Ay Nakikilala sa Umaga

54: (Pagbubunyag)

55: Malaking Sakuna

56: Sabi-sabi at Kuro-kuro

57: Vae Victis! (Ay, ang mga Natalo!)

58: Isinumpa

59: Pambayan at mga Pansariling Kapakanan

60: Ikakasal Si Maria Clara

61: Pagtakas Hanggang Lawa

62: Nagpaliwanag si Padre Damaso

63: Noche Buena

64: Epilogo

The word "filibustero" wrote Rizal to his friend, Ferdinand Blumentritt, is very little known in the Philippines. The masses do
not know it yet.
Jose Alejandro, one of the new Filipinos who had been quite intimate with Rizal, said, "in writing the Noli Rizal signed his
own death warrant." Subsequent events, after the fate of the Noli was sealed by the Spanish authorities, prompted Rizal to
write the continuation of his first novel. He confessed, however, that regretted very much having killed Elias instead of
Ibarra, reasoning that when he published the Noli his health was very much broken, and was very unsure of being able to
write the continuation and speak of a revolution.
Explaining to Marcelo H. del Pilar his inability to contribute articles to the La Solidaridad, Rizal said that he was haunted by
certain sad presentiments, and that he had been dreaming almost every night of dead relatives and friends a few days
before his 29th birthday, that is why he wanted to finish the second part of the Noli at all costs.
Consequently, as expected of a determined character, Rizal apparently went in writing, for to his friend, Blumentritt, he
wrote on March 29, 1891: "I have finished my book. Ah! Ive not written it with any idea of vengeance against my
enemies, but only for the good of those who suffer and for the rights of Tagalog humanity, although brown and not goodlooking."
To a Filipino friend in Hong Kong, Jose Basa, Rizal likewise eagerly announced the completion of his second novel. Having
moved to Ghent to have the book published at cheaper cost, Rizal once more wrote his friend, Basa, in Hongkong on July
9, 1891: "I am not sailing at once, because I am now printing the second part of the Noli here, as you may see from the
enclosed pages. I prefer to publish it in some other way before leaving Europe, for it seemed to me a pity not to do so. For
the past three months I have not received a single centavo, so I have pawned all that I have in order to publish this book.
I will continue publishing it as long as I can; and when there is nothing to pawn I will stop and return to be at your side."
Inevitably, Rizals next letter to Basa contained the tragic news of the suspension of the printing of the sequel to his first
novel due to lack of funds, forcing him to stop and leave the book half-way. "It is a pity," he wrote Basa, "because it seems
to me that this second part is more important than the first, and if I do not finish it here, it will never be finished."
Fortunately, Rizal was not to remain in despair for long. A compatriot, Valentin Ventura, learned of Rizals predicament. He
offered him financial assistance. Even then Rizals was forced to shorten the novel quite drastically, leaving only thirty-eight
chapters compared to the sixty-four chapters of the first novel.
Rizal moved to Ghent, and writes Jose Alejandro. The sequel to Rizals Noli came off the press by the middle of September,
1891.On the 18th he sent Basa two copies, and Valentin Ventura the original manuscript and an autographed printed copy.
Inspired by what the word filibustero connoted in relation to the circumstances obtaining in his time, and his spirits
dampened by the tragic execution of the three martyred priests, Rizal aptly titled the second part of the Noli Me Tangere,
El Filibusterismo. In veneration of the three priests, he dedicated the book to them.
"To the memory of the priests, Don Mariano Gomez (85 years old), Don Jose Burgos (30 years old), and Don Jacinto
Zamora (35 years old). Executed in the Bagumbayan Field on the 28th of February, 1872."

"The church, by refusing to degrade you, has placed in doubt the crime that has been imputed to you; the Government, by
surrounding your trials with mystery and shadows causes the belief that there was some error, committed in fatal
moments; and all the Philippines, by worshipping your memory and calling you martyrs, in no sense recognizes your
culpability. In so far, therefore, as your complicity in the Cavite Mutiny is not clearly proved, as you may or may not have
been patriots, and as you may or may not cherished sentiments for justice and for liberty, I have the right to dedicate my
work to you as victims of the evil which I undertake to combat. And while we await expectantly upon Spain some day to
restore your good name and cease to be answerable for your death, let these pages serve as a tardy wreath of dried
leaves over one who without clear proofs attacks your memory stains his hands in your blood."
Rizals memory seemed to have failed him, though, for Father Gomez was then 73 not 85, Father Burgos 35 not 30 Father
Zamora 37 not 35; and the date of execution 17th not 28th.
The FOREWORD of the Fili was addressed to his beloved countrymen, thus:
"TO THE FILIPINO PEOPLE AND THEIR GOVERNMENT"

l Filibusterismo was written in dedication to the three martyred priests Mariano


Gomez, Jose Burgos, and Jacinto Zamora, whose deaths left an indelible mark in
his mind.
Like Noli Me Tangere, Fili aims at enlightening the society, at bringing the Filipinos
closer to the truth. But whereas in the first novel, we are encouraged to ask and
aspire for change and liberation, in this novel, the society is urged to open its
eyes to reality and rebel against the Spanish government for its oppression and
abuse.
In Noli, there is aspiration, beauty, romance, and mercy. In Fili, all the reader will
feel is bitterness, hatred, and antipathy. The romance and aspirations are gone.
Even the characters' personalities seem to have undergone radical change. This is
how different Rizal's second novel is. Considering that both were written by the
same author, the plots are poles apart.
Outright scorn and bitterness may already be felt at the beginning of the story,
where Simoun promotes abuse and tyranny in the Spanish government, in the
hope that the people will reach the limits of their endurance and declare a
revolution.
Simoun, who is actually Noli's Ibarra in disguise, conveys an entirely different
personality in Fili. While Ibarra is trusting, aspiring, and loving, Simoun is now
cunningly careful in his dealings, distrusting, and extremely bitter. Something
changed in Rizal; and this is reflected in the personalities he gave his El
Filibusterismo characters.

Chapter Summaries
of El Filibusterismo

El Filibusterismo (Spanish for The Filibustering), also known by its English alternate
title The Reign of Greed, is the second novel written by Philippine national hero Dr. Jos
Rizal. It is the sequel to Noli Me Tangere and like the first book, was written in Spanish.
Rizal began the work in October 1887 while practicing medicine in Calamba. In London
(1888), he made several changes to the plot and revised a number of chapters. Rizal
continued to work on his manuscript while in Paris, Madrid, and Brussels, finally
completing it on March 29, 1891 in Biarritz. It was published the same year in Ghent.

Chapter 1: On the Upper Deck (The Summary of El Filibusterismo)

Chapter 2: On the Lower Deck (The Summary of El Filibusterismo)

Chapter 3: Legends (The Summary of El Filibusterismo)

Chapter 4: Cabesang Tales (The Summary of El Filibusterismo)

Chapter 5: A Cocheros Christmas Eve (The Summary of El Filibusterismo)

Chapter 6: Basilio (The Summary of El Filibusterismo)

Chapter 7: Simoun (The Summary of El Filibusterismo)

Chapter 8: Merry Christmas! (The Summary of El Filibusterismo)

Chapter 9: Pilates (The Summary of El Filibusterismo)

Chapter 10: Wealth and Want (The Summary of El Filibusterismo)

Chapter 11: Los Baos (The Summary of El Filibusterismo)

Chapter 12: Placido Penitente (The Summary of El Filibusterismo)

Chapter 13: The Class in Physics (The Summary of El Filibusterismo)

Chapter 14: In the House of the Students (The Summary of El Filibusterismo)

Chapter 15: Seor Pasta (The Summary of El Filibusterismo)

Chapter 16: The Tribulations of a Chinese (The Summary of El Filibusterismo)

Chapter 17: The Quiapo Fair (The Summary of El Filibusterismo)

Chapter 18: Legerdemain (The Summary of El Filibusterismo)

Chapter 19: The Fuse (The Summary of El Filibusterismo)

Chapter 20: The Arbiter (The Summary of El Filibusterismo)

Chapter 21: Manila Types (The Summary of El Filibusterismo)

Chapter 22: The Performance (The Summary of El Filibusterismo)

Chapter 23: A Corpse (The Summary of El Filibusterismo)

Chapter 24: Dreams (The Summary of El Filibusterismo)

Chapter 25: Smiles and Tears (The Summary of El Filibusterismo)

Chapter 26: Pasquinades (The Summary of El Filibusterismo)

Chapter 27: The Friar and the Filipino (The Summary of El Filibusterismo)

Chapter 28: Tatakut (The Summary of El Filibusterismo)

Chapter 29: Exit Capitan Tiago (The Summary of El Filibusterismo)

Chapter 30: Juli (The Summary of El Filibusterismo)

Chapter 31: The High Official (The Summary of El Filibusterismo)

Chapter 32: Effect of the Pasquinades (The Summary of El Filibusterismo)

Chapter 33: La Ultima Razn (The Summary of El Filibusterismo)

Chapter 34: The Wedding (The Summary of El Filibusterismo)

Chapter 35: The Fiesta (The Summary of El Filibusterismo)

Chapter 36: Ben-Zaybs Afflictions (The Summary of El Filibusterismo)

Chapter 37: The Mystery (The Summary of El Filibusterismo)

Chapter 38: Fatality (The Summary of El Filibusterismo)

Chapter 39: Conclusion (The Summary of El Filibusterismo)